Radioisotopes: Isotopes that exhibit radioactivity and undergo radioactive decay. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Zinc Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of zinc that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Zn atoms with atomic weights 60-63, 65, 69, 71, and 72 are radioactive zinc isotopes.Radioisotope Dilution Technique: Method for assessing flow through a system by injection of a known quantity of radionuclide into the system and monitoring its concentration over time at a specific point in the system. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Strontium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of strontium that decay or disintegrate spontaneously emitting radiation. Sr 80-83, 85, and 89-95 are radioactive strontium isotopes.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Krypton Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of krypton that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Kr atoms with atomic weights 74-77, 79, 81, 85, and 87-94 are radioactive krypton isotopes.Indium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of indium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. In atoms with atomic weights 106-112, 113m, 114, and 116-124 are radioactive indium isotopes.Sodium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of sodium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Na atoms with atomic weights 20-22 and 24-26 are radioactive sodium isotopes.Radioactivity: The spontaneous transformation of a nuclide into one or more different nuclides, accompanied by either the emission of particles from the nucleus, nuclear capture or ejection of orbital electrons, or fission. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Barium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of barium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ba atoms with atomic weights 126-129, 131, 133, and 139-143 are radioactive barium isotopes.Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Yttrium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of yttrium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Y atoms with atomic weights 82-88 and 90-96 are radioactive yttrium isotopes.Tin Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of tin that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Sn atoms with atomic weights 108-111, 113, 120-121, 123 and 125-128 are tin radioisotopes.Carbon Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.Iron Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iron that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Fe atoms with atomic weights 52, 53, 55, and 59-61 are radioactive iron isotopes.Copper Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of copper that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cu atoms with atomic weights 58-62, 64, and 66-68 are radioactive copper isotopes.Phosphorus Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of phosphorus that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. P atoms with atomic weights 28-34 except 31 are radioactive phosphorus isotopes.Beta Particles: High energy POSITRONS or ELECTRONS ejected from a disintegrating atomic nucleus.Technetium: The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.Mercury Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of mercury that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Hg atoms with atomic weights 185-195, 197, 203, 205, and 206 are radioactive mercury isotopes.Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.Cesium Isotopes: Stable cesium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cesium, but differ in atomic weight. Cs-133 is a naturally occurring isotope.Cerium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cerium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ce atoms with atomic weights 132-135, 137, 139, and 141-148 are radioactive cerium isotopes.Cobalt Isotopes: Stable cobalt atoms that have the same atomic number as the element cobalt, but differ in atomic weight. Co-59 is a stable cobalt isotope.Hafnium: Hafnium. A metal element of atomic number 72 and atomic weight 178.49, symbol Hf. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Gold Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gold that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Au 185-196, 198-201, and 203 are radioactive gold isotopes.Isotope Labeling: Techniques for labeling a substance with a stable or radioactive isotope. It is not used for articles involving labeled substances unless the methods of labeling are substantively discussed. Tracers that may be labeled include chemical substances, cells, or microorganisms.Lead Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of lead that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Pb atoms with atomic weights 194-203, 205, and 209-214 are radioactive lead isotopes.Diagnostic Techniques, Radioisotope: Any diagnostic evaluation using radioactive (unstable) isotopes. This diagnosis includes many nuclear medicine procedures as well as radioimmunoassay tests.Zinc Isotopes: Stable zinc atoms that have the same atomic number as the element zinc, but differ in atomic weight. Zn-66-68, and 70 are stable zinc isotopes.Sulfur Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of sulfur that decay or disintegrate spontaneously emitting radiation. S 29-31, 35, 37, and 38 are radioactive sulfur isotopes.Cadmium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cadmium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cd atoms with atomic weights 103-105, 107, 109, 115, and 117-119 are radioactive cadmium isotopes.Astatine: Astatine. A radioactive halogen with the atomic symbol At, atomic number 85, and atomic weight 210. Its isotopes range in mass number from 200 to 219 and all have an extremely short half-life. Astatine may be of use in the treatment of hyperthyroidism.Radioimmunotherapy: Radiotherapy where cytotoxic radionuclides are linked to antibodies in order to deliver toxins directly to tumor targets. Therapy with targeted radiation rather than antibody-targeted toxins (IMMUNOTOXINS) has the advantage that adjacent tumor cells, which lack the appropriate antigenic determinants, can be destroyed by radiation cross-fire. Radioimmunotherapy is sometimes called targeted radiotherapy, but this latter term can also refer to radionuclides linked to non-immune molecules (see RADIOTHERAPY).Lutetium: Lutetium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Lu, atomic number 71, and atomic weight 175.Rhenium: Rhenium. A metal, atomic number 75, atomic weight 186.2, symbol Re. (Dorland, 28th ed)Samarium: Samarium. An element of the rare earth family of metals. It has the atomic symbol Sm, atomic number 62, and atomic weight 150.36. The oxide is used in the control rods of some nuclear reactors.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Soil Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in soil, which exhibit radioactivity.Bromine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of bromine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Br atoms with atomic weights 74-78, 80, and 82-90 are radioactive bromine isotopes.Scintillation Counting: Detection and counting of scintillations produced in a fluorescent material by ionizing radiation.Subdural Effusion: Leakage and accumulation of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID in the subdural space which may be associated with an infectious process; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; INTRACRANIAL HYPOTENSION; and other conditions.Calcium Isotopes: Stable calcium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element calcium, but differ in atomic weight. Ca-42-44, 46, and 48 are stable calcium isotopes.Radioactive Waste: Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Serum Albumin, Radio-Iodinated: Normal human serum albumin mildly iodinated with radioactive iodine (131-I) which has a half-life of 8 days, and emits beta and gamma rays. It is used as a diagnostic aid in blood volume determination. (from Merck Index, 11th ed)Ruthenium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of ruthenium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ru atoms with atomic weights 93-95, 97, 103, and 105-108 are radioactive ruthenium isotopes.Radiometric Dating: Techniques used to determine the age of materials, based on the content and half-lives of the RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES they contain.Selenium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of selenium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Se atoms with atomic weights 70-73, 75, 79, 81, and 83-85 are radioactive selenium isotopes.Alpha Particles: Positively charged particles composed of two protons and two NEUTRONS, i.e. equivalent to HELIUM nuclei, which are emitted during disintegration of heavy ISOTOPES. Alpha rays have very strong ionizing power, but weak penetrability.Heterocyclic Compounds, 1-Ring: A class of organic compounds containing a ring structure made up of more than one kind of atom, usually carbon plus another atom. The ring structure can be aromatic or nonaromatic.Sodium Pertechnetate Tc 99m: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular and cerebral circulation, brain, thyroid, and joints.Tungsten: Tungsten. A metallic element with the atomic symbol W, atomic number 74, and atomic weight 183.85. It is used in many manufacturing applications, including increasing the hardness, toughness, and tensile strength of steel; manufacture of filaments for incandescent light bulbs; and in contact points for automotive and electrical apparatus.Isotopes: Atomic species differing in mass number but having the same atomic number. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Radioisotope Teletherapy: A type of high-energy radiotherapy using a beam of gamma-radiation produced by a radioisotope source encapsulated within a teletherapy unit.Pentetic Acid: An iron chelating agent with properties like EDETIC ACID. DTPA has also been used as a chelator for other metals, such as plutonium.Spectrometry, Gamma: Determination of the energy distribution of gamma rays emitted by nuclei. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Technetium Tc 99m Pentetate: A technetium imaging agent used in renal scintigraphy, computed tomography, lung ventilation imaging, gastrointestinal scintigraphy, and many other procedures which employ radionuclide imaging agents.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Radiometry: The measurement of radiation by photography, as in x-ray film and film badge, by Geiger-Mueller tube, and by SCINTILLATION COUNTING.Rosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.TritiumNostoc commune: A form species of spore-producing CYANOBACTERIA, in the family Nostocaceae, order Nostocales. It is an important source of fixed NITROGEN in nutrient-depleted soils. When wet, it appears as a jelly-like mass.Whole-Body Counting: Measurement of radioactivity in the entire human body.Potassium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of potassium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. K atoms with atomic weights 37, 38, 40, and 42-45 are radioactive potassium isotopes.Iodohippuric Acid: An iodine-containing compound used in pyelography as a radiopaque medium. If labeled with radioiodine, it can be used for studies of renal function.Carbon Isotopes: Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Vitamin B 12: A cobalt-containing coordination compound produced by intestinal micro-organisms and found also in soil and water. Higher plants do not concentrate vitamin B 12 from the soil and so are a poor source of the substance as compared with animal tissues. INTRINSIC FACTOR is important for the assimilation of vitamin B 12.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Bismuth: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Bi, atomic number 83 and atomic weight 208.98.Avidin: A specific protein in egg albumin that interacts with BIOTIN to render it unavailable to mammals, thereby producing biotin deficiency.Absorption: The physical or physiological processes by which substances, tissue, cells, etc. take up or take in other substances or energy.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights of 123, 125-132, and 134-145 are radioactive cesium isotopes.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Iridium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iridium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ir atoms with atomic weights 182-190, 192, and 194-198 are radioactive iridium isotopes.Autoradiography: The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)Phosphorus Isotopes: Stable phosphorus atoms that have the same atomic number as the element phosphorus, but differ in atomic weight. P-31 is a stable phosphorus isotope.Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Octreotide: A potent, long-acting synthetic SOMATOSTATIN octapeptide analog that inhibits secretion of GROWTH HORMONE and is used to treat hormone-secreting tumors; DIABETES MELLITUS; HYPOTENSION, ORTHOSTATIC; HYPERINSULINISM; hypergastrinemia; and small bowel fistula.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Cobalt Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cobalt that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Co atoms with atomic weights of 54-64, except 59, are radioactive cobalt isotopes.Tomography, Emission-Computed: Tomography using radioactive emissions from injected RADIONUCLIDES and computer ALGORITHMS to reconstruct an image.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Receptors, Somatostatin: Cell surface proteins that bind somatostatin and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Somatostatin is a hypothalamic hormone, a pancreatic hormone, and a central and peripheral neurotransmitter. Activated somatostatin receptors on pituitary cells inhibit the release of growth hormone; those on endocrine and gastrointestinal cells regulate the absorption and utilization of nutrients; and those on neurons mediate somatostatin's role as a neurotransmitter.Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Radiotherapy Dosage: The total amount of radiation absorbed by tissues as a result of radiotherapy.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Mice, Nude: Mutant mice homozygous for the recessive gene "nude" which fail to develop a thymus. They are useful in tumor studies and studies on immune responses.Metabolic Clearance Rate: Volume of biological fluid completely cleared of drug metabolites as measured in unit time. Elimination occurs as a result of metabolic processes in the kidney, liver, saliva, sweat, intestine, heart, brain, or other site.Biological Assay: A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon: A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Nitrogen Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of nitrogen that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. N atoms with atomic weights 12, 13, 16, 17, and 18 are radioactive nitrogen isotopes.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Chromium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of chromium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cr atoms with atomic weights of 46-49, 51, 55, and 56 are radioactive chromium isotopes.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Calcium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of calcium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ca atoms with atomic weights 39, 41, 45, 47, 49, and 50 are radioactive calcium isotopes.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Radioisotope Renography: Graphic tracing over a time period of radioactivity measured externally over the kidneys following intravenous injection of a radionuclide which is taken up and excreted by the kidneys.Rubidium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of rubidium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Rb atoms with atomic weights 79-84, and 86-95 are radioactive rubidium isotopes.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Xenon Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of xenon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Xe atoms with atomic weights 121-123, 125, 127, 133, 135, 137-145 are radioactive xenon isotopes.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Gallium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ga atoms with atomic weights 63-68, 70 and 72-76 are radioactive gallium isotopes.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Oxygen Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of oxygen that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. O atoms with atomic weights 13, 14, 15, 19, and 20 are radioactive oxygen isotopes.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Fluorine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. F atoms with atomic weights 17, 18, and 20-22 are radioactive fluorine isotopes.

