*  Bombacaceae - Wikipedia
Bombacaceae were long recognised as a family of flowering plants or Angiospermae. The family name was based on the type genus ... Bombacaceae is no longer recognized by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group I 1998, II 2003 and Kubitzki system 2003 at the rank of ... A close relationship between Bombacaceae and Malvaceae has long been recognized but until recently the families have been kept ... Kostermansia Soegeng Neesia Blume Genus that should be excluded from Bombacaceae after Heywood et al. 2007 and that be included ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombacaceae
*  Malvales
ex Bombacaceae), support was weak (Alverson et al. 1999; c.f. Bayer et al. 1999; Baum et al. 2002). Quararibea, etc., may be ... Synonymy: Bombacaceae Kunth, nom. cons.. *Malvaceae are usually readily recognisable even when sterile by the combination of ... Note that the limits of both Malvoideae and Bombacaceae are unclear, and there are about a dozen unplaced genera in this area. ... Malvaceae + Bombacaceae + Sterculiaceae + Tiliaceae make a readily recognized and well circumscribed group, yet the clades ...
  http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/Research/APweb/orders/malvalesweb.htm
*  Khanna N K - AbeBooks
Bombacaceae. 15. Sterculiaceae. 16. Tiliaceae. 17. Elaeocarpaceae. 18. Malpighiaceae. 19. Zygophyllaceae. 20. Tropaeolaceae. 21 ...
  https://www.abebooks.com/book-search/author/khanna-n-k/
*  Pharmaceutics | Free Full-Text | Application and Characterization of Gum from Bombax buonopozense Calyxes as an Excipient in...
Bombacaceae) edible floral extracts. Eur. J. Sci. Res. 2011, 48, 627-630. [Google Scholar] ... Bombax buonopozense from family Bombacaceae is a wild tree found in Nigeria mainly in the North-Central part of Nigeria. The ...
  http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4923/4/3/354/htm
*  Sun bear - Wikipedia
Durio graveolens Bombacaceae S fr Tree. *^ MacKinnon, K., Hattah, G., Halim, H., Mangalik, A. (1996). The ecology of Kalimantan ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_bear
*  Alamos Succs; Tropical Succulents
BOMBACACEAE. Ceiba acuminata Pseudobombax palmeri BROMELIACEAE. Bromelia alsodes Hechtia montana Tillandsia caput-medusae ...
  http://www.desertmuseum.org/programs/alamos_succs.php?print=y
*  Monitoreo de la población de la guacamaya verde en la Reserva de la Biosfera Tehuacán-Cuicatlán
Bombacaceae, Malvaceae, Rutaceae, Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Malpighiaceae, Capparaceae, Cactaceae, Sapotaceae, Boraginaceae, ...
  https://www.gbif.org/dataset/db6e18ea-16cb-4047-a261-1488c8ea3317
*  Composición florística del Parque Nacional Huatulco
Bombacaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Orchidaceae, Meliaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Rutaceae, Plumbaginaceae, Solanaceae, Sapindaceae, ...
  https://www.gbif.org/dataset/7fc43fee-f762-11e1-a439-00145eb45e9a
*  Flora del municipio de Culiacán, Sinaloa
Bombacaceae, Polygonaceae, Malvaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Commelinaceae, Convolvulaceae, Cyperaceae, Nyctaginaceae, Scrophulariaceae ...
  https://www.gbif.org/dataset/1a523735-7023-4457-8075-55ed885a5163
*  Field Research<...
Bombacaceae. Cavanillesia platanifolia. Macondo. G. SC. Ceiba pentandra. Ceiba bonga. G. SC. ...
  http://www.proyectotiti.com/en-us/Cotton-Top-Tamarins/Field-Research
*  I Brake for Dung Beetles! | Beetles In The Bush
Chafers were not the only scarabs I encountered in abundance at Borakalalo [National Park], and I'll give you one guess as to what other scarab group I encountered in abundance at this mammal game reserve. That's right, dung beetles. Never before have I seen such an abundance and diversity of dung beetles in one spot, but then again, never before have I seen such an abundance of dung! The ground was littered with the stuff - antelope such as gemsbok and impala, warthogs, giraffes, and a host of other mammals thrive in the protected confines of the park, and the seasonally dry climate allows their dung to dry quickly and accumulate rather than breaking down and disappearing. It did, however, take a few days before I became aware of the area's dung beetle diversity. Prior to our arrival in the park, the weather had been dry for some time, and so it remained for the first few days we were there. I collected a smattering of different dung beetles during that time, but it seemed like they should be ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2009/04/27/i-brake-for-dung-beetles/
*  04 | April | 2010 | Beetles In The Bush
Ted C. MacRae is an agricultural research entomologist with "an inordinate fondness for beetles." Primary expertise includes taxonomy and host associations of wood-boring beetles, with more recent interest also in tiger beetle survey and conservation. I am currently serving as Managing Editor of the The Pan-Pacific Entomologist, Layout Editor for the journal Cicindela and Newsletter Editor for the Webster Groves Nature Study Society. Read my interview at Nature Blog Network, and visit me at these other sites:. Bikes Bugs and Bones ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2010/04/04/
*  Gnom, Gnom, Gnom…
I've become a big fan of night-time tiger beetle photography since my early August trip to Florida. Not only does it open up the world of nocturnal species that might go undetected during the day, it also affords the opportunity to see diurnal species engaged in behaviors that are more difficult to photograph during the day. This female Gulf Beach Tiger Beetle (Ellipsoptera hamata lacerata) came to my blacklight at a coastal salt marsh near Steinhatchee and promptly began munching on a smaller beetle that had also come to the light. I didn't get a good enough look at the prey early on to identify it, and by the time I was able to zoom in big with the camera lens the prey had already been macerated to a crunchy pulp. It was interesting to watch the tiger beetle grasp and chew the prey with its mandibles while manipulating its position with its maxillary parts ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2011/08/25/gnom-gnom-gnom/
*  Formicidae
Ants. More than 12,000 species worldwide. Ants form colonies with castes of 'workers', 'soldiers', 'drones', and 'queens'; exhibit division of labor, chemical communication.
