Thyrotropin: A glycoprotein hormone secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Thyrotropin stimulates THYROID GLAND by increasing the iodide transport, synthesis and release of thyroid hormones (THYROXINE and TRIIODOTHYRONINE). Thyrotropin consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH; LUTEINIZING HORMONE and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Immunoglobulins, Thyroid-Stimulating: Autoantibodies that bind to the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (RECEPTORS, THYROTROPIN) on thyroid epithelial cells. The autoantibodies mimic TSH causing an unregulated production of thyroid hormones characteristic of GRAVES DISEASE.Receptors, Thyrotropin: Cell surface proteins that bind pituitary THYROTROPIN (also named thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH) and trigger intracellular changes of the target cells. TSH receptors are present in the nervous system and on target cells in the thyroid gland. Autoantibodies to TSH receptors are implicated in thyroid diseases such as GRAVES DISEASE and Hashimoto disease (THYROIDITIS, AUTOIMMUNE).Thyroid Gland: A highly vascularized endocrine gland consisting of two lobes joined by a thin band of tissue with one lobe on each side of the TRACHEA. It secretes THYROID HORMONES from the follicular cells and CALCITONIN from the parafollicular cells thereby regulating METABOLISM and CALCIUM level in blood, respectively.Immunoglobulins: Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Thyroxine: The major hormone derived from the thyroid gland. Thyroxine is synthesized via the iodination of tyrosines (MONOIODOTYROSINE) and the coupling of iodotyrosines (DIIODOTYROSINE) in the THYROGLOBULIN. Thyroxine is released from thyroglobulin by proteolysis and secreted into the blood. Thyroxine is peripherally deiodinated to form TRIIODOTHYRONINE which exerts a broad spectrum of stimulatory effects on cell metabolism.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Hypothyroidism: A syndrome that results from abnormally low secretion of THYROID HORMONES from the THYROID GLAND, leading to a decrease in BASAL METABOLIC RATE. In its most severe form, there is accumulation of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and EDEMA, known as MYXEDEMA.Graves Disease: A common form of hyperthyroidism with a diffuse hyperplastic GOITER. It is an autoimmune disorder that produces antibodies against the THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR. These autoantibodies activate the TSH receptor, thereby stimulating the THYROID GLAND and hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES. These autoantibodies can also affect the eyes (GRAVES OPHTHALMOPATHY) and the skin (Graves dermopathy).Thyroid Function Tests: Blood tests used to evaluate the functioning of the thyroid gland.Long-Acting Thyroid Stimulator: An immunoglobulin G, often found in the blood of hyperthyroid individuals. It stimulates the thyroid for a longer duration than does thyrotoxin and may cause hyperthyroidism in newborns due to placental transmission.Thyrotropin, beta Subunit: The beta subunit of thyroid stimulating hormone, thyrotropin. It is a 112-amino acid glycopolypeptide of about 16 kD. Full biological activity of TSH requires the non-covalently bound heterodimers of an alpha and a beta subunit.Thyroid Hormones: Natural hormones secreted by the THYROID GLAND, such as THYROXINE, and their synthetic analogs.Triiodothyronine: A T3 thyroid hormone normally synthesized and secreted by the thyroid gland in much smaller quantities than thyroxine (T4). Most T3 is derived from peripheral monodeiodination of T4 at the 5' position of the outer ring of the iodothyronine nucleus. The hormone finally delivered and used by the tissues is mainly T3.Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains: The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.Hyperthyroidism: Hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES from the THYROID GLAND. Elevated levels of thyroid hormones increase BASAL METABOLIC RATE.Immunoglobulins, Intravenous: Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.Iodine: A nonmetallic element of the halogen group that is represented by the atomic symbol I, atomic number 53, and atomic weight of 126.90. It is a nutritionally essential element, especially important in thyroid hormone synthesis. In solution, it has anti-infective properties and is used topically.ThyroglobulinGenes, Immunoglobulin: Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone: A tripeptide that stimulates the release of THYROTROPIN and PROLACTIN. It is synthesized by the neurons in the PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, TRH (was called TRF) stimulates the release of TSH and PRL from the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND.Immunoglobulin Light Chains: Polypeptide chains, consisting of 211 to 217 amino acid residues and having a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa. There are two major types of light chains, kappa and lambda. Two Ig light chains and two Ig heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) make one immunoglobulin molecule.Iodide Peroxidase: A hemeprotein that catalyzes the oxidation of the iodide radical to iodine with the subsequent iodination of many organic compounds, particularly proteins. EC Hypothyroidism: A condition in infancy or early childhood due to an in-utero deficiency of THYROID HORMONES that can be caused by genetic or environmental factors, such as thyroid dysgenesis or HYPOTHYROIDISM in infants of mothers treated with THIOURACIL during pregnancy. Endemic cretinism is the result of iodine deficiency. Clinical symptoms include severe MENTAL RETARDATION, impaired skeletal development, short stature, and MYXEDEMA.Thyroid Diseases: Pathological processes involving the THYROID GLAND.Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains: One of the types of light chains of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Antithyroid Agents: Agents that are used to treat hyperthyroidism by reducing the excessive production of thyroid hormones.Thyroxine-Binding Globulin: A thyroid hormone transport protein found in serum. It binds about 75% of circulating THYROXINE and 70% of circulating TRIIODOTHYRONINE.Immunoglobulin E: An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).Euthyroid Sick Syndromes: Conditions of abnormal THYROID HORMONES release in patients with apparently normal THYROID GLAND during severe systemic illness, physical TRAUMA, and psychiatric disturbances. It can be caused by the loss of endogenous hypothalamic input or by exogenous drug effects. The most common abnormality results in low T3 THYROID HORMONE with progressive decrease in THYROXINE; (T4) and TSH. Elevated T4 with normal T3 may be seen in diseases in which THYROXINE-BINDING GLOBULIN synthesis and release are increased.Iodine Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iodine that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. I atoms with atomic weights 117-139, except I 127, are radioactive iodine isotopes.Immunoglobulin A, Secretory: The principle immunoglobulin in exocrine secretions such as milk, respiratory and intestinal mucin, saliva and tears. The complete molecule (around 400 kD) is composed of two four-chain units of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, one SECRETORY COMPONENT and one J chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN J-CHAINS).Immunoglobulin Variable Region: That region of the immunoglobulin molecule that varies in its amino acid sequence and composition, and comprises the binding site for a specific antigen. It is located at the N-terminus of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. It includes hypervariable regions (COMPLEMENTARITY DETERMINING REGIONS) and framework regions.Graves Ophthalmopathy: An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.Pituitary Gland: A small, unpaired gland situated in the SELLA TURCICA. It is connected to the HYPOTHALAMUS by a short stalk which is called the INFUNDIBULUM.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Immunoglobulin mu-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN M. They have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa and they contain about 57 amino acid residues arranged in five domains and have more oligosaccharide branches and a higher carbohydrate content than the heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G.Propylthiouracil: A thiourea antithyroid agent. Propythiouracil inhibits the synthesis of thyroxine and inhibits the peripheral conversion of throxine to tri-iodothyronine. It is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopeoia, 30th ed, p534)Goiter: Enlargement of the THYROID GLAND that may increase from about 20 grams to hundreds of grams in human adults. Goiter is observed in individuals with normal thyroid function (euthyroidism), thyroid deficiency (HYPOTHYROIDISM), or hormone overproduction (HYPERTHYROIDISM). Goiter may be congenital or acquired, sporadic or endemic (GOITER, ENDEMIC).Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Immunoglobulin Isotypes: The classes of immunoglobulins found in any species of animal. In man there are nine classes that migrate in five different groups in electrophoresis; they each consist of two light and two heavy protein chains, and each group has distinguishing structural and functional properties.Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains: One of the types of light chain subunits of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Myxedema: A condition characterized by a dry, waxy type of swelling (EDEMA) with abnormal deposits of MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDES in the SKIN and other tissues. It is caused by a deficiency of THYROID HORMONES. The skin becomes puffy around the eyes and on the cheeks. The face is dull and expressionless with thickened nose and lips.Pituitary Hormones, Anterior: Hormones secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Structurally, they include polypeptide, protein, and glycoprotein molecules.Perchlorates: Compounds that contain the Cl(=O)(=O)(=O)O- structure. Included under this heading is perchloric acid and the salts and ester forms of perchlorate.Immunoassay: A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.Diiodotyrosine: A product from the iodination of MONOIODOTYROSINE. In the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones, diiodotyrosine residues are coupled with other monoiodotyrosine or diiodotyrosine residues to form T4 or T3 thyroid hormones (THYROXINE and TRIIODOTHYRONINE).Immunoglobulin D: An immunoglobulin which accounts for less than 1% of plasma immunoglobulin. It is found on the membrane of many circulating B LYMPHOCYTES.Thyrotropin Alfa: A highly purified recombinant glycoprotein form of human THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE, produced by recombinant DNA technology comprising two non-covalently linked subunits, an alpha subunit of 92 amino acid residues containing two N-linked glycosylation sites, and a beta subunit of 118 residues containing one N-linked glycosylation site. The amino acid sequence of thyrotropin alfa is identical to that of human pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone.Thyroid Hormone Resistance Syndrome: An inherited autosomal recessive trait, characterized by peripheral resistance to THYROID HORMONES and the resulting elevation in serum levels of THYROXINE and TRIIODOTHYRONINE. This syndrome is caused by mutations of gene THRB encoding the THYROID HORMONE RECEPTORS BETA in target cells. HYPOTHYROIDISM in these patients is partly overcome by the increased thyroid hormone levels.Pituitary Hormones: Hormones secreted by the PITUITARY GLAND including those from the anterior lobe (adenohypophysis), the posterior lobe (neurohypophysis), and the ill-defined intermediate lobe. Structurally, they include small peptides, proteins, and glycoproteins. They are under the regulation of neural signals (NEUROTRANSMITTERS) or neuroendocrine signals (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) from the hypothalamus as well as feedback from their targets such as ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES; ANDROGENS; ESTROGENS.Thyrotoxicosis: A hypermetabolic syndrome caused by excess THYROID HORMONES which may come from endogenous or exogenous sources. The endogenous source of hormone may be thyroid HYPERPLASIA; THYROID NEOPLASMS; or hormone-producing extrathyroidal tissue. Thyrotoxicosis is characterized by NERVOUSNESS; TACHYCARDIA; FATIGUE; WEIGHT LOSS; heat intolerance; and excessive SWEATING.Prolactin: A lactogenic hormone secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). It is a polypeptide of approximately 23 kD. Besides its major action on lactation, in some species prolactin exerts effects on reproduction, maternal behavior, fat metabolism, immunomodulation and osmoregulation. Prolactin receptors are present in the mammary gland, hypothalamus, liver, ovary, testis, and prostate.Immunoglobulin Constant Regions: The domains of the immunoglobulin molecules that are invariable in their amino acid sequence within any class or subclass of immunoglobulin. They confer biological as well as structural functions to immunoglobulins. One each on both the light chains and the heavy chains comprises the C-terminus half of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FAB FRAGMENT and two or three of them make up the rest of the heavy chains (all of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN FC FRAGMENT)Immunoglobulin Fc Fragments: Crystallizable fragments composed of the carboxy-terminal halves of both IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fc fragments contain the carboxy-terminal parts of the heavy chain constant regions that are responsible for the effector functions of an immunoglobulin (COMPLEMENT fixation, binding to the cell membrane via FC RECEPTORS, and placental transport). This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Iodides: Inorganic binary compounds of iodine or the I- ion.