*  radioisotope scan - oi
A method of examining the brain by passing a Geiger counter over the cranium after the intravenous injection of a radioisotope ...
  http://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100401128
*  Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes | The Scientist Magazine®
New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that threaten medical research and ... Desperately Seeking Radioisotopes. New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that ... When the reactor shut down for repairs in May 2009, it contributed to a global shortage of radioisotopes.. The unsteady supply ... Unfortunately, the supply of Mo-99 and other radioisotopes has been unreliable at best. All of the Mo-99 used in the United ...
  https://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/30760/title/Desperately-Seeking-Radioisotopes/flagPost/66495/
*  Radioisotopes Archives - Clarksville, TN Online
Topic: Radioisotopes. U.S. Department of Energy produces fuel to power NASA's Deep Space Missions. December 29, 2015 , ...
  http://www.clarksvilleonline.com/tag/radioisotopes/
*  European Nuclear Medicine / Radiopharmaceuticals Market [SPECT/PET Radioisotopes (Technetium,
The European radioisotopes market was valued at $1.1 billion in 2012 and is poised to reach $1.6 billion in 2017 at a CAGR of ... European Nuclear Medicine / Radiopharmaceuticals Market [SPECT/PET Radioisotopes (Technetium, F-18)], [Beta/Alpha Radiation ... European Nuclear Medicine / Radiopharmaceuticals Market [SPECT/PET Radioisotopes (Technetium, F-18)], [Beta/Alpha Radiation ... The radioisotope and stable isotope markets have been segmented according to the type of isotope, and applications. Both of ...
  https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/european-nuclear-medicine--radiopharmaceuticals-market-spectpet-radioisotopes-technetium-f-18-betaalpha-radiation-therapy-i131-y-90-applications-canceroncology-cardiac--stable-isotopes-deuterium-c-13---gl-202345131.html
*  Non-radio-isotope-detection????
... Mandy Caird PhD mandy at DRUID.HSC.COLORADO.EDU Fri Jul 8 16:13:02 EST 1994 *Previous message ...
  http://www.bio.net/bionet/mm/ageing/1994-July/000815.html
*  Radioisotope dictionary definition | radioisotope defined
radioisotope definition: a naturally occurring or artificially created radioactive isotope of a chemical element: used in ... radioisotope. ra·di·o·i·so·tope. a naturally occurring or artificially created radioactive isotope of a chemical element: used ... How would you define radioisotope? Add your definition here.. Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. ...
  http://www.yourdictionary.com/radioisotope
*  Radioisotopes | definition of Radioisotopes by Medical dictionary
Radioisotopes explanation free. What is Radioisotopes? Meaning of Radioisotopes medical term. What does Radioisotopes mean? ... Looking for online definition of Radioisotopes in the Medical Dictionary? ... radioisotope. (redirected from Radioisotopes). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia. radioisotope. [ra″de-o-i´so- ... radioisotope. see ISOTOPE.. Radioisotope. A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear ...
  https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Radioisotopes
*  Radioisotope - Medical Dictionary / Glossary | Medindia
Radioisotope' - An unstable element that releases radiation as it breaks down. Radioisotopes can be used in imaging tests or as ... Medical Word - Radioisotope. Ans : An unstable element that releases radiation as it breaks down. Radioisotopes can be used in ... Radioisotope - Glossary. Written & Compiled by Medindia Content Team. Medically Reviewed by The Medindia Medical Review Team on ...
  https://www.medindia.net/glossary/radioisotope.htm
*  Uses of Radioisotopes
Jan 2006-50 The decay of which radioisotope can be used to estimate the age of the fossilized remains of an insect?. (1) Rn-222 ... Jan 2010-49 Which radioisotope is used to treat thyroid disorders?. (1) Co-60 (3) C-14. (2) I-131 (4) U-238 ... Vitamin B 12 can be tagged with a radioisotope of cobalt to study the absorption of the vitamin from the gastrointestinal tract ... June 2007-50 Which radioisotope is used in medicine to treat thyroid disorders?. (1) cobalt-60 (3) phosphorus-32. (2) iodine- ...
  http://kentchemistry.com/links/Nuclear/radioisotopes.htm
*  Fluorine Radioisotopes Summary Report | CureHunter
Fluorine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. F atoms with atomic ... Fluorine Radioisotopes. Subscribe to New Research on Fluorine Radioisotopes Unstable isotopes of fluorine that decay or ... Radioisotopes: 1836*Fluorine Radioisotopes*(R)-3-bromo-N-(4-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propanamide( ...
  http://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD005462-Fluorine-Radioisotopes.do
*  Cesium Radioisotopes Summary Report | CureHunter
Cesium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Cs atoms with atomic weights ... Cesium Radioisotopes. Subscribe to New Research on Cesium Radioisotopes Unstable isotopes of cesium that decay or disintegrate ... 01/01/2004 - "It was shown that the chromosome instability and sensitivity to cesium radioisotopes increased and the ...
  http://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD002588-Cesium-Radioisotopes.do
*  Radioisotopes applications in industry: an overview on Environmental XPRT
Article Radioisotopes applications in industry: an overview. Radioactive isotopes, particularly in the form of radiotracers and ... No comments were found for Radioisotopes applications in industry: an overview. Be the first to comment! ... Radioisotope-based measurement techniques are best suited for multiphase flow systems encountered in industrial processes, ... Can chemical treatments to displace radioisotopes influence soil fertility? A laboratory trial. Dec. 10, 2014. Soils ...
  https://www.environmental-expert.com/articles/radioisotopes-applications-in-industry-an-overview-80162
*  Radioisotopes and Their Biomedical Applications | OMICS International
Radionuclides also termed as radioisotopes are elements that possess radioactivity. It means upon decay they emit radiations ... Radioisotopes are widely used for a number of purposes following are some major applications of radioisotope. ... This decaying property of radioisotopes is called half-life. Thus radioisotopes could be used for numerous biomedical purposes ... Radioisotopes and Their Biomedical Applications Nida Tabassum Khan*. Department of Biotechnology, Balochistan University of ...
  https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/radioisotopes-and-their-biomedical-applications-2167-7956-1000156.php?aid=92789
*  Radioisotopes generators | Physics Forums - The Fusion of Science and Community
I believe you mean - Radioisotope thermoelectric generator. For starters - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_ ...
  https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/radioisotopes-generators.115155/
*  Keeping tabs on radioisotopes - and more | SelectScience
... the sample management and radioisotope inventory system from LabLogic Systems, are still finding new applications for the ... Users of STacy, the sample management and radioisotope inventory system from LabLogic Systems, are still finding new ...
  http://www.selectscience.net/product-news/keeping-tabs-on-radioisotopes---and-more/?artID=15800
*  radioisotopes
Gases, Vapours and aerosol particles were carried into the atmosphere by convection and travelled large distances from the accident.. The amount of radiation released in the days after the accident is shown in the chart below.. ...
  http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/webprojects2001/fraser/rad.htm
*  Radioisotope Laboratory Safety Training Articles on Environmental XPRT
Find radioisotope laboratory safety training articles on Environmental XPRT, the world's largest environmental industry ... radioisotope laboratory safety training Articles. Related terms for "radioisotope laboratory safety training ": safety training ... Managing Low-level Radioisotopes as Part of a Company´s Total Lifecycle of Chemicals and Radioactive Materials Chiron ... articles , laboratory safety training articles , radioisotope articles , laboratory safety articles , radioisotope laboratory ...
  https://www.environmental-expert.com/articles/keyword-radioisotope-laboratory-safety-training-75170
*  Radioisotopes in Water Resources & the Environment - World Nuclear Association
Radioisotopes in Water Resources & the Environment Non-power uses of nuclear technology for medicine, industry or transport, ... Home / Information Library / Non-power Nuclear Applications / Radioisotopes & Research / Radioisotopes in Water Resources & the ... Radioisotopes in Water Resources and the Environment. (Updated May 2017). *The use of environmental tracers and isotope ... Radioisotopes are used to determine the age of water, whilst stable isotopes can be used to determine the source's history, ...
  http://world-nuclear.org/information-library/non-power-nuclear-applications/radioisotopes-research/radioisotopes-in-water-resources-the-environment.aspx
*  Radioisotope Products and Radiation Technology Section
Radioisotope Handling Facilities and Automation of Radioisotope Production Vienna , December 2004 IAEA-TECDOC -1420 (full text ... Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals Series No. 2. Production of Long Lived Parent Radionuclides for Generators: 68Ge, 82Sr, ... Radioisotope Products and Radiation Technology Section August 2003 IAEA-CN-103, Book of Abstracts, International Conference, ... "Radioisotope applications for troubleshooting and optimizing industrial processes" March 2002. 2001. IAEA-TECDOC-1262. IACS ...
  http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/iachem/publications.html
*  Radioisotope Products and Radiation Technology Section
The Windows-7 compliant version of k0-IAEA is available for downloading from www.rid.tudelft.nl/~blaauw. The software has improved in many respects, from peakfitting to the decay schemes and the K0-values themselves. In the update files, you will find the list of improvements made.. K0-IAEA 5.22 available here. Please read this before you do anything else.. Please note that update 5.20 must be installed on an already installed K0-IAEA. The full installation version (4.04) is available here. Please download the .zip file, extract and read the readme.txt. The update can also be downloaded from Mr Menno Blaauw's website, where you can find some more information.. Click here to download the K0-IAEA tutorial, a Powerpoint presentation with video and sound files prepared by Menno Blaauw under an IAEA research contract. This tutorial is compressed into a zip file (IAEA_K0-tutorial.zip). To view it, please extract all the content of the zip file and then execute the play.bat file.. Here you can find the ...
  http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/iachem/K0-IAEA.html
*  Radioisotope Products and Radiation Technology Section
The programme on Radioisotope Production and Radiation Technology has two sub- programmes: * Subprogramme 2.5.1: Radioisotope ... To improve Member State capabilities in the production and use of radioisotope products for supporting the management of cancer ... In particular, the IAEA helps Member States to achieve self-sufficiency in the production of radioisotopes and ... Setting up Cyclotron and radioisotope/radiopharmaceutical production facilities. * Setting up irradiation facilities and using ...
  http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/iachem/home.html
*  Radioisotope - UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center
Exposure to certain radioisotopes can cause cancer. Use of radioisotopes under controlled conditions can be used to treat ... Radioisotope. By A type of atom that is unstable and prone to break up (decay). Decay releases small fragments of atoms and ... In certain imaging procedures, radioisotopes are injected. They travel through the body and collect in areas where the disease ... In breast cancer, radioisotopes are used to check for metastasis to the bones. ...
  http://cancer.unm.edu/2001/12/05/radioisotope/
*  A challenging future for medical radioisotopes / News / SCK•CEN - SCK•CEN
A challenging future for the medical radioisotope. 2015-05-07. 5th Symposium on Medical Radioisotopes 2015-2020. On 5 May, the ... Every year, BR2 supplies as much as 25% of the worldwide demand for radioisotopes for medical imaging and the treatment of ... But before doctors are able to work with these radioisotopes, a whole series of challenges first need to be overcome in the ... The extremely short half-life of these medical radioisotopes means that speed is of the essence. But safety and transparency in ...
  http://www.sckcen.be/en/News/20150507_symposium_radioisotopes
*  Radioisotopes in Medicine by Earl W. Phelan - Download link
Radioisotopes in Medicine by Earl W. Phelan - free book at E-Books Directory. You can download the book or read it online. It ... Radioisotopes in Medicine by Earl W. Phelan Publisher: United States Atomic Energy Commission 1966. ISBN/ASIN: B00C454PN2. ... Radioisotopes play an important role in medicine. For the diagnostician, small harmless quantities of many isotopes serve as ...
  http://www.e-booksdirectory.com/details.php?ebook=10584

