Keratitis: Inflammation of the cornea.Acanthamoeba Keratitis: Infection of the cornea by an ameboid protozoan which may cause corneal ulceration leading to blindness.Keratitis, Herpetic: A superficial, epithelial Herpesvirus hominis infection of the cornea, characterized by the presence of small vesicles which may break down and coalesce to form dendritic ulcers (KERATITIS, DENDRITIC). (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Keratitis, Dendritic: A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)Corneal Ulcer: Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.Eye Infections, Fungal: Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.Eye Infections, Bacterial: Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Acanthamoeba: A genus of free-living soil amoebae that produces no flagellate stage. Its organisms are pathogens for several infections in humans and have been found in the eye, bone, brain, and respiratory tract.Contact Lenses: Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)Eye Infections: Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.Fusariosis: OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS with the soil fungus FUSARIUM. Typically the infection is limited to the nail plate (ONYCHOMYCOSIS). The infection can however become systemic especially in an IMMUNOCOMPROMISED HOST (e.g., NEUTROPENIA) and results in cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions, fever, KERATITIS, and pulmonary infections.Natamycin: Amphoteric macrolide antifungal antibiotic from Streptomyces natalensis or S. chattanoogensis. It is used for a variety of fungal infections, mainly topically.Corneal Stroma: The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.Keratoplasty, Penetrating: Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.Trifluridine: An antiviral derivative of THYMIDINE used mainly in the treatment of primary keratoconjunctivitis and recurrent epithelial keratitis due to HERPES SIMPLEX virus. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p557)Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Contact Lens Solutions: Sterile solutions used to clean and disinfect contact lenses.Amebicides: Agents which are destructive to amebae, especially the parasitic species causing AMEBIASIS in man and animal.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Pseudomonas Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus PSEUDOMONAS.Fusarium: A mitosporic Hypocreales fungal genus, various species of which are important parasitic pathogens of plants and a variety of vertebrates. Teleomorphs include GIBBERELLA.Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Corneal Diseases: Diseases of the cornea.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.MycosesOnchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Corneal Transplantation: Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Corneal Opacity: Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Amebiasis: Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.Corneal Perforation: A puncture or hole through the CORNEAL STROMA resulting from various diseases or trauma.Herpesvirus 1, Human: The type species of SIMPLEXVIRUS causing most forms of non-genital herpes simplex in humans. Primary infection occurs mainly in infants and young children and then the virus becomes latent in the dorsal root ganglion. It then is periodically reactivated throughout life causing mostly benign conditions.Acanthamoeba castellanii: A species of free-living soil amoebae in the family Acanthamoebidae. It can cause ENCEPHALITIS and KERATITIS in humans.Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A species of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens (wound, burn, and urinary tract infections). It is also found widely distributed in soil and water. P. aeruginosa is a major agent of nosocomial infection.Eye Infections, Viral: Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.Microsporidia: A phylum of fungi comprising minute intracellular PARASITES with FUNGAL SPORES of unicellular origin. It has two classes: Rudimicrosporea and MICROSPOREA.Keratoconjunctivitis: Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.Contact Lenses, Extended-Wear: Hydrophilic contact lenses worn for an extended period or permanently.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus: Virus infection of the Gasserian ganglion and its nerve branches characterized by pain and vesicular eruptions with much swelling. Ocular involvement is usually heralded by a vesicle on the tip of the nose. This area is innervated by the nasociliary nerve.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.BiguanidesRNA, Ribosomal, 18S: Constituent of the 40S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 18S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.Aza CompoundsIritis: Inflammation of the iris characterized by circumcorneal injection, aqueous flare, keratotic precipitates, and constricted and sluggish pupil along with discoloration of the iris.Microsporidiosis: Infections with FUNGI of the phylum MICROSPORIDIA.Corneal Neovascularization: New blood vessels originating from the corneal veins and extending from the limbus into the adjacent CORNEAL STROMA. Neovascularization in the superficial and/or deep corneal stroma is a sequel to numerous inflammatory diseases of the ocular anterior segment, such as TRACHOMA, viral interstitial KERATITIS, microbial KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS, and the immune response elicited by CORNEAL TRANSPLANTATION.Potassium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain potassium as an integral part of the molecule.Acyclovir: A GUANOSINE analog that acts as an antimetabolite. Viruses are especially susceptible. Used especially against herpes.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Scleritis: Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.Benzamidines: Amidines substituted with a benzene group. Benzamidine and its derivatives are known as peptidase inhibitors.Antifungal Agents: Substances that destroy fungi by suppressing their ability to grow or reproduce. They differ from FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL because they defend against fungi present in human or animal tissues.

