Guanine NucleotidesGuanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: Protein factors that promote the exchange of GTP for GDP bound to GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.GuanineRho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: Signaling proteins which function as master molecular switches by activating Rho GTPases through conversion of guanine nucleotides. Rho GTPases in turn control many aspects of cell behavior through the regulation of multiple downstream signal transduction pathways.Guanosine Triphosphate: Guanosine 5'-(tetrahydrogen triphosphate). A guanine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety.Nucleotides: The monomeric units from which DNA or RNA polymers are constructed. They consist of a purine or pyrimidine base, a pentose sugar, and a phosphate group. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Guanosine Diphosphate: A guanine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety.ras Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors: A family of GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTORS that are specific for RAS PROTEINS.GTP-Binding Proteins: Regulatory proteins that act as molecular switches. They control a wide range of biological processes including: receptor signaling, intracellular signal transduction pathways, and protein synthesis. Their activity is regulated by factors that control their ability to bind to and hydrolyze GTP to GDP. EC 3.6.1.-.Guanylyl Imidodiphosphate: A non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP, in which the oxygen atom bridging the beta to the gamma phosphate is replaced by a nitrogen atom. It binds tightly to G-protein in the presence of Mg2+. The nucleotide is a potent stimulator of ADENYLYL CYCLASES.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Guanosine 5'-O-(3-Thiotriphosphate): Guanosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate), monoanhydride with phosphorothioic acid. A stable GTP analog which enjoys a variety of physiological actions such as stimulation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, cyclic AMP accumulation, and activation of specific proto-oncogenes.Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors: Protein factors that inhibit the dissociation of GDP from GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.GTP Phosphohydrolases: Enzymes that hydrolyze GTP to GDP. EC 3.6.1.-.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-vav: Proto-oncogene proteins that are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for RHO GTPASES. They also function as signal transducing adaptor proteins.Thionucleotides: Nucleotides in which the base moiety is substituted with one or more sulfur atoms.ras-GRF1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is expressed primarily in neuronal tissue and may be specific for the Ha-ras homolog of the RAS PROTEINS.Adenine Nucleotidescdc42 GTP-Binding Protein: A member of the Rho family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. It is associated with a diverse array of cellular functions including cytoskeletal changes, filopodia formation and transport through the GOLGI APPARATUS. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.ADP-Ribosylation Factors: MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that were initially recognized as allosteric activators of the MONO(ADP-RIBOSE) TRANSFERASE of the CHOLERA TOXIN catalytic subunit. They are involved in vesicle trafficking and activation of PHOSPHOLIPASE D. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Adenylate Cyclase: An enzyme of the lyase class that catalyzes the formation of CYCLIC AMP and pyrophosphate from ATP. EC 4.6.1.1.rac1 GTP-Binding Protein: A rac GTP-binding protein involved in regulating actin filaments at the plasma membrane. It controls the development of filopodia and lamellipodia in cells and thereby influences cellular motility and adhesion. It is also involved in activation of NADPH OXIDASE. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.rho GTP-Binding Proteins: A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are involved in regulation of actin organization, gene expression and cell cycle progression. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Purine Nucleotides: Purines attached to a RIBOSE and a phosphate that can polymerize to form DNA and RNA.ral Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor that stimulates the dissociation of GDP from RAL GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. It also has GDP exchange activity towards other MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.IMP Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of inosine 5'-phosphate to xanthosine 5'-phosphate in the presence of NAD. EC 1.1.1.205.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.rhoA GTP-Binding Protein: A RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEIN involved in regulating signal transduction pathways that control assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.rac GTP-Binding Proteins: A sub-family of RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that is involved in regulating the organization of cytoskeletal filaments. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.GTPase-Activating Proteins: Proteins that activate the GTPase of specific GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Guanine Nucleotide-Releasing Factor 2: A 145-kDa guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is specific for rap1 and ras GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. It associates with SH3 domains of the crk family of signaling proteins.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Guanosine Monophosphate: A guanine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety and found widely in nature.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Virulence Factors, Bordetella: A set of BACTERIAL ADHESINS and TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL produced by BORDETELLA organisms that determine the pathogenesis of BORDETELLA INFECTIONS, such as WHOOPING COUGH. They include filamentous hemagglutinin; FIMBRIAE PROTEINS; pertactin; PERTUSSIS TOXIN; ADENYLATE CYCLASE TOXIN; dermonecrotic toxin; tracheal cytotoxin; Bordetella LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES; and tracheal colonization factor.Pertussis Toxin: One of the virulence factors produced by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS. It is a multimeric protein composed of five subunits S1 - S5. S1 contains mono ADPribose transferase activity.Guanine Deaminase: An enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of guanine to form xanthine. EC 3.5.4.3.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.rap1 GTP-Binding Proteins: A genetically related subfamily of RAP GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that share homology with RAS PROTEINS. They bind to Ras effectors but do not activate them, therefore they may antagonize the effects of RAS PROTEINS. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1: ADP-RIBOSYLATION FACTOR 1 is involved in regulating intracellular transport by modulating the interaction of coat proteins with organelle membranes in the early secretory pathway. It is a component of COAT PROTEIN COMPLEX I. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.rho-Specific Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitors: A subcategory of guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors that are specific for RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.SOS1 Protein: A mammalian homolog of the DROSOPHILA SON OF SEVENLESS PROTEIN. It is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RAS PROTEINS.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.rap GTP-Binding Proteins: A family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are related to RAS PROTEINS.This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose: An ester formed between the aldehydic carbon of RIBOSE and the terminal phosphate of ADENOSINE DIPHOSPHATE. It is produced by the hydrolysis of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by a variety of enzymes, some of which transfer an ADP-ribosyl group to target proteins.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2B: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor that acts to restore EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR-2 to its GTP bound form.Adenylate Cyclase Toxin: One of the virulence factors produced by virulent BORDETELLA organisms. It is a bifunctional protein with both ADENYLYL CYCLASES and hemolysin components.Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras): Cellular proteins encoded by the H-ras, K-ras and N-ras genes. The proteins have GTPase activity and are involved in signal transduction as monomeric GTP-binding proteins. Elevated levels of p21 c-ras have been associated with neoplasia. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Sodium Fluoride: A source of inorganic fluoride which is used topically to prevent dental caries.ras Proteins: Small, monomeric GTP-binding proteins encoded by ras genes (GENES, RAS). The protooncogene-derived protein, PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN P21(RAS), plays a role in normal cellular growth, differentiation and development. The oncogene-derived protein (ONCOGENE PROTEIN P21(RAS)) can play a role in aberrant cellular regulation during neoplastic cell transformation (CELL TRANSFORMATION, NEOPLASTIC). This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.ral GTP-Binding Proteins: A family of ubiquitously expressed MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are involved in intracellular signal transduction. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.rab GTP-Binding Proteins: A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that play a key role in cellular secretory and endocytic pathways. EC 3.6.1.-.rho Guanine Nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor alpha: An abundantly-expressed rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor subtype that regulates a broad variety of RHO GTPASES.Cholera Toxin: An ENTEROTOXIN from VIBRIO CHOLERAE. It consists of two major protomers, the heavy (H) or A subunit and the B protomer which consists of 5 light (L) or B subunits. The catalytic A subunit is proteolytically cleaved into fragments A1 and A2. The A1 fragment is a MONO(ADP-RIBOSE) TRANSFERASE. The B protomer binds cholera toxin to intestinal epithelial cells, and facilitates the uptake of the A1 fragment. The A1 catalyzed transfer of ADP-RIBOSE to the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G PROTEINS activates the production of CYCLIC AMP. Increased levels of cyclic AMP are thought to modulate release of fluid and electrolytes from intestinal crypt cells.Guanosine: A purine nucleoside that has guanine linked by its N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is a component of ribonucleic acid and its nucleotides play important roles in metabolism. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Son of Sevenless Proteins: A class of RAS GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTORS that are genetically related to the Son of Sevenless gene from DROSOPHILA. Sevenless refers to genetic mutations in DROSOPHILA that cause loss of the R7 photoreceptor which is required to see UV light.COS Cells: CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins: A class of monomeric, low molecular weight (20-25 kDa) GTP-binding proteins that regulate a variety of intracellular processes. The GTP bound form of the protein is active and limited by its inherent GTPase activity, which is controlled by an array of GTPase activators, GDP dissociation inhibitors, and guanine nucleotide exchange factors. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Cyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Deoxyguanine Nucleotides: Guanine nucleotides which contain deoxyribose as the sugar moiety.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.rab5 GTP-Binding Proteins: A genetically related subfamily of RAB GTP-BINDING PROTEINS involved in transport from the cell membrane to early endosomes. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins: A genetically related subfamily of RAB GTP-BINDING PROTEINS involved in vesicle transport between the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and the GOLGI APPARATUS and through early Golgi compartments. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Transducin: A heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein that mediates the light activation signal from photolyzed rhodopsin to cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase and is pivotal in the visual excitation process. Activation of rhodopsin on the outer membrane of rod and cone cells causes GTP to bind to transducin followed by dissociation of the alpha subunit-GTP complex from the beta/gamma subunits of transducin. The alpha subunit-GTP complex activates the cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase which catalyzes the hydrolysis of cyclic GMP to 5'-GMP. This leads to closure of the sodium and calcium channels and therefore hyperpolarization of the rod cells. EC 3.6.1.-.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Hydrolysis: The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.Nucleotides, CyclicFluorides: Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.Pyrimidine Nucleotides: Pyrimidines with a RIBOSE and phosphate attached that can polymerize to form DNA and RNA.GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, G12-G13: A ubiquitously expressed family of heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein alpha subunits that signal through interactions with a variety of second messengers as GTPASE-ACTIVATING PROTEINS; GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE EXCHANGE FACTORS; and HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS. The G12-G13 part of the name is also spelled G12/G13.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing: A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymesPhosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Aluminum Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain aluminum as an integral part of the molecule.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.ras GTPase-Activating Proteins: PROTEINS that specifically activate the GTP-phosphohydrolase activity of RAS PROTEINS.Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins: GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that contain three non-identical subunits. They are found associated with members of the seven transmembrane domain superfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS. Upon activation the GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT of the complex dissociates leaving a dimer of a GTP-BINDING PROTEIN BETA SUBUNIT bound to a GTP-BINDING PROTEIN GAMMA SUBUNIT.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Adenine: A purine base and a fundamental unit of ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2: Eukaryotic initiation factor of protein synthesis. In higher eukaryotes the factor consists of three subunits: alpha, beta, and gamma. As initiation proceeds, eIF-2 forms a ternary complex with Met-tRNAi and GTP.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Ribonucleotides: Nucleotides in which the purine or pyrimidine base is combined with ribose. (Dorland, 28th ed)Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Proto-Oncogene Proteins: Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Brefeldin A: A fungal metabolite which is a macrocyclic lactone exhibiting a wide range of antibiotic activity.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits: The GTPase-containing subunits of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. When dissociated from the heterotrimeric complex these subunits interact with a variety of second messenger systems. Hydrolysis of GTP by the inherent GTPase activity of the subunit causes it to revert to its inactive (heterotrimeric) form. The GTP-Binding protein alpha subunits are grouped into families according to the type of action they have on second messenger systems.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Peptide Elongation Factors: Protein factors uniquely required during the elongation phase of protein synthesis.3T3 Cells: Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.ran GTP-Binding Protein: A monomeric GTP-binding protein involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins into the nucleus and RNA into the cytoplasm. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Coat Protein Complex I: A protein complex comprised of COATOMER PROTEIN and ADP RIBOSYLATION FACTOR 1. It is involved in transport of vesicles between the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and the GOLGI APPARATUS.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Peptide Elongation Factor Tu: A protein found in bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria which delivers aminoacyl-tRNA's to the A site of the ribosome. The aminoacyl-tRNA is first bound to a complex of elongation factor Tu containing a molecule of bound GTP. The resulting complex is then bound to the 70S initiation complex. Simultaneously the GTP is hydrolyzed and a Tu-GDP complex is released from the 70S ribosome. The Tu-GTP complex is regenerated from the Tu-GDP complex by the Ts elongation factor and GTP.Purines: A series of heterocyclic compounds that are variously substituted in nature and are known also as purine bases. They include ADENINE and GUANINE, constituents of nucleic acids, as well as many alkaloids such as CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE. Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism.GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go: A family of heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein alpha subunits that were originally identified by their ability to inhibit ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Members of this family can couple to beta and gamma G-protein subunits that activate POTASSIUM CHANNELS. The Gi-Go part of the name is also spelled Gi/Go.Oncogene Protein p21(ras): Transforming protein encoded by ras oncogenes. Point mutations in the cellular ras gene (c-ras) can also result in a mutant p21 protein that can transform mammalian cells. Oncogene protein p21(ras) has been directly implicated in human neoplasms, perhaps accounting for as much as 15-20% of all human tumors. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Phosphoinositide Phospholipase C: A type C phospholipase with specificity towards PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS that contain INOSITOL 1,4,5-TRISPHOSPHATE. Many of the enzymes listed under this classification are involved in intracellular signaling.Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Type C Phospholipases: A subclass of phospholipases that hydrolyze the phosphoester bond found in the third position of GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS. Although the singular term phospholipase C specifically refers to an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE (EC 3.1.4.3), it is commonly used in the literature to refer to broad variety of enzymes that specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Receptors, Adrenergic, beta: One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases: A class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of one of the two ester bonds in a phosphodiester compound. EC 3.1.4.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and hypoxanthine, guanine, or 6-mercaptopurine to the corresponding 5'-mononucleotides and pyrophosphate. The enzyme is important in purine biosynthesis as well as central nervous system functions. Complete lack of enzyme activity is associated with the LESCH-NYHAN SYNDROME, while partial deficiency results in overproduction of uric acid. EC 2.4.2.8.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.Isoproterenol: Isopropyl analog of EPINEPHRINE; beta-sympathomimetic that acts on the heart, bronchi, skeletal muscle, alimentary tract, etc. It is used mainly as bronchodilator and heart stimulant.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Phosphatidylinositols: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to the hexahydroxy alcohol, myo-inositol. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid, myo-inositol, and 2 moles of fatty acids.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.p21-Activated Kinases: A family of serine-threonine kinases that bind to and are activated by MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS such as RAC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS and CDC42 GTP-BINDING PROTEIN. They are intracellular signaling kinases that play a role the regulation of cytoskeletal organization.Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Golgi Apparatus: A stack of flattened vesicles that functions in posttranslational processing and sorting of proteins, receiving them from the rough ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and directing them to secretory vesicles, LYSOSOMES, or the CELL MEMBRANE. The movement of proteins takes place by transfer vesicles that bud off from the rough endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus and fuse with the Golgi, lysosomes or cell membrane. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Inosine Monophosphate: Inosine 5'-Monophosphate. A purine nucleotide which has hypoxanthine as the base and one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Colforsin: Potent activator of the adenylate cyclase system and the biosynthesis of cyclic AMP. From the plant COLEUS FORSKOHLII. Has antihypertensive, positive inotropic, platelet aggregation inhibitory, and smooth muscle relaxant activities; also lowers intraocular pressure and promotes release of hormones from the pituitary gland.Oligodeoxyribonucleotides: A group of deoxyribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each deoxyribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the deoxyribose moieties.Hypoxanthines: Purine bases related to hypoxanthine, an intermediate product of uric acid synthesis and a breakdown product of adenine catabolism.Inositol Phosphates: Phosphoric acid esters of inositol. They include mono- and polyphosphoric acid esters, with the exception of inositol hexaphosphate which is PHYTIC ACID.Receptors, Purinergic: Cell surface proteins that bind PURINES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The best characterized classes of purinergic receptors in mammals are the P1 receptors, which prefer ADENOSINE, and the P2 receptors, which prefer ATP or ADP.Codon: A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein, Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A member of the Rho family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS from SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. It is involved in morphological events related to the cell cycle. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Cytosine: A pyrimidine base that is a fundamental unit of nucleic acids.rhoB GTP-Binding Protein: A GTP-BINDING PROTEIN involved in regulating a signal transduction pathway that controls assembly of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Cercopithecus aethiops: A species of CERCOPITHECUS containing three subspecies: C. tantalus, C. pygerythrus, and C. sabeus. They are found in the forests and savannah of Africa. The African green monkey (C. pygerythrus) is the natural host of SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS and is used in AIDS research.Protein Prenylation: A post-translational modification of proteins by the attachment of an isoprenoid to the C-terminal cysteine residue. The isoprenoids used, farnesyl diphosphate or geranylgeranyl diphosphate, are derived from the same biochemical pathway that produces cholesterol.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).PhosphoproteinsCytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.NIH 3T3 Cells: A continuous cell line of high contact-inhibition established from NIH Swiss mouse embryo cultures. The cells are useful for DNA transfection and transformation studies. (From ATCC [Internet]. Virginia: American Type Culture Collection; c2002 [cited 2002 Sept 26]. Available from http://www.atcc.org/)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.DNA Adducts: The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates: Phosphatidylinositols in which one or more alcohol group of the inositol has been substituted with a phosphate group.src Homology Domains: Regions of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE similarity in the SRC-FAMILY TYROSINE KINASES that fold into specific functional tertiary structures. The SH1 domain is a CATALYTIC DOMAIN. SH2 and SH3 domains are protein interaction domains. SH2 usually binds PHOSPHOTYROSINE-containing proteins and SH3 interacts with CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.GRB2 Adaptor Protein: A signal transducing adaptor protein that links extracellular signals to the MAP KINASE SIGNALING SYSTEM. Grb2 associates with activated EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR and PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTORS via its SH2 DOMAIN. It also binds to and translocates the SON OF SEVENLESS PROTEINS through its SH3 DOMAINS to activate PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN P21(RAS).Ethylmaleimide: A sulfhydryl reagent that is widely used in experimental biochemical studies.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oligonucleotides: Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)Catalytic Domain: The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.Peptide Elongation Factor 1: Peptide elongation factor 1 is a multisubunit protein that is responsible for the GTP-dependent binding of aminoacyl-tRNAs to eukaryotic ribosomes. The alpha subunit (EF-1alpha) binds aminoacyl-tRNA and transfers it to the ribosome in a process linked to GTP hydrolysis. The beta and delta subunits (EF-1beta, EF-1delta) are involved in exchanging GDP for GTP. The gamma subunit (EF-1gamma) is a structural component.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Quinuclidinyl Benzilate: A high-affinity muscarinic antagonist commonly used as a tool in animal and tissue studies.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.

