*  Drosophila hydei - Wikipedia
Drosophila hydei Sturtevant, 1921 è un insetto del genere Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae). È una sottospecie della specie Drosophila repleta. Ha una lunghezza (3-4 mm) all'incirca doppia rispetto al comune moscerino della frutta Drosophila melanogaster (2 mm). ^ (EN) Greg S. Spicer, Scott Pitnick, Molecular Systematics of the Drosophila hydei Subgroup as Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Sequences, in J Mol Evol, vol. 43, nº 3, 1996, pp. 281-286, DOI:10.1007/BF02338836. PDF Archiviato il 11 giugno 2010 in Internet Archive. (EN) H. D. Berendes, Salivary gland function and chromosomal puffing patterns in Drosophila hydei, in Chromosoma, vol. 17, nº 1, 1965, pp. 35-77, DOI:10.1007/BF00285155. (EN) H. D. Berendes and H. G. Keyl, Distribution of DNA in Heterochromatin and Euchromatin of Polytene Nuclei of Drosophila hydei, in Genetics, vol. 57, nº 1, 1967, pp. 1-13. PDF (EN) J. B. Boyd, H. D. ...
  https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosophila_hydei
*  Sequence analysis of active mariner elements in natural populations of Drosophila simulans. | Genetics
Active and inactive mariner elements from natural and laboratory populations of Drosophila simulans were isolated and sequenced in order to assess their nucleotide variability and to compare them with previously isolated mariner elements from the sibling species Drosophila mauritiana and Drosophila sechellia. The active elements of D. simulans are very similar among themselves (average 99.7% nucleotide identity), suggesting that the level of mariner expression in different natural populations is largely determined by position effects, dosage effects and perhaps other factors. Furthermore, the D. simulans elements exhibit nucleotide identities of 98% or greater when compared with mariner elements from the sibling species. Parsimony analysis of mariner elements places active elements from the three species into separate groups and suggests that D. simulans is the species from which mariner elements in D. mauritiana and D. sechellia are most likely derived. ...
  http://www.genetics.org/content/130/3/499
*  A human protein with sequence similarity to Drosophila mastermind coordinates the nuclear form of Notch and a CSL protein to...
Kitagawa M., Oyama T., Kawashima T., Yedvobnick B., Kumar A., Matsuno K., Harigaya K.. Mastermind (Mam) has been implicated as an important positive regulator of the Notch signaling pathway by genetic studies using Drosophila melanogaster. Here we describe a biochemical mechanism of action of Mam within the Notch signaling pathway. Expression of a human sequence related to Drosophila Mam (hMam-1) in mammalian cells augments induction of Hairy Enhancer of split (HES) promoters by Notch signaling. hMam-1 stabilizes and participates in the DNA binding complex of the intracellular domain of human Notch1 and a CSL protein. Truncated versions of hMam-1 that can maintain an association with the complex behave in a dominant negative fashion and depress transactivation. Furthermore, Drosophila Mam forms a similar complex with the intracellular domain of Drosophila Notch and Drosophila CSL protein during activation of Enhancer of ...
  http://www.uniprot.org/citations/11390662
*  Molecular Cytogenetics - Drosophila buzzatii group and Tandemly Repeated Satellite DNA - Kuhn Heslop-Harrison
Publications - Link to Drosophila publication page: (Most title links need intranet password - DOI links need subscription) 279. Kuhn GC, Schwarzacher T, Heslop-Harrison JS. 2010. The non-regular orbit: three satellite DNAs in Drosophila martensis (buzzatii complex, repleta group) followed three different evolutionary pathways. Molecular Genetics and Genomics 284(4): 251-262. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00438-010-0564-1. 268. Kuhn GCS, Teo CH, Schwarzacher T, Heslop-Harrison JS. 2009. Evolutionary dynamics and sites of illegitimate recombination revealed in the interspersion and sequence junctions of two nonhomologous satellite DNAs in cactophilic Drosophila species. Heredity 102: 453-464. doi: 10.1038/hdy.2009.9 (The link to the title contains the full colour plate - also available here - which is not in the Heredity DOI for the PDF but is in the HTML version; it is rather essential to show the results in the paper.). 255. Kuhn GCS, Sene FM, Moreira-Filho O, ...
