*  Haemodynamic instability after cardiac surgery: nurses' perceptions of clinical decision-making - Currey - 2006 - Journal of...
Background. Cardiac surgical patients are distinguished by their potential for instability in the early postoperative period, highly invasive haemodynamic monitoring technologies and unique clinical presentations as a result of undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. Little is known about nurses' perceptions of assuming responsibility for such patients. An understanding of nurses' perceptions may identify areas of practice that can be improved and assist in determining the adequacy of current decision supports.. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe critical care nurses' perceptions of assuming responsibility for the nursing management of cardiac patients in the initial two-hour postoperative period.. Design. An exploratory descriptive study based on naturalistic decision-making.. Methods. Thirty-eight nurses were interviewed immediately following a two-hour observation of their clinical practice. Content analysis and a systematic thematic ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01392.x/abstract
*  Admiral Abbot Commemorates National Nurses Week 2016 | Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society
NMCRS President and CEO Admiral Steve Abbot congratulates the Society's visiting nurses on their vital and compassionate work. In honor of National Nurses Week 2016, we will be featuring one of our wonderful nurses on our blog each day next week. Read their stories and celebrate them-and all of our nurses, past and present-with us. May 2016. Dear Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Visiting Nurses,. I'm pleased to publicly acknowledge and celebrate the enduring dedication and compassion of the Society's visiting nurses. As the 2016 National Nurses Week festivities take place, it's entirely fitting to reflect upon the significant contributions you've made to ensure the health and welfare of generations of Navy and Marine Corps service members and families stationed around the globe.. As heath care professionals, your compassion, breadth of knowledge, and access to valuable referral sources ...
  http://legacy.planwithnmcrs.org/admiral-abbot-commemorates-national-nurses-week-2016/
*  Nursefriendly.com: Nurses: Believe What They Tell You in Nursing School, A Nurse Does Make a Difference | BonnieRN Blog
My world, in geriatric care management, primarily consists of interacting with many health care technicians, non-degree workers, and varied professionals. So, saying this another way, most of my contacts are not nurses. I can tell you, more than weekly, I must explain to those in the field of social and care-giving support, how beneficial it is to have a nurse on the team or committee for decision making. I still get surprised that family is often unaware that a trained and registered nurse is not a part of the team when very serious medical choices are being reviewed for their loved one. A nurse on the health care team is a natural advocate for the patient.. It is true, and is what I was taught, that the nurse is the last line of deffense (often) for a patient in a facility (or elsewhere). Nurses, know when to contact physicians when there is a concern, check physician orders after they are written, call for questions, order the medication (if needed) from the pharmacy, and ...
  http://4nursing.blogspot.com/2010/12/nurses-believe-what-they-tell-you-in.html
*  Nurse.com | Nursing Jobs, Continuing Education Courses, and News
Nurse.com - The leading source of nursing jobs and nurse continuing education with over 13,500 nurse jobs and over 550 nurse CEs available at Nurse.com. Our magazines, NurseWeek & Nursing Spectrum, our nursing websites, our local and national nursing news, nursing events, and other innovative nurse products reach more nurses, more ways, more often. We enrich the professional lives of nurses and celebrate their unique contributions to society.
  http://www.nurse.com
*  Introducing free skills assessment testing for nurses
By completing an online skills test with Mighty Nurse, nurses will own that record for up to one year and can use it with any potential employer.. Most nursing employers require applicants to successfully complete skills assessment tests as part of their application process.. "We're excited to partner with Prophecy Healthcare to bring our community a new and unique feature at no cost to our members," said Mariah Scott, COO, Origin, Inc. "This saves time for nurses, and gives them control in managing their careers. We're proud to be the only nursing community with this offering.". "Our partnership with Mighty Nurse provides nurses with an invaluable career resource tool," said Ron Gonzalez, Founder/CEO Prophecy Healthcare, Inc. "We hope that the ability to take ownership of their knowledge set and credential management translates into propelling their careers forward in the specialties they wish to pursue.". Skills assessment testing is only available to ...
