Congenital contractural arachnodactyly: Beals syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly, Beals-Hecht syndrome) is a rare congenital connective tissue disorder. Beals syndrome has only recently been described as a syndrome distinct from Marfan's syndrome.Plantar fibromatosisContraction band necrosis: Contraction band necrosis is a type of uncontrolled cell death (necrosis) unique to cardiac myocytes and thought to arise in reperfusion from hypercontraction, which results in sarcolemmal rupture.List of diseases (A): This is a list of diseases starting with the letter "A".Malignant hyperthermiaSynovial joint: A synovial joint, also known as diarthrosis, joins bones with a fibrous joint capsule that is continuous with the periosteum of the joined bones, constitutes the outer boundary of a synovial cavity, and surrounds the bones' articulating surfaces. The synovial (or joint) cavity is filled with synovial fluid.CaffeineMuscle contraction: Muscle contraction is the activation of tension-generating sites within muscle fibers. In physiology, muscle contraction does not mean muscle shortening because muscle tension can be produced without changes in muscle length such as holding a heavy book or a dumbbell at the same position.Splints: Splints is an ailment of the horse or pony, characterized by a hard, bony swelling, usually on the inside of a front leg, lying between the splint and cannon bone or on the splint bone itself. It may be "hot," meaning that it occurred recently and is still painful; or "cold," meaning that the splint has completely recovered and there is no longer any swelling or pain associated with it.Collagenase clostridium histolyticumHemiphractidae: The Hemiphractidae are a family of frogs from South and Central America. Previously, this group had been classified as a subfamily (Hemiphractinae) under family Hylidae.Waldeyer's fascia: The Waldeyer's fascia is synonymous with the presacral fascia and is more commonly described in surgery textbooks, rather than in anatomy textbooks. Although Waldeyer himself did not actually describe this exact anatomy, it is credited to him as he was the first to describe the anatomy of pelvic fascia in detail.Hand deformityElbow extension test: The Elbow extension test is simple test that can be administered as part of the physical exam to help guide healthcare providers diagnosis and management of acute elbow fractures. The elbow extension test is performed when an elbow fracture, most commonly caused by trauma, is suspected as the source of pain and dysfunction.Calcium signaling: Calcium ions are important for cellular signalling, as once they enter the cytosol of the cytoplasm they exert allosteric regulatory effects on many enzymes and proteins. Calcium can act in signal transduction resulting from activation of ion channels or as a second messenger caused by indirect signal transduction pathways such as G protein-coupled receptors.Trans-tubular potassium gradient: The trans-tubular potassium gradient (TTKG) is an index reflecting the conservation of potassium in the cortical collecting ducts (CCD) of the kidneys. It is useful in diagnosing the causes of hyperkalemia or hypokalemia.MonoplegiaHalothaneBirth trauma (physical)ProcaineSuccinylmonocholineHeberden's nodeHip spica cast: A hip spica cast is a sort of orthopedic cast used to immobilize the hip or thigh. It is used to facilitate healing of injured hip joints or of fractured femurs.Pallor mortis: Pallor mortis (Latin: pallor "paleness", mortis "of death") is a post mortem paleness that occurs in those with light/white skin almost immediately (in the 15–25 minutes immediately post-mortem) due to a lack of capillary circulation throughout the body. The blood sinks down into the lower parts (due to gravity) of the body creating livor mortis.KetotifenKnee pain: Knee pain is a common complaint for many people. There are several factors that can cause knee pain.Lanthanum(III) bromideReversal potential: In a biological membrane, the reversal potential (also known as the Nernst potential) of an ion is the membrane potential at which there is no net (overall) flow of that particular ion from one side of the membrane to the other. In the case of post-synaptic neurons, the reversal potential is the membrane potential at which a given neurotransmitter causes no net current flow of ions through that neurotransmitter receptor's ion channel.Myocytolysis: Myocytolysis refers to a degenerative change (often reversible) that occurs to myocytes upon myocardial strain. This phenomenon tends to occur when neighboring cardiac muscle loses its ability to contract (i.Fractional sodium excretion: The fractional excretion of sodium (FENa) is the percentage of the sodium filtered by the kidney which is excreted in the urine. It is measured in terms of plasma and urine sodium, rather than by the interpretation of urinary sodium concentration alone, as urinary sodium concentrations can vary with water reabsorption.Sarcalumenin: Sarcalumenin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SAR gene.Axillary nerve palsy: Axillary nerve palsy is a neurological condition in which the axillary (also called circumflex) nerve has been damaged by shoulder dislocation. It can cause weak deltoid and sensory loss below the shoulder.MyofibrilHand injury: The hand is a very complex organ with multiple joints, different types of ligament, tendons and nerves. With constant use, it is no wonder that hand disease injuries are common in society.Breast prostheses