Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Pancreas, Exocrine: The major component (about 80%) of the PANCREAS composed of acinar functional units of tubular and spherical cells. The acinar cells synthesize and secrete several digestive enzymes such as TRYPSINOGEN; LIPASE; AMYLASE; and RIBONUCLEASE. Secretion from the exocrine pancreas drains into the pancreatic ductal system and empties into the DUODENUM.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Pancreas, Artificial: Devices for simulating the activity of the pancreas. They can be either electromechanical, consisting of a glucose sensor, computer, and insulin pump or bioartificial, consisting of isolated islets of Langerhans in an artificial membrane.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Amylases: A group of amylolytic enzymes that cleave starch, glycogen, and related alpha-1,4-glucans. (Stedman, 25th ed) EC 3.2.1.-.Choristoma: A mass of histologically normal tissue present in an abnormal location.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Pancreatic Juice: The fluid containing digestive enzymes secreted by the pancreas in response to food in the duodenum.Pancreatic Cyst: A true cyst of the PANCREAS, distinguished from the much more common PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYST by possessing a lining of mucous EPITHELIUM. Pancreatic cysts are categorized as congenital, retention, neoplastic, parasitic, enterogenous, or dermoid. Congenital cysts occur more frequently as solitary cysts but may be multiple. Retention cysts are gross enlargements of PANCREATIC DUCTS secondary to ductal obstruction. (From Bockus Gastroenterology, 4th ed, p4145)Ceruletide: A specific decapeptide obtained from the skin of Hila caerulea, an Australian amphibian. Caerulein is similar in action and composition to CHOLECYSTOKININ. It stimulates gastric, biliary, and pancreatic secretion; and certain smooth muscle. It is used in paralytic ileus and as diagnostic aid in pancreatic malfunction.Glucagon: A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Secretin: A peptide hormone of about 27 amino acids from the duodenal mucosa that activates pancreatic secretion and lowers the blood sugar level. (USAN and the USP Dictionary of Drug Names, 1994, p597)Insulin-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 50-80% of the islet cells. Beta cells secrete INSULIN.Cholecystokinin: A peptide, of about 33 amino acids, secreted by the upper INTESTINAL MUCOSA and also found in the central nervous system. It causes gallbladder contraction, release of pancreatic exocrine (or digestive) enzymes, and affects other gastrointestinal functions. Cholecystokinin may be the mediator of satiety.Pancreatic Polypeptide: A 36-amino acid pancreatic hormone that is secreted mainly by endocrine cells found at the periphery of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS and adjacent to cells containing SOMATOSTATIN and GLUCAGON. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP), when administered peripherally, can suppress gastric secretion, gastric emptying, pancreatic enzyme secretion, and appetite. A lack of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) has been associated with OBESITY in rats and mice.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Pancreatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Acinar Cells: Cells lining the saclike dilatations known as acini of various glands or the lungs.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Carcinoma, Acinar Cell: A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Adenoma, Islet Cell: A benign tumor of the pancreatic ISLET CELLS. Usually it involves the INSULIN-producing PANCREATIC BETA CELLS, as in INSULINOMA, resulting in HYPERINSULINISM.Somatostatin: A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Trypsinogen: The inactive proenzyme of trypsin secreted by the pancreas, activated in the duodenum via cleavage by enteropeptidase. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pancreatic Hormones: Peptide hormones secreted into the blood by cells in the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS of the pancreas. The alpha cells secrete glucagon; the beta cells secrete insulin; the delta cells secrete somatostatin; and the PP cells secrete pancreatic polypeptide.ChymotrypsinogenCholangiopancreatography, Magnetic Resonance: Non-invasive diagnostic technique for visualizing the PANCREATIC DUCTS and BILE DUCTS without the use of injected CONTRAST MEDIA or x-ray. MRI scans provide excellent sensitivity for duct dilatation, biliary stricture, and intraductal abnormalities.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Glucagon-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 5-20% of the islet cells. Alpha cells secrete GLUCAGON.Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing: A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.Azaserine: Antibiotic substance produced by various Streptomyces species. It is an inhibitor of enzymatic activities that involve glutamine and is used as an antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Carcinoma, Islet Cell: A primary malignant neoplasm of the pancreatic ISLET CELLS. Usually it involves the non-INSULIN-producing cell types, the PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and the pancreatic delta cells (SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS) in GLUCAGONOMA and SOMATOSTATINOMA, respectively.