  http://www.mightynurse.com/introducing-free-skills-assessment-testing-for-nurses/
*  What Makes A Good Nurse Leader? - Nursing Crib
Each nurse has that potential within him/her to become a good nurse leader. You don't really have to occupy the highest position for you to be called a nurse leader. You can be a leader in your own way. As a nurse, you manage other members of the healthcare team, you cause others to act, and you facilitate positive outcomes. But how does one become more effective? What makes a good nurse leader?. Has high regard for others. A good leader sees the best in the people around them. Instead of looking down on colleagues and other members of the team, he/she has a way of making others feel good about themselves. Always treat your colleagues with respect.. Has adequate knowledge and skills. For one to be a good nurse leader, he/she must first possess necessary knowledge and skills and feels confident in that knowledge. Leaders have a sense of what is right and keep that at the heart of everything they do.. An inspiration to others and encourages them to do their best. As a nurse leader, it is important ...
  http://nursingcrib.com/news-blog/what-makes-a-good-nurse-leader/
*  Forty years of the Nurses' Health Study: An evidence goldmine with a long-lasting legacy
... . It started in 1976 as an investigation into the potential health consequences of oral contraceptives, but the long-running Nurses' Health Study has yielded increasingly greater benefits to scientific knowledge of health and disease, according to a paper published today in the journal Public Health Research & Practice.
  http://www.krankenpflege-journal.com/nursing-news/9584-forty-years-of-the-nurses-health-study-an-evidence-goldmine-with-a-long-lasting-legacy-.html
*  Forced medication in psychiatric care : patient experiences and nurse perceptions
The general aim was, within psychiatric inpatient care, to explore patient and staff perceptions with regard to medication administration and locked entrance doors. In Study I, medication administration was illuminated according to a mini-ethnographic approach. Nurses and voluntarily admitted patients were observed and interviewed. Two central categories of patient and nurse experiences were identified, get control and leave control. In Study II, patients and nurses were interviewed about patient experiences of forced medication. Identified experiences were related to the disease, being forcibly medicated, and the drug. In Study III, the frequency of and reasons for locked entrance doors on Swedish psychiatric inpatient wards were investigated. Seventy three per cent of the doors were locked on a specific day. According to ward managers, doors were most often locked in order to prevent patients from escaping, provide security and safety, and because legalisation. In Study ...
  http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:167317
*  Sabinet | The prevalence of resilience in a group of professional nurses : original research
The literature and practice show that many professional nurses feel emotionally overloaded and are experiencing job dissatisfaction, which often results in them leaving the profession. Paradoxically, some nurses choose to remain in nursing and survive, cope and even thrive despite their unique workplace adversities. It is, however, not known what the prevalence of resilience amongst nurses is, and what influence working in private versus public contexts has on this resilience. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of resilience in a group of professional nurses, to determine whether private versus public contexts played a role in nurses' resilience, and to obtain an indication of participants' views of their profession and resilience therein. A cross-sectional survey design was used where professional nurses (N = 312) working in public and private hospitals in South Africa ...
  http://journals.co.za/content/health/16/1/EJC35120
*  The prevalence of resilience in a group of professional nurses
ABSTRACT. The literature and practice show that many professional nurses feel emotionally overloaded and are experiencing job dissatisfaction, which often results in them leaving the profession. Paradoxically, some nurses choose to remain in nursing and survive, cope and even thrive despite their unique workplace adversities. It is, however, not known what the prevalence of resilience amongst nurses is, and what influence working in private versus public contexts has on this resilience. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of resilience in a group of professional nurses, to determine whether private versus public contexts played a role in nurses' resilience, and to obtain an indication of participants' views of their profession and resilience therein. A cross-sectional survey design was used where professional nurses (N = 312) working in public and private hospitals in South Africa ...