List of radioactive isotopes by half-life: This is a list of radioactive isotopes ordered by half-life from shortest to longest.Project GABRIEL: Project GABRIEL refers to an investigation by the United States Atomic Energy Commission to gauge the impact of radioactive fallout resulting from nuclear warfare. GABRIEL surmised that the radioactive isotope strontium-90 (Sr-90) presented the greatest hazard to life globally.Indium (111In) capromab pendetideDecay productSelective internal radiation therapy: Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a form of radiation therapy used in interventional radiology to treat cancer. It is generally for selected patients with unresectable cancers, those that cannot be treated surgically, especially hepatic cell carcinoma or metastasis to the liver.Carbon-12: Carbon-12 is the more abundant carbon of the two stable isotopes, amounting to 98.93% of the element carbon; its abundance is due to the triple-alpha process by which it is created in stars.Liberate Tate: Liberate Tate is an art collective exploring the role of creative intervention in social change. The group aims to "free art from oil" with a primary focus on the art museum Tate ending its corporate sponsorship with BP.Kaufmann–Bucherer–Neumann experiments: The Kaufmann–Bucherer–Neumann experiments measured the dependence of the inertial mass (or momentum) of an object on its velocity. The historical importance of this series of experiments performed by various physicists between 1901 and 1915 is due to the results being used to test the predictions of special relativity.Technetium(IV) chloridePositronium: This article is about the exotic atom. For the hydrogen isotope, see Protium.Hafnium(IV) silicateTC-1827Isotope-coded affinity tag: An Isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) is an isotopic labeling method used for quantitative proteomics by mass spectrometry that uses chemical labeling reagents. "Rapid quantitative analysis of proteins or protein function in complex mixtures," Rudolf Hans Aebersold et al.Central Park Medical UnitTimeline of the Republic of China's nuclear program: The nuclear program of the Republic of China can be represented as a Timeline of the Republic of China's nuclear program.Thermal ionization: Thermal ionization, also known as surface ionization or contact ionization, is a physical process whereby the atoms are desorbed from a hot surface, and in the process are spontaneously ionized.Isotopes of astatine: Astatine (At) has 37 known isotopes, all of which are radioactive; the range of their mass numbers is from 191 to 229. There also exist 23 metastable excited states.Lutetium(III) oxideRhenium pentachlorideSamarium(III) chlorideAvid Radiopharmaceuticals: Avid Radiopharmaceuticals is an American company, founded by Dr. Daniel Skovronsky, and based at the University City Science Center research campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Scintillation proximity assay: Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is an assay development and biochemical screening that permits the rapid and sensitive measurement of a broad range of biological processes in a homogeneous system. The type of beads that are involved in the SPA are microscopic in size and within the beads itself, there is a scintillant which emits light when it is stimulated.Isotopes of calcium: Calcium (Ca) has 24 isotopes, from 34Ca to 57Ca. There are five stable isotopes (40Ca, 42Ca, 43Ca, 44Ca and 46Ca), plus one isotope (48Ca) with such a long half-life that for all practical purposes it can be considered stable.High-level radioactive waste management: High-level radioactive waste management concerns management and disposal of highly radioactive materials created during production of nuclear power and nuclear weapons. Radioactive waste contains a mixture of short-lived and long-lived nuclides, as well as non-radioactive nuclides.RhodolithAlpha particleAffibody molecule: Affibody molecules are small proteins engineered to bind to a large number of target proteins or peptides with high affinity, imitating monoclonal antibodies, and are therefore a member of the family of antibody mimetics. Affibody molecules are used in biochemical research and are being developed as potential new biopharmaceutical drugs.Sodium pertechnetateAldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase: In enzymology, an aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase () is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reactionIsotopes of meitnerium: Meitnerium (Mt) is a synthetic element, and thus a standard atomic mass cannot be given. Like all synthetic elements, it has no stable isotopes.Cobalt therapy: Cobalt therapy or cobalt-60 therapy is the medical use of gamma rays from the radioisotope cobalt-60 to treat conditions such as cancer. Beginning in the 1950s cobalt-60 was widely used in external beam radiotherapy (teletherapy) machines, which produced a beam of gamma rays which was directed into the patient's body to kill tumor tissue.Full-spectrum photographyNuclear medicine in Pakistan: The history of pursuing nuclear medicine goes back to 1956, when the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) was established under the executive order of the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy. The PAEC, the scientific body who is responsible for establishing the nuclear power plants in the country, has sat up a Nuclear Medicines laboratory.Irradiance: In radiometry (measurement of electromagnetic radiation), irradiance is the radiant flux (power) received by a surface per unit area, and spectral irradiance is the irradiance of a surface per unit frequency or wavelength, depending on whether the spectrum is taken as a function of frequency or of wavelength. The SI unit of irradiance is the watt per square metre (), while that of spectral irradiance is the watt per square metre per hertz (W·m−2·Hz−1) or the watt per square metre per metre (W·m−3)—commonly the watt per square metre per nanometre ().FuchsineTritium illumination: Tritium illumination is the use of gaseous tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, to create visible light. Tritium emits electrons through beta decay, and, when they interact with a phosphor material, fluorescent light is created, a process called radioluminescence.Nostoc communeSteptoean positive carbon isotope excursion: The Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE) was a geological event which occurred about 500 million years ago at the end of the Cambrian Period. The SPICE event was a sudden reversal of the anoxia (lack of oxygen) that had steadily spread throughout the oceans during the Cambrian which also affected the atmosphere.Automatic exposure control: Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) is an X-ray exposure termination device. A medical radiography x-ray exposure is always initiated by a human operator.Brain positron emission tomography: Positron emission tomography (PET) measures emissions from radioactively labeled metabolically active chemicals that have been injected into the bloodstream. The emission data are computer-processed to produce multi-dimensional images of the distribution of the chemicals throughout the brain.Cobalamin biosynthesis: {{Infobox protein familyMale breast cancerMetallocene: A metallocene is a compound typically consisting of two cyclopentadienyl anions (Cp, which is C5H5−) bound to a metal center (M) in the oxidation state II, with the resulting general formula (C5H5)2M. Closely related to the metallocenes are the metallocene derivatives, e.Sodium bismuthateMonoclonal antibody therapyProstate brachytherapyAutoradiograph: An autoradiograph is an image on an x-ray film or nuclear emulsion produced by the pattern of decay emissions (e.g.OctreotideBentazepamCobalt-60Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingAssay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.SST-1 (tokamak): SST-1 (steady state superconducting tokamak) is a plasma confinement experimental device in the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), an autonomous research institute under Department of Atomic Energy, India. It belongs to a new generation of tokamaks with the major objective being steady state operation of an advanced configuration ('D' Shaped) plasma.Zinc toxicityBone tumorAtomic mass: right |thumb|200px|Stylized [[lithium-7 atom: 3 protons, 4 neutrons, & 3 electrons (total electrons are ~1/4300th of the mass of the nucleus). It has a mass of 7.Burst kinetics: Burst kinetics is a form of enzyme kinetics that refers to an initial high velocity of enzymatic turnover when adding enzyme to substrate. This initial period of high velocity product formation is referred to as the "Burst Phase".External beam radiotherapyNude mouse