*  WikiGenes - GNA15 - guanine nucleotide binding protein (G...

... the region A guanine nucleotide-binding domain, and in the carboxyl-terminal third of the protein [1]. ...

*  rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 17 (ARHGEF17) Antibodies

164 kDa Rho-specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor , Rho-specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 164 kDa , rho guanine ... anti-rho/rac Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 18 Antibodies * anti-rho/rac Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 2 ... anti-rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 11 Antibodies * anti-rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 10-Like ... anti-rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 5 Antibodies * anti-rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) 6 Antibodies ...

*  ARHGEF7 - Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 7 - Homo sapiens (Human) - ARHGEF7 gene & protein

Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 7Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from another database using automatic ... Guanine-nucleotide releasing factorSAAS annotation. ,p>Information which has been generated by the UniProtKB automatic ... tr,E9PDQ5,E9PDQ5_HUMAN Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 7 OS=Homo sapiens GN=ARHGEF7 PE=1 SV=1 ...

*  ARHGEF4 - Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 4 - Homo sapiens (Human) - ARHGEF4 gene & protein

Acts as guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RHOA, RAC1 and CDC42 GTPases. Binding of APC may activate RAC1 GEF ... Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 4. Alternative name(s):. APC-stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1. Short name ... Cluster: Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 4. 6. Q9NR80-4. A0A0C4DFY6. Homo sapiens (Human). 670. UniRef100_Q9NR80-4. ... Cluster: Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 4. 18. Q9NR80-4. A0A0C4DFY6. UPI0004F069D6. UPI000533EB37. UPI0005F3ADCE. ...

*  Arhgef4 MGI Mouse Gene Detail - MGI:2442507 - Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 4

View mouse Arhgef4 Chr1:34678188-34813309 with: phenotypes, sequences, polymorphisms, proteins, references, function, expression

*  Gnb5 - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-5 - Rattus norvegicus (Rat) - Gnb5 gene & protein

IPR016346. Guanine_nucleotide-bd_bsu. IPR015943. WD40/YVTN_repeat-like_dom. IPR001680. WD40_repeat. IPR019775. WD40_repeat_CS. ... IPR016346. Guanine_nucleotide-bd_bsu. IPR015943. WD40/YVTN_repeat-like_dom. IPR001680. WD40_repeat. IPR019775. WD40_repeat_CS. ... sp,P62882,GNB5_RAT Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-5 OS=Rattus norvegicus GN=Gnb5 PE=2 SV=1 ...

*  Intracellular calcium translocation: mechanism of activation by guanine nucleotides and inositol phosphates | Journal of...

We have characterized a highly sensitive and specific guanine nucleotide-regulatory mechanism that induces rapid and profound ... Intracellular calcium translocation: mechanism of activation by guanine nucleotides and inositol phosphates ... Intracellular calcium translocation: mechanism of activation by guanine nucleotides and inositol phosphates ... Intracellular calcium translocation: mechanism of activation by guanine nucleotides and inositol phosphates ...

*  Gnb3 MGI Mouse Gene Detail - MGI:95785 - guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), beta 3

PR:000008099 guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-3 ...

*  Gng12 MGI Mouse Gene Detail - MGI:1336171 - guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 12

PR:000008105 guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(O) subunit gamma-12 ...

*  Gng4 MGI Mouse Gene Detail - MGI:102703 - guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 4

PR:000008109 guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(O) subunit gamma-4 ...

*  GNAZ - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(z) subunit alpha - Homo sapiens (Human) - GNAZ gene & protein

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as modulators or transducers in various transmembrane signaling ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(z) subunit alphaAdd BLAST. 354. Amino acid modifications. Feature key. Position(s). ... Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as modulators or transducers in various transmembrane signaling ... sp,P19086,GNAZ_HUMAN Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(z) subunit alpha OS=Homo sapiens GN=GNAZ PE=2 SV=3 ...

*  odr-3 - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha-17 subunit - Caenorhabditis elegans - odr-3 gene & protein

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as modulators or transducers in various transmembrane signaling ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha-17 subunitAdd BLAST. 355. Amino acid modifications. Feature key. Position(s). ... Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as modulators or transducers in various transmembrane signaling ... sp,Q18434,GPA17_CAEEL Guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha-17 subunit OS=Caenorhabditis elegans GN=odr-3 PE=1 SV=1 ...

*  GNAL - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(olf) subunit alpha - Homo sapiens (Human) - GNAL gene & protein

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as modulators or transducers in various transmembrane signaling ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(olf) subunit alphaAdd BLAST. 380. Amino acid modifications. Feature key. Position(s). ... Cluster: Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(olf) subunit alpha. 3. P38405-2. UPI0003EAEFC9. Q8N2B4. Homo sapiens (Human). 458 ... Cluster: Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(olf) subunit alpha. 86. P38405-3. F7IHR3. A0A1S3G2W5. UPI00064FC805. ...

*  Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), beta Polypeptide 1-Like (GNB1L) Antibodies

anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), beta 5 Antibodies * anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), ... anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), gamma 2 Antibodies * anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), ... anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), gamma 8 Antibodies * anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), ... anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein), alpha 14 Antibodies * anti-Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein (G Protein ...

