ErythropoiesisProerythroblastContinuous erythropoietin receptor activator: Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is the generic term for drugs in a new class of third-generation erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In the media, these agents are commonly referred to as 'EPO', short for erythropoietin.AnemiaOsazoneBlueberry muffin baby: Blueberry muffin baby is the characteristic distributed purpura occurring as a result of extramedullary hematopoiesis found in infants. The purpura are often generalized, but occur more often on the trunk, head, and neck.PolycythemiaErythrocrine: Erythrocrine describes red blood cell or erythrocyte for production and release of signaling molecules. The term “erythrocrine“ was coined by Song et al.Iron stress repressed RNA: Iron stress repressed RNA (IsrR) is a cis-encoded antisense RNA which regulates the expression of the photosynthetic protein isiA. IsiA expression is activated by the Ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) under iron stress conditions.Hemoglobin, alpha 2: Hemoglobin, alpha 2 also known as HBA2 is a gene that in humans codes for the alpha globin chain of hemoglobin.Hematocrit: The hematocrit (Ht or HCT, British English spelling haematocrit), also known as packed cell volume (PCV) or erythrocyte volume fraction (EVF), is the volume percentage (%) of red blood cells in blood. It is normally 45% for men and 40% for women.Isotopes of iron: Naturally occurring iron (Fe) consists of four isotopes: 5.845% of 54Fe (possibly radioactive with a half-life over 3.Reticulocyte indexYolk sac: The yolk sac is a membranous [attached to an embryo], formed by cells of the [[hypoblast adjacent to the embryonic disk. This is alternatively called the umbilical vesicle by the Terminologia Embryologica (TE), though yolk sac is far more widely used.Microangiopathic hemolytic anemiaBone marrow suppression: Bone marrow suppression or myelotoxicity (adjective myelotoxic) or myelosuppression is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). Bone marrow suppression is a serious side effect of chemotherapy and certain drugs affecting the immune system such as azathioprine.GlobinTransferrin receptor: Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a carrier protein for transferrin. It is needed for the import of iron into the cell and is regulated in response to intracellular iron concentration.Myeloid: The term myeloid (myelogenous) is an adjective that can refer to a progenitor cell for granulocytes, monocytes, erythrocytes, or platelets. Myeloid can be distinguished from the lymphoid progenitor cells that give rise to B cells and T cells.ReticulocytosisMacrocytosisBloodletting (Boxer album): Bloodletting[ Bloodletting] at Allmusic was an album by the rock band Boxer, released on the Virgin record label in 1979. Their third album in order of release, it had in fact been recorded in 1976 after their debut Below the Belt.Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobinLizzie's LootPeriarteriolar lymphoid sheaths: Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths (or periarterial lymphatic sheaths, or PALS) are a portion of the white pulp of the spleen. They are populated largely by T cells and surround central arteries within the spleen; the PALS T-cells are presented with blood borne antigens via myeloid dendritic cells.Partial cloning: In the field of cell biology, the method of partial cloning (PCL) converts a fully differentiated old somatic cell into a partially reprogrammed young cell that retains all the specialised functions of the differentiated old cell but is simply younger. The method of PCL reverses characteristics associated with old cells.Non-sideropenic hypochromic anaemia: ==Basic Features==Glycophorin C: Glycophorin C (GYPC; CD236/CD236R; glycoprotein beta; glycoconnectin; PAS-2') plays a functionally important role in maintaining erythrocyte shape and regulating membrane material properties, possibly through its interaction with protein 4.1.Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III: Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type III (CDA III) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by macrocytic anemia, bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia and giant multlnucleate erythroblasts.http://hmg.Hemoglobin E: Hemoglobin E or haemoglobin E (HbE) is an abnormal hemoglobin with a single point mutation in the β chain. At position 26 there is a change in the amino acid, from glutamic acid to lysine.Louis Henri Vaquez: Louis Henri Vaquez (27 August 1860 – 1936) was a French internist born in Paris. He is known for his work in the field of hematology and his research of heart disease.Hematinic: A hematinic is a nutrient required for the formation of blood cells in the process of hematopoiesis. The principle hematinics are iron, B12, and folate.Antimicrobial peptides: Antimicrobial peptides, also called "host defense peptides" are part of the innate immune response found among all classes of life. Fundamental differences exist between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that may represent targets for antimicrobial peptides.FerritinGeomelophagia: Geomelophagia is an unusual pica (medical eating disorder) See in iron-deficiency anemia] and is characterized by abnormal ingestion of raw [[potatoes. See Google books link.American Society of Phlebotomy Technicians: American Society of Phlebotomy Technicians (ASPT) is the second oldest certifying agency for Phlebotomy. The ASPT was founded in 1983.AncestimLiver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GICarbohydrate deficient transferrinThrombopoietic agent: Thrombopoietic agents are drugs that induce the growth and maturation of megakaryocytes. Two of them are currently in clinical use: interleukin 11 and thrombopoietin.Red blood cell distribution width: right|frame|Human red blood cellsPregnatriene: A pregnatriene is a triene derivative of a pregnane.Hemolysis (microbiology): Hemolysis (or haemolysis in British English) is the breakdown of red blood cells. The ability of bacterial colonies to induce hemolysis when grown on blood agar is used to classify certain microorganisms.Blood cell: A blood cell, also called a hemocyte, hematocyte, or hematopoietic cell, is a cell produced through hematopoiesis and is normally found in blood. In mammals, these fall into three general categories:Sideroblastic anemiaSLC19A2: Thiamine transporter 1, also known as thiamine carrier 1 (TC1) or solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC19A2 gene. SLC19A2 is a thiamine transporter.Congenital hypoplastic anemiaKLF14: Krüppel-like factor 14, also known as basic transcription element-binding protein 5 (BTEB5) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the KLF14 gene. The corresponding Klf14 mouse gene is known as Sp6.Transfusion associated circulatory overloadHeme arginateMegaloblast: A megaloblast is an unusually large erythroblast that can be associated with Vitamin B12 deficiency (as caused by pernicious anemia or dietary insufficiency) and/or folic acid deficiency (collectively called megaloblastic anemia). It is differentiated from a normoblast, which is a normally-sized erythroblast.Pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1: POU domain, class 1, transcription factor 1 (Pit1, growth hormone factor 1), also known as POU1F1, is a transcription factor for growth hormone.Flow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Hypoxic hypoxia: Hypoxic hypoxia is a result of insufficient oxygen available to the lungs. A blocked airway, a drowning or a reduction in partial pressure (high altitude above 10,000 feet) are examples of how lungs can be deprived of oxygen.Janus kinase 2: Janus kinase 2 (commonly called JAK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase. It is a member of the Janus kinase family and has been implicated in signaling by members of the type II cytokine receptor family (e.Potassium ferrate