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/category/arthropoda/insecta/hymenoptera/formicidae/
*  Cleaning Tiger Beetles | Beetles In The Bush
This is Cicindela scutellaris (festive tiger beetle), one of the six species of tiger beetles that we found last September at Monroe Canyon in the Pine Ridge area of northwestern Nebraska. The red elytra and green head and pronotum are characteristic of nominotypical populations of this species that are found in sandy habitats throughout the Great Plains. This is your classic tiger beetle in a classic tiger beetle pose; however, photographs such as this are not so easy to come by. The biggest challenge is the beetle itself - rarely are they so accommodating to allow this nice lateral profile perspective with the head slightly cocked towards the camera while standing up on their front legs. This posture is seen only when the beetles are warm and active, and warm beetles are skittish beetles that yield lots of not-as-interesting back shots (head directed away from the camera) as they persistently run away from the photographer. Cooler temperatures make them less skittish and easier to approach ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2010/12/14/cleaning-tiger-beetles/
*  Proof that I am out standing in my field | Beetles In The Bush
Okay, I'll fess up. The crop is soybean, and I'm rating damage by defoliating lepidopterans. You'll note the frame structure with a screen covering? The crop is enclosed inside a giant "screenhouse" into which we have liberated adult moths, allowing them to oviposit naturally on the crop and simulate a heavy field infestation.. A great job (better than most others I can think of). Still, I think beetle taxonomy is much more interesting!. ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/proof-that-i-am-out-standing-in-my-field/
*  Now you see me…
In a previous post, I lamented the fact that I had never actually seen a live antlion larva, or doodlebug (family Myrmeleontidae). Lovers of sand, I've seen their famous pitfall traps many times, especially in recent years as I've searched sand habitats for my beloved tiger beetles. Occasionally, I've stopped to jab my knife under a pit, give it a quick flip, and search the freshly turned sand for the maker of the pit - never seeing anything. It never bothered me much either - there were always beetles to catch! Two weeks ago I returned to the sand prairies of southeastern Missouri to look for additional sites for Cicindela scutellaris (festive tiger beetle), and as we searched one particular site on the Sikeston Sand Ridge I once again saw the characteristic funnel-shaped pits amongst sparse vegetation in the sandy soil. I decided this time I needed to give it a good effort - how can any self-respecting entomologist accept not having ever seen a live doodlebug? As I'd done many times before, I ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2009/05/11/now-you-see-me/
*  ID Challenge #15
I'll get the unnecessary part out of the way and say that it belongs in Coleoptera and family Carabidae (subfamily Cicindelinae). Or if you're being true to your "roots" Coleoptera, family Cicindelidae.. The pattern on your specimen can be found in several species within the genus Cicindela, so quick identification from a picture taken from in front and to the side can be tricky. Sadly the condition of the apical lunule is not well illustrated so I have to go on what I can see. On the last challenge I over-thought the identification, and allowed myself to swayed by the season and your use of the term "crop". This time I think I'll go with first impressions and say that this is Cicindela formosa formosa, the Big Sand Tiger Beetle. The species is found west of the Missouri River on sandy substrates. This would be the species found locally for you. The one thing that troubles me is that the head and thorax are not the same color as the elytra. That might be a result of the angle or I could be ...
  https://beetlesinthebush.wordpress.com/2012/01/11/id-challenge-15/
*  Ceiba chodatii - Wikipedia
Bombacaceae)". ISSN 0211-1322. Retrieved 2013-06-22. Chocarro, Maria Peña. "Ceiba chodatii (palo borracho, palo botella, samu'u ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceiba_chodatii
*  White-fronted capuchin - Wikipedia
Bombacaceae (4, 5.5%); Palmae (4, 5.5%). Defler collected 40 species of plants from 23 families eaten by this primate in ... Bombacaceae (1); Celastraceae (1); Connaraceae (1); Euphorbiaceae (1); Lecythidaceae (1); Maranthaceae (1); Melastomataceae (1 ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-fronted_capuchin
*  Cullenia exarillata - Wikipedia
"Cullenia exarillata - BOMBACACEAE". www.biotik.org. Retrieved 2016-11-16. Brandis, Dietrich (1906). Indian trees: an account of ... Robyns, André (1970). "Revision of the genus Cullenia Wight (Bombacaceae - Durioneae)". Bulletin du Jardin botanique national ... Ganesh, T.; Davidar, Priya (1997). "Flowering Phenology and Flower Predation of Cullenia exarillata (Bombacaceae) by Arboreal ... Nyffeler, R.; Baum, D.A. (2000). "Phylogenetic relationships of the durians (Bombacaceae-Durioneae or /Malvaceae/Helicteroideae ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cullenia_exarillata
*  Reveal system - Wikipedia
Bombacaceae family 11. Malvaceae order 3. Thymelaeales family 1. Gonystylaceae family 2. Thymelaeaceae superorder 11. ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reveal_system
*  List of culinary fruits - Wikipedia
Bombacaceae) Karkalla (Carpobrotus rossii; Aizoaceae) Karonda (Carissa carandas; Apocynaceae) Kei apple (Dovyalis caffra; ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_culinary_fruits