*  Ggamma1 - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit gamma-1 precursor - Drosophila melanogaster (Fruit fly) - Ggamma1 gene &...

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as a modulator or transducer in various transmembrane signaling ... Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as a modulator or transducer in various transmembrane signaling ... sp,P38040,GBG1_DROME Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit gamma-1 OS=Drosophila melanogaster GN=Ggamma1 PE=2 SV=1 ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit gamma-1Add BLAST. 67. ,p>This subsection of the ,a href="http://www.uniprot.org/help ...

*  Gngt1 MGI Mouse Gene Detail - MGI:109165 - guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma transducing activity...

View mouse Gngt1 Chr6:3993792-3997436 with: phenotypes, sequences, polymorphisms, proteins, references, function, expression

*  Regulation of ligand binding to leukotriene D4 receptors: effects of cations and guanine nucleotides

These data indicate that guanine nucleotides, Na+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ regulate [3H]LTD4 binding to its receptors in guinea pig lung. ... Regulation of ligand binding to leukotriene D4 receptors: effects of cations and guanine nucleotides. ... effects of cations and guanine nucleotides. European Journal of Pharmacology 106(2): 241-253. High affinity, stereoselective ... Purine nucleotides quantitatively reduced [3H]LTD4 specific binding with a rank order potency of guanosine-5'-O-3- ...

*  Guanine Nucleotide Exchange-Independent Activation of Gs Protein by β2-Adrenoceptor | Molecular Pharmacology

Guanine Nucleotide Exchange-Independent Activation of Gs Protein by β2-Adrenoceptor. Özlem Uğur, Şükrü Sadik Öner, Paola ... Guanine Nucleotide Exchange-Independent Activation of Gs Protein by β2-Adrenoceptor. Özlem Uğur, Şükrü Sadik Öner, Paola ... Guanine Nucleotide Exchange-Independent Activation of Gs Protein by β2-Adrenoceptor. Özlem Uğur, Şükrü Sadik Öner, Paola ... Guanine Nucleotide Exchange-Independent Activation of Gs Protein by β2-Adrenoceptor Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a ...

*  Abstract A86: SIRT1 regulates Rac1-GTPase activation via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TIAM1 | Cancer Research

Abstract A86: SIRT1 regulates Rac1-GTPase activation via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TIAM1. Madhurima Saxena, ... Subsequent analysis revealed that SIRT1 co-immunoprecipitated with the Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), TIAM1. To ... SIRT1 regulates Rac1-GTPase activation via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TIAM1. [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the ... Abstract A86: SIRT1 regulates Rac1-GTPase activation via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor TIAM1 ...

*  GNAS - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(s) subunit alpha isoforms short - Bos taurus (Bovine) - GNAS gene & protein

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) function as transducers in numerous signaling pathways controlled by G protein ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(s) subunit alpha isoforms shortAdd BLAST. 393. ... sp,P04896,GNAS2_BOVIN Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(s) subunit alpha isoforms short OS=Bos taurus GN=GNAS PE=1 SV=1 ... Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) function as transducers in numerous signaling pathways controlled by G protein ...

*  GEA2 - ARF guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 - Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain ATCC 204508 / S288c) (Baker's yeast) - GEA2...

ARF guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2Add BLAST. 1459. Amino acid modifications. Feature key. Position(s). DescriptionActions ... sp,P39993,GEA2_YEAST ARF guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 OS=Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain ATCC 204508 / S288c) GN=GEA2 ... ARF guanyl-nucleotide exchange factor activity Source: SGD ,p>Inferred from Direct Assay,/p> ,p>Used to indicate a direct assay ...

*  RCSB PDB - 1CIP: GI-ALPHA-1 SUBUNIT OF GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE-BINDING PROTEIN COMPLEXED WITH A GTP ANALOGUE Structure...

PROTEIN (GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA-1 SUBUNIT) A 353 Rattus norvegicus Gene Name(s): Gnai1 Gnai-1 ... GI-ALPHA-1 SUBUNIT OF GUANINE NUCLEOTIDE-BINDING PROTEIN COMPLEXED WITH A GTP ANALOGUE. *DOI: 10.2210/pdb1cip/pdb ...

*  RCSB PDB - Protein Feature View - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-1 - P54311 (GBB1...

Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as a modulator or transducer in various transmembrane signaling ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-1 - P54311 (GBB1_RAT) ...

*  GNB3 - Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-3 - Homo sapiens (Human) - GNB3 gene & protein

Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-3Imported. ,p>Information which has been imported from another ... tr,F5GZN8,F5GZN8_HUMAN Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-3 OS=Homo sapiens GN=GNB3 PE=1 SV=1 ... Guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-3. ...

*  Gng10 (GFP-tagged) - Mouse guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 10 (Gng10) - MG200063 | acris-antibodies.com

Mouse guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 10 (Gng10), 10 µg. ... Mouse guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 10 (Gng10) Search for all "Gng10 (GFP-tagged) - Mouse guanine ... Home » ORF » Mouse ORF » Gng10 (GFP-tagged) - Mouse guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 10 (Gng10) ... Properties for Gng10 (GFP-tagged) - Mouse guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), gamma 10 (Gng10). Product Category. ...

