TerbogrelHydrazine sulfateRamatrobanProstacyclinPlatelet lysate: Human Platelet Lysate (or hPL) is a substitute supplement for fetal bovine serum (FBS) in experimental and clinical cell culture. It corresponds to a turbid, light-yellow liquid that is obtained from human blood platelets after freeze/thaw cycle(s).ProstaglandinGlutathionuria: Glutathionuria is the presence of glutathione in the urine, and is a rare inborn error of metabolism.AspirinIsovaleric acidemiaPoly(methacrylic acid)Arachidonic acidProstaglandin analogue: Synthetic prostaglandin analogues are molecules which are manufactured to bind to a prostaglandin receptor.COX-3: COX-3 is an enzyme that is encoded by the PTGS1 (COX1) gene, but is not functional in humans. COX-3 is the third and most recently discovered cyclooxygenase (COX) isozyme, the others being COX-1 and COX-2.Prostaglandin EImidazoleAntiplatelet drug: An antiplatelet drug (antiaggregant) is a member of a class of pharmaceuticals that decrease platelet aggregation and inhibit thrombus formation. They are effective in the arterial circulation, where anticoagulants have little effect.Acrylate: Acrylates are the salts, esters, and conjugate bases of acrylic acid and its derivatives. They are also known as propenoates (since acrylic acid is also known as 2-propenoic acid).Isoprostane: The isoprostanes are prostaglandin-like compounds formed in vivo from the free radical-catalyzed peroxidationMenthyl anthranilateIrbesartanIbuprofenCXCL7: Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 7 (CXCL7) is a human gene.Concentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.Sulfonamide (medicine): Sulfonamide or sulphonamide is the basis of several groups of drugs. The original antibacterial sulfonamides (sometimes called sulfa drugs or sulpha drugs) are synthetic antimicrobial agents that contain the sulfonamide group.Tris(tert-butoxy)silanethiolNew Zealand rabbitDirect thrombin inhibitor: Direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) are a class of medication that act as anticoagulants (delaying blood clotting) by directly inhibiting the enzyme thrombin (factor II). Some are in clinical use, while others are undergoing clinical development.Prostacyclin synthaseA. N. Hartley: Annie Norah Hartley (1902 – 1994), usually known simply as Norah Hartley, was a dog breeder and the first female board member of the Kennel Club.Vascular smooth muscleEndothelial activation: Endothelial activation is a proinflammatory and procoagulant state of the endothelial cells lining the lumen of blood vessels. It is most characterized by an increase in interactions with white blood cells (leukocytes), and it is associated with the early states of atherosclerosis and sepsis, among others.TerpyridineMeldrum's acidKennel clubLeukotriene B4Serotonergic: Serotonergic (, ) or serotoninergic (, ) means "pertaining to or affecting serotonin". Serotonin is a neurotransmitter.Phenyl acetateCalcium signaling: Calcium ions are important for cellular signalling, as once they enter the cytosol of the cytoplasm they exert allosteric regulatory effects on many enzymes and proteins. Calcium can act in signal transduction resulting from activation of ion channels or as a second messenger caused by indirect signal transduction pathways such as G protein-coupled receptors.Lipokine: A lipokine is a lipid-controlling hormone. The term "lipokine" was first used by Haiming Cao in 2008 to classify fatty acids which modulate lipid metabolism by what he called a "chaperone effect".BenzofuranAortic pressure: Central aortic blood pressure (CAP or CASP) is the blood pressure at the root of aorta. Studies have shown the importance of central aortic pressure and its implications in assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment with respect to cardiovascular risk factors.Anterior interventricular branch of left coronary artery: The left anterior descending artery (also LAD, anterior interventricular branch of the left coronary artery, or anterior descending branch), also known as the "widow maker", is an artery of the heart.CollagenLung receptor: Lung receptors sense irritation or inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli.Muscle contraction: Muscle contraction is the activation of tension-generating sites within muscle fibers. In physiology, muscle contraction does not mean muscle shortening because muscle tension can be produced without changes in muscle length such as holding a heavy book or a dumbbell at the same position.Bronchoconstriction: Bronchoconstriction is the constriction of the airways in the lungs due to the tightening of surrounding smooth muscle, with consequent coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath.Dibenzothiepin: Dibenzothiepins are chemical compounds which are derivatives of thiepin with two benzene (here called benzo) rings.Vasodilation: Vasodilation (or vasodilatation) refers to the widening of blood vessels. It results from relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the vessel walls, in particular in the large veins, large arteries, and smaller arterioles.Pulmonary artery banding: Pulmonary Artery Banding (PAB) was introduced by Muller and Danimann in 1951 as a surgical technique to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow in infants suffering from congenital heart defects.Muller WH, Dammann JF.Isozyme: Isozymes (also known as isoenzymes or more generally as Multiple forms of enzymes) are enzymes that differ in amino acid sequence but catalyze the same chemical reaction. These enzymes usually display different kinetic parameters (e.