Hemolysis (microbiology): Hemolysis (or haemolysis in British English) is the breakdown of red blood cells. The ability of bacterial colonies to induce hemolysis when grown on blood agar is used to classify certain microorganisms.Microangiopathic hemolytic anemiaErythrocrine: Erythrocrine describes red blood cell or erythrocyte for production and release of signaling molecules. The term “erythrocrine“ was coined by Song et al.Erythrocyte fragility: Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It can be thought of as the degree or proportion of hemolysis that occurs when a sample of red blood cells are subjected to stress (typically physical stress, and most commonly osmotic and/or mechanical stress).Acute fatty liver of pregnancyWarm autoimmune hemolytic anemiaHaemolysin expression modulating protein family: In molecular biology, the haemolysin expression modulating protein family is a family of proteins. This family consists of haemolysin expression modulating protein (Hha) from Escherichia coli and its enterobacterial homologues, such as YmoA from Yersinia enterocolitica, and RmoA encoded on the R100 plasmid.HemoglobinuriaHemoglobin, alpha 2: Hemoglobin, alpha 2 also known as HBA2 is a gene that in humans codes for the alpha globin chain of hemoglobin.Haptoglobin: Haptoglobin (abbreviated as Hp) is the protein that in humans is encoded by the HP gene. In blood plasma, haptoglobin binds free hemoglobin (Hb) released from erythrocytes with low affinity and thereby inhibits its oxidative activity.Coombs test: A Coombs test (also known as Coombs' test, antiglobulin test or AGT) is either of two clinical blood tests used in immunohematology and immunology. The two Coombs tests are the direct Coombs test (DCT, also known as direct antiglobulin test or DAT), and the indirect Coombs test (also known as indirect antiglobulin test or IAT).OsazoneSickle-cell diseaseAcute hemolytic transfusion reaction: An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AHTR) is a type of transfusion reaction that is associated with hemolysis.DivicineMethemoglobin: Methemoglobin (English: methaemoglobin) (pronounced "met-hemoglobin") is a form of the oxygen-carrying metalloprotein hemoglobin, in which the iron in the heme group is in the Fe3+ (ferric) state, not the Fe2+ (ferrous) of normal hemoglobin. Methemoglobin cannot bind oxygen, unlike oxyhemoglobin.Corriedale: Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed, meaning they are used both in the production of wool and meat. The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New ZealandStock Types, The Land, North Richmond, c.Complement deficiencyGull Island (Prudhoe Bay): Gull Island is a small island located at , 8 km (5 miles) off shore from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in the Beaufort Sea. In plan view it is shaped somewhat like the capital letter "L", with a length of approximately 300 m, and is about 30 m wide along much of its length.BilirubinHaemagglutination activity domain: In molecular biology, the haemagglutination activity domain is a conserved protein domain found near the N terminus of a number of large, repetitive bacterial proteins, including many proteins of over 2500 amino acids. A number of the members of this family have been designated adhesins, filamentous haemagglutinins, haem/haemopexin-binding protein, etc.CSL LimitedVacutainer: A Vacutainer blood collection tube is a sterile glass or plastic tube with a closure that is evacuated to create a vacuum inside the tube facilitating the draw of a predetermined volume of liquid. Most commonly used to collect blood samples in venipuncture, they are also used as urine collection tubes and as serum separator tubes.Partial cloning: In the field of cell biology, the method of partial cloning (PCL) converts a fully differentiated old somatic cell into a partially reprogrammed young cell that retains all the specialised functions of the differentiated old cell but is simply younger. The method of PCL reverses characteristics associated with old cells.TocofersolanHereditary spherocytosisThiol-activated cytolysin: Cholesterol-binding cytolysin, previously incorrectly known as 'thiol-activated' cytolysins Bacterial Disease Mechanisms: Michael Wilson, Rod McNab, Brian Henderson (2002)" are toxins produced by a variety of Gram-positive bacteria and are characterised by their ability to lyse cholesterol-containing membranes, their reversible inactivation by oxidation and their capacity to bind to cholesterol.Lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus: Lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus, or LDV for short, belongs to part of the arteriviridae family and the nidovirales order. Also included in the nidovirales order are the coronaviridae.Hemopexin: Hemopexin (or haemopexin; HPX), also known as beta-1B-glycoprotein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HPX gene and belongs to hemopexin family of proteins.AnisocytosisLoxoscelismABO blood group system: The ABO blood group system is the most important blood type system (or blood group system) in human blood transfusion. Found on platelets, epithelium, and cells other than erythrocytes, AB antigens (as with other serotypes) can also cause an adverse immune response to organ transplantation.Transient erythroporphyria of infancy: Transient erythroporphyria of infancy (also known as "Purpuric phototherapy-induced eruption") is a cutaneous condition reported in infants exposed to blue lights for the treatment of indirect hyperbilirubinemia characterized by marked purpura in skin exposed to the UV light.Erythrocyte deformability: Erythrocyte deformability refers to the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to change shape under a given level of applied stress, without hemolysing (rupturing). This is an important property because erythrocytes must change their shape extensively under the influence of mechanical forces in fluid flow or while passing through microcirculation.Rickettsia prowazekii: Rickettsia prowazekii is a species of gram-negative, alphaproteobacteria, obligate intracellular parasitic, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of epidemic typhus, transmitted in the feces of lice. In North America, the main reservoir for R.Terminal complement pathway deficiencyAmidine: Amidines are a class of oxoacid derivatives.New Zealand rabbitSeiichiro Tarui: is a Japanese physician and metabolic disorder researcher. He received the Uehara Award in 1990 while working as a professor at the University of Osaka.Rubella virus: Rubella virus (RuV) is the pathogenic agent of the disease rubella, and is the cause of congenital rubella syndrome when infection occurs during the first weeks of pregnancy.Clostridium perfringens beta toxin: Clostridium perfringens beta toxin is one of the four major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens Type B and Type C strains. It is a necrotizing agent and it induces hypertension by release of catecholamine.