OssificationHarry Raymond Eastlack: Harry Raymond Eastlack, Jr. (1933–1973) suffered from fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare and poorly understood disease in which the bone repair mechanism runs out of control, turning other tissue like muscles and tendons into bone.ChondrocyteEpiphysis: The epiphysis (OED 2nd edition, 1989 as .Entry "epiphysis" in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary.Cancellous bone: Cancellous bone, synonymous with trabecular bone or spongy bone, is one of two types of osseous tissue that form bones. The other osseous tissue type is cortical bone also called compact bone.Cranial vault: The cranial vault is the space in the skull within the neurocranium, occupied by the brain. In humans, the size and shape of the brain, may be affected by the size of the vault as shown in craniometry, but studies relating it to intelligence have found no conclusive evidence.Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosisCoronal suture: The coronal suture is a dense, fibrous connective tissue joint that separates the frontal and parietal bones of the skull. At birth, the bones of the skull do not meet.Degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis: Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis commonly called DSLD, also known as Equine Systemic Proteoglycan Accumulation (ESPA) is a systemicAnkylosisCervical fractureType XXVII collagen: Type XXVII collagen is the protein predicted to be encoded by COL27A1. It was first described by Dr.Codman triangle: Codman triangle (previously referred to as Codman's triangle) is the triangular area of new subperiosteal bone that is created when a lesion, often a tumour, raises the periosteum away from the bone.General Practice notebook A Codman triangle is not actually a full triangle.Greater occipital nerve: The greater occipital nerve is a spinal nerve, specifically the medial branch of the dorsal primary ramus of cervical spinal nerve 2. This nerve arises from between the first and second cervical vertebrae, along with the lesser occipital nerve.OsteoblastCalvaria (skull): The calvaria or skullcap (feminine Latin noun with plural calvariae; however, many medical texts list the word as calvarium, neuter Latin noun with plural calvaria) is the upper part of the neurocranium and covers the cranial cavity containing the brain.Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenitaElbow extension test: The Elbow extension test is simple test that can be administered as part of the physical exam to help guide healthcare providers diagnosis and management of acute elbow fractures. The elbow extension test is performed when an elbow fracture, most commonly caused by trauma, is suspected as the source of pain and dysfunction.Velvet antlerDwarfism: Dwarf}}LaminectomyMaverick (cigarette): Maverick is a brand of cigarettes owned by ITG Brands LLC, a subsidiary of Imperial Tobacco Company. Maverick cigarettes are made in the United States and Austria.A. Hari ReddiCostovertebral angleSpinal decompression: Spinal decompression is the relief of pressure on one or many pinched nerves (neural impingement) of the spinal column.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Muscle hypertrophyArcuate foramen: In human anatomy, arcuate foramen, also known as ponticulus posticus (Latin for "little posterior bridge"), refers to a bony bridge on the atlas (C1 vertebra) that covers the groove for the vertebral artery. It is a common anatomical variation and estimated to occur in approximately 3-15% of the population.Lightwood–Albright syndromeTrigonocephalyCanine degenerative myelopathy: Canine degenerative myelopathy, also known as chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy, is an incurable, progressive disease of the canine spinal cord that is similar in many ways to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Onset is typically after the age of 7 years and it is seen most frequently in the German shepherd dog, Pembroke Welsh corgi, and boxer dog, though the disorder is strongly associated with a gene mutation in SOD1 that has been found in 43 breeds as of 2008, including the wire fox terrier, Chesapeake Bay retriever, Rhodesian ridgeback, and Cardigan Welsh corgi.Calcaneal fractureClay-shoveler fracture: Clay-shoveler's fracture is a stable fracture through the spinous process of a vertebra occurring at any of the lower cervical or upper thoracic vertebrae, classically at C6 or C7. In Australia in the 1930s, men digging deep ditches tossed clay 10 to 15 feet above their heads using long handled shovels.Osteoma: An osteoma (plural: "osteomata") is a new piece of bone usually growing on another piece of bone, typically the skull. It is a benign tumor.Elevated alkaline phosphataseHypochondrogenesisAchondrogenesis type 1BBrachymetatarsia: Brachymetatarsia or hypoplastic metatarsal is a condition in which there is one or more abnormally short metatarsals. This condition may result due to a congenital defect or it may be an acquired condition.Ankylosing