(1/2142) Combined microautoradiography-16S rRNA probe technique for determination of radioisotope uptake by specific microbial cell types in situ.

We propose a novel method for studying the function of specific microbial groups in situ. Since natural microbial communities are dynamic both in composition and in activities, we argue that the microbial "black box" should not be regarded as homogeneous. Our technique breaks down this black box with group-specific fluorescent 16S rRNA probes and simultaneously determines 3H-substrate uptake by each of the subgroups present via microautoradiography (MAR). Total direct counting, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and MAR are combined on a single slide to determine (i) the percentages of different subgroups in a community, (ii) the percentage of total cells in a community that take up a radioactively labeled substance, and (iii) the distribution of uptake within each subgroup. The method was verified with pure cultures. In addition, in situ uptake by members of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria (alpha-Proteobacteria) and of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group obtained off the California coast and labeled with fluorescent oligonucleotide probes for these subgroups showed that not only do these organisms account for a large portion of the picoplankton community in the sample examined ( approximately 60% of the universal probe-labeled cells and approximately 50% of the total direct counts), but they also are significant in the uptake of dissolved amino acids in situ. Nearly 90% of the total cells and 80% of the cells belonging to the alpha-Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium groups were detectable as active organisms in amino acid uptake tests. We suggest a name for our triple-labeling technique, substrate-tracking autoradiographic fluorescent in situ hybridization (STARFISH), which should aid in the "dissection" of microbial communities by type and function.  (+info)