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Goiter, Nodular: An enlarged THYROID GLAND containing multiple nodules (THYROID NODULE), usually resulting from recurrent thyroid HYPERPLASIA and involution over many years to produce the irregular enlargement. Multinodular goiters may be nontoxic or may induce THYROTOXICOSIS.Methimazole: A thioureylene antithyroid agent that inhibits the formation of thyroid hormones by interfering with the incorporation of iodine into tyrosyl residues of thyroglobulin. This is done by interfering with the oxidation of iodide ion and iodotyrosyl groups through inhibition of the peroxidase enzyme.Hashimoto Disease: Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, characterized by the presence of high serum thyroid AUTOANTIBODIES; GOITER; and HYPOTHYROIDISM.Carbimazole: An imidazole antithyroid agent. Carbimazole is metabolized to METHIMAZOLE, which is responsible for the antithyroid activity.Immunoglobulin Class Switching: Gene rearrangement of the B-lymphocyte which results in a substitution in the type of heavy-chain constant region that is expressed. This allows the effector response to change while the antigen binding specificity (variable region) remains the same. The majority of class switching occurs by a DNA recombination event but it also can take place at the level of RNA processing.Immunoglobulin gamma-Chains: Heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G having a molecular weight of approximately 51 kDa. They contain about 450 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region. The gamma heavy chain subclasses (for example, gamma 1, gamma 2a, and gamma 2b) of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN G isotype subclasses (IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B) resemble each other more closely than the heavy chains of the other IMMUNOGLOBULIN ISOTYPES.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Iodine Isotopes: Stable iodine atoms that have the same atomic number as the element iodine, but differ in atomic weight. I-127 is the only naturally occurring stable iodine isotope.Pituitary Function Tests: Examinations that evaluate functions of the pituitary gland.Immunoglobulin J-Chains: A 15 kD "joining" peptide that forms one of the linkages between monomers of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or IMMUNOGLOBULIN M in the formation of polymeric immunoglobulins. There is one J chain per one IgA dimer or one IgM pentamer. It is also involved in binding the polymeric immunoglobulins to POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR which is necessary for their transcytosis to the lumen. It is distinguished from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN JOINING REGION which is part of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains.Thyroiditis, Autoimmune: Inflammatory disease of the THYROID GLAND due to autoimmune responses leading to lymphocytic infiltration of the gland. It is characterized by the presence of circulating thyroid antigen-specific T-CELLS and thyroid AUTOANTIBODIES. The clinical signs can range from HYPOTHYROIDISM to THYROTOXICOSIS depending on the type of autoimmune thyroiditis.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Immunoglobulin Fragments: Partial immunoglobulin molecules resulting from selective cleavage by proteolytic enzymes or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Immunoglobulin Allotypes: Allelic variants of the immunoglobulin light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) or heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES.Glycoprotein Hormones, alpha Subunit: The alpha chain of pituitary glycoprotein hormones (THYROTROPIN; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE; LUTEINIZING HORMONE) and the placental CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Within a species, the alpha subunits of these four hormones are identical; the distinct functional characteristics of these glycoprotein hormones are determined by the unique beta subunits. Both subunits, the non-covalently bound heterodimers, are required for full biologic activity.Receptors, Polymeric Immunoglobulin: Specialized Fc receptors (RECEPTORS, FC) for polymeric immunoglobulins, which mediate transcytosis of polymeric IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN M into external secretions. They are found on the surfaces of epithelial cells and hepatocytes. After binding to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, the receptor-ligand complex undergoes endocytosis, transport by vesicle, and secretion into the lumen by exocytosis. Before release, the part of the receptor (SECRETORY COMPONENT) that is bound to IMMUNOGLOBULIN A is proteolytically cleaved from its transmembrane tail. (From Rosen et al., The Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)Growth Hormone: A polypeptide that is secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin, stimulates mitosis, cell differentiation and cell growth. Species-specific growth hormones have been synthesized.Thyroid Hormone Receptors beta: High affinity receptors for THYROID HORMONES, especially TRIIODOTHYRONINE. These receptors are usually found in the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. They are encoded by the THRB gene (also known as NR1A2, THRB1, or ERBA2 gene) as several isoforms produced by alternative splicing. Mutations in the THRB gene cause THYROID HORMONE RESISTANCE SYNDROME.Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.Immunoglobulin Joining Region: A segment of the immunoglobulin heavy chains, encoded by the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES in the J segment where, during the maturation of B-LYMPHOCYTES; the gene segment for the variable region upstream is joined to a constant region gene segment downstream. The exact position of joining of the two gene segments is variable and contributes to ANTIBODY DIVERSITY. It is distinguished from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN J CHAINS; a separate polypeptide that serves as a linkage piece in polymeric IGA or IGM.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Dysprosium: Dysprosium. An element of the rare earth family that has the atomic symbol Dy, atomic number 66, and atomic weight 162.50. Dysprosium is a silvery metal used primarily in the form of various salts.Thiouracil: Occurs in seeds of Brassica and Crucifera species. Thiouracil has been used as antithyroid, coronary vasodilator, and in congestive heart failure although its use has been largely supplanted by other drugs. It is known to cause blood dyscrasias and suspected of terato- and carcinogenesis.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Luteinizing Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Luteinizing hormone regulates steroid production by the interstitial cells of the TESTIS and the OVARY. The preovulatory LUTEINIZING HORMONE surge in females induces OVULATION, and subsequent LUTEINIZATION of the follicle. LUTEINIZING HORMONE consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Ablation Techniques: Removal of tissue by vaporization, abrasion, or destruction. Methods used include heating tissue by hot liquids or microwave thermal heating, freezing (CRYOABLATION), chemical ablation, and photoablation with LASERS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Pituitary Gland, Anterior: The anterior glandular lobe of the pituitary gland, also known as the adenohypophysis. It secretes the ADENOHYPOPHYSEAL HORMONES that regulate vital functions such as GROWTH; METABOLISM; and REPRODUCTION.Antigen-Antibody Complex: The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Thyroxine-Binding Proteins: Blood proteins that bind to THYROID HORMONES such as THYROXINE and transport them throughout the circulatory system.Thyroiditis, Subacute: Spontaneously remitting inflammatory condition of the THYROID GLAND, characterized by FEVER; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; SORE THROAT; severe thyroid PAIN; and an enlarged damaged gland containing GIANT CELLS. The disease frequently follows a viral infection.Follicle Stimulating Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Follicle-stimulating hormone stimulates GAMETOGENESIS and the supporting cells such as the ovarian GRANULOSA CELLS, the testicular SERTOLI CELLS, and LEYDIG CELLS. FSH consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell: IMMUNOGLOBULINS on the surface of B-LYMPHOCYTES. Their MESSENGER RNA contains an EXON with a membrane spanning sequence, producing immunoglobulins in the form of type I transmembrane proteins as opposed to secreted immunoglobulins (ANTIBODIES) which do not contain the membrane spanning segment.Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Whole-Body Counting: Measurement of radioactivity in the entire human body.Myeloma Proteins: Abnormal immunoglobulins characteristic of MULTIPLE MYELOMA.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Radioimmunoassay: Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.Hypopituitarism: Diminution or cessation of secretion of one or more hormones from the anterior pituitary gland (including LH; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE; SOMATOTROPIN; and CORTICOTROPIN). This may result from surgical or radiation ablation, non-secretory PITUITARY NEOPLASMS, metastatic tumors, infarction, PITUITARY APOPLEXY, infiltrative or granulomatous processes, and other conditions.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Genes, Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain: Genes and gene segments encoding the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS. Gene segments of the heavy chain genes are symbolized V (variable), D (diversity), J (joining), and C (constant).Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin: A programmed mutation process whereby changes are introduced to the nucleotide sequence of immunoglobulin gene DNA during development.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Thyroiditis: Inflammatory diseases of the THYROID GLAND. Thyroiditis can be classified into acute (THYROIDITIS, SUPPURATIVE), subacute (granulomatous and lymphocytic), chronic fibrous (Riedel's), chronic lymphocytic (HASHIMOTO DISEASE), transient (POSTPARTUM THYROIDITIS), and other AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS subtypes.