  https://www.le.ac.uk/biology/phh4/drosophila.htm
*  GENETIC VARIATION FOR DISPERSAL BY DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA AND DROSOPHILA PERSIMILIS | Genetics
Release-recapture experiments using Drosophila pseudoobscura and D. persimilis strains of different karyotypes were performed in a heterogeneous environment. The heterogeneity was due to both spatial variation and the species of yeast used to attract the released flies. No karyotypic-specific habitat preferences were detected. However, in all releases, different strains did behave differently with respect to one or both of the heterogeneous factors. These results indicate there is variation for dispersal behavior in these species that is most likely based on genotype-dependent habitat preferences.. ...
  http://www.genetics.org/content/112/2/229
*  "Functional Analysis Of A Highly Conserved Cyclin, Cyclin Y, In Drosophila Melanogaste . . ." by Nermin Gerges
Cyclin Y is a highly conserved member of the Cyclin superfamily of proteins. In Drosophila the Cyclin Y gene (CycY) is required for progression through several stages of development but the specific pathways that Cyclin Y belongs to and that account for its requirement are not known. Studies in human and Drosophila cell lines have shown that membrane-localized Cyclin Y is required for phosphorylation of the wingless/Wnt co-receptor, arrow/LRP6, and for full activation of the canonical wingless/Wnt pathway. CycY null Drosophila, however, do not phenocopy loss-of-function mutations in canonical wingless pathway genes, suggesting that Cyclin Y may have additional roles outside the wingless pathway in vivo. To identify roles for Cyclin Y in Drosophila I used RNAi to knock down CycY expression in 31 distinct tissue patterns. The screen revealed that expression of the CycY shRNA in specific tissue patterns causes larval lethality and other ...
  http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/oa_dissertations/1334/
*  Words that start with drosophila | Words starting with drosophila
words that start with drosophila, words starting with drosophila, words that begin with drosophila, words beginning with drosophila
  https://www.thefreedictionary.com/words-that-start-with-drosophila
*  JCDD | Free Full-Text | On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart
The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing human heart disease are also present in Drosophila, where they play the same or similar roles in heart development, maintenance or physiology as their respective counterparts in humans. This review will attempt to briefly introduce the anatomy of the Drosophila circulatory system and then focus on the different cell types and non-cellular tissue that constitute the heart.
  http://www.mdpi.com/2308-3425/3/2/15
*  P element homing to the Drosophila bithorax complex | Development
P elements containing a 7 kb DNA fragment from the middle of the Drosophila bithorax complex insert preferentially into the bithorax complex or into the adjacent chromosome regions. This 'homing' property is similar to that reported for the engrailed promoter (Hama, C., Ali, Z. and Kornberg, T. B. (1990) Genes Dev. 4, 1079-1093). The 7 kb fragment does not contain any known promoter, but it acts as a boundary element separating adjacent segmental domains. An enhancer-trap P element was constructed with the homing fragment and the selectable marker flanked by FRT sites. P insertions can be trimmed down by Flp-mediated recombination to just the lacZ reporter, so that the (beta)-galactosidase pattern is not influenced by sequences inside the P element. Twenty insertions into the bithorax complex express (beta)-galactosidase in segmentally limited patterns, reflecting the segmental domains of the bithorax complex where the elements reside. The mapping of segmental domains has now been revised, ...
  http://dev.biologists.org/content/127/18/3981
*  Cancers | Free Full-Text | Epidermal Growth Factor Pathway Signaling in Drosophila Embryogenesis: Tools for Understanding Cancer
EGF signaling is a well-known oncogenic pathway in animals. It is also a key developmental pathway regulating terminal and dorsal-ventral patterning along with many other aspects of embryogenesis. In this review, we focus on the diverse roles for the EGF pathway in Drosophila embryogenesis. We review the existing body of evidence concerning EGF signaling in Drosophila embryogenesis focusing on current uncertainties in the field and areas for future study. This review provides a foundation for utilizing the Drosophila model system for research into EGF effects on cancer.
  http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6694/9/2/16
*  Racial divergence of a rare laboratory evolved centromeric fission Cytorace of nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila -...