(2/2142) Specific radioactivity of europium-152 in roof tiles exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Nagasaki.

Specific radioactivities of residual europium (Eu)-152 were measured in six roof tile samples exposed to the Nagasaki atomic bomb at two locations. The ground distances of the two locations from the hypocenter are 1020 m and 1060 m. In order to obtain reliable data, Eu-enriched samples (from 207 to 855 mg) were prepared by separating Eu from each roof tile sample (from 1 to 2 kg). For the major aliquot of the Eu-enriched sample, residual radioactivity of 152Eu was measured using a low-energy photon spectrometer. For the minor aliquot of the Eu-enriched sample, Eu content was determined by neutron activation analysis. Results of the specific radioactivity (152Eu/Eu, Bq mg-1) corrected to the time of bombing were in a range from 0.080 to 0.446. Although the measured values showed some scattering, they are moderately consistent with the calculated values by the DS86 methodology, i.e. the average ratio of the calculated to measured values is 1.3 +/- 0.8.  (+info)

(3/2142) 186Re-etidronate in breast cancer patients with metastatic bone pain.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 186Re-1,1-hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (etidronate) in breast cancer patients with painful bone metastases. METHODS: Thirty patients with advanced breast cancer who had metastatic bone pain were treated with 186Re-etidronate using different dosages in a noncomparative, open-label study. Twenty-four patients were evaluated for efficacy (6 patients had incomplete datasets). Dosages varied from 1295 to 2960 MBq (35 to 80 mCi). Efficacy was evaluated according to the multidimensional pain model using a paper-and-pencil diary. The diary was kept twice daily for 8-10 wk (2 wk before through 6-8 wk after 186Re-etidronate treatment). Response was determined with a strict criteria, in which pain intensity (PI), medication index (MI) and daily activities (DA) were core determinants. Response was defined as: (a) Reduced PI > or = 5% while MI and DA were at least constant; or (b) Reduced PI <25% in combination with improvement of MI or DA > or = 25%, without worsening of either factor. Duration of response should always exceed a minimum of 2 wk. RESULTS: Fifty-eight percent (n = 14) of all patients reported a response. The maximum follow-up period was 8 wk. Duration of response ranged from 2 to 8 wk (mean 4 wk). Patients (14/24) not only experienced considerable pain reduction, but in 12 patients this was also accompanied by noteworthy reduction in MI (> or = 25%). No clear dose-response relationship was found. CONCLUSION: With strict pain assessment criteria, 186Re-etidronate showed a response of 58% in the palliative treatment of metastatic bone pain originating from breast cancer.  (+info)

(4/2142) Combination 186Re-HEDP and cisplatin supra-additive treatment effects in prostate cancer cells.

Radionuclide therapy has proven to be an efficacious palliative treatment for metastatic prostate cancer. Its potential therapeutic possibilities may be substantially increased by combining it with effective radiosensitizing drugs. METHODS: This study explores the radiosensitizing properties of cisplatin when combined with 186Re-labeled hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) in the treatment of R3327-MATLyLu prostate cancer cells in vitro. A concomitant incubation during 4 d, combining various concentrations of cisplatin (0, 0.42, 0.83 and 1.67 micromol/L) and 186Re-HEDP (0, 1.84 and 3.69 MBq/mL [0, 50 and 100 microCi/mL, respectively]) was followed by the determination of the cell numbers surviving and the replating of these cells in semisolid agar. RESULTS: The surviving fraction of clonogenic tumor cells after combination treatment clearly showed synergism when analyzed by a panel of three different published analytical methods. In addition, analysis of variance demonstrated a significant interaction between radionuclide therapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy (P < 0.001). Treatment with 186Re-HEDP and cisplatin by sequential incubation yielded similar, but never superior results. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that radionuclide therapy in combination with cisplatin is able, in principle, to improve therapeutic success rate in metastatic prostate cancer in a more than additive way.  (+info)

(5/2142) Phase I study of 90Y-labeled B72.3 intraperitoneal administration in patients with ovarian cancer: effect of dose and EDTA coadministration on pharmacokinetics and toxicity.

The tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72) antigen is present on a high percentage of tumor types including ovarian carcinomas. Antibody B72.3 is a murine monoclonal recognizing the surface domain of the TAG-72 antigen and has been widely used in human clinical trials. After our initial encouraging studies (M. G. Rosenblum et al., J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 83: 1629-1636, 1991) of tissue disposition, metabolism, and pharmacokinetics in 9 patients with ovarian cancer, we designed an escalating dose, multi-arm Phase I study of 90Y-labeled B72.3 i.p. administration. In the first arm of the study, patients (3 pts/dose level) received an i.p. infusion of either 2 or 10 mg of B72.3 labeled with either 1, 10, 15, or 25 mCi of 90Y. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that concentrations of 90Y-labeled B72.3 persist in peritoneal fluid with half-lives >24 h after i.p. administration. In addition, 90Y-labeled B72.3 was absorbed rapidly into the plasma with peak levels achieved within 48 h, and levels declined slowly thereafter. Cumulative urinary excretion of the 90Y label was 10-20% of the administered dose which suggests significant whole-body retention of the radiolabel. Biopsy specimens of bone and marrow obtained at 72 h after administration demonstrated significant content of the label in bone (0.015% of the dose/g) with relatively little in marrow (0.005% of the dose/g). The maximal tolerated dose was determined to be 10 mCi because of hematological toxicity and platelet suppression. This typically occurred on the 29th day after administration and was thought to be a consequence of the irradiation of the marrow from the bony deposition of the radiolabel. In an effort to suppress the bone uptake of 90Y, patients were treated with a continuous i.v. infusion of EDTA (25 mg/kg/12 h x 6) infused immediately before i.p. administration of the radiolabeled antibody. Patients (3 pts/dose level) were treated with doses of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, or 45 mCi of 90Y-labeled B72.3 for a total of 38 patients. EDTA administration resulted in significant myeloprotection, which allowed escalation to the maximal tolerated dose of 40 mCi. Dose-limiting toxicity was thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Studies of plasma and peritoneal fluid pharmacokinetics demonstrate no changes compared with patients without EDTA pretreatment. Cumulative urinary excretion of the radiolabel was not increased in patients pretreated with EDTA compared with the untreated group. However, analysis of biopsy specimens of bone and marrow demonstrated that bone and marrow content of the 90Y label was 15-fold lower (<0.001% injected dose/g) than a companion group without EDTA. Four responses were noted in patients who received 15-30 mCi of 90Y-labeled B72.3 with response durations of 1-12 months. These results demonstrate the myeloprotective ability of EDTA, which allows safe i.p. administration of higher doses of 90Y-labeled B72.3 and, therefore, clearly warrant an expanded Phase II trial in patients with minimal residual disease after standard chemotherapy or for the palliation of refractory ascites.  (+info)

(6/2142) Locoregional regulatory peptide receptor targeting with the diffusible somatostatin analogue 90Y-labeled DOTA0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide (DOTATOC): a pilot study in human gliomas.

Human gliomas, especially of low-grade type, have been shown to express high-affinity somatostatin receptor type 2 (J-C. Reubi et al., Am. J. Pathol, 134: 337-344, 1989). We enrolled seven low-grade and four anaplastic glioma patients in a pilot study using the diffusible peptidic vector 90Y-labeled DOTA0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide (DOTATOC) for receptor targeting. The radiopharmakon was locoregionally injected into a stereotactically inserted Port-a-cath. DOTATOC competes specifically with somatostatin binding to somatostatin receptor type 2 in the low nanomolar range as shown by a displacement curve of 125I-[Tyr3]-octreotide in tumor tissue sections. Diagnostic (111)In-labeled DOTATOC-scintigraphy following local injection displayed homogeneous to nodular intratumoral vector distribution. The cumulative activity of regionally injected peptide-bound 90Y amounted to 370-3300 MBq, which is equivalent to an effective dose range between 60 +/- 15 and 550 +/- 110 Gy. Activity was injected in one to four fractions according to tumor volumes; 1110 MBq of 90Y-labeled DOTATOC was the maximum activity per single injection. We obtained six disease stabilizations and shrinking of a cystic low-grade astrocytoma component. The only toxicity observed was secondary perifocal edema. The activity:dose ratio (MBq:Gy) represents a measure for the stability of peptide retention in receptor-positive tissue and might predict the clinical course. We conclude that SR-positive human gliomas, especially of low-grade type, can be successfully targeted by intratumoral injection of the metabolically stable small regulatory peptide DOTATOC.  (+info)

(7/2142) High-linear energy transfer (LET) alpha versus low-LET beta emitters in radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors: therapeutic efficacy and dose-limiting toxicity of 213Bi- versus 90Y-labeled CO17-1A Fab' fragments in a human colonic cancer model.