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Cyst-like space not lined by EPITHELIUM and contained within the PANCREAS. Pancreatic pseudocysts account for most of the cystic collections in the pancreas and are often associated with chronic PANCREATITIS.Endocrine Cells: Secretory cells of the ductless glands. They secrete HORMONES directly into the blood circulation (internal secretion) to be carried to the target cells. The secreted chemicals can be PEPTIDES; STEROIDS; NEUROPEPTIDES; or BIOGENIC AMINES.Cystadenoma, Papillary: A benign neoplasm of the ovary.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Lipase: An enzyme of the hydrolase class that catalyzes the reaction of triacylglycerol and water to yield diacylglycerol and a fatty acid anion. It is produced by glands on the tongue and by the pancreas and initiates the digestion of dietary fats. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 3.1.1.3.Endoderm: The inner of the three germ layers of an embryo.Organogenesis: Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Ampulla of Vater: A dilation of the duodenal papilla that is the opening of the juncture of the COMMON BILE DUCT and the MAIN PANCREATIC DUCT, also known as the hepatopancreatic ampulla.Insulinoma: A benign tumor of the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS. Insulinoma secretes excess INSULIN resulting in HYPOGLYCEMIA.Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Pancreatitis, Alcoholic: Acute or chronic INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS due to excessive ALCOHOL DRINKING. Alcoholic pancreatitis usually presents as an acute episode but it is a chronic progressive disease in alcoholics.Duodenal Obstruction: Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.Receptors, Cholecystokinin: Cell surface proteins that bind cholecystokinin (CCK) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholecystokinin receptors are activated by GASTRIN as well as by CCK-4; CCK-8; and CCK-33. Activation of these receptors evokes secretion of AMYLASE by pancreatic acinar cells, acid and PEPSIN by stomach mucosal cells, and contraction of the PYLORUS and GALLBLADDER. The role of the widespread CCK receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Sincalide: An octapeptide hormone present in the intestine and brain. When secreted from the gastric mucosa, it stimulates the release of bile from the gallbladder and digestive enzymes from the pancreas.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Gabexate: A serine proteinase inhibitor used therapeutically in the treatment of pancreatitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and as a regional anticoagulant for hemodialysis. The drug inhibits the hydrolytic effects of thrombin, plasmin, and kallikrein, but not of chymotrypsin and aprotinin.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Secretory Rate: The amount of a substance secreted by cells or by a specific organ or organism over a given period of time; usually applies to those substances which are formed by glandular tissues and are released by them into biological fluids, e.g., secretory rate of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex, secretory rate of gastric acid by the gastric mucosa.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Cystadenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Organ Preservation: The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Pancreatic Stellate Cells: Star-shaped, myofibroblast-like cells located in the periacinar, perivascular, and periductal regions of the EXOCRINE PANCREAS. They play a key role in the pathobiology of FIBROSIS; PANCREATITIS; and PANCREATIC CANCER.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Duodenal Diseases: Pathological conditions in the DUODENUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors: A family of DNA-binding transcription factors that contain a basic HELIX-LOOP-HELIX MOTIF.Proglucagon: The common precursor polypeptide of pancreatic GLUCAGON and intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Proglucagon is the 158-amino acid segment of preproglucagon without the N-terminal signal sequence. Proglucagon is expressed in the PANCREAS; INTESTINES; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Posttranslational processing of proglucagon is tissue-specific yielding numerous bioactive peptides.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Lithostathine: The proteinaceous component of the pancreatic stone in patients with PANCREATITIS.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Glucagonoma: An almost always malignant GLUCAGON-secreting tumor derived from the PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS. It is characterized by a distinctive migratory ERYTHEMA; WEIGHT LOSS; STOMATITIS; GLOSSITIS; DIABETES MELLITUS; hypoaminoacidemia; and normochromic normocytic ANEMIA.Carboxypeptidases A: Carboxypeptidases that are primarily found the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM that catalyze the release of C-terminal amino acids. Carboxypeptidases A have little or no activity for hydrolysis of C-terminal ASPARTIC ACID; GLUTAMIC ACID; ARGININE; LYSINE; or PROLINE. This enzyme requires ZINC as a cofactor and was formerly listed as EC 3.4.2.1 and EC 3.4.12.2.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Streptozocin: An antibiotic that is produced by Stretomyces achromogenes. It is used as an antineoplastic agent and to induce diabetes in experimental animals.Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration: Conducting a fine needle biopsy with the aid of ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.