Fissioncytorace-1, a member of the nasuta-albomicans complex of Drosophila is an evolutionary product of centric fission, which had occurred in the chromosome X3 of Cytorace 1, a hydridization product of Drosophila nasuta nasuta male (2n=8) and Drosophila nasuta albomicans female (2n=6). Cytorace 1 (males 2n=7; females 2n=6) has inherited this chromosome from its D. n. albomicans parent. The chromosome X3 of D. n. albomicans is a derivative of a centric fusion between the acrocentric chromosome 3 and the chromosome X of D. n. nasuta. The Fissioncytorace-1 has crossed 200 generations from the time of its evolution in the laboratory environment. When this centromeric fission race was subjected to some of the morphophenotypic and fitness assessment to find its overall population fitness showed, increased body size, sternopleural bristle, ovarioles, lifetime fecundity and fertility with reduced interspecific competitive ability and hatching success when compared ...
  http://eprints.uni-mysore.ac.in/2908/
*  Binding of pumilio to maternal hunchback mRNA is required for posterior patterning in Drosophila embryos. Developmental...
Binding of pumilio to maternal hunchback mRNA is required for posterior patterning in Drosophila embryos. Developmental regulation of vesicle transport in Drosophila embryos: forces and kinetics
  http://www.readabstracts.com/Biological-sciences/Binding-of-pumilio-to-maternal-hunchback-mRNA-is-required-for-posterior-patterning-in-Drosophila-emb.html
*  Divergent strategies for adaptations to stress resistance in two tropical Drosophila species: effects of developmental...
Water conservation and thermotolerance are crucial to the ecological success of different insect taxa from diverse types of habitats (Hadley, 1994; Willmer et al., 2000; Angilletta, 2009). Several studies have compared desiccation as well as cold and heat resistance levels of Drosophila species of temperate and tropical origin but few studies have investigated genetic variation for stress-related traits (Parsons, 1983; Hoffmann, 2010; Kellermann et al., 2012a; Kellermann et al., 2012b). Kellermann and co-workers have shown low genetic variation for desiccation and cold resistance (estimated as additive genetic variance and narrow sense heritability) in D. bipectinata and four other tropical species, whereas five widespread Drosophila species have been shown to have higher genetic variation (Kellermann et al., 2009). For the two tropical species (D. malerkotliana and D. bipectinata), there are no studies that have investigated the overall levels of genetic variation. However, ...
  http://jeb.biologists.org/content/217/6/924
*  Myosin II is not required for Drosophila tracheal branch elongation and cell intercalation | Development
The Drosophila tracheal system consists of an interconnected network of monolayered epithelial tubes that ensures oxygen transport in the larval and adult body. During tracheal dorsal branch (DB) development, individual DBs elongate as a cluster of cells, led by tip cells at the front and trailing cells in the rear. Branch elongation is accompanied by extensive cell intercalation and cell lengthening of the trailing stalk cells. Although cell intercalation is governed by Myosin II (MyoII)-dependent forces during tissue elongation in the Drosophila embryo that lead to germ-band extension, it remained unclear whether MyoII plays a similar active role during tracheal branch elongation and intercalation. Here, we have used a nanobody-based approach to selectively knock down MyoII in tracheal cells. Our data show that, despite the depletion of MyoII function, tip cell migration and stalk cell intercalation (SCI) proceed at a normal rate. This confirms a model in which DB ...
  http://dev.biologists.org/content/144/16/2961?rss=1
*  British Library EThOS: Characterisation of early patterning events during Drosophila eye morphogenesis
Epithelial tissue morphogenesis relies on tightly regulated cell shape changes and local cell-cell contact rearrangements. However, our knowledge on how these cells' behaviours are controlled and implemented during organogenesis remains incomplete. To address this issue, I have made use of the genetically amenable developing Drosophila eye. Patterning of the Drosophila eye is initiated by the morphogenetic furrow (MF), a developmental compartment characterized by a wave of apically constricted cells that travels from the posterior pole of the disc. In the wake of the MF emerges a regular array of aligned photoreceptor-precursor cells that will further assemble into mature ommatidia, the building blocks of the fly's compound eye. My thesis work is concerned with characterizing the cellular and molecular mechanisms directing early ommatidia patterning. My work demonstrates that the alignment of the ommatidial precursor cells is directed by the basic helix-loop-helix ...
  http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.625579
*  Cells | Free Full-Text | Genetic Systems to Investigate Regulation of Oncogenes and Tumour Suppressor Genes in Drosophila
Animal growth requires coordination of cell growth and cell cycle progression with developmental signaling. Loss of cell cycle control is extremely detrimental, with reduced cycles leading to impaired organ growth and excessive proliferation, potentially resulting in tissue overgrowth and driving tumour initiation. Due to the high level of conservation between the cell cycle machinery of Drosophila and humans, the appeal of the fly model continues to be the means with which we can use sophisticated genetics to provide novel insights into mammalian growth and cell cycle control. Over the last decade, there have been major additions to the genetic toolbox to study development in Drosophila. Here we discuss some of the approaches available to investigate the potent growth and cell cycle properties of the Drosophila counterparts of prominent cancer genes, with a focus on the c-Myc oncoprotein and the tumour suppressor protein FIR (Hfp in flies), which behaves as ...
  http://mdpi.com/2073-4409/1/4/1182
*  Drosophila heart cell movement to the midline occurs through both cell autonomous migration and dorsal closure - Nottingham...