Nucleotide exchange factor: Nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) are proteins that stimulate the exchange (replacement) of nucleoside diphosphates for nucleoside triphosphates bound to other proteins.NTP binding site: An NTP binding site is a type of binding site found in nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinases, N can be adenosine or guanosine. A P-loop is one of the structural motifs common for nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding sites, it interacts with the bound nucleotide's phosphoryl groups.Guanylate-binding protein: In molecular biology, the guanylate-binding protein family is a family of GTPases that is induced by interferon (IFN)-gamma. GTPases induced by IFN-gamma (Interferon-inducible GTPase) are key to the protective immunity against microbial and viral pathogens.Coles PhillipsRab GDP dissociation inhibitors: In molecular biology, the Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (Rab GDIs) constitute a family of small GTPases that serve a regulatory role in vesicular membrane traffic. C-terminal geranylgeranylation is crucial for their membrane association and function.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Energy charge: Energy charge is an index used to measure the energy status of biological cells. It is related to ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations.Burst kinetics: Burst kinetics is a form of enzyme kinetics that refers to an initial high velocity of enzymatic turnover when adding enzyme to substrate. This initial period of high velocity product formation is referred to as the "Burst Phase".Cyclase-associated protein family: In molecular biology, the cyclase-associated protein family (CAP) is a family of highly conserved actin-binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, flies, plants, and mammals. CAPs are multifunctional proteins that contain several structural domains.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Rho family of GTPases: The Rho family of GTPases is a family of small (~21 kDa) signaling G proteins, and is a subfamily of the Ras superfamily. The members of the Rho GTPase family have been shown to regulate many aspects of intracellular actin dynamics, and are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, including yeasts and some plants.Purine nucleotide cycle: The Purine Nucleotide Cycle is a metabolic pathway in which fumarate is generated from aspartate in order to increase the concentration of Krebs cycle intermediates.Salway, J.IMP dehydrogenaseProximity ligation assay: Proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA) is a technology that extends the capabilities of traditional immunoassays to include direct detection of proteins, protein interactions and modifications with high specificity and sensitivity. Protein targets can be readily detected and localized with single molecule resolution and objectively quantified in unmodified cells and tissues.Myoblast city: Myoblast city (Mbc) is the Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of the mammalian protein Dock180. Mutant mbc embryos exhibit defects in dorsal closure, cytoskeletal organization, myogenesis, and neural development.GTPase-activating protein: GTPase-Activating Proteins, or GAPs, or GTPase-Accelerating Proteins are a family of regulatory proteins whose members can bind to activated G proteins and stimulate their GTPase activity, with the result of terminating the signaling event. GAPs are also known as RGS protein, or RGS proteins,Kimple, A.WGAViewer: WGAViewer is a bioinformatics software tool which is designed to visualize, annotate, and help interpret the results generated from a genome wide association study (GWAS). Alongside the P values of association, WGAViewer allows a researcher to visualize and consider other supporting evidence, such as the genomic context of the SNP, linkage disequilibrium (LD) with ungenotyped SNPs, gene expression database, and the evidence from other GWAS projects, when determining the potential importance of an individual SNP.Calcium guanylateLigation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Pertussis toxinGahSilent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Rap1: Rap1 (Ras-proximate-1 or Ras-related protein 1) is a small GTPase, which are small cytosolic proteins that act like cellular switches and are vital for effective signal transduction. There are two isoforms of the Rap1 protein, each encoded by a separate gene, RAP1A and RAP1B.Cell membraneFERM domain: In molecular biology, the FERM domain (F for 4.1 protein, E for ezrin, R for radixin and M for moesin) is a widespread protein module involved in localising proteins to the plasma membrane.DNA binding site: DNA binding sites are a type of binding site found in DNA where other molecules may bind. DNA binding sites are distinct from other binding sites in that (1) they are part of a DNA sequence (e.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.EIF2: Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2) is a eukaryotic initiation factor. It is required in the initiation of translation.Raf-like Ras-binding domain: B:56-131, B:56-131, :56-131 :56-131 A:366-374, A:19-91Lattice protein: Lattice proteins are highly simplified computer models of proteins which are used to investigate protein folding.Rab (G-protein): The Rab family of proteins is a member of the Ras superfamily of monomeric G proteins. Approximately 70 types of Rabs have now been identified in humans.AB5 toxin: The AB5 toxins are six-component protein complexes secreted by certain pathogenic bacteria known to cause human diseases such as cholera, dysentery, and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. One component is known as the A subunit, and the remaining five components make up the B subunit.Archaeosine synthase: Archaeosine synthase (, ArcS, TgtA2, MJ1022 (gene), glutamine:preQ0-tRNA amidinotransferase) is an enzyme with system name L-glutamine:7-cyano-7-carbaguanine aminotransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionInhibitor protein: The inhibitor protein (IP) is situated in the mitochondrial matrix and protects the cell against rapid ATP hydrolysis during momentary ischaemia. In oxygen absence, the pH of the matrix drops.Magnesium acetateNucleic acid structure: Nucleic acid structure refers to the structure of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA. Chemically speaking, DNA and RNA are very similar.CS-BLASTCrosstalk (biology): Biological crosstalk refers to instances in which one or more components of one signal transduction pathway affects another. This can be achieved through a number of ways with the most common form being crosstalk between proteins of signalling cascades.Reaction coordinateBeef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Deoxyguanosine triphosphateRNA transfection: RNA transfection is the process of deliberately introducing RNA into a living cell. RNA can be purified from cells after lysis or synthesized from free nucleotides either chemically, or enzymatically using an RNA polymerase to transcribe a DNA template.Triparental mating: Triparental mating is a form of Bacterial conjugation where a conjugative plasmid present in one bacterial strain assists the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid present in a second bacterial strain into a third bacterial strain. Plasmids are introduced into bacteria for such purposes as transformation, cloning, or transposon mutagenesis.RabaptinTransducinZuotin: Z-DNA binding protein 1, also known as Zuotin, is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast gene.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Cyclic nucleotideFluoride toxicityEthyl groupSignal transducing adaptor protein: Signal transducing adaptor proteins are proteins that are accessory to main proteins in a signal transduction pathway. Adaptor proteins contain a variety of protein-binding modules that link protein-binding partners together and facilitate the creation of larger signaling complexes.Hyperphosphorylation: Hyperphosphorylation occurs when a biochemical with multiple phosphorylation sites is fully saturated. Hyperphosphorylation is one of the signalling mechanisms used by the cell to regulate mitosis.Sodium aluminateMature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.

(1/1391) Inhibition of cellular growth by increased guanine nucleotide pools. Characterization of an Escherichia coli mutant with a guanosine kinase that is insensitive to feedback inhibition by GTP.

