Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Anemia, Refractory: A severe sometimes chronic anemia, usually macrocytic in type, that does not respond to ordinary antianemic therapy.Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: Chronic refractory anemia with granulocytopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. Myeloblasts and progranulocytes constitute 5 to 40 percent of the nucleated marrow cells.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic: A myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative disease characterized by monocytosis, increased monocytes in the bone marrow, variable degrees of dysplasia, but an absence of immature granulocytes in the blood.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5: One of the two pairs of human chromosomes in the group B class (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 4-5).Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Azacitidine: A pyrimidine analogue that inhibits DNA methyltransferase, impairing DNA methylation. It is also an antimetabolite of cytidine, incorporated primarily into RNA. Azacytidine has been used as an antineoplastic agent.Anemia, Sideroblastic: Anemia characterized by the presence of erythroblasts containing excessive deposits of iron in the marrow.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Monosomy: The condition in which one chromosome of a pair is missing. In a normally diploid cell it is represented symbolically as 2N-1.Thalidomide: A piperidinyl isoindole originally introduced as a non-barbiturate hypnotic, but withdrawn from the market due to teratogenic effects. It has been reintroduced and used for a number of immunological and inflammatory disorders. Thalidomide displays immunosuppressive and anti-angiogenic activity. It inhibits release of TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA from monocytes, and modulates other cytokine action.Preleukemia: Conditions in which the abnormalities in the peripheral blood or bone marrow represent the early manifestations of acute leukemia, but in which the changes are not of sufficient magnitude or specificity to permit a diagnosis of acute leukemia by the usual clinical criteria.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases: Clonal myeloid disorders that possess both dysplastic and proliferative features but are not properly classified as either MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES or MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Granulocyte Precursor Cells: The cells in the granulocytic series that give rise to mature granulocytes (NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS). These precursor cells include myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes and metamyelocytes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Bone Marrow DiseasesHematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Iron Overload: An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic: Antimetabolites that are useful in cancer chemotherapy.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Hematologic Agents: Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Chelation Therapy: Therapy of heavy metal poisoning using agents which sequester the metal from organs or tissues and bind it firmly within the ring structure of a new compound which can be eliminated from the body.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Antigens, CD34: Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Blast Crisis: An advanced phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia, characterized by a rapid increase in the proportion of immature white blood cells (blasts) in the blood and bone marrow to greater than 30%.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Vidarabine: A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Sweet Syndrome: Condition characterized by large, rapidly extending, erythematous, tender plaques on the upper body usually accompanied by fever and dermal infiltration of neutrophilic leukocytes. It occurs mostly in middle-aged women, is often preceded by an upper respiratory infection, and clinically resembles ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME. Sweet syndrome is associated with LEUKEMIA.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Anemia, Macrocytic: Anemia characterized by larger than normal erythrocytes, increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH).Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit: A transcription factor that dimerizes with the cofactor CORE BINDING FACTOR BETA SUBUNIT to form core binding factor. It contains a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the runt domain. Runx1 is frequently mutated in human LEUKEMIAS.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Haploinsufficiency: A copy number variation that results in reduced GENE DOSAGE due to any loss-of-function mutation. The loss of heterozygosity is associated with abnormal phenotypes or diseased states because the remaining gene is insufficient.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Karyotype: The full set of CHROMOSOMES presented as a systematized array of METAPHASE chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single CELL NUCLEUS arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the CENTROMERE. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Erythroid Precursor Cells: The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20: A specific pair of GROUP F CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Iron Chelating Agents: Organic chemicals that form two or more coordination links with an iron ion. Once coordination has occurred, the complex formed is called a chelate. The iron-binding porphyrin group of hemoglobin is an example of a metal chelate found in biological systems.Hematinics: Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute: A pediatric acute myeloid leukemia involving both myeloid and monocytoid precursors. At least 20% of non-erythroid cells are of monocytic origin.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Erythroid Cells: The series of cells in the red blood cell lineage at various stages of differentiation.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.DNA Modification Methylases: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They are responsible for producing a species-characteristic methylation pattern, on either adenine or cytosine residues, in a specific short base sequence in the host cell's own DNA. This methylated sequence will occur many times in the host-cell DNA and remain intact for the lifetime of the cell. Any DNA from another species which gains entry into a living cell and lacks the characteristic methylation pattern will be recognized by the restriction endonucleases of similar specificity and destroyed by cleavage. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms.Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal: A condition characterized by the recurrence of HEMOGLOBINURIA caused by intravascular HEMOLYSIS. In cases occurring upon cold exposure (paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), usually after infections, there is a circulating antibody which is also a cold hemolysin. In cases occurring during or after sleep (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria), the clonal hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a global deficiency of cell membrane proteins.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Isochromosomes: Metacentric chromosomes produced during MEIOSIS or MITOSIS when the CENTROMERE splits transversely instead of longitudinally. The chromosomes produced by this abnormal division are one chromosome having the two long arms of the original chromosome, but no short arms, and the other chromosome consisting of the two short arms and no long arms. Each of these isochromosomes constitutes a simultaneous duplication and deletion.HLA-DR Serological Subtypes: HLA-DR antigen subtypes that have been classified according to their affinity to specific ANTIBODIES. The DNA sequence analyses of HLA-DR ALPHA-CHAINS and HLA-DR BETA-CHAINS has for the most part revealed the specific alleles that are responsible for each serological subtype.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Myeloid Progenitor Cells: Stem cells derived from HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS. Derived from these myeloid progenitor cells are the MEGAKARYOCYTES; ERYTHROID CELLS; MYELOID CELLS; and some DENDRITIC CELLS.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Ribonucleoprotein, U2 Small Nuclear: A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U2 snRNP along with other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U1, U4-U6, and U5) assemble into SPLICEOSOMES that remove introns from pre-mRNA by splicing. The U2 snRNA forms base pairs with conserved sequence motifs at the branch point, which associates with a heat- and RNAase-sensitive factor in an early step of splicing.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Nephrotic Syndrome: A condition characterized by severe PROTEINURIA, greater than 3.5 g/day in an average adult. The substantial loss of protein in the urine results in complications such as HYPOPROTEINEMIA; generalized EDEMA; HYPERTENSION; and HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. Diseases associated with nephrotic syndrome generally cause chronic kidney dysfunction.Arabinonucleosides: Nucleosides containing arabinose as their sugar moiety.Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.DNA Methylation: Addition of methyl groups to DNA. DNA methyltransferases (DNA methylases) perform this reaction using S-ADENOSYLMETHIONINE as the methyl group donor.Dual Specificity Phosphatase 2: A dual specificity phosphatase subtype that plays a role in intracellular signal transduction by inactivating MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES. It has specificity for EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED MAP KINASES and is primarily localized to the CELL NUCLEUS.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Idarubicin: An orally administered anthracycline antineoplastic. The compound has shown activity against BREAST NEOPLASMS; LYMPHOMA; and LEUKEMIA.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Leukemia, Radiation-Induced: Leukemia produced by exposure to IONIZING RADIATION or NON-IONIZING RADIATION.Sjogren's Syndrome: Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.Uniparental Disomy: The presence in a cell of two paired chromosomes from the same parent, with no chromosome of that pair from the other parent. This chromosome composition stems from non-disjunction (NONDISJUNCTION, GENETIC) events during MEIOSIS. The disomy may be composed of both homologous chromosomes from one parent (heterodisomy) or a duplicate of one chromosome (isodisomy).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.Red-Cell Aplasia, Pure: Suppression of erythropoiesis with little or no abnormality of leukocyte or platelet production.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Abnormal Karyotype: A variation from the normal set of chromosomes characteristic of a species.Leukemia, Myeloid, Chronic, Atypical, BCR-ABL Negative: A myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorder characterized by myelodysplasia associated with bone marrow and peripheral blood patterns similar to CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA, but cytogenetically lacking a PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME or bcr/abl fusion gene (GENES, ABL).fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3: A receptor tyrosine kinase that is involved in HEMATOPOIESIS. It is closely related to FMS PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEIN and is commonly mutated in acute MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Pyoderma Gangrenosum: An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Systemic Vasculitis: A heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation and necrosis of the blood vessel walls.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3: A 67-kDa sialic acid binding lectin that is specific for MYELOID CELLS and MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGE PRECURSOR CELLS. This protein is the smallest siglec subtype and contains a single immunoglobulin C2-set domain. It may play a role in intracellular signaling via its interaction with SHP-1 PROTEIN-TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE and SHP-2 PROTEIN-TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Immunologic Surveillance: The theory that T-cells monitor cell surfaces and detect structural changes in the plasma membrane and/or surface antigens of virally or neoplastically transformed cells.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Aspartate Aminotransferase, Cytoplasmic: An aspartate aminotransferase found in the CYTOPLASM.Amifostine: A phosphorothioate proposed as a radiation-protective agent. It causes splenic vasodilation and may block autonomic ganglia.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Turner Syndrome: A syndrome of defective gonadal development in phenotypic females associated with the karyotype 45,X (or 45,XO). Patients generally are of short stature with undifferentiated GONADS (streak gonads), SEXUAL INFANTILISM, HYPOGONADISM, webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus, elevated GONADOTROPINS, decreased ESTRADIOL level in blood, and CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS. NOONAN SYNDROME (also called Pseudo-Turner Syndrome and Male Turner Syndrome) resembles this disorder; however, it occurs in males and females with a normal karyotype and is inherited as an autosomal dominant.Polychondritis, Relapsing: An acquired disease of unknown etiology, chronic course, and tendency to recur. It is characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage and can result in deformities such as floppy ear and saddle nose. Loss of cartilage in the respiratory tract can lead to respiratory obstruction.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.