The Drosophila heart is a linear organ formed by the movement of bilaterally specified progenitor cells to the midline and adherence of contralateral heart cells. This movement occurs through the attachment of heart cells to the overlying ectoderm which is undergoing dorsal closure. Therefore heart cells are thought to move to the midline passively. Through live imaging experiments and analysis of mutants that affect the speed of dorsal closure we show that heart cells in Drosophila are autonomously migratory and part of their movement to the midline is independent of the ectoderm. This means that heart formation in flies is more similar to that in vertebrates than previously thought. We also show that defects in dorsal closure can result in failure of the amnioserosa to properly degenerate, which can physically hinder joining of contralateral heart cells leading to a broken heart phenotype.. ...
  http://eprints.nottingham.ac.uk/34077/
*  Dwil\GK19666 - Uncharacterized protein - Drosophila willistoni (Fruit fly) - Dwil\GK19666 gene & protein
p>The checksum is a form of redundancy check that is calculated from the sequence. It is useful for tracking sequence updates.,/p> ,p>It should be noted that while, in theory, two different sequences could have the same checksum value, the likelihood that this would happen is extremely low.,/p> ,p>However UniProtKB may contain entries with identical sequences in case of multiple genes (paralogs).,/p> ,p>The checksum is computed as the sequence 64-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check value (CRC64) using the generator polynomial: x,sup>64,/sup> + x,sup>4,/sup> + x,sup>3,/sup> + x + 1. The algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard. ,/p> ,p class="publication">Press W.H., Flannery B.P., Teukolsky S.A. and Vetterling W.T.,br /> ,strong>Cyclic redundancy and other checksums,/strong>,br /> ,a href="http://www.nrbook.com/b/bookcpdf.php">Numerical recipes in C 2nd ed., pp896-902, Cambridge University Press (1993),/a>),/p> Checksum:i ...
  http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/B4MNZ3
*  Drosophila Genomes by the Baker's Dozen | Genetics
WHAT a wonderful time to be a biologist! This month we celebrate the publication of the "complete" genomic sequences of 10 species of Drosophila to complement those of Drosophila melanogaster (Adams et al. 2000) and D. pseudoobscura (Richards et al. 2005). A 13th genome, that of D. mauritiana, has been sequenced in part, but the data have yet to be analyzed (L. Hillier, Washington University, personal communication). This achievement is marked by the publication of two "community" articles in Nature in November 2007 (Drosophila 12 Genomes Consortium 2007; Stark et al. 2007) and nearly 50 articles in other journals, including Genetics. Rather than attempt to summarize these articles (in effect this is done by the community publications), here I will attempt to draw some more general biological and sociological lessons learned from the sequencing of these genomes.. What are the deep biological questions that large-scale sequencing should seek to answer, in ...
  http://www.genetics.org/content/177/3/1263
*  Drosophila Amphiphysin Functions during Synaptic Fasciclin II Membrane Cycling | Journal of Neuroscience
Studies in vertebrates have suggested two roles for Amph: endocytosis of synaptic vesicles and deformation of membranes required for the generation of muscle T-tubules. Although this second function appears to be conserved in Drosophila (Razzaq et al., 2001), damph mutants show no defects in presynaptic vesicle cycling. Moreover, damph mutants show no genetic interaction with Shibire, the gene encoding the Drosophila Dynamin homolog (Zelhof et al., 2001), suggesting that in the fly, Damph does not play a role in endocytosis (Leventis et al., 2001; Razzaq et al., 2001; Zelhof et al., 2001).. At the Drosophila larval NMJ, Damph is enriched at the postsynaptic region (Leventis et al., 2001; Razzaq et al., 2001; Zelhof et al., 2001), suggesting a role in postsynaptic function. The observations that Damph colocalizes with FasII at the postsynaptic membrane, and that both severe hypomorphic fasII and null damph mutants show a similar decrease in synaptic bouton ...
  http://www.jneurosci.org/content/23/33/10710.long
*  Rapid evolution of reproductive proteins in abalone and Drosophila | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B:...