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Plasmacytoma: Any discrete, presumably solitary, mass of neoplastic PLASMA CELLS either in BONE MARROW or various extramedullary sites.Hypothalamic Diseases: Neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and other diseases of the hypothalamus. Clinical manifestations include appetite disorders; AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SLEEP DISORDERS; behavioral symptoms related to dysfunction of the LIMBIC SYSTEM; and neuroendocrine disorders.Chorionic Gonadotropin: A gonadotropic glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the PLACENTA. Similar to the pituitary LUTEINIZING HORMONE in structure and function, chorionic gonadotropin is involved in maintaining the CORPUS LUTEUM during pregnancy. CG consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is virtually identical to the alpha subunits of the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity (CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN, BETA SUBUNIT, HUMAN).Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Immunoglobulin delta-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN D. They have a molecular weight of approximately 64 kDa and they contain about 500 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Immunoglobulin Switch Region: A site located in the INTRONS at the 5' end of each constant region segment of a immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene where recombination (or rearrangement) occur during IMMUNOGLOBULIN CLASS SWITCHING. Ig switch regions are found on genes encoding all five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN ISOTYPES) of IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS.Flame Retardants: Materials applied to fabrics, bedding, furniture, plastics, etc. to retard their burning; many may leach out and cause allergies or other harm.Immunoglobulin alpha-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN A. They have a molecular weight of approximately 58 kDa and contain about 470 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component bound covalently to their Fc fragment constant region.Receptors, Thyroid Hormone: Specific high affinity binding proteins for THYROID HORMONES in target cells. They are usually found in the nucleus and regulate DNA transcription. These receptors are activated by hormones that leads to transcription, cell differentiation, and growth suppression. Thyroid hormone receptors are encoded by two genes (GENES, ERBA): erbA-alpha and erbA-beta for alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptors, respectively.Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers: Compounds that contain two halogenated benzene rings linked via an OXYGEN atom. Many polybrominated diphenyl ethers are used as FLAME RETARDANTS.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic: Antibodies which react with the individual structural determinants (idiotopes) on the variable region of other antibodies.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Immunoglobulin Idiotypes: Unique genetically-controlled determinants present on ANTIBODIES whose specificity is limited to a single group of proteins (e.g., another antibody molecule or an individual myeloma protein). The idiotype appears to represent the antigenicity of the antigen-binding site of the antibody and to be genetically codetermined with it. The idiotypic determinants have been precisely located to the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION of both immunoglobin polypeptide chains.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Pituitary Diseases: Disorders involving either the ADENOHYPOPHYSIS or the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS. These diseases usually manifest as hypersecretion or hyposecretion of PITUITARY HORMONES. Neoplastic pituitary masses can also cause compression of the OPTIC CHIASM and other adjacent structures.gamma-Globulins: Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Hyperprolactinemia: Increased levels of PROLACTIN in the BLOOD, which may be associated with AMENORRHEA and GALACTORRHEA. Relatively common etiologies include PROLACTINOMA, medication effect, KIDNEY FAILURE, granulomatous diseases of the PITUITARY GLAND, and disorders which interfere with the hypothalamic inhibition of prolactin release. Ectopic (non-pituitary) production of prolactin may also occur. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch36, pp77-8)Secretory Component: The extracellular moiety of the POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR found alone or complexed with IGA or IGM, in a variety of external secretions (tears, bile, colostrum.) Secretory component is derived by proteolytic cleavage of the receptor during transcytosis. When immunoglobulins IgA and IgM are bound to the receptor, during their transcytosis secretory component becomes covalently attached to them generating SECRETORY IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or secretory IMMUNOGLOBULIN M.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Fetal Organ Maturity: Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Agammaglobulinemia: An immunologic deficiency state characterized by an extremely low level of generally all classes of gamma-globulin in the blood.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Hormones: Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.Immunoglobulin Gm Allotypes: Allelic variants of the gamma-immunoglobulin heavy chain (IMMUNOGLOBULIN GAMMA-CHAINS) encoded by ALLELES of IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Colostrum: The thin, yellow, serous fluid secreted by the mammary glands during pregnancy and immediately postpartum before lactation begins. It consists of immunologically active substances, white blood cells, water, protein, fat, and carbohydrates.Cricetulus: A genus of the family Muridae consisting of eleven species. C. migratorius, the grey or Armenian hamster, and C. griseus, the Chinese hamster, are the two species used in biomedical research.Receptors, Fc: Molecules found on the surface of some, but not all, B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, and macrophages, which recognize and combine with the Fc (crystallizable) portion of immunoglobulin molecules.Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Biological Assay: A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.Binding Sites, Antibody: Local surface sites on antibodies which react with antigen determinant sites on antigens (EPITOPES.) They are formed from parts of the variable regions of FAB FRAGMENTS.Mice, Inbred BALB CCarcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Immunoelectrophoresis: A technique that combines protein electrophoresis and double immunodiffusion. In this procedure proteins are first separated by gel electrophoresis (usually agarose), then made visible by immunodiffusion of specific antibodies. A distinct elliptical precipitin arc results for each protein detectable by the antisera.Receptors, FSH: Cell surface proteins that bind FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte, Heavy Chain: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the first stage of differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the IMMUNOGLOBULIN CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Thyroid Nodule: A small circumscribed mass in the THYROID GLAND that can be of neoplastic growth or non-neoplastic abnormality. It lacks a well-defined capsule or glandular architecture. Thyroid nodules are often benign but can be malignant. The growth of nodules can lead to a multinodular goiter (GOITER, NODULAR).Staphylococcal Protein A: A protein present in the cell wall of most Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein selectively binds to the Fc region of human normal and myeloma-derived IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. It elicits antibody activity and may cause hypersensitivity reactions due to histamine release; has also been used as cell surface antigen marker and in the clinical assessment of B lymphocyte function.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).3',5'-Cyclic-AMP Phosphodiesterases: Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of CYCLIC AMP to form adenosine 5'-phosphate. The enzymes are widely distributed in animal tissue and control the level of intracellular cyclic AMP. Many specific enzymes classified under this heading demonstrate additional spcificity for 3',5'-cyclic IMP and CYCLIC GMP.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Glucuronosyltransferase: A family of enzymes accepting a wide range of substrates, including phenols, alcohols, amines, and fatty acids. They function as drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of UDPglucuronic acid to a variety of endogenous and exogenous compounds. EC An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Immunodiffusion: Technique involving the diffusion of antigen or antibody through a semisolid medium, usually agar or agarose gel, with the result being a precipitin reaction.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Mice, Inbred C57BLReceptors, LH: Those protein complexes or molecular sites on the surfaces and cytoplasm of gonadal cells that bind luteinizing or chorionic gonadotropic hormones and thereby cause the gonadal cells to synthesize and secrete sex steroids. The hormone-receptor complex is internalized from the plasma membrane and initiates steroid synthesis.Genes, Immunoglobulin Light Chain: Genes and gene segments encoding the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS. Gene segments of the light chain genes are designated as V (variable), J (joining), and C (constant).Immunoglobulin epsilon-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN E. They have a molecular weight of approximately 72 kDa and they contain about 550 amino acid residues arranged in five domains and about three times more carbohydrate than the heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; and IMMUNOGLOBULIN G.Hybridomas: Cells artificially created by fusion of activated lymphocytes with neoplastic cells. The resulting hybrid cells are cloned and produce pure MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES or T-cell products, identical to those produced by the immunologically competent parent cell.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Environmental Pollutants: Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.Symporters: Membrane transporters that co-transport two or more dissimilar molecules in the same direction across a membrane. Usually the transport of one ion or molecule is against its electrochemical gradient and is "powered" by the movement of another ion or molecule with its electrochemical gradient.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Gene Rearrangement, B-Lymphocyte, Light Chain: Ordered rearrangement of B-lymphocyte variable gene regions coding for the kappa or lambda IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS, thereby contributing to antibody diversity. It occurs during the second stage of differentiation of the IMMATURE B-LYMPHOCYTES.Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes: Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral.Rats, Inbred F344Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.IgA Deficiency: A dysgammaglobulinemia characterized by a deficiency of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.Cross Reactions: Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.Pokeweed Mitogens: Proteins isolated from the roots of the pokeweed, Phytolacca americana, that agglutinate some erythrocytes, stimulate mitosis and antibody synthesis in lymphocytes, and induce activation of plasma cells.Complement System Proteins: Serum glycoproteins participating in the host defense mechanism of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION that creates the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX. Included are glycoproteins in the various pathways of complement activation (CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; ALTERNATIVE COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; and LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY).Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Adenylate Cyclase: An enzyme of the lyase class that catalyzes the formation of CYCLIC AMP and pyrophosphate from ATP. EC

