Tonsillitis: Inflammation of the tonsils, especially the PALATINE TONSILS but the ADENOIDS (pharyngeal tonsils) and lingual tonsils may also be involved. Tonsillitis usually is caused by bacterial infection. Tonsillitis may be acute, chronic, or recurrent.Tonsillectomy: Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)Peritonsillar Abscess: An accumulation of purulent material in the area between the PALATINE TONSIL and its capsule.Palatine Tonsil: A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.Adenoids: A collection of lymphoid nodules on the posterior wall and roof of the NASOPHARYNX.Pharyngitis: Inflammation of the throat (PHARYNX).Tonsillar Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATINE TONSIL.Prevotella intermedia: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria originally classified within the BACTEROIDES genus. This bacterium is a common commensal in the gingival crevice and is often isolated from cases of gingivitis and other purulent lesions related to the mouth.Geotrichosis: Infection due to the fungus Geotrichum.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Fusobacterium nucleatum: A species of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the gingival margin and sulcus and from infections of the upper respiratory tract and pleural cavity.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.

*  Acute bacterial tonsillitis | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org

... the neck reveals enlarged palatine tonsils with a serpentine enhancement pattern characteristic of uncomplicated tonsillitis, ... the neck reveals enlarged palatine tonsils with a serpentine enhancement pattern characteristic of uncomplicated tonsillitis, ...
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*  Diagnosed with tonsillitis, has severe stomach cramps, flatulence, urge to pass stools. Related to tonsillitis? - Doctor's...

Related to tonsillitis?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Tonsillitis, Ask a Gastroenterologist ... Diagnosed with tonsillitis, has severe stomach cramps, flatulence, urge to pass stools. ... Diagnosed with tonsillitis, has severe stomach cramps, flatulence, urge to pass stools. Related to tonsillitis?. ... Hi, My 3 year old son was diagnosed with tonsillitis 3 days ago, the day after I had to rush him to the doctors as he was in a ...
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*  Having tonsillitis and taking antibiotics. Had stomach pain. Blood in stools. Is it related?

Having tonsillitis and taking antibiotics. Had stomach pain. Blood in stools. Is it related? . Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, ... Follow-up: Having tonsillitis and taking antibiotics. Had stomach pain. Blood in stools. Is it related? 16 minutes later ... I am 27 and have had very serious tonsillitis for the past 12 days (sore throat, mucus thick enough to suffocate, blocked nose ... Having tonsillitis and taking antibiotics. Had stomach pain. Blood in stools. Is it related? ...
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*  Fever, joint pain, swelling in tonsils. History of chronic tonsillitis. Do I need to get tonsils removed? - Doctor's insight...

History of chronic tonsillitis. Do I need to get tonsils removed? . Ask a Doctor about Palatine tonsil, Ask an ENT Specialist ... Now, lower grade fever may be due to tonsillitis but don't forget the other cause like Typhoid fever which is more common now a ... Now, lower grade fever may be due to tonsillitis but don't forget the other cause like Typhoid fever which is more common now a ... I have been diagnosed with chronic tonsillitis before, have large cryptic tonsils, but have seen several ENT s who all have ...
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*  Hi i regularly suffer for tonsillitis, maybe 3-5 times a year.

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*  Strep Tonsil Infection: Home Care

Home care for streptococcal tonsillitis includes: * Avoid alcohol. * Stop smoking ... ... Another name for Strep Tonsil Infection is Streptococcal Tonsillitis. ... Home care for vomiting in adults with streptococcal tonsillitis includes:. * Drink clear liquids only, such as water, sports ... Medications commonly used to control pain and fever in adults with streptococcal tonsillitis include:. * Acetaminophen ...
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*  Tonsillopharyngitis - Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition

Tonsillectomy has often been considered if GABHS tonsillitis recurs repeatedly (> 6 episodes/yr, > 4 episodes/yr for 2 yr, or > ...
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*  Tonsillectomy: Is it Necessary

Is It a Cold, Strep, or Tonsillitis?. *Tips to Prevent Cold Sores ...
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*  Comparison of bacteria isolated from surface swabs to bacteria isolated from core tonsilar tissue of patients undergoing...