In Escherichia coli the enzyme guanosine kinase phosphorylates guanosine to GMP, which is further phosphorylated to GDP and GTP by other enzymes. Here I report that guanosine kinase is subject to efficient feedback inhibition by the end product of the pathway, GTP, and that this regulation is abolished by a previously described mutation, gsk-3, in the structural gene for guanosine kinase (Hove-Jensen, B., and Nygaard, P. (1989) J. Gen. Microbiol. 135, 1263-1273). Consequently, the gsk-3 mutant strain was extremely sensitive to guanosine, which caused the guanine nucleotide pools to increase dramatically, thereby initiating a cascade of metabolic changes that eventually led to growth arrest. By isolation and characterization of guanosine-resistant derivatives of the gsk-3 mutant, some of the crucial steps in this deleterious cascade of events were found to include the following: first, conversion of GMP to adenine nucleotides via GMP reductase, encoded by the guaC gene; second, inhibition of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase by an adenine nucleotide, presumably ADP, causing starvation for histidine, tryptophan, and pyrimidines, all of which require PRPP for their synthesis; third, accumulation of the regulatory nucleotide guanosine 5',3'-bispyrophosphate (ppGpp), a general transcriptional inhibitor synthesized by the relA gene product in response to amino acid starvation.  (+info)

(2/1391) Elevated expression of the CD4 receptor and cell cycle arrest are induced in Jurkat cells by treatment with the novel cyclic dinucleotide 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid.

The effect of the novel, naturally occurring nucleotide cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) on the lymphoblastoid CD4+ Jurkat cell line was studied. When exposed to 50 microM c-di-GMP, Jurkat cells exhibited a markedly elevated expression of the CD4 receptor of up to 6.3-fold over controls. C-di-GMP also causes blockage of the cell cycle at the S-phase, characterized by increased cellular thymidine uptake, reduction in G2/M-phase cells, increase in S-phase cells and decreased cell division. Additionally c-di-GMP naturally enters these cells and binds irreversibly to the P21ras protein. The effects described appear to be unique for c-di-GMP.  (+info)

(3/1391) Metabolism of methionine and biosynthesis of caffeine in the tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

1. Caffeine biosynthesis was studied by following the incorporation of 14C into the products of L-[Me-14C]methionine metabolism in tea shoot tips. 2. After administration of a 'pulse' of L-[Me-14C]methionine, almost all of the L-[Me-14C]methionine supplied disappeared within 1 h, and 14C-labelled caffeine synthesis increased throughout the experimental periods, whereas the radioactivities of an unknown compound and theobromine were highest at 3 h after the uptake of L-[Me-14C]methionine, followed by a steady decrease. There was also slight incorporation of the label into 7-methylxanthine, serine, glutamate and aspartate, disappearing by 36 h after the absorption of L-[Me-14C]methionine. 3. The radioactivities of nucleic acids derived from L-[Me-14C]methionine increased rapidly during the first 12 h incubation period and then decreased steadily. Sedimentation analysis of nucleic acids by sucrose-gradient centrifugation showed that methylation of nucleic acids in tea shoot tips occurred mainly in the tRNA fraction. The main product among the methylated bases in tea shoot tips was identified as 1-methyladenine. 4. The results indicated that the purine ring in caffeine is derived from the purine nucleotides in the nucleotide pool rather than in nucleic acids. A metabolic scheme to show the production of caffeine and related methylxanthines from the nucleotides in tea plants is discussed.  (+info)

(4/1391) Endothelin-B receptors activate Galpha13.

Endothelin (ET) receptors activate heterotrimeric G proteins that are members of the Gi, Gq, and Gs families but may also activate members of other families such as Galpha12/13. Galpha13 has multiple complex cellular effects that are similar to those of ET. We studied the ability of ET receptors to activate Galpha13 using an assay for G protein alpha-chain activation that is based on the fact that an activated (GTP-bound) alpha-chain is resistant to trypsinization compared with an inactive (GDP-bound) alpha-chain. Nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotides and AlMgF protected Galpha13 from degradation by trypsin. In membranes from human embryonic kidney 293 cells that coexpress ETB receptors and alpha13, ET-3 and 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] increased the protection of alpha13 compared with Gpp(NH)p alone. The specificity of ETB receptor-alpha13 coupling was documented by showing that beta2 receptors and isoproterenol or ETA receptors and ET-1 did not activate alpha13 and that a specific antagonist for ETB receptors blocked ET-3-dependent activation of alpha13.  (+info)

(5/1391) Structural elements of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 required for functional interaction with cytohesin-1.

ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) is a 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding protein involved in vesicular trafficking. Conversion of inactive ARF-GDP to active ARF-GTP is catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange proteins such as cytohesin-1. Cytohesin-1 and its Sec7 domain (C-1Sec7) exhibit guanine nucleotide exchange protein activity with ARF1 but not ARF-like protein 1 (ARL1), which is 57% identical in amino acid sequence. With chimeric proteins composed of ARF1 (F) and ARL1 (L) sequences we identified three structural elements responsible for this specificity. Cytohesin-1 increased [35S]guanosine 5'-(gamma-thio)triphosphate binding to L28/F (first 28 residues of L, remainder F) and to a much lesser extent F139/L, and mut13F139/L (F139/L with random sequence in the first 13 positions) but not Delta13ARF1 that lacks the first 13 amino acids; therefore, a nonspecific ARF N terminus was required for cytohesin-1 action. The N terminus was not, however, required for that of C-1Sec7. Both C-1Sec7 and cytohesin-1 effectively released guanosine 5'-(gamma-thio)triphosphate from ARF1, but only C-1Sec7 displaced the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog bound to mut13F139/L, again indicating that structure in addition to the Sec7 domain is involved in cytohesin-1 interaction. Some element(s) of the C-terminal region is also involved, because replacement of the last 42 amino acids with ARL sequence in F139L decreased markedly the interaction with cytohesin-1. Participation of both termini is consistent with the crystallographic structure of ARF in which the two terminal alpha-helices are in close proximity. ARF1 residues 28-50 are also important in the interaction with cytohesin-1; replacement of Lys-38 with Gln, the corresponding residue in ARL1, abolished the ability to serve as substrate for cytohesin-1 or C-1Sec7. These studies have defined multiple structural elements in ARF1, including switch 1 and the N and C termini, that participate in functional interactions with cytohesin-1 (or its catalytic domain C-1Sec7), which were not apparent from crystallographic analysis.  (+info)

(6/1391) Cysteine carboxyl O-methylation of human placental 23 kDa protein.