*  Pancreas Divisum | Diseases of the Pancreas | MUSC DDC
Pancreas divisum is a birth defect where the normal drainage of pancreatic juices is altered, possibly resulting in ... Pancreas Divisum. Pancreas divisum is a birth defect in the anatomy of the pancreas where the normal drainage of the pancreas ... However, when scarring occurs around the small duct in the substance of the pancreas, endoscopic treatment can't open up this ... is altered so that most of the pancreatic drainage has to pass through the smaller duct and sphincter of the pancreas. This may ...
  http://ddc.musc.edu/public/diseases/pancreas-biliary-system/pancreas-divisum.html
*  Surgical injury to the mouse pancreas through ligation of the pancreatic duct as a model for endocrine and exocrine...
Pancreas,Issue 102,Medicine}, language = {eng}, number = {102}, pages = {9}, title = {Surgical injury to the mouse pancreas ... Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of ... Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of ... DIFFERENTIATION, MICE, REGENERATION, PROGENITORS, ISLET GROWTH, ADULT PANCREAS, BETA-CELL NEOGENESIS, CONTRIBUTE, EXPRESSION, ...
  https://biblio.ugent.be/publication/6854376
*  Induction of TFF1 gene expression in pancreas overexpressing transforming growth factor α | Gut
... we analysed the expression of TFF1 in the pancreas of patients with chronic pancreatitis and in the pancreas of transgenic mice ... 1993) Pancreas. in Diagnostic surgical pathology. ed Sternberg SS (Raven Press, New York), pp 57-93. ... 1993) Chronic pancreatitis. in The pancreas, pathology, and disease. ed Go VLW (Raven Press, New York), pp 665-706. ... Whereas the pancreas of wild type mice exhibited no histopathological alterations of pancreatic morphology (not shown), the ...
  http://gut.bmj.com/content/45/1/105
*  Plus it
The pancreas originates from the dorsal and ventral regions of the foregut endoderm directly posterior to the stomach. Pancreas ... Epithelia from E13.5 pancreata were reassociated with mesenchymes prepared from E13.5 pancreata. Ngn3-positive epithelial cells ... It is now established that the in vitro developmental potential of pancreata depends of the stage at which the pancreas is ... E13.5 rat embryonic pancreatic epithelia (A and D) or whole pancreata (B, C, E, and F) were cultured without (A, B, D, and E) ...
  http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/55/3/582
*  Effects of Hedhehog Signaling on Pancreas Organogenesis | Global Research Projects
In the pancreas, the role of this pathway is complex. At early stages, Hh signaling is excluded from the pancreas and ectopic ... Primary cilia are present on adult duct and endocrine cells within the pancreas, the same cell types that are marked by ... Given the distinct roles Hh signaling plays at different time points during pancreas and endocrine cell development and ... Home » Noncommunicable and/or Chronic Disease » Effects of Hedhehog Signaling on Pancreas Organogenesis ...
  http://globalprojects.ucsf.edu/project/effects-hedhehog-signaling-pancreas-organogenesis
*  C57BL/6 Mouse Primary Pancreatic Epithelial Cells | Creative Bioarray
C57BL/6 Mouse Primary Pancreatic Epithelial Cells from Creative Bioarray are isolated from tissue of pathogen-free laboratory mice. Mouse Primary Pancreatic Epithelial Cells are grown in T25 tissue culture flasks pre-coated with gelatin-based coating solution for 0.5 hour and incubated in Creative Bioarray's Culture Complete Growth Medium for 3-7 days. Cells are detached from flasks and immediately cryo-preserved in vials. Each vial contains at least 1x10^6 cells per ml and is delivered frozen ...
  https://www.creative-bioarray.com/C57BL-6-Mouse-Primary-Pancreatic-Epithelial-Cells-CSC-C4258X-item-2533.htm
*  ERK Activation and Its Role in Pancreatic Acinar Cell Function | Pancreapedia
Pancreas 25(3): 251-259,2002. PMID: 12370536.. *Collins MA, Yan W, Sebolt-Leopold JS and Pasca di Magliano M. MAPK signaling is ... Pancreas 21(4): 376-384,2000. PMID: 11075992.. *Dabrowski A, Detjen KM, Logsdon CD and Williams JA. Stimulation of both CCK-A ... In pancreas, as in other cell types, most studies of ERK action have focused on growth, proliferation and regeneration as ERK1/ ... Pancreas 41(4): 560-570,2012. PMID: 22228051.. *Meloche S and Pouyssegur J. The ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway ...
  https://pancreapedia.org/reviews/erk-activation-and-its-role-in-pancreatic-acinar-cell-function
*  Elastase from porcine pancreas Type III, lyophilized powder, Protein 55-85 %, ≥4.0 units/mg protein | Sigma-Aldrich
Elastase from porcine pancreas for your research needs. Find product specific information including CAS, MSDS, protocols and ... Elastase from porcine pancreas Type III, lyophilized powder, Protein 55-85 %, ≥4.0 units/mg protein Synonym: Elastase from hog ... Elastase from porcine pancreas has also been used in a study to investigate the effect of a specific synthetic inhibitor of ... Elastase from porcine pancreas has been used in a study to identify a novel bone/calcium metabolism-regulating factor in ...