  http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S2071-97362011000100019&lng=en&nrm=iso
*  Hospital Restructuring and the Work of Registered Nurses - Norrish - 2001 - The Milbank Quarterly - Wiley Online Library
American hospitals have undergone three waves of organizational restructuring in the past two decades. These changes have had direct effects on a key set of employees-nurses. A review of the relevant literature to identify the ways in which hospital restructuring affects the work of registered nurses focuses on three important structural characteristics of nursing work: nurses' work roles, workload, and control of work. The review concludes that the impact of restructuring on each of the characteristics affects nurses' satisfaction with their work and may also affect the quality of patient care. While much of the policy debate around restructuring focuses on the extent to which reductions in nurse staffing levels affects quality of care, it is important to examine not only changes in nurse staffing levels, but changes in the work performed by registered nurses, as well. ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-0009.00196/abstract
*  Substitution of doctors by nurses in primary care - Laurant - 2005 - The Cochrane Library - Wiley Online Library
4253 articles were screened of which 25 articles, relating to 16 studies, met our inclusion criteria. In seven studies the nurse assumed responsibility for first contact and ongoing care for all presenting patients. The outcomes investigated varied across studies so limiting the opportunity for data synthesis. In general, no appreciable differences were found between doctors and nurses in health outcomes for patients, process of care, resource utilisation or cost.. In five studies the nurse assumed responsibility for first contact care for patients wanting urgent consultations during office hours or out-of-hours. Patient health outcomes were similar for nurses and doctors but patient satisfaction was higher with nurse-led care. Nurses tended to provide longer consultations, give more information to patients and recall patients more frequently than did doctors. The impact on physician workload and direct cost of care was variable.. In four studies the nurse ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD001271.pub2/abstract
*  Motivational Interviewing : Experiences Of Primary Care Nurses Trained In The Method
Aim: The overall aim of the present thesis was to describe and examine primary care nursesยด self-reports on training, use and performance as well as experiences and actual performance of MI.. Method: One qualitative and three quantitative studies were conducted among primary care nurses. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to 980 primary care nurses and 673 (69%) responded (Study I). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 MI trained primary care nurses (Study II). MI sessions between 12 (Study III) respective 23 (Study IV) primary care nurses and patients (total 32 respective 50 sessions) were audio-recorded. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis, Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code, Motivational Interviewing Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchanges and statistical analysis.. Results: The findings showed that primary care nurses reported and experienced lack of ...
  http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:768711
*  Critical Need to Address Accuracy of Nurses' Diagnoses
Vol. 13 No. 1. DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol13No01PPT06 Key words: administration, clinical judgement, education, evidence-based practice, nursing diagnosis. The research evidence is strong that it is time to address the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses... Accuracy of nurses' data interpretations (diagnoses) should be a serious concern of nurses in both practice and education because interpretations of patient data serve as the basis for selecting the nursing interventions that will achieve positive patient outcomes. Accuracy of nurses' diagnoses is defined as a rater's judgment of the match between a diagnostic statement and patient data (Lunney, 1990, 2001). The research evidence is strong that it is time to address the accuracy of nurses' diagnoses and consider strategies to improve accuracy. In an analysis of 20 studies published from 1966 to 2000, Lunney (2001) reported that in all clinical simulation studies, and also in a study ...
  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/vol132008/No1Jan08/ArticlePreviousTopic/AccuracyofNursesDiagnoses.aspx
*  Nurse staffing issue goes back to the operating room | Bemidji Pioneer
But on Monday, it was back to the operating room to work on a state legislative bill that would study the relationship between the number of nurses on a hospital staff and patient care. The two sides did agree, however, this year there would be no bill requiring specific levels of nurse staffing. The disagreement has gone on for years, with nurses complaining hospitals do not have enough of them on staff to properly handle patients. They say that results in health problems. The hospitals say patients are recovering better than ever, and increasing nurse staffing is not the only criteria to improving care. Minnesota already is near the top in hospital care, hospital officials say. With strong hospital opposition to the state requiring a nurse staffing level, a House committee Friday approved a compromise that removed the requirement but would require data to be released showing possible links between staffing shortages and patient problems. On Monday, a Senate committee ...
  http://www.bemidjipioneer.com/news/600102-nurse-staffing-issue-goes-back-operating-room?qt-latest_trending_article_page=0
*  Militant Medical Nurse: Hell must have frozen over. They sent me a staff nurse!