C-Terminal carboxyl methylation of a human placental 23 kDa protein catalyzed by membrane-associated methyltransferase has been investigated. The 23 kDa protein substrate methylated was partially purified by DEAE-Sephacel, hydroxyapatite and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatographies. The substrate protein was eluted on Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography as a protein of about 29 kDa. In the absence of Mg2+, the methylation was stimulated by guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP and GTPgammaS), but in the presence of Mg2+, only GTPgammaS stimulated the methylation which was similar to the effect on the G25K/rhoGDI complex. AFC, an inhibitor of C-terminal carboxyl methylation, inhibited the methylation of human placental 23 kDa protein. These results suggests that the substrate is a small G protein different from the G25K and is methylated on C-terminal isoprenylated cysteine residue. This was also confirmed by vapor phase analysis. The methylated substrate protein was redistributed to membrane after in vitro methylation, suggesting that the methylation of this protein is important for the redistribution of the 23 kDa small G protein for its putative role in intracellular signaling.  (+info)

(7/1391) The A26G replacement in the consensus sequence A-X-X-X-X-G-K-[T,S] of the guanine nucleotide binding site activates the intrinsic GTPase of the elongation factor 2 from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

A recombinant form of the elongation factor 2 from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsEF-2), carrying the A26G substitution, has been produced and characterized. The amino acid replacement converted the guanine nucleotide binding consensus sequences A-X-X-X-X-G-K-[T,S] of the elongation factors EF-G or EF-2 into the corresponding G-X-X-X-X-G-K-[T,S] motif which is present in all the other GTP-binding proteins. The rate of poly(U)-directed poly(Phe) synthesis and the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of A26GSsEF-2 were decreased compared to SsEF-2, thus indicating that the A26G replacement partially affected the function of SsEF-2 during translocation. In contrast, the A26G substitution enhanced the catalytic efficiency of the intrinsic SsEF-2 GTPase triggered by ethylene glycol [Raimo, G., Masullo, M., Scarano, G., & Bocchini, V. (1997) Biochimie 78, 832-837]. Surprisingly, A26GSsEF-2 was able to hydrolyse GTP even in the absence of ethylene glycol; furthermore, the alcohol increased the affinity for GTP without modifying the catalytic constant of A26GSsEF-2 GTPase. Compared to SsEF-2, the affinity of A26GSsEF-2 for [3H]GDP was significantly reduced. These findings suggest that A26 is a regulator of the biochemical functions of SsEF-2. The involvement of this alanine residue in the guanine nucleotide-binding pocket of EF-2 or EF-G is discussed.  (+info)

(8/1391) Characteristics of sequences around individual nucleotide substitutions in IgVH genes suggest different GC and AT mutators.

Somatic hypermutation affects Ig genes during T-dependent B cell responses and is characterized by a high frequency of single base substitutions. Hypermutation is not a completely random process; a study of mutations in different systems has revealed the presence of sequence motifs that target mutation. In a recent analysis of the sequences surrounding individual mutated bases in out-of-frame human IgVH genes, we found that the target motifs around mutated G's and C's are reverse complements of each other. This finding suggests that hypermutation acts on both strands of DNA, which contradicts evidence of a strand-dependent mechanism as suggested by an observed bias in A and T mutations and the involvement of transcriptional machinery. We have now extended our database of out-of-frame genes and determined the sequence motifs flanking mutated A and T nucleotides. In addition, we have analyzed the flanking sequences for different types of nucleotide substitutions separately. Our results confirm the relationship between the motifs for G and C mutations and show that the motifs surrounding mutated A's and T's are weaker and do not have the same relationship. Taken together with our observation of A/T strand bias in out-of-frame genes, this observation suggests that there is a semitargeted G/C mutator that is strand-independent and a separate A/T mutator that is strand-dependent and is less reliant on the local target sequence.  (+info)



specific guanine nucleo

  • This gene encodes a protein that functions as a specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA. (nih.gov)
  • We show that when Cool‐2 exists as a dimer, it functions as a Rac‐specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). (embopress.org)

RhoA

  • Regulation of immature dendritic cell migration by RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor Arhgef5. (yale.edu)
  • Acts as guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RHOA, RAC1 and CDC42 GTPases. (uniprot.org)
  • The trio guanine nucleotide exchange factor is a RhoA target. (wikipedia.org)

dissociation inhibitor

  • This animation shows the basic heterotrimeric G protein cycle and allows the user to then add three different regulators of the cycle, an RGS (regulator of G protein signaling) protein, a GDI (guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor) protein, or a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). (sciencemag.org)

Protein

  • The GDP-bound structure was morphed into each of the other structures by computer to provide an idea of how nucleotide binding and hydrolysis contribute to changes in structure during the G protein activation and inactivation cycle. (sciencemag.org)

Molecular

  • Note that the complete sequence of our molecular clones may differ from the sequence published for this corresponding reference, e.g., by representing an alternative RNA splicing form or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). (origene.com)

proteins

  • Three classes of proteins, GTPase‐activating proteins (GAPs), guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), regulate the cycling of these GTP‐binding proteins between their GDP‐bound and GTP‐bound states ( Boguski and McCormick, 1993 ). (embopress.org)

exchange factors

  • Guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (RAPGEF3/RAPGEF4) induce sperm membrane depolarization and acrosomal exocytosis in capacitated stallion sperm. (umass.edu)
  • Due to the recent discovery of cAMP-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factors RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4 , we sought to investigate the separate roles of PRKACA and RAPGEF3 / RAPGEF4 in modulating capacitation and acrosomal exocytosis. (umass.edu)