Recent studies suggest that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation may have therapeutic advantages over conventional low-LET (e.g., beta-) emissions. Furthermore, fragments may be more effective in controlling tumor growth than complete IgG. However, to the best of our knowledge, no investigators have attempted a direct comparison of the therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of a systemic targeted therapeutic strategy, using high-LET alpha versus low-LET beta emitters in vivo. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the toxicity and antitumor efficacy of RIT with the alpha emitter 213Bi/213Po, as compared to the beta emitter 90Y, linked to a monovalent Fab' fragment in a human colonic cancer xenograft model in nude mice. Biodistribution studies of 213Bi- or 88Y-labeled benzyl-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate-conjugated Fab' fragments of the murine monoclonal antibody CO17-1A were performed in nude mice bearing s.c. human colon cancer xenografts. 213Bi was readily obtained from an "in-house" 225Ac/213Bi generator. It decays by beta- and 440-keV gamma emission, with a t(1/2) of 45.6 min, as compared to the ultra-short-lived alpha emitter, 213Po (t(1/2) = 4.2 micros). For therapy, the mice were injected either with 213Bi- or 90Y-labeled CO17-1A Fab', whereas control groups were left untreated or were given a radiolabeled irrelevant control antibody. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of each agent was determined. The mice were treated with or without inhibition of the renal accretion of antibody fragments by D-lysine (T. M. Behr et al., Cancer Res., 55: 3825-3834, 1995), bone marrow transplantation, or combinations thereof. Myelotoxicity and potential second-organ toxicities, as well as tumor growth, were monitored at weekly intervals. Additionally, the therapeutic efficacy of both 213Bi- and 90Y-labeled CO17-1A Fab' was compared in a GW-39 model metastatic to the liver of nude mice. In accordance with kidney uptake values of as high as > or = 80% of the injected dose per gram, the kidney was the first dose-limiting organ using both 90Y- and 213Bi-labeled Fab' fragments. Application of D-lysine decreased the renal dose by >3-fold. Accordingly, myelotoxicity became dose limiting with both conjugates. By using lysine protection, the MTD of 90Y-Fab' was 250 microCi and the MTD of 213Bi-Fab' was 700 microCi, corresponding to blood doses of 5-8 Gy. Additional bone marrow transplantation allowed for an increase of the MTD of 90Y-Fab' to 400 microCi and for 213Bi-Fab' to 1100 microCi, respectively. At these very dose levels, no biochemical or histological evidence of renal damage was observed (kidney doses of <35 Gy). At equitoxic dosing, 213Bi-labeled Fab' fragments were significantly more effective than the respective 90Y-labeled conjugates. In the metastatic model, all untreated controls died from rapidly progressing hepatic metastases at 6-8 weeks after tumor inoculation, whereas a histologically confirmed cure was observed in 95% of those animals treated with 700 microCi of 213Bi-Fab' 10 days after model induction, which is in contrast to an only 20% cure rate in mice treated with 250 microCi of 90Y-Fab'. These data show that RIT with alpha emitters may be therapeutically more effective than conventional beta emitters. Surprisingly, maximum tolerated blood doses were, at 5-8 Gy, very similar between high-LET alpha and low-LET beta emitters. Due to its short physical half-life, 213Bi appears to be especially suitable for use in conjunction with fast-clearing fragments.  (+info)

(8/2142) Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada.

The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus). Radionuclides included uranium (U), radium (226Ra), lead (210Pb), and polonium (210Po) from the uranium decay series; the fission product (137Cs) from fallout; and naturally occurring potassium (40K). Natural background radiation doses average 2-4 mSv/year from cosmic rays, external gamma rays, radon inhalation, and ingestion of food items. The ingestion of 210Po and 137Cs when caribou are consumed adds to these background doses. The dose increment was 0.85 mSv/year for adults who consumed 100 g of caribou meat per day and up to 1.7 mSv/year if one liver and 10 kidneys per year were also consumed. We discuss the cancer risk from these doses. Concentration ratios (CRs), relating caribou tissues to lichens or rumen (stomach) contents, were calculated to estimate food chain transfer. The CRs for caribou muscle ranged from 1 to 16% for U, 6 to 25% for 226Ra, 1 to 2% for 210Pb, 6 to 26% for 210Po, 260 to 370% for 137Cs, and 76 to 130% for 40K, with 137Cs biomagnifying by a factor of 3-4. These CRs are useful in predicting caribou meat concentrations from the lichens, measured in monitoring programs, for the future evaluation of uranium mining impacts on this critical food chain.  (+info)



  • generators
  • The energy conversion process used by an ASRG is about four times more efficient than in previous radioisotope systems to produce a similar amount of power, and allows it to use about one quarter of the plutonium-238 as other similar generators. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclides
  • Generally speaking, trace radioisotopes have half-lives that are short in comparison with the age of the Earth, since primordial nuclides tend to occur in larger than trace amounts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Natural processes which produce trace radioisotopes include cosmic ray bombardment of stable nuclides, ordinary alpha and beta decay of the long-lived heavy nuclides, thorium-232, uranium-238, and uranium-235, spontaneous fission of uranium-238, and nuclear transmutation reactions induced by natural radioactivity, such as the production of plutonium-239 and uranium-236 from neutron capture by natural uranium. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In 2012, NASA chose a solar-powered mission (InSight) for Discovery 12 interplanetary mission, which would have otherwise needed a radioisotope power system for the planned 2016 launch (which as it happens has been delayed until 2018). (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • New strategies are needed to address the current and future shortages of radioisotopes that threaten medical research and treatment. (the-scientist.com)
  • Though still in the planning stages, such projects may be able to produce all the Mo-99 physicians could want, as well as a wider variety of other radioisotopes, each with its own specific medical application. (the-scientist.com)
  • Since conventional treatment procedures of cancer, surgery and chemotherapy have significant side effects, radioisotopes are being preferred by medical practitioners due to minimum or no side effects. (prnewswire.com)
  • Radioisotope renography is a form of medical imaging of the kidneys that uses radiolabelling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research
  • The produced radioisotopes are used in medicine, industry and research activities for domestic market. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Radioisotope Production Facility (RPF) is located at the Nuclear Research Center in Inshas, near ETRR-2 research reactor and Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant (FMPP) as the three facilities share the same auxiliary services with high degree of integration between ETRR-2 and RPF to ensure safe transfer of the irradiated targets for radioisotope production. (wikipedia.org)
  • power
  • The even shorter half-life element fermium has also been suggested Another drawback to the use of radioisotopes in rockets is an inability to change the operating power. (wikipedia.org)
  • processes
  • Radioisotope-based measurement techniques are best suited for multiphase flow systems encountered in industrial processes, since these systems are opaque and contain a large volume fraction of the dispersed phase. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Production
  • To improve Member State capabilities in the production and use of radioisotope products for supporting the management of cancer and other chronic diseases. (iaea.org)
  • The Radioisotope Production Facility (RPF) was initially highlighted during the 2004/2005 investigation by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as Egypt declared the new facility which was under construction to the agency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multi-Purpose Production hot cell - one hot cell (for compound labeling and production of other radioisotopes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Licensing of digital Instrumentation & Control in Radioisotope Production Facility" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • heat
  • The radioisotope rocket is a type of thermal rocket engine that uses the heat generated by the decay of radioactive elements to heat a working fluid, which is then exhausted through a rocket nozzle to produce thrust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, Radioisotope Heat Units (RHUs) were used to provide heat to critical components on Apollo 11 as well as the first two generations of Mars rovers. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • In the study, high specific uptake was obtained in human colon cancer cells transplanted in mice, resulting in very high tumour-to-blood and tumour-to-kidney ratios of radioisotope uptake. (thefreedictionary.com)