Progressive macular hypomelanosis: Progressive macular hypomelanosis is a common skin condition, a disorder, observed more frequently in young women with darkly pigmented skin who originate from or reside in tropical climates.Dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria: Dyschromatosis symmetrica hereditaria (also known as "Reticulate acropigmentation of Dohi," and "Symmetrical dyschromatosis of the extremities") is a rare autosomally inherited dermatosis. It is characterized by progressively pigmented and depigmented macules, often mixed in a reticulate pattern, concentrated on the dorsal extremities.Ocular albinismOculocutaneous albinism type I: Oculocutaneous Albinism Type I or –Type 1A (OCA1A) is an autosomal recessive skin disease associated with albinism. This type of albinism is caused when the gene OCA1 does not function properly.Human hair color: Hair color is the pigmentation of hair follicles due to two types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Generally, if more eumelanin is present, the colour of the hair is darker; if less eumelanin is present, the hair is lighter.Melanosome: A melanosome is an organelle found in animal cells, and is the cellular site of synthesis, storage and transport of melanin, the most common light-absorbing pigment found in the animal kingdom. These melanosomes are responsible for color and photoprotection in animal tissues.Deaf white catIdiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation: Idiopathic eruptive macular pigmentation is a skin condition developing in young persons, with an average age of 11, characterized by asymptomatic widespread brown to gray macules of up to several centimeters in diameter on the neck, trunk, and proximal extremities.List of Bratz charactersVitiligo Research FoundationPlatelet storage pool deficiencyPetrus Johannes Waardenburg: Petrus Johannes Waardenburg (3 June 1886, Nijeveen, Drenthe – 23 September 1979) was a Dutch ophthalmologist, geneticist, and pioneer in the application of genetics to ophthalmology. Waardenburg syndrome is named after him.MelanocyteAcromelanism: Acromelanism is a genetically determined, temperature-dependent pigmentation pattern, with full expression only occurring on legs, ears, tail and face. Seen in Siamese and Himalayan cats, rats, and rabbits.Amelanism: Amelanism (also known as amelanosis) is a pigmentation abnormality characterized by the lack of pigments called melanins, commonly associated with a genetic loss of tyrosinase function. Amelanism can affect fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans.Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor: Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor also known as class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 32 or bHLHe32 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the MITF gene.Prader–Willi syndromeRon Gallemore: Ron P. Gallemore is a registered ophthalmologist with the American Academy of OphthalmologyThe American Academy of Ophthalmology Dr Ron Gallemore certification involved in research and treatment of diseases of the macula and retina.Hair analysisPedigree chart: A pedigree chart is a diagram that shows the occurrence and appearance or phenotypes of a particular gene or organism and its ancestors from one generation to the next,pedigree chart Genealogy Glossary - About.com, a part of The New York Times Company.Malformative syndrome: A malformative syndrome (or malformation syndrome) is a recognizable pattern of congenital anomalies that are known or thought to be causally related (VIIth International Congress on Human Genetics).