I am a university educated registered nurse. We had a hell of a lot of hands on practice as well as our academic courses. The only people who say that you don't need a brain or an education to be an RN are the people who do not have any direct experience of nursing in acute care on today's wards. I have yet to meet a nurse who thinks that she is above providing basic care. I work with nurses who are completely unable to provide basic care due to ward conditions. I have lived and worked in 3 countries and have seen more similarities than differences. I have been a qualified nurse for nearly 15 years. I never used to use foul language until working on the wards got to me. It's a mess everywhere, not just the NHS. Hospital management is slashing the numbers of staff on the ward whilst filling us up with more patients than we can handle... patients who are increasingly frail. After an 8-14 hour shift without stopping once we have still barely scratched the surface of being able to do what we ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2009/04/hell-must-have-frozen-over-they-sent-me.html?showComment=1238760960000
*  Work related report - GCSE Science - Marked by Teachers.com
Introduction. Introduction The NHS is a massive organisation employing over 1.5 million employees. The NHS employs over 400, 000 nurses and without the NHS (National Health Service) would be nothing but fiction. Nurses play a big role inside the NHS. From all of the people providing a service in the NHS a nurse is the core of it all. A nurse will perform a range of tasks. Nurses will also work in different places and wards in a hospital. This is what I will discuss in my work related report moreover I will discuss the role of a nurse and many other topics regarding towards a nurse. What personal skills and qualities must a nurse have? Being a nurse is a big responsibility. You are only allowed to perform the job if you are 17 or over. There is a lot that is expected from a nurse. Stated below is what qualities and skills a nurse must have to go ahead with a nursing career. Nurses Specialise in: * Adult nursing * Children's Nursing * Mental ...
  http://www.markedbyteachers.com/gcse/science/work-related-report.html
*  Red Triage: Nurse Jackie, Flawed Nurse, Good Show
On the whole, Nurse Jackie has the potential to alter the public image of nursing more profoundly than any Hollywood show of recent decades. Even on ER, by far the best major show for nursing so far, the profession was never more than an occasional supplement to the real action, which was dominated by the heroic physician characters. But Nurse Jackie is an unusually compelling, witty character who works at center stage, dispensing expert physical and psychosocial care, saving and endangering lives, raising nurses' and physicians' level of play, deceiving herself and those who love her, making dubious moral choices--and presenting a radically different vision of what a nurse is ...
  http://redtriage.blogspot.com/2009/06/truth-about-nursing-has-different-take.html
*  Militant Medical Nurse: Nurses and Stress
I am a university educated registered nurse. We had a hell of a lot of hands on practice as well as our academic courses. The only people who say that you don't need a brain or an education to be an RN are the people who do not have any direct experience of nursing in acute care on today's wards. I have yet to meet a nurse who thinks that she is above providing basic care. I work with nurses who are completely unable to provide basic care due to ward conditions. I have lived and worked in 3 countries and have seen more similarities than differences. I have been a qualified nurse for nearly 15 years. I never used to use foul language until working on the wards got to me. It's a mess everywhere, not just the NHS. Hospital management is slashing the numbers of staff on the ward whilst filling us up with more patients than we can handle... patients who are increasingly frail. After an 8-14 hour shift without stopping once we have still barely scratched the surface of being able to do what we ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2009/03/nurses-and-stress.html?showComment=1321356623343
*  Militant Medical Nurse: Nurses we are not hiring
I am a university educated registered nurse. We had a hell of a lot of hands on practice as well as our academic courses. The only people who say that you don't need a brain or an education to be an RN are the people who do not have any direct experience of nursing in acute care on today's wards. I have yet to meet a nurse who thinks that she is above providing basic care. I work with nurses who are completely unable to provide basic care due to ward conditions. I have lived and worked in 3 countries and have seen more similarities than differences. I have been a qualified nurse for nearly 15 years. I never used to use foul language until working on the wards got to me. It's a mess everywhere, not just the NHS. Hospital management is slashing the numbers of staff on the ward whilst filling us up with more patients than we can handle... patients who are increasingly frail. After an 8-14 hour shift without stopping once we have still barely scratched the surface of being able to do what we ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2010/12/nurses-we-are-not-hiring.html?showComment=1291761060006
*  Militant Medical Nurse: Hell In Staffordshire Revisited. They are indeed blaming nurses for management failures.
