Inhibition of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization by endothelial prostanoids in guinea-pig coronary artery. (1/744)

1. In smooth muscle of the circumflex coronary artery of guinea-pig, acetylcholine (ACh, 10(-6) M) produced an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization consisting of two components. An initial component that occurs in the presence of ACh and a slow component that developed after ACh had been withdrawn. Each component of the hyperpolarization was accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance. 2. Indomethacin (5 x 10(-6) M) or diclofenac (10(-6) M), both inhibitors of cyclooxygenase, abolished only the slow hyperpolarization. The initial hyperpolarization was not inhibited by diclofenac nor by nitroarginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. 3. Both components of the ACh-induced hyperpolarization were abolished in the presence of atropine (10(-6) M) or high-K solution ([K+]0 = 29.4 mM). 4. The interval between ACh-stimulation required to generate an initial hyperpolarization of reproducible amplitude was 20 min or greater, but it was reduced to less than 5 min after inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Conditioning stimulation of the artery with substance P (10(-7) M) also caused a long duration (about 20 min) inhibition of the ACh-response. 5. The amplitude of the hyperpolarization generated by Y-26763, a K+-channel opener, was reproducible within 10 min after withdrawal of ACh. 6. Exogenously applied prostacyclin (PGI2) hyperpolarized the membrane and reduced membrane resistance in concentrations over 2.8 x 10(-9)M. 7. At concentrations below threshold for hyperpolarization and when no alteration of membrane resistance occurred, PGI2 inhibited the initial component of the ACh-induced hyperpolarization. 8. It is concluded that endothelial prostanoids, possibly PGI2, have an inhibitory action on the release of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor.  (+info)

Pseudogout attack associated with chronic thyroiditis and Sjogren's syndrome. (2/744)

A 66-year-old woman, diagnosed with chronic thyroiditis at age 63, presented with anorexia and fatigue. Therapy for the chronic thyroiditis consisted of levothyroxine sodium (100 microg/day). Her symptoms were attributed to the insufficient supply of levothyroxine sodium. Following a dosage increase to 150 microg/day, she suffered from an acute attack of pseudogout. Clinical features were complicated by Sjogren's syndrome, which appeared after treatment onset. Pseudogout was effectively treated by colchicine after administration of diclofenac sodium failed to alleviate the symptoms. Pseudogout is a recognized complication of thyroid replacement therapy, but association with Sjogren's syndrome has not been previously reported.  (+info)

Studies on cytochrome P-450-mediated bioactivation of diclofenac in rats and in human hepatocytes: identification of glutathione conjugated metabolites. (3/744)

The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac causes a rare but potentially fatal hepatotoxicity that may be associated with the formation of reactive metabolites. In this study, three glutathione (GSH) adducts, namely 5-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac (M1), 4'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac (M2), and 5-hydroxy-6-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac (M3), were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of bile from Sprague-Dawley rats injected i.p. with a single dose of diclofenac (200 mg/kg). These adducts presumably were formed via hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-catalyzed oxidation of diclofenac to reactive benzoquinone imines that were trapped by GSH conjugation. In support of this hypothesis, M1, M2, and M3 were generated from diclofenac in incubations with rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH and GSH. Increases in adduct formation were observed when incubations were performed with liver microsomes from phenobarbital- or dexamethasone-treated rats. Adduct formation was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies against CYP2B, CYP2C, and CYP3A (40-50% inhibition at 5 mg of IgG/nmol of CYP) but not by an antibody against CYP1A. Maximal inhibition was obtained when the three inhibitory antibodies were used in a cocktail fashion (70-80% inhibition at 2.5 mg of each IgG/nmol of CYP). These data suggest that diclofenac undergoes biotransformation to reactive metabolites in rats and that CYP isoforms of the 2B, 2C, and 3A subfamilies are involved in this bioactivation process. With respect to CYP2C isoforms, rat hepatic CYP2C7 and CYP2C11 were implicated as mediators of the bioactivation based on immunoinhibition studies using antibodies specific to CYP2C7 and CYP2C11. Screening for GSH adducts also was carried out in human hepatocyte cultures containing diclofenac, and M1, M2, and M3 again were detected. It is possible, therefore, that reactive benzoquinone imines may be formed in vivo in humans and contribute to diclofenac-mediated hepatic injury.  (+info)