  http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/sigma/e0127?lang=en®ion=US
*  Pancreatic stem cells isolated from mice
In the study, the pancreases of mice were altered in a way that makes duct cells proliferate and differentiate. Some cells in ... However, these signaling pathways and molecules are inactive in the adult pancreas. "We have found a way to activate the Wnt ... Hans Clevers of the Hubrecht Institute, The Netherlands, have isolated and grown stem cells from the pancreases of mice using a ... Unlimited in vitro expansion of adult bi-potent pancreas progenitors through the Lgr5/Rspondin axis ...
  http://www.embo.org/news/press-releases/2013/pancreatic-stem-cells-isolated-from-mice?tmpl=component&print=1&page=
*  Long Term Outcomes After EUS-guided Ablation for Cystic Tumors of the Pancreas - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Cystic lesions of the pancreas are defined as round, fluid-filled structures within the pancreas detected by radiologic imaging ... Long Term Outcomes After EUS-guided Ablation for Cystic Tumors of the Pancreas (EUS-EP). This study is ongoing, but not ... Cystic Tumors of the Pancreas Procedure: Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided ethanol lavage with paclitaxel injection Phase 2 ... Recently, a pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol lavage for cystic tumors of the pancreas reported that complete resolution was ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00689715?term=pancreatic%2Ccancer%2Cdetection&recr=Open&rank=7
*  Pancreas Transplants
... An Interview with Christian Hobbis. Tell me a little bit about yourself? I am a 30 year old former ... How did you find out about the possibility of having a pancreas transplant, and how long did it take to find a donor? The way I ... Is the option of pancreas transplant available to all ages? Once again I want to state that this is a major surgey and It comes ... I can say that now since my recent pancreas alone transplant on 8/8/00. I had diabetes for 15 years and had been having ...
  http://www.angelfire.com/id/emilyspage/transplant.html
*  ENDOCRINE-PANCREAS
PART-OF-PANCREAS ANCESTORS. ALL ANIMAL-PART ANIMATE ANIMATE-PART BODY-PART INTERNAL-ANIMAL-PART OBJECT ORGAN-OF-DIGESTIVE- ... endocrine pancreas. term type: main entry term. part of speech: noun. number: singular. reliability code: 10. definition: inner ... ENDOCRINE-PANCREAS. origination date: 18/09/2000. originator: Carlos. subject field: medicine: body-part. check date: 25/08/ ... part of the pancreas, which secretes insuline and glucagon, hormones that contribute to the processing of starches in the body ...
  http://www.ugr.es/~oncoterm/csdata/ENDOCRINE-PANCREAS.html
*  Pancreas allograft rejection
The outcomes of vascularized pancreas transplantation have steadily improved secondary to improvements in surgical techniques, ... However, pancreas allograft rejection remains a major clinical challenge and is the primary cause of death-censored pancreas ... Acute pancreas allograft rejection is associated with increased risk of graft failure in pancreas transplantation. Am J ... See 'Benefits and complications associated with kidney-pancreas transplantation in diabetes mellitus' and 'Pancreas and islet ...
  https://www.uptodate.com/contents/pancreas-allograft-rejection
*  Most Popular 'Pancreas' Titles - IMDb
Pancreas Hospital (7) Nurse (6) Blood (5) Death (5) Friendship (5) Husband Wife Relationship (5) Murder (5) Bare Chested Male ( ... Most Popular 'Pancreas' Titles Refine See titles to watch instantly, titles you haven't rated, etc ...
  http://www.imdb.com/search/keyword?keywords=pancreas
*  The pancreas | Open Library
The pancreas; 1 edition; First published in 2008; Subjects: Diseases, Pancreatic Diseases, Physiopathology, Therapy, ... The pancreas an integrated textbook of basic science, medicine, and surgery 2nd ed. Hans G. Beger ... [et al.]. Published 2008 ... Are you sure you want to remove The pancreas from your list? ... The pancreas ,url = http://openlibrary.org/books/OL21422901M/ ...
  https://openlibrary.org/works/OL16981813W/The_pancreas
*  Stem Cells Finally Found in Pancreas
24 (HealthDay News) -- An international team of researchers has finally managed to locate stem cells in the pancreas -- in mice ... "If this kind of cell and their progenitors with a capacity to divide exist in the pancreas of man, and if we can identify the ... "This is the first conclusive evidence that there are stem cells in the pancreas, but any potential benefit is a very long way ... In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas has lost all or virtually all of its ability to produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the loss ...