*  Thyroid Antibodies: The Test
... and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody (TSHRAb) tests, used to help diagnose autoimmune thyroid diseases such as ... Learn about thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) ... Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin; TSI. Formal name: Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody; Thyroglobulin Antibody; Thyroid Stimulating ... Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody, Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin. TRAb, TSHR Ab, TSI. Graves disease. When a ...
*  Table of Contents - June 21, 1975, 2 (5972) | The BMJ
Placental transmission of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins. Br Med J 1975; 2 :665 (Published 21 June 1975) ...
*  Graves Disease - Basedow Disease Summary Report | CureHunter
These autoantibodies activate the TSH receptor, thereby stimulating the THYROID GLAND and hypersecretion of THYROID HORMONES. ... It is an autoimmune disorder that produces antibodies against the THYROID STIMULATING HORMONE RECEPTOR. ... Thyroid-Stimulating ImmunoglobulinsIBA 10/01/2002 - "Neonatal Graves' disease tends to resolve spontaneously within 3-12 weeks ... 04/01/1987 - "Many reports of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) in relation to treatment of Graves' disease have been ...
*  Neonatal thyroid disorders | ADC Fetal & Neonatal Edition
TSH, Thyroid stimulating hormone; fT4, free thyroxine; TSI, thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin; PTU, propylthiouracil. ... Immunoglobulin G inhibitor of thyroid-stimulating antibody is a cause of delay in the onset of neonatal Graves' disease. J Clin ... The role of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins of Graves's disease in neonatal thyrotoxicosis. Br J Obstet Gynaecol1978;85:837 ... The cause of hyperthyroidism in the newborn is usually transplacental passage of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins (TSIs) ...
*  Spinal muscular atrophy - throat swollen, can't sleep, wheezy & gasping for air, should I see doctor
... thyroid - Answer: Sincerely my friend you need to see/talk to a specialist doc. who would be ... ... Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI). Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody. Anti-TSH receptor antibody ... a swollen thyroid can mean it's causing anxiety, etc. Did your doctor run a thyroid screen? Many of the things you describe can ... In this day and age-2011-my thyroid went wacko-and I had a young doctor that was treating the symptoms of my thyroid troubles- ...
*  Private MD - Buy Lab Tests Online
Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin (TSI) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $89.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH). Description: The TSH test is used to monitor thyroid function and diagnose thyroid disorders ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Free T4 Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $52.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $47.99. More Info Add To Cart ...
*  Northside Hospital - Graves disease
Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) *Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody *Anti-TSH receptor antibody ... However, thyroid surgery or radioactive iodine usually will cause hypothyroidism. Without getting the correct dose of thyroid ... It is caused by an abnormal immune system response that causes the thyroid gland to produce too much thyroid hormone. Graves ... If the body makes too much thyroid hormone, the condition is called hyperthyroidism. (An underactive thyroid leads to ...
*  Clinical Trials sub-cluster 9
CONTEXT: Immunoglobulins stimulating the TSH receptor (TSI) influence thyroid function and likely mediate extrathyroidal ... thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH) level and ultrasonographically measured thyroid volume, both commonly available in thyroid ... A novel thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin bioassay is a functional indicator of activity ... ... Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and morbidity from cardiovascular disease and fractures in ... ...
*  MTB Europe biotechnology news
Diagnostic Hybrids releases Thyretain for specific detection of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin. Thyretain is the first FDA- ... Antibiotic stimulates production of itself across bacteria population. An antibiotic has been found to stimulate its own ... Functional thyroid tissue generated from stem cells in mice. The discovery could allow the treatment of patients who suffer ... Magnetic nanoparticles stimulate stem cells to regenerate bone. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with targeting proteins can ...
*  Medical Technology Business Europe diagnostics news
Diagnostic Hybrids releases Thyretain for specific detection of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin. Thyretain is the first FDA- ... The X Prize Foundation and Qualcomm Foundation have launched the US$10 million Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize to stimulate the ... Kent-based diagnostic technology company Vivacta has announced that following successful development of its thyroid function ... within one and a half minutes by using laser stimulated fluorescence. 14 Nov 2014 ...
*  Quantification of cells expressing the thyrotropin receptor in extraocular muscles in thyroid associated orbitopathy | British...
The combination of absent thyroid peroxidase antibodies and high thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels in Graves' disease ... Changes in thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins during antithyroid therapy. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1979;48:572-6. ... American Thyroid Association. European Thyroid Association, Latin-American Thyroid Association, Japanese and Asia-Oceania ... A) Normal human thyroid as positive immunostaining control. TSHR is located at the baso-lateral pole of thyroid cells (×250). ( ...
*  Diet, Medication and Home remedy for Hyperthyroidism
Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) crosses the placenta to stimulate the fetal thyroid. Carbimazole also crosses the ... Thyroid storm. Fluorosis. Acrodermatitis enteropathica. Metal fume fever. Keshan disease. Metabolic Syndrome ... Hyperthyroidism (thyroid overactivity, thyrotoxicosis) is common, affecting perhaps 2-5% of all females at some time and with a ... Nearly all cases (, 99%) are caused by intrinsic thyroid disease; a pituitary cause is extremely rare.. Hyperthyroidism symptom ...
*  Private MD - Buy Lab Tests Online
Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin (TSI) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $89.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Free T4 Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $52.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $47.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Immunoglobulins IgA, IgG, IgM, Quantitative, Serum Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $62.49. More Info Add To ...
*  Private MD - Buy Lab Tests Online
Thyroid-Stimulating Immunoglobulin (TSI) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $89.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid Profile w/ TSH: Free Thyroxine Index (FTI);Thyroxine (T4); Thyroid Hormone Binding Ratio (T3 Uptake); Thyroid- ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and Free T4 Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $52.99. More Info Add To Cart ... Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) Add to Wishlist *Build Your Own Panel Eligible [?] $47.99. More Info Add To Cart ...
*  Graves' disease in infants and children - ONA
TRS-Ab can be evaluated by measuring either a thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) level or a thyrotropin binding inhibitor ... Serum TSH receptor stimulating antibody (TRS-Ab) tests confirming Graves' disease as the etiology. *. Thyroid stimulating ... 1. Anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs) - These work by inhibiting further production of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland. ... 1. Anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs) - ATDs work by inhibiting further production of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland. ...
*  Rituximab Treatment of Graves' Dysthyroid Ophthalmopathy - Full Text View -
... prior to thyroid treatment. *Elevated thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin, antithyroid peroxidase antibody or antithyroglobulin ... Reduction (25%) of elevated antibody levels- serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI), antithyroidperoxidase antibody ( ... Evidence of thyroid abnormality (hyper or hypo thyroid) ... Ophthalmopathy or disease activity as measured by the thyroid ... Thyroid Diseases. Endocrine System Diseases. Hyperthyroidism. Autoimmune Diseases. Immune System Diseases. Rituximab. ...
*  2017 AACC
Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) assay can help make diagnosis of Graves' disease faster and easier. ... Thyroid stimulating antibodies are the hallmark of Graves' disease (GD). Their detection in the blood, along with other ... The IMMULITE TSI assay can measure thyroid stimulating antibodies with a high clinical sensitivity and specificity of 98.3% and ...
*  Graves' Disease - Causes , Symptoms, Complications & Treatment | Everyday Health
... disease is a condition that occurs when your immune system makes an antibody known as thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI). ... disease is a condition that occurs when your immune system makes an antibody known as thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI). ... Anti-thyroid medicines: These drugs prevent your thyroid gland from producing too much of its hormones. Common anti-thyroid ... Thyroid storm: This life-threatening complication of Graves' disease involves a sudden increase in thyroid hormones.. A thyroid ...
*  PPT - Endocrine Physiology Thyroid PowerPoint Presentation - ID:3357360
Endocrine Physiology Thyroid. Bob Bing-You, MD, MEd, MBA Medical Director Maine Center for Endocrinology. A case of fatigue. 28 ... TSII [Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin]. *High concordance rate, 2-hit hypothesis [?Yersinia]. Thyroiditis*May be viral cause ... Markers of Thyroid Cancer -What is thyroid cancer? . thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer. thyroid cancer is a ... Thyroid Hormone*Lack of thyroid secretion causes BMR to fall 40%. *Extreme thyroid hormone excesses can cause BMR ,60-100% ...
*  Hyperthyroidism (graves disease), Biology
Graves diseases is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children and is usually associated with an enlarged thyroid ... There is no specific cause of this disease but it is apparently caused by a serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin and has ... Graves diseases is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children and is usually associated with an enlarged thyroid ... Therapeutic management consists of anti thyroid drugs, subtotal thyroidectomy and ablation with radio iodine (131 - lodide). ...
*  PPT - Schecter Conference PowerPoint Presentation - ID:3221202
Thyroid CA. Ginger Xu PGY-3 General Surgery Oct 27, 2010. Thyroid Embyrology and Anatomy. Slideshow 3221202 by dara ... Patients with Graves disease have increased levels of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins that increase iodine uptake despite ... thyroid-stimulating hormone) from the pituitary  TSH binds to TSH receptors on the thyroidstimulates release of TH (T3/T4 ... Other findings include a high thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) level, low serum cholesterol, lymphocytosis, and ...
*  TSI Blood Test - Request A Test
Ordering the TSI Blood Test from Request A Test is an easy and convenient way to get a thyroid test. Call or go online to order ... The TSI blood test is typically used to aid in the diagnosis of autoimmune disorders which affect the thyroid. ... Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin) Blood Test is used to aid in the diagnosis of autoimmune disorders which affect the Thyroid ... Human Thyroid Stimulator (HTS), Thyroid Stimulating Antibody (TSAb), Long-acting Thyroid Stimulator (LATS), Thyretain ...
*  Grave's Disease
In Graves' disease these antibodies (called the thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) or thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins ( ... Primary Thyroid Lymphoma. Radioactive Iodine. Thyroid Function Tests. Thyroid Hormone Treatment. Thyroid Nodules. Thyroid ... Medullary Thyroid Cancer Nuclear Radiation & the Thyroid. Older Patients and Thyroid Disease. Papillary & Follicular Thyroid ... Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease. FNA Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules. Goiter. ...
*  Metabolism Disorders | Fremont Healthcare System
Thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) test. *Antithyroid antibody test / thyroid peroxidase antibody test (TPOab) ... Your doctor can provide tests to determine how well your thyroid is doing its job, and to discover whether you have a condition ... If you believe you may have a thyroid disorder or other metabolic disorder, ask your doctor at Washington Township Medical ...