Induction of an acetaminophen-sensitive cyclooxygenase with reduced sensitivity to nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs. (4/744)

The transformed monocyte/macrophage cell line J774.2 undergoes apoptosis when treated for 48 h with competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoenzymes 1 and 2. Many of these nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but in particular diclofenac, induce during this time period a COX activity that coincides with a robust induction of COX-2 protein. Induction of this activity requires high, apoptosis-inducing concentrations of diclofenac (>100 microM). Prolonged treatment of J774.2 cells with lower doses of diclofenac inhibits COX activity, indicating that diclofenac is a time-dependent, pseudoirreversible inhibitor of COX-2. It is difficult to wash out the inhibition. However, the activity evoked by high concentrations of diclofenac has a profoundly distinct COX active site that allows diclofenac, its inducer, to be washed readily from its active site. The diclofenac-induced activity also has the unusual property of being more sensitive to inhibition by acetaminophen (IC50 = 0.1-1.0 mM) than COX-2 induced with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, relative to COX-1 or COX-2, diclofenac-induced enzyme activity shows significantly reduced sensitivity to inhibition by diclofenac or other competitively acting nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the enzyme activity is insensitive to aspirin. If the robust induction of COX-2 observed is responsible for diclofenac-induced COX enzyme activity, it is clear that COX-2 can, therefore, exist in two catalytically active states. A luciferase reporter-construct that contains part of the COX-2 structure and binds into the membrane showed that chronic diclofenac treatment of fibroblasts results in marked mobilization of the fusion protein. Such a mobilization could result in enzymatically distinct COX-2 populations in response to chronic diclofenac treatment.  (+info)

Postoperative analgesia and vomiting, with special reference to day-case surgery: a systematic review. (5/744)

BACKGROUND: Day-case surgery is of great value to patients and the health service. It enables many more patients to be treated properly, and faster than before. Newer, less invasive, operative techniques will allow many more procedures to be carried out. There are many elements to successful day-case surgery. Two key components are the effectiveness of the control of pain after the operation, and the effectiveness of measures to minimise postoperative nausea and vomiting. OBJECTIVES: To enable those caring for patients undergoing day-case surgery to make the best choices for their patients and the health service, this review sought the highest quality evidence on: (1) the effectiveness of the control of pain after an operation; (2) the effectiveness of measures to minimise postoperative nausea and vomiting. METHODS: Full details of the search strategy are presented in the report. RESULTS - ANALGESIA: The systematic reviews of the literature explored whether different interventions work and, if they do work, how well they work. A number of conclusions can be drawn. RESULTS-ANALGESIA, INEFFECTIVE INTERVENTIONS: There is good evidence that some interventions are ineffective. They include: (1) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in acute postoperative pain; (2) the use of local injections of opioids at sites other than the knee joint; (3) the use of dihydrocodeine, 30 mg, in acute postoperative pain (it is no better than placebo). RESULTS-ANALGESIA, INTERVENTIONS OF DOUBTFUL VALUE: Some interventions may be effective but the size of the effect or the complication of undertaking them confers no measurable benefit over conventional methods. Such interventions include: (1) injecting morphine into the knee joint after surgery: there is a small analgesic benefit which may last for up to 24 hours but there is no clear evidence that the size of the benefit is of any clinical value; (2) manoeuvres to try and anticipate pain by using pre-emptive analgesia; these are no more effective than standard methods; (3) administering non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by injection or per rectum in patients who can swallow; this appears to be no more effective than giving NSAIDs by mouth and, indeed, may do more harm than good; (4) administering codeine in single doses; this has poor analgesic efficacy. RESULTS-ANALGESIA, INTERVENTIONS OF PROVEN VALUE: These include a number of oral analgesics including (at standard doses): (1) dextropropoxyphene; (2) tramadol; (3) paracetamol; (4) ibuprofen; (5) diclofenac. Diclofenac and ibuprofen at standard doses give analgesia equivalent to that obtained with 10 mg of intramuscular morphine. Each will provide at least 50% pain relief from a single oral dose in patients with moderate or severe postoperative pain. Paracetamol and codeine combinations also appear to be highly effective, although there is little information on the standard doses used in the UK. The relative effectiveness of these analgesics is compared in an effectiveness 'ladder' which can inform prescribers making choices for individual patients, or planning day-case surgery. Dose-response relationships show that higher doses of ibuprofen may be particularly effective. Topical NSAIDs (applied to the skin) are effective in minor injuries and chronic pain but there is no obvious role for them in day-case surgery. RESULTS-POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING: The proportion of patients who may feel nauseated or vomit after surgery is very variable, despite similar operations and anaesthetic techniques. Systematic review can still lead to clear estimations of effectiveness of interventions. Whichever anti-emetic is used, the choice is often between prophylactic use (trying to prevent anyone vomiting) and treating those people who do feel nauseated or who may vomit. Systematic reviews of a number of different anti-emetics show clearly that none of the anti-emetics is sufficiently effective to be used for prophylaxis. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATE  (+info)

Prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastropathy: clinical and economic implications of a single-tablet formulation of diclofenac/misoprostol. (6/744)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to manage arthritis. While controlling symptoms and improving quality of life, NSAID use is associated with gastroduodenal injury and a 2%-4% annual risk for symptomatic gastroduodenal ulceration, hemorrhage, and perforation. This requires clinicians to balance the efficacy of NSAIDs against the potential risk of serious gastrointestinal events. Identification and stratification of risk can help guide the optimal approach for arthritis management of individual patients or large populations such as managed care organizations. NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy carries considerable economic consequences; 46% of arthritis costs are related to managing serious adverse events. It is reasonable to assume that these costs may not be incurred if high-risk patients are recognized and optimally managed. Newer therapies with proven safety margins present an attractive option, especially for patients at higher risk. The single-tablet formulations of diclofenac and misoprostol (Arthrotec) offer an alternative in managing NSAID patients because of their inherent safety profile. Studies with diclofenac/misoprostol indicate its effectiveness in treating signs and symptoms of arthritis and in reducing the incidence of NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy. As such, this agent may provide improved medical and economic outcomes. This review discusses the clinical aspects of NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy, including available preventive therapies. Approaches to assessing patients' risk for developing complications, and the relationship of medical risk and economic outcomes, are also examined. Although not all patients require preventive therapy, patients with heightened risk may benefit clinically and economically from gastroprotective NSAIDs. Additional research or modeling may provide further insight into the economic implications of managing and preventing NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy.  (+info)

Hydrolytic activity is essential for aceclofenac to inhibit cyclooxygenase in rheumatoid synovial cells. (7/744)

To investigate the mechanisms of action underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug aceclofenac in humans, we studied the metabolism of aceclofenac in detail in primary cultured synovial cells of 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Aceclofenac and 4'-hydroxyaceclofenac are the major compounds in human blood after the administration of aceclofenac, but they had no inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity or COX expression in the rheumatoid synovial cells. In contrast, aceclofenac and 4'-hydroxyaceclofenac reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by the rheumatoid synovial cells. We also observed that aceclofenac and 4'-hydroxyaceclofenac were hydrolyzed into the COX inhibitors diclofenac and 4'-hydroxydiclofenac, respectively, by the rheumatoid synovial cells. However, the hydrolytic activity differed markedly among the cell preparations. Because the suppressive potency of aceclofenac and 4'-hydroxyaceclofenac against the PGE2 production was proportionally correlated with the hydrolytic activity in rheumatoid synovial cell preparations, we suggest that the suppressive effects of aceclofenac and 4'-hydroxy aceclofenac on PGE2 production are facilitated by the hydrolytic activity in rheumatoid synovial cells.  (+info)

Effectiveness of preoperative analgesics on postoperative dental pain: a study. (8/744)

Patients undergoing extractions of third molar teeth under general anesthesia were given a placebo, diclofenac (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) 100 mg, or methadone (an opiate) 10 mg 60 to 90 min prior to surgery, and their pain scores and postoperative medication requirements were measured for 3 days. All patients received local anesthetic blocks and analgesic drugs during the perioperative period. There were no significant differences between the three groups in the pain scores and medication requirements during the period of study. It was concluded that preoperative use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates may not offer a preemptive analgesic effect in patients who have had adequate analgesia during the surgery. Continued use of analgesic drugs during the postoperative period is perhaps more useful for this purpose. There appears to be a higher incidence of vomiting following opiates (methadone), precluding its clinical use in day-care patients.  (+info)