  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/24/AR2008012401435.html
*  Post-Pancreas Transplant
Although the hospitalization is relatively short following pancreas and pancreas-kidney transplantation, our physicians and ... Life after Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation. The goal of pancreas or pancreas-kidney transplantation is to return patients to a ... Post-Pancreas Transplant. Clinic Visits. Although the hospitalization is relatively short following pancreas and pancreas- ... The nephrologist or endocrinologist will address problems with hypertension, diabetes, and worsening pancreas-kidney function ...
  http://www.memorialhermann.org/services-specialties/post-pancreas-transplant-process/
*  Pancreas problem????? - Pancreatic Cancer - MedHelp
Iron loads onto liver first, heart, then pancreas, and joints. So, it leads to pancreatic cancer, diabetes. Enlarged pancreas. ... Iron loads onto liver first, heart, then pancreas, and joints. So, it leads to pancreatic cancer, diabetes. Enlarged pancreas. ... Pancreas problem?????. I had a bout of pancreatitis about a year ago (along with chronic cholecystitis (gall bladder is now out ... Stones dislodge from gall bladder and create blockages in bile ducts of liver and pancreas. Pancreatitis. Heart burn and acid ...
  http://www.medhelp.org/posts/Pancreatic-Cancer-/Pancreas-problem/show/1825599
*  Drug InfoNet - Pancreas - [general]
Doctors' Answers to 'Frequently Asked Questions' - Pancreas. These comments are made for the purpose of discussion and should ... Could my pancreas cause this type of problem as there is a small cyst there? I'm 39 years old, have a tendency to low blood ... Pancreas Question: Approximately 2 years ago I was having stomach and abdominal pain, vomiting after eating, an aversion to ... It was discovered I had digestive juices flowing back into my stomach and a small cyst on my pancreas. I took medication for ...
  http://www.druginfonet.com/index.php?pageID=faq/new/DISEASE_FAQ/Pancreas.htm
*  Pancreas - Medical Dictionary / Glossary | Medindia
The pancreas is surrounded by the stomach, intestines, and other organs, is clearly explained in Medindia s glossary of medical ... Pancreas' - A glandular organ located in the abdomen. It makes pancreatic juices, which contain enzymes that aid in digestion. ... Medical Word - Pancreas. Ans : A glandular organ located in the abdomen. It makes pancreatic juices, which contain enzymes that ... Pancreas - Glossary. Written & Compiled by Medindia Content Team. Medically Reviewed by The Medindia Medical Review Team on May ...
  http://www.medindia.net/glossary/pancreas.htm
*  British Scientists Develop Artificial Pancreas
... artificial pancreas'. This experimental artificial pancreas has been created by combining a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), ... Helen Murphy, lead of the study at Cambridge University said, "To discover an artificial pancreas can help maintain near-normal ... Pancreatitis or inflammation of the pancreas may show up as acute pancreatitis or chronic pain. Alcohol consumption is the main ...
  http://www.medindia.net/news/British-Scientists-Develop-Artificial-Pancreas-80207-1.htm
*  Pancreas Transplantation: Does Age Increase Morbidity?
... pancreas and stem cell transplantation. The journal welcomes submissions focusing on the histocompatibility as well as related ... Pancreas Transplantation: Does Age Increase Morbidity?. Cheguevara Afaneh,1 Barrie S. Rich,1 Meredith J. Aull,1 Choli Hartono,2 ... D. E. Sutherland, R. W. Gruessner, D. L. Dunn et al., "Lessons learned from more than 1,000 pancreas transplants at a single ... A. O. Ojo, H. U. Meier-Kriesche, J. A. Hanson et al., "The impact of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation on long-term ...
  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jtrans/2011/596801/ref/
*  Phys.org - pancreas
Pancreas. The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine system of vertebrates. It is both an endocrine gland ... Implantable 'artificial pancreas' could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar. Living with Type 1 diabetes requires ... Scientists at the University of Copenhagen have captured thousands of progenitor cells of the pancreas on video as they made ... might one day play a key role in helping scientists successfully build a bioartificial pancreas in the lab to cure type 1 ... ...
  https://phys.org/tags/pancreas/
*  Gamma cell of pancreas definition | Drugs.com
Definition of gamma cell of pancreas. Provided by Stedman's medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ...
  https://www.drugs.com/dict/gamma-cell-of-pancreas.html
*  Pancreas and Gallbladder Quiz - By Emmorb
Pancreas and Gallbladder? Huh? Test your knowledge on this science quiz to see how you do and compare your score to others. ...
  https://www.sporcle.com/games/Emmorb/pancreas-and-gallbladder