Thyrotropic cellFollicular cellCD4 immunoadhesin: CD4 immunoadhesin is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of a combination of CD4 and the fragment crystallizable region.SeroconversionHypothyroidismSymptoms and signs of Graves' disease: Virtually all the symptoms and signs of Graves' disease result from the direct and indirect effects of hyperthyroidism, with exceptions being Graves' ophthalmopathy, goitre and pretibial myxedema (which are caused by the autoimmune processes of Graves' disease). These clinical manifestations are dramatic and involve virtually every system in the body.List of MeSH codes (D12.776.124): This is a sub-part (blood proteins only) of List of MeSH codes (D12.776), itself a part of the list of the "D" codes for MeSH.Thyroid hormone: The thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone, thyroxine (T4), are tyrosine-based hormones produced by the thyroid gland that are primarily responsible for regulation of metabolism. T3 and T4 are partially composed of iodine (see molecular model).Reverse triiodothyronineImmunoglobulin heavy chainHyperthyroidismLennox–Gastaut syndromeIodine deficiencyThyroglobulin: Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a 660 kDa, dimeric protein produced by the follicular cells of the thyroid and used entirely within the thyroid gland. Thyroglobulin protein accounts for approximately half of the protein content of the thyroid gland.TRH stimulation test: Prior to the availability of sensitive TSH assays, thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH)Immunoglobulin light chainIodothyronine deiodinase: Iodothyronine deiodinases ( and ) are a subfamily of deiodinase enzymes important in the activation and deactivation of thyroid hormones. Thyroxine (T4), the precursor of 3,5,3’-triiodothyronine (T3) is transformed into T3 by deiodinase activity.Congenital hypothyroidismEuthyroid sick syndromeFramework region: In molecular biology, a framework region is a region in the variable domain of a protein which belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily, and which is less "variable" than the CDR.Infiltrative ophthalmopathy: Infiltrative ophthalmopathy is found in Graves disease and resembles exophthalmos, except that the blurry or double vision is acquired because of weakness in the ocular muscles of the eye. In addition, there is no known correlation with the patient's thyroid levels.Autoantibody: An autoantibody is an antibody (a type of protein) produced by the immune system that is directed against one or more of the individual's own proteins. Many autoimmune diseases, (notably lupus erythematosus), are caused by such autoantibodies.PropylthiouracilGoitreThyroid cancerSieved ultraspherical polynomials: In mathematics, the two families c(x;k) and B(x;k) of sieved ultraspherical polynomials, introduced by Waleed Al-Salam, W.R.MyxedemaSodium perchlorateImmunoassay: An immunoassay is a biochemical test that measures the presence or concentration of a macromolecule in a solution through the use of an antibody or immunoglobulin. The macromolecule detected by the immunoassay is often referred to as an "analyte" and is in many cases a protein.DiiodotyrosineThyroid hormone resistanceProlactin cellImmunoglobulin class switching: Immunoglobulin class switching, also known as isotype switching, isotypic commutation or class-switch recombination (CSR), is a biological mechanism that changes a B cell's production of immunoglobulin (antibodies) from one type to another, such as from the isotype IgM to the isotype IgG. During this process, the constant-region portion of the antibody heavy chain is changed, but the variable region of the heavy chain stays the same (the terms "variable" and "constant" refer to changes or lack thereof between antibodies that target different epitopes).TriiodidePolyclonal B cell response: Polyclonal B cell response is a natural mode of immune response exhibited by the adaptive immune system of mammals. It ensures that a single antigen is recognized and attacked through its overlapping parts, called epitopes, by multiple clones of B cell.Toxic nodular goiterHashimoto's encephalopathy: Hashimoto's Encephalopathy is a rare autoimmune disease associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It was first described in 1966.Fragment antigen-binding: The fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) is a region on an antibody that binds to antigens. It is composed of one constant and one variable domain of each of the heavy and the light chain.ATC code J06: ==J06A Immune sera==Autoimmune thyroiditisCrosstalk (biology): Biological crosstalk refers to instances in which one or more components of one signal transduction pathway affects another. This can be achieved through a number of ways with the most common form being crosstalk between proteins of signalling cascades.Coles PhillipsThyroidectomyDiary TourSomatotropic cellPituitary adenomaDysprosium: Dysprosium is a chemical element with the symbol Dy and atomic number 66. It is a rare earth element with a metallic silver luster.Monoclonal antibody therapyCell ablation: Cell ablation (also known as tissue ablation) is a biotechnological tool for studying cell lineage and/or function and is a form of ablation. The process consists of selectively destroying one or multiple cells in a given organism by any chosen means.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Anterior pituitary: A major organ of the endocrine system, the anterior pituitary (also called the adenohypophysis or pars anterior), is the glandular, anterior lobe that together with the posterior lobe (posterior pituitary, or the neurohypophysis) makes up the pituitary gland (hypophysis). The anterior pituitary regulates several physiological processes including stress, growth, reproduction and lactation.Raji cell: Raji cell line is the first continuous human cell line from hematopoietic origin. The cell lines produce an unusual strain of Epstein-Barr virus which will both transform cord blood lymphocytes and induce early antigens in Raji cells.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Subacute thyroiditisEva Engvall: Eva Engvall, born 1940, is one of the scientists who invented ELISA in 1971.Eva Engvall, The Scientist 1995, 9(18):8