Justification; the cost of management of tonsillitis is high in terms of time and finances yet if tonsillitis could be treated ... Introduction and background; Tonsillitis is a common condition among ENT patients, with raw data showing up to 10 patients with ... Problem statement; Tonsillitis is a common condition seen among patients in MNRH, with tonsillectomy waiting lists up to 1 year ... Acute tonsillitis is traditionally managed with antibiotics basing on the clinical picture and occasionally throat swabs while ...
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*  Buy Vantin Online

... tonsillitis. Generic Vantin acts as an anti-infection remedy. Generic Vantin operates by killing bacteria which spreads by ... tonsillitis. Generic Vantin acts as an anti-infection remedy. Generic Vantin operates by killing bacteria which spreads by ... tonsillitis). Target of Generic Vantin is to control, ward off and terminate bacteria. ...
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*  infections such as, colds, flu, upper respiratory tract and tonsilitis

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*  Had protected sex. Recurrent tonsillitis, cough and fever. Could this be symptoms of something? - Doctor's insight on...

Recurrent tonsillitis, cough and fever. Could this be symptoms of something?, Ask an ENT Specialist ...
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*  Zithromax - Antibiotics :: Online Drugstore

It is used to treat infections of upper and low respiratory organs (tonsillitis, otitis, sinusitis, pneumonia), urogenital ...
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*  Weight loss Forum - weightloss.com.au • View topic - Tonsillitis

Tonsillitis. by Mandie » Wed Aug 22, 2007 6:07 pm Reasons why it sucks: 1. I feel awful. 2. It hurts to breathe, to swallow, to ... Tonsillitis. Talk about anything and everything, whether it's related to weight loss or not. ... I used to get tonsillitis frequently as a kid - it stopped when I stopped going to a chlorinated pool) ...
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*  Frequent respiratory tract infections in children. The role of environmental and genetic factors.

Respiratory tract infections (RTI), presenting as common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, acute otitis media, bronchitis or ...
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*  Had antibiotics course for tonsillitis, large pink/red bumps on the back of tongue appeared. Why ? - Doctor's insight on...

Had antibiotics course for tonsillitis, large pink/red bumps on the back of tongue appeared. Why ?. Ask a Doctor about uses, ... HI I have gone through your mail, as you said that you have taken treatment for tonsillitis and now you feel as your tongue is ... HI I have gone through your mail, as you said that you have taken treatment for tonsillitis and now you feel as your tongue is ... I have recently had tonsillitis and finnished my course of pennicillin last Friday. Since i have noticed large pinky/red bumps ...
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*  NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens - Pharyngitis / Tonsillitis

Pharyngitis / Tonsillitis. What is pharyngitis and tonsillitis?. Pharyngitis and tonsillitis are infections in the throat that ... What are the symptoms of pharyngitis and tonsillitis?. The symptoms of pharyngitis and tonsillitis depend greatly on the cause ... What is the treatment for pharyngitis and tonsillitis?. Specific treatment for pharyngitis and tonsillitis will be determined ... How are pharyngitis and tonsillitis diagnosed?. In most cases, it is hard to distinguish between a viral sore throat and a ...
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*  What to do in tonsillitis ? - Online Doctor Chats

What to do in tonsillitis ?, Ask a Doctor about Tonsil, Online doctor patient chat conversation by Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar ... Doctor : Tonsillitis Doctor : can spread with salivary route Doctor : nothing more than that User : so no kissing people at ...
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*  How to cure tonsillitis naturally?- Natural Remedies for Tonsillitis

The best and the easiest way to cure tonsillitis is salt water gargle. drink one glass of warm water with a pinch of salt, ... How to cure tonsillitis naturally?. This is the article which covers all the causes of tonsillitis and how to cure tonsillitis ... But, before I share how to cure tonsillitis naturally let me tell you about tonsillitis and its causes. Tonsils are the two ... Tonsillitis can be caused by virus like common cold and bacteria like strep throat. According to studies almost 15-30 percent ...
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*  Tonsillitis

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*  Tonsillitis - familydoctor.org

