Giacomini vein: The Giacomini vein is a communicant vein between the great saphenous vein (GSV) and the small saphenous vein (SSV). It is named after the Italian anatomist Carlo Giacomini (1840-1898).Superficial vein: Superficial vein is a vein that is close to the surface of the body. This differs from deep veins that are far from the surface.Femoral vein: In the human body, the femoral vein is a blood vessel that accompanies the femoral artery in the femoral sheath. It begins at the adductor canal (also known as Hunter's canal) and is a continuation of the popliteal vein.Perforator vein: Perforator veins are so called because they perforate the deep fascia of muscles, to connect the superficial veins to the deep veins where they drain.http://www.Pylephlebitis: Pylephlebitis (also called pyelophlebitis and infective suppurative thrombosis of the portal vein) is an uncommon thrombophlebitis of the portal vein or any of its branches (ie a portal vein thrombosis) that is caused by infection. It is usually a complication of intraabdominal sepsis, most often following diverticulitis, perforated appendicitis, or peritonitis.Pratt Test: The Pratt Test is a simple test to check for deep vein thrombosis in the leg. It involves having the patient lie supine with the leg bent at the knee, grasping the calf with both hands and pressing on the popliteal vein in the proximal calf.Jugular venous pressureEndoscopic vessel harvestingTrabeculoplasty: Trabeculoplasty is a laser treatment for glaucoma. It is done on an argon laser equipped slit lamp, using a Goldmann gonioscope lens mirror.External iliac vein: The external iliac veins are large veins that connect the femoral veins to the common iliac veins. Their origin is at the inferior margin of the inguinal ligaments and they terminate when they join the internal iliac veins (to form the common iliac veins).Superior mesenteric vein: In anatomy, the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) is a blood vessel that drains blood from the small intestine (jejunum and ileum). At its termination behind the neck of the pancreas, the SMV combines with the splenic vein to form the hepatic portal vein.ThrombosisEcchymosis: e- + chym + -osisSclerotherapyPopliteal artery entrapment syndrome: The popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rather uncommon pathology, which results into claudication and chronic leg ischemia. The popliteal artery may be compressed behind the knee, due to congenital deformity of the muscles or tendon insertions of the popliteal fossa.Transport in Luxembourg: Transport in Luxembourg is ensured principally by road, rail and air. There are also services along the River Moselle which forms the border with Germany.PolidocanolVascular smooth muscleSumatriptanAngioscopyTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingAmbesh maneuver: Ambesh maneuver is a technique that involves the simple external compression of internal jugular vein in supraclavicular fossa to prevent and diagnose misplacement of the subclavian vein catheter into the internal jugular vein (IJV). The subclavian vein is a big vessel that drains the blood from the hand, forearm and the upper arm into the right side of the heart through superior vena cava.Splenic vein: The splenic vein (formerly the lienal vein) is a blood vessel that drains blood from the spleen, the stomach fundus and part of the pancreas. It is part of the hepatic portal system.Rasmussen's aneurysm: Rasmussen's aneurysm is a pulmonary artery aneurysm adjacent or within a tuberculous cavity. It occurs in up to 5% of patients with such lesions.Great cerebral vein: The great cerebral vein is one of the large blood vessels in the skull draining the cerebrum (brain). It is also known as the "vein of Galen" (VG), named for its discoverer, the Greek physician Galen.Anti-lymphocyte globulin: Anti-lymphocyte globulin (ALG) is an infusion of animal- antibodies against human T cells which is used in the treatment of acute rejection in organ transplantation. It was developed in the 1960s, during which time 74 scientific papers were published on its use.Acute limb ischaemiaRevision using distal inflow: Revision Using Distal Inflow (RUDI) is a surgical treatment for Dialysis-associated Steal Syndrome.Endothelial activation: Endothelial activation is a proinflammatory and procoagulant state of the endothelial cells lining the lumen of blood vessels. It is most characterized by an increase in interactions with white blood cells (leukocytes), and it is associated with the early states of atherosclerosis and sepsis, among others.Endoscopy unit: An endoscopy unit refers to a dedicated area where medical procedures are performed with endoscopes, which are cameras used to visualize structures within the body, such as the digestive tract and genitourinary system. Endoscopy units may be located within a hospital, incorporated within other medical care centres, or may be stand-alone in nature.Posterior tibial artery: The posterior tibial artery of the lower limb carries blood to the posterior compartment of the leg and plantar surface of the foot, from the popliteal artery via the tibial-fibular trunk. It is accompanied by a deep vein, the posterior tibial vein, along its course.Superficial vein thrombosis: Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is a type of venous thrombosis, or a blood clot in a vein, which forms in a superficial vein near the surface of the body. Usually there is an inflammatory reaction around the vein which presents as a painful induration with erythema.Azygos lobeBrachiocephalic vein: The left and right brachiocephalic veins (or innominate veins) in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding internal jugular vein and subclavian vein. This is at the level of the sternoclavicular joint.PhlebitisMulti-link suspension: __NOTOC__Groin: In human anatomy, the groin (the adjective is inguinal, as in inguinal canal) is the junctional area (also known as the inguinal region) between the abdomen and the thighon either side of the pubic bone. This is also known as the medial compartment of the thigh that consists of the adductor muscles of the hip or the groin muscles.Intravascular ultrasoundImpedance phlebographyKennel clubCentral retinal vein occlusionCardiac imagingThigh: In humans, the thigh is the area between the pelvis and the knee. Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb.Arterial embolismPeroxisomal biogenesis factor 11: Peroxisomal biogenesis factor 11 (PEX11) are peroxisomal membrane proteins which promote peroxisome division in eukaryotic cells.Tunica intimaSuperficial external pudendal artery: The superficial external pudendal artery (superficial external pudic artery) arises from the medial side of the femoral artery, close to the superficial epigastric artery and superficial iliac circumflex artery.Distributing artery: A distributing artery (or muscular artery) is a medium-sized artery that draw blood from an elastic artery and branch into "resistance vessels" including small arteries and arterioles. In contrast to the mechanism elastic arteries use to store energy generated by the heart's contraction, distributing arteries contain layers of smooth muscle.Phlegmasia cerulea dolens: Phlegmasia cerulea dolens (literally: painful blue edema) is an uncommon severe form of deep venous thrombosis which results from extensive thrombotic occlusion (blockage by a thrombus) of the major and the collateral veins of an extremity. It is characterized by sudden severe pain, swelling, cyanosis and edema of the affected limb.Muscle contraction: Muscle contraction is the activation of tension-generating sites within muscle fibers. In physiology, muscle contraction does not mean muscle shortening because muscle tension can be produced without changes in muscle length such as holding a heavy book or a dumbbell at the same position.Peripheral venous catheterDysesthesia: Dysesthesia (dysaesthesia) comes from the Greek word "dys", meaning "not-normal" and "aesthesis", which means "sensation" (abnormal sensation). It is defined as an unpleasant, abnormal sense of touch.ThrombusWaldeyer's fascia: The Waldeyer's fascia is synonymous with the presacral fascia and is more commonly described in surgery textbooks, rather than in anatomy textbooks. Although Waldeyer himself did not actually describe this exact anatomy, it is credited to him as he was the first to describe the anatomy of pelvic fascia in detail.Hyperplasia: Hyperplasia (from ancient Greek ὑπέρ huper, "over" + πλάσις plasis, "formation"), or hypergenesis, is an increase in the amount of organic tissue that results from cell proliferation. It may lead to the gross enlargement of an organ and the term is sometimes confused with benign neoplasia or benign tumor.Arteriovenous fistula