*  Symptoms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) | Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point | Hudson, FL

Learn more about Symptoms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point Main Page Risk Factors ... ... T114054/Myelodysplastic-syndrome-MDS. Updated January 13, 2017. Accessed June 30, 2017. ... www.cancer.org/cancer/myelodysplastic-syndrome/detection-diagnosis-staging/signs-symptoms.html. Updated February 10, 2014. ... www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/leukemias/myelodysplastic-syndrome. Updated January 2017. Accessed ...
rmchealth.com/hl/?/32723/Treatments-for-Myelodysplastic-Syndrome--MDS-~Symptoms&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Myelodysplastic Syndromes | Portsmouth Regional Hospital

Learn more about Myelodysplastic Syndromes at Portsmouth Regional Hospital DefinitionCausesRisk ... Understanding myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The Myelodysplastic Syndromes Foundation website. Available at: http://www.mds- ... Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is more common in men and in those aged 60 years and older. Other factors that may increase your ... Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of diseases that involve dysfunction of the bone marrow. Bone marrow is the tissue ...
portsmouthhospital.com/hl/?/99915/myelodysplastic-syndromes&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Leukemia - Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

Somatic point mutations in RUNX1/CBFA2/AML1 are common in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, but not in myelofibrosis with ... Hyperactivation of the RAS signaling pathway in myelodysplastic syndrome with AML1/RUNX1 point mutations. Leukemia 2006; 20: ... RUNX1 gene mutation in primary myelodysplastic syndrome - the mutation can be detected early at diagnosis or acquired during ... International scoring system for evaluating prognosis in myelodysplastic syndromes. Blood 1997; 89: 2079-2088. , PubMed , ISI ...
nature.com/leu/journal/v22/n2/full/2405078a.html?foxtrotcallback=true&error=cookies_not_supported&code=737b5cb7-9d64-4225-a3c1-985e90565b9f

*  Myelodysplastic syndrome | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal haematological stem cell disorders. It has sometimes been ... Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal haematological stem cell disorders. It has sometimes been ... A primary care approach to myelodysplastic syndromes. Korean J Fam Med. 2014;35 (3): 111-8. doi:10.4082/kjfm.2014.35.3.111 - ... 1. Meers S. The myelodysplastic syndromes: the era of understanding. Eur. J. Haematol. 2014; . doi:10.1111/ejh.12443 - Pubmed ...
https://radiopaedia.org/articles/myelodysplastic-syndrome

*  A Study To Evaluate PF-04449913 With Chemotherapy In Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome - Full...

A Study To Evaluate PF-04449913 With Chemotherapy In Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome. This ... MedlinePlus related topics: Acute Myeloid Leukemia Leukemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes Genetic and Rare Diseases Information ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Bone Marrow Diseases. Hematologic Diseases. ... For a diagnosis of high-risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome RAEB 2 the patient must have 10-19% bone marrow blasts ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01546038?term=B1371003&rank=1

*  Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Syndrome. Leukemia. Leukemia, Myeloid. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Neoplasm Metastasis. ... Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes Recurrent Adult Acute ... Myelodysplastic Syndromes Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative ... MedlinePlus related topics: Acute Myeloid Leukemia Leukemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes Drug Information available for: ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00049582?cond="Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia"&rank=20

*  SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes - Full...

... de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia ... Syndrome. Leukemia. Leukemia, Myeloid. Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute. Anemia. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Neoplasm ... MedlinePlus related topics: Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Leukemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes Genetic and Rare Diseases Information ... SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes. This ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00098826?cond="Acute myeloblastic leukemia without maturation"&rank=15

*  Lenalidomide for Myelodysplastic Syndrome Refractory to Hypomethylating Agents - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Syndrome. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Disease. Pathologic Processes. Bone Marrow Diseases. Hematologic Diseases. ... Lenalidomide for Myelodysplastic Syndrome Refractory to Hypomethylating Agents. This study has been completed. ... Phase II Trial of High Dose Lenalidomide in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome Refractory to Hypomethylating Agents. ... Patient must have histologically confirmed Myelodysplastic Syndrome as defined by FAB Classification including CMML and ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01246076?term=NCT01246076&rank=1

*  Fatigue - Myelodysplastic Syndrome - MedHelp

Yes, fatigue is a common complain in patients suffering from myelodysblastic syndromes. In patients who are not anemic the ... Yes, fatigue is a common complain in patients suffering from myelodysblastic syndromes. In patients who are not anemic the ...
medhelp.org/posts/Myelodysplastic-Syndrome/Fatigue/show/1833741

*  Myelodysplastic syndromes Risk factors - Mayo Clinic

Secondary myelodysplastic syndromes are often more difficult to treat.. Types of myelodysplastic syndromes. The World Health ... Doctors divide myelodysplastic syndromes into two categories based on their cause:. *Myelodysplastic syndromes with no known ... Myelodysplastic syndromes rarely cause signs or symptoms in the early stages of the disease. In time, myelodysplastic syndromes ... De novo myelodysplastic syndromes are often more easily treated than are myelodysplastic syndromes with a known cause. ...
mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/myelodysplastic-syndromes/basics/risk-factors/con-20027168?p=1

*  Managing the Side Effects of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and MDS Treatment | Grand Strand Health