hyperostosisSpinal stenosis: Spinal stenosis is an abnormal narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine. This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit.Callus (cell biology): Plant callus (plural calluses or calli) is a mass of unorganized parenchyma cells derived from plant tissue (explants) for use in biological research and biotechnology. In plant biology, callus cells are those cells that cover a plant wound.OsteoclastHip resurfacing: 155px|right|thumb|The BHRChalkstick fracture: Chalkstick fractures are fractures, typically of long bones, in which the fracture is transverse to the long axis of the bone, like a broken stick of chalk. A healthy long bone typically breaks like a hard woody stick as the collagen in the matrix adds remarkable flexibility to the mineral and the energy can run up and down the growth rings of bone.Kill Alex Cross: Kill Alex Cross is the 18th book in the Alex Cross series, following Det. Alex Cross trying to solve two crimes - the president's kidnapped children and a case of someone poisoning the water supply.Cervical spine disorder: Cervical Spine Disorders are illnesses that are relatively detrimental to ones physical health. These ailments exist in the cervical spine which is made up of the upper first seven vertebrae, encasing and shielding the Spinal cord.OsteochondrosisRehabilitation in spinal cord injury: When treating a person with a spinal cord injury, repairing the damage created by injury is the ultimate goal. By using a variety of treatments, greater improvements are achieved, and, therefore, treatment should not be limited to one method.Gestational age: Gestational age (or menstrual age) is a measure of the age of a pregnancy where the origin is the woman's last normal menstrual period (LMP), or the corresponding age as estimated by other methods. Such methods include adding 14 days to a known duration since fertilization (as is possible in in vitro fertilization), or by obstetric ultrasonography.Upper-limb surgery in tetraplegia: Upper-limb surgery in tetraplegia includes a number of surgical interventions that can help improve the quality of life of a patient with tetraplegia.Sternal fractureJohn A. PyleList of scientists whose names are used in chemical element names: Fourteen of the chemical elements are named after scientists. Below is the list of those scientists whose names are used in element nomenclature.Protrusio acetabuliX-ray microtomography: X-ray microtomography, like tomography and x-ray computed tomography, uses x-rays to create cross-sections of a physical object that can be used to recreate a virtual model (3D model) without destroying the original object. The prefix micro- (symbol: µ) is used to indicate that the pixel sizes of the cross-sections are in the micrometre range.Bone pathology: Bone pathology, also known as orthopedic pathology is a subspecialty of surgical pathology which deals with the diagnosis and feature of many bone diseases. It uses gross and microscopic findings along with the findings of in vivo radiological studies, and occasionally, specimen radiographs to diagnose diseases of the bones.Street elbow: A street elbow (sometimes called a street ell or service ell) is a type of plumbing or piping fitting intended to join a piece of pipe and another fitting at an angle. The difference between a street elbow and a regular elbow is the nature of the connections on either end.SpondylosisMinimally invasive hip resurfacing: Minimally invasive hip resurfacing (MIS) is "total or partial hip surgery that can be carried out through an incision of less than 10 cm (3.94 inches) without imparting great forces on the anatomy or compromising component positioning"Comis Orthopaedics websiteKocher–Debre–Semelaigne syndrome: The Kocher–Debré–Semelaigne syndrome is hypothyroidism in infancy or childhood characterised by lower extremity or generalized muscular hypertrophy, myxoedema, short stature and cretinism. The absence of painful spasms and pseudomyotonia differentiates this syndrome from Hoffmann syndrome.Acropectoral syndrome: Acropectoral syndrome is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia syndrome affecting the hands, feet, sternum, and lumbosacral spine. A recently proposed candidate gene for preaxial polydactyly is LMBR1, encoding a novel transmembrane receptor, which may be an upstream regulator of SHH.Mucopolysaccharide–cartilage complexStylohyoid muscle: The stylohyoid muscle is a slender muscle, lying anterior, and superior of the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. It shares this muscle's innervation by the facial nerve, and functions to draw the hyoid bone backwards and elevate the tongue.Eagle syndrome: Eagle syndrome (also termed stylohyoid syndrome styloid syndrome, styloid-stylohyoid syndrome, or styloid–carotid artery syndrome) is a rare condition caused by an elongated or deviated styloid process and/or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which interferes with adjacent anatomical structures giving rise to pain.