Well said. HDU and ITU patients are critically ill. If a nurse is responsible for these kinds of patients she cannot see her other patients. At all. Full stop. So why was shitford hospital forcing their individual nurses to take these kinds of patients on top of 10 other patients, shift after shift, and day after day? Unless you are one of these clueless visitors to the hospital or a member of the media you, of course, understand that if you have a critically ill patient for 12 hours THEN YOU CANNOT SEE ANY OF YOUR OTHER PATIENTS FOR 12 HOURS. And here in the NHS you DO NOT get another nurse to help you care for those other 10 patients. You will have to go to the nurse's station to check orders, order equipment and get/give information about your critically ill patient. It's probably a good idea to ignore anything else but what you are doing for that critically ill patient whilst you are at the station. You do not want to get delayed getting back to him because you were talking to a relative ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2010/01/hell-in-staffordshire-revisited-they.html
*  Militant Medical Nurse: Hell In Staffordshire Revisited. They are indeed blaming nurses for management failures.
Well said. HDU and ITU patients are critically ill. If a nurse is responsible for these kinds of patients she cannot see her other patients. At all. Full stop. So why was shitford hospital forcing their individual nurses to take these kinds of patients on top of 10 other patients, shift after shift, and day after day? Unless you are one of these clueless visitors to the hospital or a member of the media you, of course, understand that if you have a critically ill patient for 12 hours THEN YOU CANNOT SEE ANY OF YOUR OTHER PATIENTS FOR 12 HOURS. And here in the NHS you DO NOT get another nurse to help you care for those other 10 patients. You will have to go to the nurse's station to check orders, order equipment and get/give information about your critically ill patient. It's probably a good idea to ignore anything else but what you are doing for that critically ill patient whilst you are at the station. You do not want to get delayed getting back to him because you were talking to a relative ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2010/01/hell-in-staffordshire-revisited-they.html?showComment=1263534874994
*  Misaligned values: why NSW rural nurses resign - Healthcanal.com : Healthcanal.com
The first stage is sharing values, a time when nurse and organisation share similar values. The second stage is conceding values where, due to changes in the organisation's values, nurses perceive that patient care becomes compromised and values diverge between the nurse and the hospital. The final stage, in which the nurse eventually resigns, is where nurses 'give up' and feel that they compromise their professional integrity, that their values are conflicted, and that they are unable to realign their values to those of hospitals ...
  https://www.healthcanal.com/public-health-safety/24905-misaligned-values-why-nsw-rural-nurses-resign.html
*  Militant Medical Nurse: More fun with the kids part 2
Why are some of these family members so hateful to the nurses? I just don't get it! Did the woman asking for a cup of tea NOT understand you had an emergency? And you made sure she got the tea so what was up with all that? UK family members, if you are looking at these posts, you should be ashamed of the way nurses are treated in your country! These courageous people are working in deplorable conditions for hours on end without any break at all.They are actually putting their own means of making a livelihood at risk to keep coming to work for you! They are doing this for probably not a lot of money. Please do not subject them to verbal abuse, too. I know it is hard to have a sick family member, but you need to hold administration accountable and not browbeat fellow victims of your system. Nurses are actually the ones in your corner. I thought it was bad in the States, but this absolutely blows my mind! I'm so sorry, Anne. The people of the UK are lucky to ...
  http://militantmedicalnurse.blogspot.com/2009/04/more-fun-with-kids-part-2.html?showComment=1240913280000
*  Counting nurses: interpreting nursing workforce statistics. - Surrey Research Insight Open Access
Discusses the interpretation of nursing statistics, the problem of counting how many nurses there are in the workforce, and the need to be aware of how statistics are compiled when presenting numerical data to support arguments relating to nursing and the nursing workforce. Argues that NHS workforce statistics provide considerable evidence for claiming that there is a significant decline in the number of nursing staff doing the work of nursing in the NHS. Explains that although there was an increase in the number of qualified nurses working in the NHS throughout the 1980s (over a ten-year period the number of qualified nurses increased by 22 per cent), the increase in qualified nursing staff has not compensated for the loss of student learners in the workforce. Emphasizes that during the last three years for which figures are available, however, these gains have been wiped out, and the number of qualified nurses has declined to pre-Project ...
  http://epubs.surrey.ac.uk/815464/