Learn more about Managing the Side Effects of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) and MDS Treatment at Grand Strand Medical Center ... Managing Side EffectsLiving With Myelodysplastic Syndrome Talking to Your Doctor Resource Guide ... T114054/Myelodysplastic-syndrome-MDS. Updated January 13, 2017. Accessed June 30, 2017. ... www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/leukemias/myelodysplastic-syndrome. Updated January 2017. Accessed ...
grandstrandmed.com/hl/?/32728/Cancer-In-Depth--Myelodysplastic-Syndrome--MDS-~Managing-Side-Effects&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Leukaemia - Oxford Medicine

In spite of all these advances, however, most adults with acute leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome are destined to die from ... Myelodysplastic syndromes. In 2008 the WHO defined myelodysplastic syndromes as a group of clonal disorders occurring in adults ... Myelodysplastic syndromes/neoplasms, overview, in Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, Jaffe ES, Pileri SA, Stein H, (p. 117) et al ... The majority of myelodysplastic syndromes occur without any known cause, although some may be caused by chemotherapy for other ...
oxfordmedicine.com/view/10.1093/med/9780198717607.001.0001/med-9780198717607-chapter-7

*  Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) refers to a heterogeneous group of closely related clonal hematopoietic disorders. All are ... and Myelodysplastic Syndrome What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * Myelodysplastic Syndromes ... see Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndrome. For a summary of MDS management guidelines, see Myelodysplastic Syndromes Guidelines. ... Myelodysplastic Syndrome. Updated: Sep 28, 2016 * Author: Emmanuel C Besa, MD; Chief Editor: Koyamangalath Krishnan, MD, FRCP, ...
https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/207347-overview

*  Myelodysplastic Syndromes - The ASCO Post

Forward Progress in Myelodysplastic Syndromes Is Largely in Genetics. Most recent advances in the management of myelodysplastic ... Your search for myelodysplastic syndromes matches 35 pages. Showing 1 - 35. All. Toggle Dropdown *All ... Alan F. List, MD, and James O. Armitage, MD, FACP, FRCP, on Advances in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Alan F. List, MD, of Moffitt ... Mutations in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Associated With Poorer Outcome After Stem Cell Transplantation. In a study reported in ...
ascopost.com/topics/hematologic-malignancies/myelodysplastic-syndromes/

*  Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or...

Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or ... Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or ... Azacitidine in Combination With Vorinostat (NSC-701852) for Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic ... Patients must have morphologically confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ( ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT01522976?term=NCT01522976&rank=1

*  Cancer In Depth: Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) | Doctors Hospital

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Doctors Hospital of Augusta Main Page Risk Factors ... ... Myelodysplastic syndrome, unclassified (MDS-U)-The characteristics of blood and bone marrow cells do not fit into any other ... Myelodysplastic syndrome associated with isolated del (5q) abnormality-A specific chromosome in the bone marrow cells is ... Living With Myelodysplastic Syndrome Talking to Your Doctor Resource Guide MDS refers to a group of disorders that affect the ...
doctors-hospital.net/hl/?/32929/myelodysplastic-syndrome&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Postdoctoral Scientist in Mouse Modelling of Myelodysplastic Syndromes, University of Oxford - The Science Jobs

Postdoctoral Scientist in Mouse Modelling of Myelodysplastic Syndromes, University of Oxford. Home / Jobs Open / Biology / ... Biochemistry / Postdoctoral Scientist in Mouse Modelling of Myelodysplastic Syndromes, University of Oxford ... and characterisation of the haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell defects in mouse models of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). ...
thesciencejobs.com/jobs/biology/biochemistry/160330

*  Cancer In Depth: Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) | Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point | Hudson, FL

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point Main Page Risk Factors ... ... Myelodysplastic syndrome, unclassified (MDS-U)-The characteristics of blood and bone marrow cells do not fit into any other ... Myelodysplastic syndrome associated with isolated del (5q) abnormality-A specific chromosome in the bone marrow cells is ... Living With Myelodysplastic Syndrome Talking to Your Doctor Resource Guide MDS refers to a group of disorders that affect the ...
rmchealth.com/hl/?/32929/Resource-Guide-for-Myelodysplastic-Syndrome--MDS-~Main-Page&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Post T-plant Infusion of Allogeneic Cytokine Induced Killer Cells as Consolidative Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes...

Post T-plant Infusion of Allogeneic Cytokine Induced Killer Cells as Consolidative Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes/ ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT01392989

*  Treatments for Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) | Medical City Dallas

Learn more about Treatments for Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) at Medical City Dallas Main Page Risk Factors ... ... T114054/Myelodysplastic-syndrome-MDS. Updated January 13, 2017. Accessed June 30, 2017. ... www.merckmanuals.com/professional/hematology-and-oncology/leukemias/myelodysplastic-syndrome. Updated January 2017. Accessed ... www.cancer.org/cancer/myelodysplastic-syndrome/treating.html. Accessed June 30, 2017. ...
medicalcityhospital.com/hl/?/32725/Chemotherapy-for-Myelodysplastic-Syndrome--MDS-~Treatment-Overview&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1