Pancreatic bud: The ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds (or pancreatic diverticula) are outgrowths of the duodenum during human embryogenesis. They join together to form the adult pancreas.Klinikum GroßhadernPancreatoblastomaEuropac: EUROPAC, the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatic Diseases was established in 1997 by a collaboration of pancreas surgeons from Liverpool, UK.Pancreatic duct: The pancreatic duct, or duct of Wirsung (also, the major pancreatic duct due to the existence of an accessory pancreatic duct), is a duct joining the pancreas to the common bile duct to supply pancreatic juices which aid in digestion provided by the exocrine pancreas. The pancreatic duct joins the common bile duct just prior to the ampulla of Vater, after which both ducts perforate the medial side of the second portion of the duodenum at the major duodenal papilla.JDRFPancreatitisPine Islet LightPancreatectomyAmylase: An amylase () is an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of starch into sugars. Amylase is present in the saliva of humans and some other mammals, where it begins the chemical process of digestion.Ectopic testisDuctal carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma is a type of tumor that primarily presents in the ducts of a gland.Pancreatic mass: A pancreatic mass is any undifferentiated growth detected in the pancreas, usually on medical imaging. A number of terms used to describe abnormal masses (also known as tumors) in the pancreas.CeruletideGlucagon rescueInsulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.Secretin receptor: Human secretin receptor (gene name SCTR) is a G protein-coupled receptor which binds secretin and is the leading member (i.e.CholecystokininUR-AK49PancreaticoduodenectomyChronic pancreatitisPancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm: Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, also mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and mucinous cystic tumour, is a grouping of cystic neoplasms that arise from the pancreas. They may be benign, malignant or in between.Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasmOvarian serous cystadenoma: Ovarian serous cystadenoma, also (less precisely) known as serous cystadenoma, is a very common benign ovarian tumour.Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes: The Network for Pancreatic Organ donors with Diabetes (nPOD), is a collaborative type 1 diabetes research project funded by JDRF (formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). nPOD supports scientific investigators by providing, without cost, rare and difficult to obtain tissues beneficial to their research.Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas, also acinar cell carcinoma, is a rare malignant exocrine tumour of the pancreas. It represents 5% of all exocrine tumours of the pancreas, making it the second most common type of pancreatic cancer.Somatostatin family: A:99-116Trypsinogen: Trypsinogen (EC 3.4.Chymotrypsinogen: Chymotrypsinogen is a proteolytic enzyme Schwert G.W, Proteolytic Enzymes.Iroquois homeobox factor: Iroquois homeobox factors are a family of homeodomain transcription factors that play a role in many developmental processes.Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons: United StatesAzaserineMucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung: Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung (MCACL) is a very rare malignant mucus-producing neoplasm arising from the uncontrolled growth of transformed epithelial cells originating in lung tissue.Pancreatic pseudocystSolid pseudopapillary tumour: A solid pseudopapillary tumour (also known as solid pseudopapillary neoplasm or, more formally, solid pseudopapillary tumour/neoplasm of the pancreas) is a low-grade malignant neoplasm of the pancreas of papillary architecture that typically afflicts young women.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Adenocarcinoma of the lung: Adenocarcinoma of the lung (pulmonary adenocarcinoma) is a common histological form of lung cancer that contains certain distinct malignant tissue architectural, cytological, or molecular features, including gland and/or duct formation and/or production of significant amounts of mucus.Triacylglycerol lipase: Triacylglycerol lipase (, lipase, butyrinase, tributyrinase, Tween hydrolase, steapsin, triacetinase, tributyrin esterase, Tweenase, amno N-AP, Takedo 1969-4-9, Meito MY 30, Tweenesterase, GA 56, capalase L, triglyceride hydrolase, triolein hydrolase, tween-hydrolyzing esterase, amano CE, cacordase, triglyceridase, triacylglycerol ester hydrolase, amano P, amano AP, PPL, glycerol-ester hydrolase, GEH, meito Sangyo OF lipase, hepatic lipase, lipazin, post-heparin plasma protamine-resistant lipase, salt-resistant post-heparin lipase, heparin releasable hepatic lipase, amano CES, amano B, tributyrase, triglyceride lipase, liver lipase, hepatic monoacylglycerol acyltransferase) is an enzyme with system name triacylglycerol acylhydrolase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionDuodenal cancerBlood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.Cystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms: Cystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms is a group of tumors.Major duodenal papilla: The major duodenal papilla is an opening of the pancreatic duct into the duodenum. The major duodenal papilla is, in most people, the primary mechanism for the secretion of bile and other enzymes that facilitate digestion.InsulinomaMacropædia: The 17-volume Macropædia is the third part of the Encyclopædia Britannica; the other two parts are the 12-volume Micropædia and the 1-volume Propædia. The name Macropædia is a neologism coined by Mortimer J.Cholecystokinin receptor: Cholecystokinin receptors or CCK receptors are a group of G-protein coupled receptors which bind the peptide hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) or gastrin. There are two different subtypes CCKA and CCKB which are ~50% homologous: Various cholecystokinin antagonists have been developed and are used in research, although the only drug of this class that has been widely marketed to date is the anti-ulcer drug proglumide.Liver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GIMature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Glucose transporterCamostatTemporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingPapillary serous cystadenocarcinomaChronic allograft nephropathy: Chronic allograft nephropathy, abbreviated CAN and also known as sclerosing/chronic allograft nephropathy, is the leading cause of kidney transplant failure and happens month to years after the transplant.Coles PhillipsPancreatic stellate cell: Pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs or PSCs) are myofibroblast-like cells that can switch between the quiescent and activated phenotypes, like hepatic stellate cells. PaSCs reside in exocrine areas of the pancreas.Reactive gastropathy: In gastroenterology, reactive gastropathy, also chemical gastropathy, is an abnormality in the stomach caused by chemicals, e.g.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Kennel clubAggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (also known as a digital papillary adenocarcinoma and papillary adenoma) is a cutaneous condition characterized by an aggressive malignancy involving the digit between the nailbed and the distal interphalangeal joint spaces.Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Glucagonoma