(1/179) Development of an animal model of autoimmune thyroid eye disease.

In previous studies we have transferred thyroiditis to naive BALB/c and NOD mice with human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR)-primed splenocytes. Because the TSHR has been implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease (TED) we have examined the orbits of recipients of TSHR-primed T cells, generated using a TSHR fusion protein or by genetic immunization. In the NOD mice, 25 of 26 animals treated with TSHR-primed T cells developed thyroiditis with considerable follicular destruction, numerous activated and CD8+ T cells, and immunoreactivity for IFN-gamma. Thyroxine levels were reduced. Thyroiditis was not induced in controls. None of the NOD animals developed any orbital pathology. Thirty-five BALB/c mice received TSHR-primed spleen cells. Thyroiditis was induced in 60-100% and comprised activated T cells, B cells, and immunoreactivity for IL-4 and IL-10. Autoantibodies to the receptor were induced, including TSH binding inhibiting Igs. A total of 17 of 25 BALB/c orbits displayed changes consisting of accumulation of adipose tissue, edema caused by periodic acid Schiff-positive material, dissociation of the muscle fibers, the presence of TSHR immunoreactivity, and infiltration by lymphocytes and mast cells. No orbital changes or thyroiditis were observed in control BALB/c mice. We have induced orbital pathology having many parallels with human TED, only in BALB/c mice, suggesting that a Th2 autoimmune response to the TSHR may be a prerequisite for the development of TED.  (+info)