*  Epidemiology of myelodysplastic syndromes | Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with significant ... Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with significant ...
aamds.org/node/1325

*  After Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treatment

Get information about how to live well after myelodysplastic syndrome treatment and make decisions about next steps. ... Lifestyle Changes After Having Myelodysplastic Syndrome * How Does Having Myelodysplastic Syndrome Affect Your Emotional Health ... Get information about how to live well after myelodysplastic syndrome treatment and make decisions about next steps.. ... What Happens After Treatment for a Myelodysplastic Syndrome? * ... About Myelodysplastic Syndromes * Causes, Risk Factors, and ...
https://cancer.org/cancer/myelodysplastic-syndrome/after-treatment.html

*  Myelodysplastic syndromes Symptoms - Mayo Clinic

Secondary myelodysplastic syndromes are often more difficult to treat.. Types of myelodysplastic syndromes. The World Health ... Doctors divide myelodysplastic syndromes into two categories based on their cause:. *Myelodysplastic syndromes with no known ... Myelodysplastic syndromes rarely cause signs or symptoms in the early stages of the disease. In time, myelodysplastic syndromes ... De novo myelodysplastic syndromes are often more easily treated than are myelodysplastic syndromes with a known cause. ...
mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/myelodysplastic-syndromes/basics/symptoms/CON-20027168?p=1

*  Myelodysplastic Syndromes | Education Programs | LLS

Myelodysplastic Syndrome lectures and education programs including treatments, therapies, and other advancements. ... Current and Emerging Therapies for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) (April 7, 2017). *MDS - Diagnosis and Treatment Update ( ... These education programs cover topics related to myelodysplastic syndromes. Click on the links below to access webcasts, audio ...
lls.org/patient-education-webcasts/myelodysplastic-syndromes

*  ESMO 2014 Press Release: RAS Testing Only the First Step for Choosing Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer, Important New...

Myelodysplastic syndromes • Hodgkin's lymphoma • Primary cutaneous lymphoma • Acute myeloblastic leukaemia in adult patients • ... Hereditary Syndromes. Prevention and Screening in BRCA Mutation Carriers and Other Breast/Ovarian Hereditary Cancer Syndromes ...
esmo.org/Press-Office/Press-Releases/RAS-Testing-Only-the-First-Step-for-Choosing-Treatment-for-Metastatic-Colorectal-Cancer-Important-New-Data-Show

Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasiaMalformative syndrome: A malformative syndrome (or malformation syndrome) is a recognizable pattern of congenital anomalies that are known or thought to be causally related (VIIth International Congress on Human Genetics).Myelomonocyte: A myelomonocyte is a type of cell observed in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. It bears a resemblance to both a myelocyte and monocyte.Minimally differentiated acute myeloblastic leukemiaMyeloid leukemiaHypomethylating agent: A hypomethylating agent (or demethylating agent) is a drug that inhibits DNA methylation. Currently available hypomethylating agents block the activity of DNA methyltransferase (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors / DNMT inhibitors).Sideroblastic anemiaBone marrow suppression: Bone marrow suppression or myelotoxicity (adjective myelotoxic) or myelosuppression is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). Bone marrow suppression is a serious side effect of chemotherapy and certain drugs affecting the immune system such as azathioprine.Genetic imbalance: Genetic imbalance is to describe situation when the genome of a cell or organism has more copies of some genes than other genes due to chromosomal rearrangements or aneuploidy.Partial monosomy 13q: Partial monosomy of chromosome 13q is a monosomy that results from the loss of all or part of the long arm of chromosome 13 in human beings. It is a rare genetic disorder which results in severe congenital abnormalities which are frequently fatal at an early age.Transplacental: Transplacental refers to the ability of a toxin or pathogen to cross the physical and biological barriers of the placenta separating the mother and fetus, to whom such substances may be dangerous. This would include, for example, HIV and the drug thalidomide.Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases: Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases are a category of hematological malignancies disorders created by the World Health Organization which have characteristics of both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative conditions.PancytopeniaCongenital hypoplastic anemiaChildhood leukemia: Childhood leukemia is a type of leukemia, usually acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and a type of childhood cancer. The cure rate of childhood leukemia is generally higher than adult leukemia, approaching 90%, although some side effects of treatment last into adulthood.MyeloblastHematopoietic stem cell transplantationTrisomy 9Myeloid: The term myeloid (myelogenous) is an adjective that can refer to a progenitor cell for granulocytes, monocytes, erythrocytes, or platelets. Myeloid can be distinguished from the lymphoid progenitor cells that give rise to B cells and T cells.Chelation: Chelation describes a particular way that ions and molecules bind metal ions.Latin chela, from Greek, denotes a claw.Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator: Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is the generic term for drugs in a new class of third-generation erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In the media, these agents are commonly referred to as 'EPO', short for erythropoietin.Transfusion associated circulatory overloadNational Down Syndrome SocietyCytarabineNational Cholesterol Education Program: The National Cholesterol Education Program is a program managed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health. Its goal is to reduce increased cardiovascular disease rates due to hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol levels) in the United States of America.Bone marrow examination: Bone marrow examination refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often called a trephine biopsy) and bone marrow aspiration. Bone marrow examination is used in the diagnosis of a number of conditions, including leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, anemia, and pancytopenia.Heparin-induced thrombocytopeniaBlood cell: A blood cell, also called a hemocyte, hematocyte, or hematopoietic cell, is a cell produced through hematopoiesis and is normally found in blood. In mammals, these fall into three general categories:Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.VidarabineCancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Reactive neutrophilic dermatoses: Reactive neutrophilic dermatoses are a spectrum of conditions mediated by neutrophils, and typically associated with underlying diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and hematologic malignancy.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).MacrocytosisPegfilgrastimOrnithinaemia: Ornithinaemia is a blood disorder characterized by high levels of ornithine. Also known as hyperornithinemia, it may be associated with psychomotor retardation or epileptic episodes.Tumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.Antileukemic drug: Antileukemic drugs, anticancer drugs that are used to treat one or more types of leukemia, include:AnemiaOncogene: An oncogene is a gene that has the potential to cause cancer.Wilbur, Beth, editor.Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act: The Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act of 2001 (P.L.MyelofibrosisIron chelate: Iron chelate, also known as chelated iron, is a soluble complex of iron, sodium and a chelating agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), EDDHA, or others, used to make the iron soluble in water and, for the purposes of agriculture, accessible to plants.Hematinic: A hematinic is a nutrient required for the formation of blood cells in the process of hematopoiesis. The principle hematinics are iron, B12, and folate.Flow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Bone Marrow Transplantation (journal): Bone Marrow Transplantation is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering transplantation of bone marrow in humans. It is published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group.ProerythroblastRebase (database): In molecular biology, REBASE is a database of information about restriction enzymes and DNA methyltransferases. REBASE contains and extensive set of references, sites of recognition and cleavage, sequences and structures.HemoglobinuriaImmunophenotyping: Immunophenotyping is a technique used to study the protein expressed by cells. This technique is commonly used in basic science research and laboratory diagnostic purpose.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Anti-lymphocyte globulin: Anti-lymphocyte globulin (ALG) is an infusion of animal- antibodies against human T cells which is used in the treatment of acute rejection in organ transplantation. It was developed in the 1960s, during which time 74 scientific papers were published on its use.BusulfanGross examinationIsochromosome: An isochromosome is an unbalanced structural abnormality in which the arms of the chromosome are mirror images of each other. The chromosome consists of two copies of either the long (q) arm or the short (p) arm because isochromosome formation is equivalent to a simultaneous duplication and deletion of genetic material.ErythropoiesisLow-dose chemotherapy: Low-dose chemotherapy is being studied/used in the treatment of cancer to avoid the side effects of conventional chemotherapy. Historically, oncologists have used the highest possible dose that the body can tolerate in order to kill as many cancer cells as possible.Thrombocytosis

(1/1945) Expression and function of leptin receptor isoforms in myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes: proliferative and anti-apoptotic activities.

The receptor for the gene product of the obesity gene, leptin, was recently reported to be expressed on murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Therefore, we studied the expression of the leptin receptor, OB-R, in normal myeloid precursors, human leukemia cell lines, and primary leukemic cells using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. In normal hematopoiesis, OB-R was expressed in CD34(+) cells. Normal promyelocytes (CD34(-)33(+) and CD34(-)13(+)) expressed only very low levels of the short, presumably nonsignaling isoform. Both the long and short isoforms of OB-R were expressed in 10 of 22 samples from patients with newly diagnosed primary or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML), with a higher incidence of the long isoform in primary AML (87.6% v 28.6%; P =.01). The incidence of OB-R expression was higher in recurrent than in newly diagnosed AML (P <.001), and samples from four patients with refractory AML showed strong expression of both isoforms. Both OB-R isoforms were also expressed in newly diagnosed and recurrent acute promyelocytic leukemia cells but were essentially absent in samples of chronic or acute lymphocytic leukemia. In vitro growth of myeloid leukemic cell lines and of blasts from 14 primary AMLs demonstrated that recombinant human leptin alone induced low level proliferation, significantly (P <.05) increased proliferation induced by recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 3, and stem cell factor in a subset of AML and increased colony formation (P <.005). Also, leptin reduced apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal in MO7E and TF-1 cells. Serum leptin levels correlated only with body mass index (P <. 001) and gender (P =.03). Results confirm the reported expression of leptin receptor in normal CD34(+) cells and demonstrate the frequent expression of leptin receptors in AML blasts. While normal promyelocytes lack receptor expression, leukemic promyelocytes express both isoforms. We also demonstrate proliferative effects of leptin alone and in combination with other physiologic cytokines, and anti-apoptotic properties of leptin. These findings could have implications for the pathophysiology of AML.  (+info)

(2/1945) Bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia and leukemia.