Observations from different taxa, including plants, protozoa, insects and mammals, indicate that proteins involved in reproduction evolve rapidly. Several models of adaptive evolution have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, such as sexual conflict, sexual selection, self versus non-self recognition and pathogen resistance. Here we discuss the potential role of sexual conflict in the rapid evolution of reproductive genes in two different animal systems, abalone (Haliotis) and Drosophila. In abalone, we reveal how specific interacting sperm-egg proteins were identified and discuss this identification in the light of models for rapid protein evolution and speciation. For Drosophila, we describe the genomic approaches taken to identify male accessory gland proteins and female reproductive tract proteins. Patterns of protein evolution from both abalone and Drosophila support the predicted patterns of rapid protein evolution driven by sexual conflict. We ...
  http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/361/1466/261
*  Resumen - Cytogenetic analysis of two strains of drosophila willistoni treated with formaldehyde with special reference to the...
Resumen en: Se estudió el efecto mutagéniw del formaldehído (FA) para inducir deleciones preferenciales sobre la región Adh en los cromosomas politénicos de Lkosoph...
  http://www.redalyc.org/resumen.oa?id=37012104&idioma=en
*  Dissecting the regulatory switches of development: lessons from enhancer evolution in Drosophila | Development
The functional significance of TFBSs has also been investigated in NEEs (see Box 2), which are crucial for dorsoventral patterning of the neurogenic ectoderm in the developing Drosophila embryo (Erives and Levine, 2004). The gene expression patterns directed by this class of CRMs are mediated largely by three TFs: the activators Dorsal (DL) and Twist (TWI) and the repressor Snail (SNA) (reviewed by Rusch and Levine, 1996). The genomes of D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis were analyzed for the presence of a consensus NEE motif comprising several sequences, including closely spaced binding sites for DL and TWI and a SNA binding site that overlapped with the TWI binding site (Crocker et al., 2008b). Using their consensus motif, the authors identified five NEEs in D. melanogaster, five in D. virilis and four in D. pseudoobscura. In agreement with the findings of Hare et al. for the eve gene (Hare et al., 2008a), orthologous NEE-driven genes from different ...
  http://dev.biologists.org/content/137/1/5
*  Advances in Genetics, Vol. 31
5,855-867. ,and Sanchez, L. The scute (T4) gene acts as a numerator element of the X:A signal that determines the state of activity of Sex-lethal in Drosophila. EMBO J. 8,3079-3086. ,and Sanchez, L. Gap gene properties of the pair-rule gene runt during Drosophila segmentation. Genet. Res. 59,189- 198. , and Gergen, J. P. Zygotic expression of the Drosophila segmentation gene runt antagonizes the activity of the maternal morphogen bicoid. Submitted. , Brown, J. , Scott, M. , and Wu, C. A sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that activates fushi turazu segmentation gene expression. Cells, cap tissue is induced to form mesoderm and an organizer (Fig. 2C) (Nieuwkoop, 1969). Using the animal cap assay, several growth factors and secreted molecules have been implicated in mesodermal induction (Fig. 2) (see review in Green and Smith, 1991). , 1990). , 1993). , 1988), but when combined with activin, produces mesoderm of dorsal character (Cooke, 1989). , 1992). Bone ...
  http://ashley.wedeking.org/library/advances-in-genetics-vol-31
*  The Role of Regulated mRNA Stability in Establishing Bicoid Morphogen Gradient in Drosophila Embryonic Development - ePrints...
The Bicoid morphogen is amongst the earliest triggers of differential spatial pattern of gene expression and subsequent cell fate determination in the embryonic development of Drosophila. This maternally deposited morphogen is thought to diffuse in the embryo, establishing a concentration gradient which is sensed by downstream genes. In most model based analyses of this process, the translation of the bicoid mRNA is thought to take place at a fixed rate from the anterior pole of the embryo and a supply of the resulting protein at a constant rate is assumed. Is this process of morphogen generation a passive one as assumed in the modelling literature so far, or would available data support an alternate hypothesis that the stability of the mRNA is regulated by active processes? We introduce a model in which the stability of the maternal mRNA is regulated by being held constant for a length of time, followed by rapid degradation. With this more realistic model of the source, we have analysed ...
  https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/272827/