Learn about the symptoms and causes of and treatment options for tonsillitis. ... How is tonsillitis treated?. If your tonsillitis is caused by a virus, antibiotics won't help. But you can use some home ... Tonsillitis is only caused by bacteria in about 15% to 30% of cases. Bacterial tonsillitis is most often caused by a certain ... What causes tonsillitis?. Most cases of tonsillitis are caused by viruses. For example, the virus that causes mononucleosis ( ...
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*  Search : tonsillitis-esp

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*  Tonsillitis - Mayo Clinic

Tonsillitis - Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, treatment for this common cause of sore throat in children. ... Most cases of tonsillitis are caused by infection with a common virus, but bacterial infections also may cause tonsillitis. ... Surgery to remove tonsils, once a common procedure to treat tonsillitis, is usually performed only when bacterial tonsillitis ... Tonsillitis is inflammation of the tonsils, two oval-shaped pads of tissue at the back of the throat - one tonsil on each side ...
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*  Tonsillitis: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

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(1/198) Age-dependent altered proportions in subpopulations of tonsillar lymphocytes.

Age-related changes in functional subsets of lymphocytes may influence the potential to build up immune responses. In particular, the capacity of tonsillar lymphocytes to counter infections may be altered during ageing. In order to address this question we investigated the proportional distribution of several subsets of tonsillar T and B cells with regard to ageing. Tonsils were derived from 119 patients between 2 and 65 years of age. Lymphocyte subsets were monitored by three-colour fluorescence of relevant CD markers in flow cytometry. As a general tendency the percentage of CD3+ T cells steadily increased whereas that of CD19+ B cells decreased at the same time. No significant differences were observed between lymphocytes of patients with and without inflammatory history of the tonsils. The percentage of CD8+ T cells declined whereas that of CD4+ T cells increased during the same time span. CD45RA+ T cells increased during the first two decades of life and gradually decreased thereafter. In contrast, CD45RO+ T cells showed an opposite trend. No differences were seen in the population of CD3-/CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. The mature B cell marker CD40 showed no significant changes during ageing. However, CD38+ B cells, representing B cells of late maturation stages, dramatically declined up to the age of 65. In a similar manner the CD5+ subpopulation of B cells decreased during ageing. Substantial changes in major tonsillar T and B cell populations as shown in this study may have an impact on the ageing process of the immune system.  (+info)

(2/198) Macrolide resistance in group A streptococci.

Two hundred and twenty one Streptococcus pyogenes isolates collected from throat swabs of untreated children with uncomplicated pharyngotonsillitis living in two centres situated in the north of Italy were tested to evaluate their macrolide resistance phenotype. Isolates were also typed for T protein and assayed for opacity factor (OF) and protease production. Resistance to macrolides was found to be similar in the two centres. Fifty-one point two per cent of Torino strains and 43.5% of Pinerolo strains were not inhibited by erythromycin. Resistant strains belonged to one of three phenotypes: CR, constitutive resistance (37.9 and 42.5% in Torino and Pinerolo, respectively); IR, inducible resistance (40.9 and 17. 5%); NR, new resistance phenotype (21.2 and 40%). All the resistant and some of the susceptible strains were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and genomic patterns were defined on the basis of band size and number. Five DNA profiles were found among erythromycin-resistant strains: three patterns characterized the NR resistance phenotype and one each the IR and CR phenotypes. The distribution of resistant strains according to their genomic patterns appears to be related to the resistance phenotype and only in some cases to the T serotype of bacteria. We conclude that the S. pyogenes strains analysed are genetically heterogeneous and therefore the high rate of erythromycin resistance observed is not caused by the spread of a single clone nor is it related to a particular serotype.  (+info)

(3/198) Isolation rates of Streptococcus pyogenes in patients with acute pharyngotonsillitis and among healthy school children in Iran.