(1/8132) Determination of human body burden baseline date of platinum through autopsy tissue analysis.

Results of analysis for platinum in 97 autopsy sets are presented. Analysis was performed by a specially developed emission spectrochemical method. Almost half of the individuals studied were found to have detectable platinum in one or more tissue samples. Platinum was found to be deposited in 13 of 21 tissue types investigated. Surprisingly high values were observed in subcutaneous fat, previously not considered to be a target site for platinum deposition. These data will serve as a human tissue platinum burden baseline in EPA's Catalyst Research Program.  (+info)

(2/8132) Tissue-specific knockout of the insulin receptor in pancreatic beta cells creates an insulin secretory defect similar to that in type 2 diabetes.

Dysfunction of the pancreatic beta cell is an important defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, although its exact relationship to the insulin resistance is unclear. To determine whether insulin signaling has a functional role in the beta cell we have used the Cre-loxP system to specifically inactivate the insulin receptor gene in the beta cells. The resultant mice exhibit a selective loss of insulin secretion in response to glucose and a progressive impairment of glucose tolerance. These data indicate an important functional role for the insulin receptor in glucose sensing by the pancreatic beta cell and suggest that defects in insulin signaling at the level of the beta cell may contribute to the observed alterations in insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes.  (+info)

(3/8132) Freeze-fracture replication of organized tissue without cryoprotection.

Fresh pieces of rat liver and pancreas were rapidly frozen without prior chemical fixation or cryoprotection, and replicated folloing freeze-fracture. Replicas revealed small peripheral areas free of ice crystals or damage and, within such areas, general ultrastructural morphology was essentially similar to that seen in conventionally processed material. On fracture faces of plasma and nuclear membranes a population of less prominent particles in addition to conventional membrane-associated particles was seen, and smooth areas devoid of particles of any type were seen on some nuclear membranes. These smooth areas did not appear to be similar to smooth areas allegedly arising as artifacts of conventional processing. Tight junctions and gap junctions appeared as they do in cryoprotected specimens. The results provide a base-line for assessing the possible effects of processing steps or agents on the ultrastructure of organized tissues as revealed in freeze-fracture replicas.  (+info)

(4/8132) Further studies on the mechanism of adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipid micelles.

Lipase [EC 3.1.1.3] depleted lipid micelles, in which lipolysis was not elicited by adrenaline, were prepared from lipid micelles. When these lipase-depleted lipid micelles incubated with adipose tissue extract containing lipase activity, adrenaline-induced lipolysis was restored to almost the same level as that of native lipid micelles. Adrenaline-induced lipolysis was not restored when the lipase-depleted lipid micelles were homogenized or sonicated. Various tissue extracts from kidney, lung, liver, and pancreas, and post-heparin plasma, which contained lipase activity, restored adrenaline-induced lipolysis in lipase-depleted lipid micelles.  (+info)

(5/8132) Efficient binding of regulated secretory protein aggregates to membrane phospholipids at acidic pH.

Some regulated secretory proteins are thought to be targeted to secretory granules through an acidic-dependent aggregation in the trans-Golgi network. In this report we use pancreatic zymogens, a paradigm of regulated proteins, to test this hypothesis, because they qualitatively aggregate upon acidification in vitro. Pig zymogens were found to start to aggregate significantly at pH approximately 6.0, a pH slightly lower than that at which rat zymogens aggregate, but still compatible with the pH of the cell-sorting compartments. When pig zymogen granule membranes were mixed with the zymogens in the aggregation assay, membranes that normally floated on 1 M sucrose were observed to be pelleted by the aggregating zymogens. Rat membranes were pelleted by pig zymogens and vice versa. Igs, typical constitutively secreted proteins, which needed chemical cross-linking to serve as an aggregated protein control, pelleted membranes almost independently of pH. Corresponding cross-linked zymogen-binding ability and pH dependence was unaffected by the chemical modification. Membranes treated with sodium carbonate, pH 11, or with protease K, were still pelleted by zymogens, suggesting that the aggregated zymogens bound to membrane lipids. This hypothesis was confirmed by the efficient pelleting of unilamellar vesicles composed of granule membrane lipids. Vesicles composed of single classes of phospholipids were also pelleted, but with various efficacies. We conclude that pancreatic zymogen aggregates, formed under the acidic conditions of the secretory pathway sorting compartments, have the capacity to bind firmly to membranes through their phospholipid constituents.  (+info)

(6/8132) His ... Asp catalytic dyad of ribonuclease A: histidine pKa values in the wild-type, D121N, and D121A enzymes.

Bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) has a conserved His ... Asp catalytic dyad in its active site. Structural analyses had indicated that Asp121 forms a hydrogen bond with His119, which serves as an acid during catalysis of RNA cleavage. The enzyme contains three other histidine residues including His12, which is also in the active site. Here, 1H-NMR spectra of wild-type RNase A and the D121N and D121A variants were analyzed thoroughly as a function of pH. The effect of replacing Asp121 on the microscopic pKa values of the histidine residues is modest: none change by more than 0.2 units. There is no evidence for the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond between His119 and either an aspartate or an asparagine residue at position 121. In the presence of the reaction product, uridine 3'-phosphate (3'-UMP), protonation of one active-site histidine residue favors protonation of the other. This finding is consistent with the phosphoryl group of 3'-UMP interacting more strongly with the two active-site histidine residues when both are protonated. Comparison of the titration curves of the unliganded enzyme with that obtained in the presence of different concentrations of 3'-UMP shows that a second molecule of 3'-UMP can bind to the enzyme. Together, the data indicate that the aspartate residue in the His ... Asp catalytic dyad of RNase A has a measurable but modest effect on the ionization of the adjacent histidine residue.  (+info)

(7/8132) Characterization of functional residues in the interfacial recognition domain of lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT).

Lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is an interfacial enzyme active on both high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL). Threading alignments of LCAT with lipases suggest that residues 50-74 form an interfacial recognition site and this hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The (delta56-68) deletion mutant had no activity on any substrate. Substitution of W61 with F, Y, L or G suggested that an aromatic residue is required for full enzymatic activity. The activity of the W61F and W61Y mutants was retained on HDL but decreased on LDL, possibly owing to impaired accessibility to the LDL lipid substrate. The decreased activity of the single R52A and K53A mutants on HDL and LDL and the severer effect of the double mutation suggested that these conserved residues contribute to the folding of the LCAT lid. The membrane-destabilizing properties of the LCAT 56-68 helical segment were demonstrated using the corresponding synthetic peptide. An M65N-N66M substitution decreased both the fusogenic properties of the peptide and the activity of the mutant enzyme on all substrates. These results suggest that the putative interfacial recognition domain of LCAT plays an important role in regulating the interaction of the enzyme with its organized lipoprotein substrates.  (+info)

(8/8132) Cloning and characterization of a secreted frizzled-related protein that is expressed by the retinal pigment epithelium.

The Wnt/frizzled cell signaling pathway has been implicated in the determination of polarity in a number of systems, including the Drosophila retina. The vertebrate retina develops from an undifferentiated neuroepithelium into an organized and laminated structure that demonstrates a high degree of polarity at both the tissue and cellular levels. In the process of searching for molecules that are preferentially expressed by the vertebrate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), we identified secreted frizzled-related protein 5 (SFRP5), a member of the SFRP family that appears to act by modulating Wnt signal transduction. SFRP5 is highly expressed by RPE cells, and is also expressed in the pancreas. Within the retina, the related molecule SFRP2 is expressed specifically by cells of the inner nuclear layer. Thus, photoreceptors are likely to be bathed by two opposing gradients of SFRP molecules. Consistent with SFRP5 's postulated role in modulating Wnt signaling in the retina, it inhibits the ability of Xwnt-8 mRNA to induce axis duplication in Xenopus embryos. The human SFRP5 gene consists of three coding exons and it maps to chromosome 10q24.1; human SFRP2 maps to 4q31.3. Based on the biology and complementary expression patterns of SFRP2 and SFRP5, we suggest that they may be involved in determining the polarity of photoreceptor, and perhaps other, cells in the retina.  (+info)



  • adult
  • The present study demonstrates that adult human pancreatic duct cells can be converted into insulin-expressing cells after ectopic, adenovirus-mediated expression of the class B basic helix-loop-helix factor neurogenin 3 (ngn3), which is a critical factor in embryogenesis of the mouse endocrine pancreas. (semanticscholar.org)
  • These data indicate that the Delta-Notch pathway, which controls embryonic development of the mouse endocrine pancreas, can also operate in adult human duct cells driving them to a neuroendocrine phenotype with the formation of insulin-expressing cells. (semanticscholar.org)