(2/179) A case of Graves' disease associated with autoimmune hepatitis and mixed connective tissue disease.

The patient was a woman of forty-eight. Liver dysfunction was pointed out at the age of forty-five. She was admitted to hospital because of her hyperthyroidism. Her palmar skin was wet and her fingers were swollen like sausages. She had a diffuse and elastic hard goiter with a rough surface. The serum levels of free T3 (9.6 pg/mL) and free T4 (3.76 ng/dL) were high and that of TSH (0.11 microU/mL) was low. The activity of TSH-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) was 89%. The uptake rate of 123I to the thyroid was 55.1% and the uptake pattern was nearly diffuse. The goiter was proved to contain several nodules by ultrasonography, but aspiration cytology showed no malignant cells. She was diagnosed to have Graves' disease with adenomatous goiter. She also had high ALT (34 IU/L) and gamma-globulin (1.97 g/dL). She had positive antinuclear antibody (speckled type), positive anti-ribosomal nuclear protein antibody, and positive LE cell phenomenon. The liver biopsy revealed mononuclear cell infiltration with fibrosis in the portal area. These data indicated that she also had autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). The analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) showed positive A11 which had been reported to relate to Graves' disease, and positive DR4 which had been reported to relate to AIH and MCTD. These results suggested that HLA would determine susceptibility to three distinct autoimmune diseases in this case.  (+info)

(3/179) Clinical significance of a sensitive assay for thyroid-stimulating antibodies in Graves' disease using polyethylene glycol at high concentrations and porcine thyroid cells.

The Inui and Ochi group recently reported that cAMP production by porcine thyroid cells (PTC) was augmented more by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 22.5% precipitated fractions from almost all Graves' sera than those of PEG 12.5%. In the present study, thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) activity was determined with PTC and prepared crude Ig fractions precipitated by two different concentrations of PEG (final concentrations 13.5% and 22.5%) from sera obtained from 117 Graves' patients. The activity of TSI determined by the PEG 13.5% assay and activity determined by the PEG 22.5% assay were designated as thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) and sTSAb, respectively. At first we studied 55 TSAb-positive patients with untreated hyperthyroid Graves' disease and classified them according to the TSAb activity-below 500% (group 1) and above 500% (group 2). The positive stimulatory effect, arbitrarily defined as the ratio of sTSAb to TSAb, being more than 1.2, was observed in 85% of patients, and group 1 had a significantly (P<0.025) greater stimulatory effect (34/35, 97.1%) than group 2 (13/20, 65%). Subsequently, in 29 TSAb-negative patients, sTSAb was measured and detected in 26 (89.7%). Finally, sTSAb, TSAb and TBII were compared between patients presenting with recurrent Graves' disease and those with silent thyroiditis after withdrawal of antithyroid drug treatment for Graves' disease. sTSAb was detected in all 14 relapsed patients, but none of the 9 patients with silent thyroiditis had detectable sTSAb. In contrast, TSAb and TBII activities were found in only 7 (50.0%) of the 14 relapsed cases. The present paper demonstrated that the assay with a higher PEG concentration was found to be sensitive, specific and useful for the diagnosis and follow-up of Graves' disease after drug withdrawal, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear.  (+info)

(4/179) Limitations of the semisynthetic library approach for obtaining human monoclonal autoantibodies to the thyrotropin receptor of Graves' disease.

Graves' disease (GD) is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against the TSH-receptor (TSH-R) which are pathogenic and, upon binding to the receptor, trigger intracellular signal transduction. The autoantibodies are oligoclonal and as they are responsible for disease activity, their characterization would lead to a better understanding of the development of GD. Attempts to isolate anti-TSH-R antibodies from patients have proved to be difficult due to the exceedingly low serum levels due to rarity of these B cells, together with difficulties in obtaining purified TSH-R capable of interacting with patients autoantibodies. We employed phage antibody display technology and performed selection with a previously characterized semisynthetic antibody library on the purified extracellular ectodomain of the TSH-R. We report the isolation of six different anti-TSH-R monoclonal phage antibodies (moPhabs) from this library. All the moPhabs recognized TSH-R and its recombinant fragments by Western blotting, but failed to recognize the native TSH-R by flow cytometry. Consequently, the moPhabs did not lead to TSH-R activation. As these were the first moPhabs to TSH-R, they were analysed in terms of nucleotide and amino acid sequence and epitope specificity on the receptor. The moPhabs used immunoglobulin VH1 and VH3 germ line genes, all associated with Vlambda3 genes. Interestingly, the CDR3 regions of all moPhabs were remarkably similar, though not identical. In light of the common CDR3 usage, the epitopes recognized on TSH-R appeared to be restricted to amino acids residues 405-411 and 357-364. In summary, our results show that semisynthetic libraries may be limited in isolating human monoclonal antibodies that resemble pathogenic antithyrotropin receptor autoantibodies present in patients with GD. It is likely that until preparations of purified TSH-R that can be recognized by patients autoantibodies become available, similar to the recently described glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored TSH-R ectodomain, monoclonal antibodies from phage antibody display to TSH-R will be limited for isolating the rare, pathogenic antibodies of GD.  (+info)

(5/179) Thyroid function during pregnancy.

BACKGROUND: This Case Conference reviews the normal changes in thyroid activity that occur during pregnancy and the proper use of laboratory tests for the diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction in the pregnant patient. CASE: A woman in the 18th week of pregnancy presented with tachycardia, increased blood pressure, severe vomiting, increased total and free thyroid hormone concentrations, a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration within the reference interval, and an increased human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) beta-subunit concentration. ISSUES: During pregnancy, normal thyroid activity undergoes significant changes, including a two- to threefold increase in thyroxine-binding globulin concentrations, a 30-100% increase in total triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations, increased serum thyroglobulin, and increased renal iodide clearance. Furthermore, hCG has mild thyroid stimulating activity. Pregnancy produces an overall increase in thyroid activity, which allows the healthy individual to remain in a net euthyroid state. However, both hyper- and hypothyroidism can occur in pregnant patients. In addition, two pregnancy-specific conditions, hyperemesis gravidarum and gestational trophoblastic disease, can lead to clinical hyperthyroidism. The normal changes in thyroid activity and the association of pregnancy with conditions that can cause hyperthyroidism necessitates careful interpretation of thyroid function tests during pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Assessment of thyroid function during pregnancy should be done with a careful clinical evaluation of the patient's symptoms as well as measurement of TSH and free, not total, thyroid hormones. Measurement of thyroid autoantibodies may also be useful in selected cases to detect maternal Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis and to assess risk of fetal or neonatal consequences of maternal thyroid dysfunction.  (+info)

(6/179) Regulation of thyrotropin receptor protein expression in insect cells.