We examined three populations from the Tehran region and the North part of Iran (Gilan), in all more than 5000 individuals, for carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci; GAS). Children or adults with acute pharyngotonsillitis and healthy school children harboured GAS in 34-1, 20.0 and 21.0%, respectively. Typing of 421 randomly selected isolates showed a predominance of M-types M4, M5, M11, M12, as well as the provisional type 4245; however, many of the isolates were T and M non-typable. Forty-three percent of all strains were opacity factor (OF) negative. The type distribution differed markedly from that reported in 1973-4, when M types 1 and 12 were predominant.  (+info)

(4/198) Amoxicillin for fever and sore throat due to non-exudative pharyngotonsillitis: beneficial or harmful?

OBJECTIVES: To determine duration of signs and symptoms and adverse reactions after treatment with amoxicillin of patients with fever and sore throat due to non-exudative pharyngotonsillitis. DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Outpatients at four medical centers were enrolled. Patients over 5 years of age presented with fever and sore throat for less than 10 days due to non-exudative pharyngotonsillitis. Cases with any of the following symptoms or illness were excluded: earache, nasal discharge with foul smell, rheumatic fever, valvular heart disease, renal disease, and penicillin hypersensitivity. Amoxicillin or identical placebo at the dosage of 50 mg/ kg per day was given three or four times daily for 7 days. RESULTS: There were 1217 patients enrolled in this study. Some were lost to follow-up, which is the reason for the variability in number of cases in these analyses. After therapy, duration of fever was 2.46 and 2.48 days (P = 0.78) and of sore throat 3.01 and 3.04 days (P = 0.80) in amoxicillin (n = 431) and placebo (n = 436) groups, respectively. Complications were clinically documented in 13 (2.5%) and 16 (3.0%) cases in amoxicillin (n = 527) and placebo (n = 524) groups (P = 0.56). Two cases (0.46% and 0.46%) from each group (n= 433 and 431) were positive by antistreptolysin O antibody determination. The history of carditis and abnormal urinalysis after treatment were not obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Amoxicillin therapy for non-exudative pharyngotonsillitis conferred no beneficial or harmful effect.  (+info)

(5/198) Comparison of short-course (5 day) cefuroxime axetil with a standard 10 day oral penicillin V regimen in the treatment of tonsillopharyngitis.

Oral penicillin V given three times daily in doses of 50,000-100,000 IU daily has been the standard treatment for tonsillopharyngitis for the last few decades. These regimens, initially recommended by the American Heart Association, were extrapolated from i.v. dosing with long-acting forms of penicillin which had been shown to prevent post-streptococcal sequelae. More recently, several antibiotics, including cefuroxime axetil, have been shown to be at least as effective as penicillin G in eradicating group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS) but their influence on post-streptococcal sequelae has never been assessed in a large-scale trial. The German Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases (DGPI) undertook a large study of culture-proven tonsillopharyngitis involving several agents and included a 1 year follow-up to establish the effect on sequelae. In one arm of this study, cefuroxime 250 mg bid was compared with 50,000 IU penicillin V given in three divided doses. Cefuroxime axetil was more effective than oral penicillin V in eradicating GABHS at the assessment 2-4 days post-treatment (441/490 (90%) patients versus 1196/1422 (84%) patients; P = 0.001). Clinically, the two agents were equivalent in efficacy, and carriage rates were similar (11.1% and 13.8%, respectively) in patients receiving cefuroxime axetil and penicillin V, 7-8 weeks post-treatment. One case of glomerular nephritis occurred in a patient given penicillin V. There were no post-streptococcal sequelae confirmed for patients treated with cefuroxime axetil. The findings confirm the previously reported efficacy of short-course (4-5 day) treatments with cefuroxime axetil and indicate that short-course treatment is comparable to the standard oral penicillin V regimen in preventing post-streptococcal sequelae.  (+info)

(6/198) Detection of lymphocytes productively infected with Epstein-Barr virus in non-neoplastic tonsils.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) persists for life in the infected host. Little is known about EBV reactivation and regulation of virus persistence in healthy individuals. We examined tonsils of chronic tonsillitis patients to detect EBV transcripts, EBV genomes and lytic proteins. LMP1 transcripts were observed in 11 of 15 specimens and BZLF1 transcripts were detected in six. Multiple copies of EBV genome equivalents per cell, and ZEBRA- and viral capsid antigen-positive cells were also detected in tonsillar lymphocytes. These results indicate that EBV productively infected cells may survive in the face of immune surveillance in the tonsils. Thus, EBV replication may occur in tonsillar lymphocytes, and tonsillar lymphoid tissues may play a role in the maintenance of EBV load in vivo.  (+info)

(7/198) Evaluation of the approach of primary care physicians to the management of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. IPROS Network.

