Mucocele: A mucocele is any dilatation (typically pathologic) with accumulation of mucus. Examples include:Sectional Appendix: In Great Britain, the Sectional Appendix is a railway document compiled by Network Rail and is the official definition of railway infrastructure, giving a detailed description of all railway lines owned by Network Rail. It has traditionally been published in printed format, originally as a bound book and subsequently in loose-leaf format, for ease of updating.Nasolabial cystPancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm: Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, also mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and mucinous cystic tumour, is a grouping of cystic neoplasms that arise from the pancreas. They may be benign, malignant or in between.Goblet cell carcinoid: The goblet cell carcinoid, abbreviated GCC and also known as crypt cell carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour with goblet cell differentiation, is a rare biphasic gastrointestinal tract tumour that consists of a neuroendocrine component and a conventional carcinoma, histologically arising from Paneth cells.Caldwell's view: Caldwell's view (or Occipitofrontal view) is a radiographic view of skull, where X-ray plate is angled at 20° to orbitomeatal line. The rays pass from behind the head and are perpendicular to radiographic plate.Osteoma: An osteoma (plural: "osteomata") is a new piece of bone usually growing on another piece of bone, typically the skull. It is a benign tumor.Prayer bump: A zebibah (Arabic زبيبة zabība, "raisin"), also known as a zabiba or zebiba, or browneye, is a mark on the forehead of some Muslims, apparently due to the friction generated by repeated contact of the forehead with the prayer mat during daily prayers.Pseudomyxoma peritoneiAppendectomyCystic duct: The cystic duct is the short duct that joins the gallbladder to the common bile duct. It usually lies next to the cystic artery.Orbital apex syndrome: Orbital apex syndrome, also known as Jacod syndrome, is a collection of cranial nerve deficits associated with a mass lesion near the apex of the orbit of the eye. This syndrome is a separate entity from Rochon–Duvigneaud syndrome, which occurs due to a lesion immediately anterior to the orbital apex.ExophthalmosAppendicitisSuperior orbital fissure: The superior orbital fissure is a foramen in the skull, although strictly it is more of a cleft, lying between the lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Incidentaloma: In medicine, an incidentaloma is a tumor ([found by coincidence (incidentally) without clinical symptom]s or suspicion. Like other types of [[incidental findings, it is found during the course of examination and imaging for other reasons.BronchographyEndoscopy unit: An endoscopy unit refers to a dedicated area where medical procedures are performed with endoscopes, which are cameras used to visualize structures within the body, such as the digestive tract and genitourinary system. Endoscopy units may be located within a hospital, incorporated within other medical care centres, or may be stand-alone in nature.Progressive osseous heteroplasia: Progressive osseous heteroplasia is a cutaneous condition characterized by cutaneous or subcutaneous ossification.Thin basement membrane diseaseOld German Shepherd Dog: Old German Shepherd Dog () is a controversial predicate for the long-hair variation of the German Shepherd Dog (), which is not a separate breed recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Nonetheless, there are efforts to establish this variety as a separate breed.Abdominal ultrasonographyHyperintensity