Eleven children underwent BMT for therapy-related MDS or leukemia, four from HLA-identical siblings and seven from unrelated donors. Ten of the 11 were conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide as the majority had received prior irradiation to the chest and/or abdomen. All patients engrafted. Regimen-related toxicity was more common when compared to historical controls. Eight patients developed acute GVHD and four of eight who survived 100 days post transplant developed extensive chronic GVHD. Non-relapse related mortality occurred in three patients. Five patients developed recurrent malignancy: one died from recurrence of osteosarcoma, three died of recurrent leukemia or MDS and another developed two subsequent malignancies (duodenal carcinoma and anaplastic astrocytoma). Three survive disease-free at 14+, 22+ and 43+ months for a 2 year actuarial cancer-free survival of 24% (95% confidence interval = 5-53%). Although allogeneic BMT can be curative, regimen-related toxicity is frequent and recurrent malignancy remains the major obstacle.  (+info)

(3/1945) 'Common' uncommon anemias.

Of the uncommon anemias, "common" types include the anemia of renal disease, thalassemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and the anemia of chronic disease. These conditions may be suggested by the clinical presentation, laboratory test values and peripheral blood smear, or by failure of the anemia to respond to iron supplements or nutrient replacement. The principal cause of the anemia of renal disease is a decreased production of red blood cells related to a relative deficiency of erythropoietin. When treatment is required, erythropoietin is administered, often with iron supplementation. In the anemia of chronic disease, impaired iron transport decreases red blood cell production. Treatment is predominantly directed at the underlying condition. Since iron stores are usually normal, iron administration is not beneficial. Thalassemia minor results from a congenital abnormality of hemoglobin synthesis. The disorder may masquerade as mild iron deficiency anemia, but iron therapy and transfusions are often not indicated. In the myelodysplastic syndrome, blood cell components fail to mature, and the condition may progress to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The rate of progression depends on the subtype of myelodysplasia, but the leukemia is usually resistant to therapy.  (+info)

(4/1945) Therapy-related leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide or anthracyclines.

BACKGROUND: Accumulation of data regarding therapy-related leukemia (TRL) or myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) is critical for assessing the risk of developing such diseases and for subsequent decision-making processes for better treatment. METHODS: We evaluated the clinical characteristics of patients with TRL/t-MDS diagnosed at the National Cancer Center Hospital between January 1989 and September 1997. This report is concerned with those patients who initially had been treated with chemotherapeutic agents for breast cancer. RESULTS: Thirteen patients (median age, 55 years) developed TRL (n = 4) or t-MDS (n = 9). The median interval between the development of TRL/t-MDS and initial treatment was 94 months (range 23-190 months). For the primary therapy, all patients had received intense and prolonged treatment with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and/or anthracyclines including doxorubicin (DOX), with a median cumulative dose of 55 g/body (range 16.4-288.5 g) for CPA and 480 mg/m2 (range 395-625.5 mg/m2) for DOX. Seven patients were subsequently treated by chemotherapy and one received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians must remain alert to the risks associated with unproven medical practices which include long-term administration of alkylating agents. Selected patients with TRL/t-MDS may respond to intense salvage combination chemotherapy.  (+info)

(5/1945) Secondary leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome after treatment with epipodophyllotoxins.

PURPOSE: The incidence of secondary leukemia after epipodophyllotoxin treatment and the relationship between epipodophyllotoxin cumulative dose and risk are not well characterized. The Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed a monitoring plan to obtain reliable estimates of the risk of secondary leukemia after epipodophyllotoxin treatment. METHODS: Twelve NCI-supported cooperative group clinical trials were identified that use epipodophyllotoxins at low (<1.5 g/m2 etoposide), moderate (1.5 to 2.99 g/m2 etoposide), or higher (> or =3.0 g/m2 etoposide) cumulative doses. Cases of secondary leukemia (including treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome) occurring on these trials have been reported to CTEP, as has duration of follow-up for all patients, thereby allowing calculation of cumulative 6-year incidence rates of secondary leukemia for each etoposide dose group. RESULTS: The calculated cumulative 6-year risks for development of secondary leukemia for the low, moderate, and higher cumulative dose groups were 3.3%, (95% upper confidence bound of 5.9%), 0.7% (95% upper confidence bound of 1.6%), and 2.2%, (95% upper confidence bound of 4.6%), respectively. CONCLUSION: Within the context of the epipodophyllotoxin cumulative dose range and schedules of administration encompassed by the monitoring plan regimens, and within the context of multiagent chemotherapy regimens that include alkylating agents, doxorubicin, and other agents, factors other than epipodophyllotoxin cumulative dose seem to be of primary importance in determining the risk of secondary leukemia. Data obtained by the CTEP secondary leukemia monitoring plan support the relative safety of using epipodophyllotoxins according to the therapeutic plans outlined in the monitored protocols.  (+info)

