Familial atrial fibrillation: Familial atrial fibrillation is an autosomal dominant heart condition that causes disruptions in the heart's normal rhythm. This condition is characterized by uncoordinated electrical activity in the heart's upper chambers (the atria), which causes the heartbeat to become fast and irregular.Automated ECG interpretation: Automated ECG interpretation is the use of artificial intelligence and pattern recognition software and knowledge bases to carry out automatically the interpretation, test reporting, and computer-aided diagnosis of electrocardiogram tracings obtained usually from a patient.PropafenonePericardial friction rub: A pericardial friction rub, also pericardial rub, is an audible medical sign used in the diagnosis of pericarditis. Upon auscultation, this sign is an extra heart sound of to-and-fro character, typically with three components, one systolic and two diastolic.Proarrhythmia: Proarrhythmia is a new or more frequent occurrence of pre-existing arrhythmias, paradoxically precipitated by antiarrhythmic therapy, which means it is a side effect associated with the administration of some existing antiarrhythmic drugs, as well as drugs for other indications. In other words, it is a tendency of antiarrhythmic drugs to facilitate emergence of new arrhythmias.Left atrial enlargement: Left atrial enlargement (LAE) or left atrial dilation refers to enlargement of the left atrium (LA) of the heart, and is a form of cardiomegaly.Third-degree atrioventricular blockProcainamideCardioversionVentricular dyssynchrony: In cardiology, Ventricular dyssynchrony is a difference in the timing, or lack of synchrony, of contractions in different ventricles in the heart. Large differences in timing of contractions can reduce cardiac efficiency and is correlated with heart failure.Right atrial enlargementSupraventricular tachycardiaAortocaval compression syndrome: Aortocaval compression syndrome is compression of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava by the gravid uterus when a pregnant woman lies on her back, i.e.FlecainideAmiodaroneTachycardiaRefractory period (physiology): Refractoriness is the fundamental property of any object of autowave nature (especially excitable medium) not to respond on stimuli, if the object stays in the specific refractory state. In common sense, refractory period is the characteristic recovery time, a period of time that is associated with the motion of the image point on the left branch of the isocline \dot{u} = 0 (for more details, see also Reaction-diffusion and Parabolic partial differential equation).Premature atrial contractionAtrial tachycardiaParoxysmal tachycardiaLarge for gestational age: newborn child, delivered vaginally without complications (41 weeks; fourth child; no gestational diabetes) |Cryosurgery: Cryosurgery (cryotherapy) is the use of extreme cold in surgery to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue.DermNet NZ – Cryotherapy The term comes from the Greek words cryo (κρύο) ("icy cold") and surgery (cheirourgiki – χειρουργική) meaning "hand work" or "handiwork".Periodic current reversalCystic tumour of the atrioventricular nodal region: Cystic tumour of the atrioventricular nodal region is a very rare tumour of the heart in the region of the atrioventricular node. It is also known as mesothelioma of the atrioventricular node.Tropic acidBooster pump: Booster}}Sick sinus syndromeTransesophageal echocardiogramJohn HolterLow pressure receptor zones: Low pressure receptor zones are areas with baroreceptors located in the venae cavae and the pulmonary veins, and in the atria. They are also called volume receptors.EdrophoniumSotalolKennel clubLeft atrial appendage occlusionDigoxinTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingDysgeusiaCongenital heart defectSulfonamide (medicine): Sulfonamide or sulphonamide is the basis of several groups of drugs. The original antibacterial sulfonamides (sometimes called sulfa drugs or sulpha drugs) are synthetic antimicrobial agents that contain the sulfonamide group.Bainbridge reflex: The Bainbridge reflex, also called the atrial reflex, is an increase in heart rate due to an increase in central venous pressure. Increased blood volume is detected by stretch receptors (baroreceptors) located in both atria at the venoatrial junctions.Image-guided surgery: Today, doctors are using computerized technologies that are familiar to people in the consumer world to help fight cancer in the operating room. An important example of that application is image guided surgery (IGS) and it helps surgeons perform safer and less invasive procedures and remove brain tumors that were once considered inoperable due to their size and/or location.Azygos lobePacemaker syndrome: Pacemaker syndrome is a disease that represents the clinical consequences of suboptimal atrioventricular (AV) synchrony or AV dyssynchrony, regardless of the pacing mode, after pacemaker implantation.