PropranololOculomucocutaneous syndrome: Oculomucocutaneous syndrome is characterized by keratoconjunctivitis sicca and by scarring, fibrosis, metaplasia, and shrinkage of the conjunctiva. It is a drug side effect observed in practolol and eperisone.BevantololBeta-adrenergic agonist: Beta-adrenergic agonists or Beta-agonists are medications that relax muscles of the airways, which widens the airways and results in easier breathing. They are a class of sympathomimetic agents which act upon the beta adrenoceptors.Interbeat interval: Interbeat interval is a scientific term used in the study of the mammalian heart.NadololAtenololPindololPronethalol: Pronethalol (Alderlin, Nethalide) was an early non-selective beta blocker clinical candidate. It was never used clinically due to carcinogenicity in mice, which was thought to result from formation of a carcinogenic naphthalene epoxide metabolite.Adrenalin O.D.MetoprololAortic pressure: Central aortic blood pressure (CAP or CASP) is the blood pressure at the root of aorta. Studies have shown the importance of central aortic pressure and its implications in assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive treatment with respect to cardiovascular risk factors.Long-acting beta-adrenoceptor agonist: Long-acting beta-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs, more specifically β2-agonists) are usually prescribed for moderate to severe persistent asthma patients or patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They are designed to reduce the need for shorter-acting β2-agonists such as salbutamol, as they have a duration of action of approximately 12 hours in comparison with the 4- to 6-hour duration of salbutamol, making them candidates for sparing high doses of corticosteroids or treating nocturnal asthma and providing symptomatic improvement in patients with COPD.UrapidilPhenoxybenzamineKennel clubCatecholaminergic cell groups: Catecholaminergic cell groups refers to collections of neurons in the central nervous system that have been demonstrated by histochemical fluorescence to contain one of the neurotransmitters dopamine or norepinephrine. Thus, it represents the combination of dopaminergic cell groups and noradrenergic cell groups.Imidic acid: In chemistry, an imidic acid is any molecule that contains the -C(=NH)-OH functional group. It is the tautomer of an amide and the isomer of an oxime.Alpha-adrenergic agonist: An adrenergic alpha-agonist (or alpha-adrenergic agonists) are a class sympathomimetic agents that selectively stimulates alpha adrenergic receptors. The alpha-adrenergic receptor has two subclasses α1 and α2.Holmes tremor: First identified by Gordon Holmes in 1904, Holmes tremor can be described as a wing-beating movement localized in the upper body that is caused by cerebellar damage. Holmes tremor is a combination of rest, action, and postural tremors.PrazosinSympathomimetic drug: Sympathomimetic drugs are stimulant compounds which mimic the effects of agonists of the sympathetic nervous system such as the catecholamines. (epinephrine (adrenaline), norepinephrine (noradrenaline), dopamine, etc.Concentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation: Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation (also called the Sharpless bishydroxylation) is the chemical reaction of an alkene with osmium tetroxide in the presence of a chiral quinine ligand to form a vicinal diol.Drug interaction: A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance (usually another drug) affects the activity of a drug when both are administered together. This action can be synergistic (when the drug's effect is increased) or antagonistic (when the drug's effect is decreased) or a new effect can be produced that neither produces on its own.BetaxololPulsus bigeminus: Pulsus bigeminus is a cardiovascular phenomenon characterized by groups of two heartbeats close together followed by a longer pause. The second pulse is weaker than the first.Hemangioma: (ILDS D18.010)Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis: Pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension which occurs predominantly in young adults.Beta1-adrenergic agonist: Beta1-adrenergic agonists, also known as Beta1-adrenergic receptor agonists, are a class of drugs that bind selectively to the beta-1 adrenergic receptor. As a result, they act more selectively upon the heart.Achy Breaky HeartA. N. Hartley: Annie Norah Hartley (1902 – 1994), usually known simply as Norah Hartley, was a dog breeder and the first female board member of the Kennel Club.Sustained release dosage forms: Sustained release dosage forms are designed to release a drug at a predetermined rate in order to maintain a constant drug concentration for a specific period of time with minimum side effects. This can be achieved through a variety of formulations, including liposomes and drug-polymer conjugates (an example being hydrogels).MivazerolPhosphorylethanolamineCommunity-based clinical trial: Community-based clinical trials are clinical trials conducted directly through doctors and clinics rather than academic research facilities. They are designed to be administered through primary care physicians, community health centers and local outpatient facilities.Portal hypertensionPlacebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.Opportunistic infection: An opportunistic infection is an infection caused by bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoan pathogens that take advantage of a host with a weakened immune system or an altered microbiota (such as a disrupted gut flora). Many of these pathogens do not cause disease in a healthy host that has a normal immune system.Cortical stimulation mapping: Cortical stimulation mapping (often shortened to CSM) is a type of electrocorticography that involves a physically invasive procedure and aims to localize the function of specific brain regions through direct electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. It remains one of the earliest methods of analyzing the brain and has allowed researchers to study the relationship between cortical structure and systemic function.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingCardiac function curve: A cardiac function curve is a graph showing the relationship between right atrial pressure (x-axis) and cardiac output (y-axis).