(6/1945) The myelodysplastic syndromes: predictive value of eight prognostic systems in 143 cases from a single institution.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Despite the fact that several prognostic systems for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have been proposed, few studies have been designed to test their effectiveness in independent patient populations. The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic value of 8 previously described prognostic systems in a series of consecutive MDS patients observed at a single institution over a 10-year period. DESIGN AND METHODS: One hundred and forty-three patients were diagnosed as having myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) according to the French-American-British (FAB) criteria. They were studied retrospectively in order to assess the prognostic value of the FAB classification and 7 other prognostic systems. RESULTS: On the basis of data at diagnosis, all investigated systems effectively stratified patients into groups with different life expectancies and identified a subset of patients with poor clinical outcome. However, the systems had different outcomes concerning median survival of patients classified as low-risk, ranging from less than 3 years for the Mufti scoring system to more than 8 years for the FAB classification modified according to Rosati et al. Moreover, patient distribution into different risk categories was quite different with the different prognostic systems. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: When applied to our case series, some of the prognostic systems had a much lower prognostic value than in the patient population from which they derived. This evidence suggests that testing of prognostic systems in independent case series is necessary before using the systems in clinical practice.  (+info)

(7/1945) An unusual cutaneous manifestation of myelodysplastic syndrome: "pseudo-Koebner phenomenon".

An unusual and hitherto unreported complication of myelodysplastic syndrome is reported: the "pseudo-Koebner phenomenon." The skin lesions were characterised by exuberant "fleshy" masses at the sites of intravenous cannulation and skin trauma, and by histological evidence of chronic inflammation with focal necrosis and abscess formation. No evidence of dermal infiltration by malignant haemopoietic cells was seen. The exact aetiopathology of the phenomenon is unclear but an inappropriate and exaggerated inflammatory response owing to aberrant mediator mechanisms that are known to occur in some cases of myelodysplastic syndrome may be implicated.  (+info)

(8/1945) Randomized phase II study of fludarabine + cytosine arabinoside + idarubicin +/- all-trans retinoic acid +/- granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in poor prognosis newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

Preclinical data suggest that retinoids, eg, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), lower concentrations of antiapoptotic proteins such as bcl-2, possibly thereby improving the outcome of anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) chemotherapy. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been considered to be potentially synergistic with ATRA in this regard. Accordingly, we randomized 215 patients with newly diagnosed AML (153 patients) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (refractory anemia with excess blasts [RAEB] or RAEB-t, 62 patients) to receive fludarabine + ara-C + idarubicin (FAI) alone, FAI + ATRA, FAI + G-CSF, or FAI + ATRA + G-CSF. Eligibility required one of the following: age over 71 years, a history of abnormal blood counts before M.D. Anderson (MDA) presentation, secondary AML/MDS, failure to respond to one prior course of chemotherapy given outside MDA, or abnormal renal or hepatic function. For the two treatment arms containing ATRA, ATRA was given 2 days (day-2) before beginning and continued for 3 days after completion of FAI. For the two treatment arms including G-CSF, G-CSF began on day-1 and continued until neutrophil recovery. Patients with white blood cell (WBC) counts >50,000/microL began ATRA on day 1 and G-CSF on day 2. Events (death, failure to achieve complete remission [CR], or relapse from CR) have occurred in 77% of the 215 patients. Reflecting the poor prognosis of the patients entered, the CR rate was only 51%, median event-free survival (EFS) time once in CR was 36 weeks, and median survival time was 28 weeks. A Cox regression analysis indicated that, after accounting for patient prognostic variables, none of the three adjuvant treatment combinations (FAI + ATRA, FAI + G, FAI + ATRA + G) affected survival, EFS, or EFS once in CR compared with FAI. Similarly, there were no significant effects of either ATRA ignoring G-CSF, or of G-CSF ignoring ATRA. As previously found, a diagnosis of RAEB or RAEB-t rather than AML was insignificant. There were no indications that the effect of ATRA differed according to cytogenetic group, diagnosis (AML or MDS), or treatment schedule. Logistic regression analysis indicated that, after accounting for prognosis, addition of G-CSF +/- ATRA to FAI improved CR rate versus either FAI or FAI + ATRA, but G-CSF had no effect on the other outcomes. We conclude that addition of ATRA +/- G-CSF to FAI had no effect on CR rate, survival, EFS, or EFS in CR in poor prognosis, newly diagnosed AML or high-risk MDS.  (+info)



acute


  • Evidence-based recommendations on azacitidine (Vidaza) for treating myelodysplastic syndromes, chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia in adults. (nice.org.uk)

platelets


  • The World Health Organization divides myelodysplastic syndromes into subtypes based on the type of blood cells - red cells, white cells and platelets - involved. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In both these syndromes, any of the three types of blood cells - red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets - may be low in number and appear abnormal under a microscope. (mayoclinic.org)
  • In this uncommon syndrome, there are reduced numbers of one of the three types of mature blood cells, and either the white blood cells or platelets look abnormal under a microscope. (mayoclinic.org)

treatment


  • Treatment for myelodysplastic syndromes usually focuses on reducing or preventing complications of the disease and its treatments. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Презентация на тему: 'Myelodysplastic syndromes Achievements in understanding and treatment. (myshared.ru)
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes Achievements in understanding and treatment. (myshared.ru)