Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasiaMalformative syndrome: A malformative syndrome (or malformation syndrome) is a recognizable pattern of congenital anomalies that are known or thought to be causally related (VIIth International Congress on Human Genetics).Myelomonocyte: A myelomonocyte is a type of cell observed in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. It bears a resemblance to both a myelocyte and monocyte.Minimally differentiated acute myeloblastic leukemiaMyeloid leukemiaHypomethylating agent: A hypomethylating agent (or demethylating agent) is a drug that inhibits DNA methylation. Currently available hypomethylating agents block the activity of DNA methyltransferase (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors / DNMT inhibitors).Sideroblastic anemiaBone marrow suppression: Bone marrow suppression or myelotoxicity (adjective myelotoxic) or myelosuppression is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). Bone marrow suppression is a serious side effect of chemotherapy and certain drugs affecting the immune system such as azathioprine.Genetic imbalance: Genetic imbalance is to describe situation when the genome of a cell or organism has more copies of some genes than other genes due to chromosomal rearrangements or aneuploidy.Partial monosomy 13q: Partial monosomy of chromosome 13q is a monosomy that results from the loss of all or part of the long arm of chromosome 13 in human beings. It is a rare genetic disorder which results in severe congenital abnormalities which are frequently fatal at an early age.Transplacental: Transplacental refers to the ability of a toxin or pathogen to cross the physical and biological barriers of the placenta separating the mother and fetus, to whom such substances may be dangerous. This would include, for example, HIV and the drug thalidomide.Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases: Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases are a category of hematological malignancies disorders created by the World Health Organization which have characteristics of both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative conditions.PancytopeniaCongenital hypoplastic anemiaChildhood leukemia: Childhood leukemia is a type of leukemia, usually acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and a type of childhood cancer. The cure rate of childhood leukemia is generally higher than adult leukemia, approaching 90%, although some side effects of treatment last into adulthood.MyeloblastHematopoietic stem cell transplantationTrisomy 9Myeloid: The term myeloid (myelogenous) is an adjective that can refer to a progenitor cell for granulocytes, monocytes, erythrocytes, or platelets. Myeloid can be distinguished from the lymphoid progenitor cells that give rise to B cells and T cells.Chelation: Chelation describes a particular way that ions and molecules bind metal ions.Latin chela, from Greek, denotes a claw.Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator: Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is the generic term for drugs in a new class of third-generation erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In the media, these agents are commonly referred to as 'EPO', short for erythropoietin.Transfusion associated circulatory overloadNational Down Syndrome SocietyCytarabineNational Cholesterol Education Program: The National Cholesterol Education Program is a program managed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health. Its goal is to reduce increased cardiovascular disease rates due to hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol levels) in the United States of America.Bone marrow examination: Bone marrow examination refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often called a trephine biopsy) and bone marrow aspiration. Bone marrow examination is used in the diagnosis of a number of conditions, including leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, anemia, and pancytopenia.Heparin-induced thrombocytopeniaBlood cell: A blood cell, also called a hemocyte, hematocyte, or hematopoietic cell, is a cell produced through hematopoiesis and is normally found in blood. In mammals, these fall into three general categories:Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.VidarabineCancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Reactive neutrophilic dermatoses: Reactive neutrophilic dermatoses are a spectrum of conditions mediated by neutrophils, and typically associated with underlying diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and hematologic malignancy.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).MacrocytosisPegfilgrastimOrnithinaemia: Ornithinaemia is a blood disorder characterized by high levels of ornithine. Also known as hyperornithinemia, it may be associated with psychomotor retardation or epileptic episodes.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.Antileukemic drug: Antileukemic drugs, anticancer drugs that are used to treat one or more types of leukemia, include:AnemiaOncogene: An oncogene is a gene that has the potential to cause cancer.Wilbur, Beth, editor.Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act: The Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act of 2001 (P.L.MyelofibrosisIron chelate: Iron chelate, also known as chelated iron, is a soluble complex of iron, sodium and a chelating agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), EDDHA, or others, used to make the iron soluble in water and, for the purposes of agriculture, accessible to plants.Hematinic: A hematinic is a nutrient required for the formation of blood cells in the process of hematopoiesis. The principle hematinics are iron, B12, and folate.Flow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Bone Marrow Transplantation (journal): Bone Marrow Transplantation is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering transplantation of bone marrow in humans. It is published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group.ProerythroblastRebase (database): In molecular biology, REBASE is a database of information about restriction enzymes and DNA methyltransferases. REBASE contains and extensive set of references, sites of recognition and cleavage, sequences and structures.HemoglobinuriaImmunophenotyping: Immunophenotyping is a technique used to study the protein expressed by cells. This technique is commonly used in basic science research and laboratory diagnostic purpose.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Anti-lymphocyte globulin: Anti-lymphocyte globulin (ALG) is an infusion of animal- antibodies against human T cells which is used in the treatment of acute rejection in organ transplantation. It was developed in the 1960s, during which time 74 scientific papers were published on its use.BusulfanGross examinationIsochromosome: An isochromosome is an unbalanced structural abnormality in which the arms of the chromosome are mirror images of each other. The chromosome consists of two copies of either the long (q) arm or the short (p) arm because isochromosome formation is equivalent to a simultaneous duplication and deletion of genetic material.ErythropoiesisLow-dose chemotherapy: Low-dose chemotherapy is being studied/used in the treatment of cancer to avoid the side effects of conventional chemotherapy. Historically, oncologists have used the highest possible dose that the body can tolerate in order to kill as many cancer cells as possible.Thrombocytosis