BACKGROUND: Streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis remains a common illness in children and can lead to serious complications if left untreated. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic and management approach of a sample of primary care physicians in the largest sick fund in Israel to streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to all physicians who treat children and are employed by the General Health Services (Kupat Holim Klalit) in the Jerusalem District. The questionnaire included data on demographics, practice type and size, and availability of throat culture and rapid strep test; as well as a description of three hypothetical cases followed by questions relating to their diagnosis and treatment. RESULTS: Of the 188 eligible physicians, 118 (62.5%) responded, including 65 of 89 pediatricians (73%) and 53 of 99 family and general practitioners (53.5%). Fifty-six physicians (47.4%) had more than 18 years experience, and 82 (70%) completed specialization in Israel. Mean practice size was 950 patients. Fifty-three physicians (43%) worked in Kupat Holim community clinics, 25 (21%) worked independently in private clinics, and 40 (34%) did both. A total of 91 (77%) had access to laboratory facilities for daily throat culture. The time it took for the results to arrive was 48 to 72 hours. For the three clinical scenarios, 90% of the physicians accurately evaluated case A, a 1-year-old with viral pharyngotonsillitis, and 100 (85%) correctly diagnosed case C, a 7-year-old with streptococcal infection. As expected, opinions were divided on case B, a 3-year-old child with uncertain diagnosis. Accordingly, 75 (65.3%) physicians did not recommend treatment for case A, compared to 109 (92.5%) for case C. For case B, 22 (19%) said they would always treat, 43 (36%) would sometimes treat, and 35 (30%) would await the result of the throat culture. For 104 (88%) physicians the antibiotic of choice for case C was penicillin, while only 9 (7.5%) chose amoxicillin. However, the recommended dosage regimens varied from 250 to 500 mg per dose, and from two to four doses daily. For case C, 110 physicians (93%) chose a 10 day duration of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The primary care physicians in the sample (pediatricians, general practitioners and family physicians) accurately diagnosed viral and streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. However, there was a lack of uniformity regarding its management in general, and the dosage regimen for penicillin in particular.  (+info)

(8/198) Comparison of a 5 day regimen of cefdinir with a 10 day regimen of cefprozil for treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

Patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis were treated with cefdinir 300 mg bd for 5 days or cefprozil 500 mg bd for 10 days in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicentre study. Of the 548 patients enrolled, 281 (51%) were evaluable. The clinical cure rates at the test-of-cure visit were 80% (114/142) and 72% (100/139) for the evaluable patients treated with cefdinir and cefprozil, respectively. Respiratory tract pathogens were isolated from 409 (75%) of 548 admission sputum specimens, with the predominant pathogens being Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The microbiological eradication rates at the test-of-cure visit were 81% (157 of 193 pathogens) and 84% (166 of 198 pathogens) for the evaluable patients treated with cefdinir and cefprozil, respectively. Adverse event rates while on treatment were equivalent between the two treatment groups. The incidence of diarrhoea during therapy was higher for patients treated with cefdinir (17%) than for patients treated with cefprozil (6%) (P < 0.01), but most cases were mild and did not lead to discontinuation of treatment. These results indicate that a 5 day regimen of cefdinir is as effective and safe in the treatment of patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis as a 10 day regimen of cefprozil.  (+info)



recurrent


  • Acute tonsillitis is traditionally managed with antibiotics basing on the clinical picture and occasionally throat swabs while chronic and recurrent tonsillitis are managed by tonsillectomy. (mak.ac.ug)
  • Recurrent tonsillitis, cough and fever. (healthcaremagic.com)

year


  • Tonsillitis is a common condition seen among patients in MNRH, with tonsillectomy waiting lists up to 1 year in advance. (mak.ac.ug)