Expression of large quantities of conformationally intact thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) is essential to understand the structure-function relationship of the receptor. We expressed three different constructs of full-length human TSHR in insect cells: (a) a TSHR cDNA lacking signal sequence (TSHR-ns), (b) a TSHR cDNA containing human TSHR signal sequence (TSHR-hs) and (c) a TSHR cDNA with baculovirus envelope protein encoded signal sequence gp-67 (TSHR-gp). No unique protein band, corresponding to any of these recombinant proteins, was visible upon Coomassie Blue staining after SDS-PAGE. However, Western blot using TSHR specific monoclonal antibody showed unique bands around 80, 100 and 100 kDa in TSHR-ns, TSHR-hs and TSHR-gp virus infected insect cells respectively. All three full-length TSHR proteins could neutralize the TSH binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII) activity from sera of experimental animals. However, only glycosylated proteins (TSHR-hs and TSHR-gp) neutralized the TBII activity of sera from autoimmune thyroid patients, confirming the importance of glycosylation for patient autoantibody reactivity. Expression levels of full-length TSHR proteins were much lower than the levels of similarly produced corresponding ectodomains of TSHR proteins. Southern blot and Northern blot analyses showed that DNA and RNA levels in full-length TSHR virus infected insect cells were comparable to the levels found in cells infected with viruses encoding only the ectodomain of TSHR. These data suggest that full-length TSHR expression is very low and is regulated at the translational level.  (+info)

(7/179) Serum levels of soluble Fas in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

AIM: To assess levels of soluble Fas (sFas) in the sera of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. METHODS: The subjects in this study were 43 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and 11 normal subjects. Serum levels of sFas were determined by sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, serum levels of thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAB) were also measured in all the patients. RESULTS: The mean serum level of sFas was 1.35 (SD 2.03) ng/ml in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, and 0.93 (0.32) ng/ml in normal subjects. Serum levels of sFas in the subgroup of 24 patients with diplopia (1.98 (2.56) ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the subgroup of 19 patients without diplopia (0.56 (0.24) ng/ml) and normal subjects (p <0.001). Serum levels of sFas in the subgroup of 27 patients with extraocular muscle hypertrophy (1.81 (2. 46) ng/ml) were significantly higher than those in the subgroup of 16 patients without extraocular muscle hypertrophy (0.58 (0.26) ng/ml) among the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and normal subjects (p <0.001). Serum levels of sFas were not significantly different between the subgroup of 24 patients with proptosis (1.15 (0.98) ng/ml) and the subgroup of 19 patients without proptosis (1. 61 (2.88)). In contrast, the serum levels of TSAB in the subgroup of patients with proptosis (723% (1161%)) were significantly higher than those in the subgroup of patients without proptosis (194% (122%)) (p <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Elevated sFas levels were associated with extraocular muscle disorders but not with proptosis. On the other hand, elevated TSAB levels were associated with proptosis but not with extraocular muscle disorders, suggesting different immunological mechanisms for the extraocular muscle disorders and proptosis in Graves' ophthalmopathy. Determination of the serum levels of sFas and TSAB could provide useful markers for evaluation of the immunological processes involved in the development of Graves' ophthalmopathy.  (+info)

(8/179) Serum leptin levels and bioelectrical impedance assessment of body composition in patients with Graves' disease and hypothyroidism.

We investigated whether thyroid status modulates serum leptin concentrations and body composition as determined by bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA). The percent body fat mass (%FM) in male Graves' disease was significantly lower than that in age- and sex- matched normal subjects, at the levels of 11.4+/-6.4% (mean+/-SD) vs 19.9+/-9.2% for men (n=12, P<0.05) but not for women (22.6+/-7.6% vs 24.9+/-13.1%, n=28). In contrast, in female hypothyroidism (n=11) %FM was significantly higher than that in normal subjects (32.9+/-11.5%, P<0.01). Among other body composition parameters, the percentage of body water (%BW), and lean body mass (LBM) were significantly lower in hypothyroid patients, and the ECM (extracellular mass)/BCM (body cell mass) ratio was significantly (P<0.0001) increased in Graves' disease which was the result of marked depletion of BCM with concomitant expansion of ECM. The serum leptin levels were significantly decreased in male Graves' patients (2.3+/-0.7 ng/ml, P<0.05), whereas in female Graves' patients (8.8+/-5.9 ng/ml) and patients with hypothyroidism (9.5+/-7.6 ng/ml), the levels were not different from those of normal controls matched for BMI or %FM. There was a positive correlation between serum leptin levels and %FM in female Graves' patients (r=0.635, P=0.001) and in hypothyroid patients (r=0.801, P=0.014) but not in male Graves patients. There was no significant relationship between serum leptin levels and thyroid hormones, TRAb, or TSAb. In euthyroid obese subjects there was a positive relationship between serum leptin levels and serum TSH levels (r=0.37, P<0.01). These results suggest that hyperthyroidism is characterized by the decreased fat mass and serum leptin levels in men, but female patients appear to be resistant to the effect of thyroid hormones. Together with previous reports, thyroid status has a minor role in the regulation of serum leptin levels.  (+info)

  • abnormalities
  • From the second trimester, the continued transfer of T4 from mother to fetus remains important for those babies with primary thyroid abnormalities, as despite cord blood levels only reaching about 40% of normal in those with a total inability to synthesise T4, 3 neurological development is near normal if replacement is started promptly. (
  • destroys
  • Iodine-131 in an empirical dose (usually 200-500 MBq), accumulates in the thyroid and destroys the gland by local radiation - though it takes several months to be fully effective. (
  • Radioiodine therapy involves taking iodine-131 by mouth, which is then concentrated in the thyroid and destroys it over weeks to months. (
  • Further signs that may be seen on physical examination are most commonly a diffusely enlarged (usually symmetric), nontender thyroid, lid lag, excessive lacrimation due to Graves' ophthalmopathy, arrhythmias of the heart, such as sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, and premature ventricular contractions, and hypertension. (
  • symptoms
  • The reason I said it could be a giant anxiety attack is because I had those exact symptoms you described, but I already was at the docs office at the time, he checked me out, my thyroid was ok, I was moving air in my lungs alright, had an EKG to check my heart, and every thing was normal. (
  • This situation means that bleeding would occur in the thyroid, which could cause the nodules to break down, reversing the symptoms. (
  • gene
  • Immunoglobulin superfamily, member 1 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein encoded by the IGSF1 gene, which maps to the X chromosome in humans and other mammalian species. (
  • orbital
  • Orbital tissues from 30 patients with TAO were compared with those of 20 patients with strabismus and four with non-thyroid orbital inflammation. (
  • The hypothesis is that antigens shared by the thyroid and the orbital tissues are the targets of a cellular autoimmune reaction. (
  • levels
  • This abrupt withdrawal of progesterone in the presence of high prolactin levels stimulates the copious milk production of Secretory Activation. (
  • When the breast is stimulated, prolactin levels in the blood rise, peak in about 45 minutes, and return to the pre-breastfeeding state about three hours later. (
  • significantly
  • Risk of carcinogenesis has been long debated, but it is now clear that overall cancer incidence and mortality are not increased after radioactive iodine (and indeed are significantly reduced in some studies) but the risk of thyroid cancer is significantly increased although the risk remains very low in absolute terms. (
  • liver
  • It is located in the liver, kidney, and the thyroid and is important for T3 production. (
  • primarily
  • It is primarily found on the surface of the thyroid epithelial cells, but also found on adipose tissue and fibroblasts. (
  • Dopamine acts primarily through the reward centers of the brain, whereas serononin primarily acts through effects on neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) [stimulate appetite] and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) [induce satiety] neurons located in the arcuate nucleus. (