*  Herpes Simplex Keratitis
Herpetic Keratitis, Herpes Simplex Conjunctivitis, HSV Conjunctivitis, Herpetic Dendrite, Dendritic Keratitis, Dendritic Ulcer. ... Dendritic Keratitides, Furrow Keratitides, Furrow Keratitis, Keratitides, Dendritic, Keratitides, Furrow, Keratitis, Dendritic ... Keratitis, Dendritic [Disease/Finding], Dendritic keratitis, Herpes simplex dendritic keratitis, HSV dendritic keratitis, ... Keratitis, Furrow, Herpes simp.dendritic keratit., keratitis dentritic, dendritic keratitis (diagnosis), dendritic keratitis, ...
  http://www.fpnotebook.com/Eye/Conjunctiva/HrpsSmplxKrts.htm
*  HSV herpetic dendritic ulcer on cornea (Video) - TimRoot.com
This photo shows the classic dendritic ulcer that you see on the cornea of the eye with herpetic keratitis. The ulcer has ... This photo shows the classic dendritic ulcer that you see on the cornea of the eye with herpetic keratitis. The ulcer has ... This video shows the classic dendritic ulcer seen with HSV keratitis. You can see them easily with the use of fluorescein ... This slit-lamp photograph shows a HSV dendritic lesion on the corneal surface of the eye. These lesions occur in the ...
  https://timroot.com/hsv-herpetic-dendritic-ulcer-on-cornea-video/
*  List of Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis Medications (2 Compared) - Drugs.com
Compare risks and benefits of common medications used for Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis. Find the most popular drugs, view ... What is Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis: Herpes simplex dendritic keratitis is infection of the cornea caused by herpes ... Home › Drugs by Condition › Eye Conditions › Herpetic Keratitis › Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis ... Looking for answers? Ask a question or go join the herpes simplex dendritic keratitis support group to connect with others who ...
  https://www.drugs.com/condition/herpes-simplex-dendritic-keratitis.html
*  Herpes Simplex Keratitis
... aesthesiometry can be helpful in differentiating true recurrent dendritic keratitis from pseudo-dendritic keratitis, especially ... Epithelial keratitis- Dendritic epithelial defects with terminal bulbs. Base stains with fluorescein; adjacent epithelium ... Positive fluorescein stain of the dendritic lesions. *Positive rose bengal stain of epithelium adjacent to the dendritic lesion ... significantly reducing the incidence of recurrent epithelial keratitis and stromal keratitis; (2) possibly effective in ...
  http://eyerounds.org/cases/160-HSV.htm
*  Herpes Simplex Keratitis - Eye Disorders - Merck Manuals Professional Edition
Recurrences usually take the form of epithelial keratitis (also called dendritic keratitis) with tearing, foreign body ... Characteristic findings include a branching dendritic or serpentine corneal lesion (indicating dendritic keratitis) or disc- ... Herpes Simplex Keratitis (Herpes Simplex Keratoconjunctivitis). By Melvin I. Roat, MD, FACS, Clinical Associate Professor of ... have a history of epithelial keratitis. Disciform keratitis is a deeper, disc-shaped, localized area of secondary corneal edema ...
  http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/eye-disorders/corneal-disorders/herpes-simplex-keratitis?Ref=s&RefId=/eye_disorders/corneal_disorders/herpes_simplex_keratitis&Plugin=WMP&Speed=256&ItemId=v955006
*  Canadian-Pharmacy
... in most viral diseases of the cornea and conjunctiva including epithelial herpes simplex keratitis (dendritic keratitis), ... non-specific keratitis or superficial punctate keratitis, postoperative ocular inflammation, optic neuritis, diffuse posterior ...
  http://webtrustreal.su/product/?product=pred_forte_brand_eye_drops
*  Keratitis Treatment, Treatment for Dendritic Ulcers in Breach Candy Hospital, Mumbai - View Doctors, Book Appointment, Consult...
Doctors for Keratitis in Breach Candy Hospital, Mumbai , Lybrate ... Treatment for Keratitis in Breach Candy Hospital, Mumbai. Find ... Dermatologist - Specializes in Treatment of Keratitis A-6, Ratandeep CHS, Near Shoppers Stop, Above gemini medical, SV Road, ...
  https://www.lybrate.com/mumbai/treatment-for-keratitis/breach-candy-hospital-mumbai
*  Zirgan Dosage Guide - Drugs.com
Home › Conditions › Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis › Zirgan › Dosage. Print Share Zirgan Dosage. Generic name: GANCICLOVIR ...
  https://www.drugs.com/dosage/zirgan.html
*  Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis: A Treatment Guideline - 2014 - American Academy of Ophthalmology
A comprehensive HSV keratitis treatment guideline authored by Drs. Michelle Lee White and James Chodosh of the Massachusetts ... HSV epithelial keratitis. Dendritic epithelial ulcer. Geographic epithelial ulcer. Stroma. HSV stromal keratitis without ... HSV stromal keratitis with ulceration. Non-necrotizing keratitis, Interstitial keratitis, Immune stromal keratitis ... varicella zoster virus keratitis, Epstein-Barr virus keratitis, measles keratitis, mumps keratitis, Lyme disease, and others. ...
  https://www.aao.org/clinical-statement/herpes-simplex-virus-keratitis-treatment-guideline
*  Refresh Support Group - Drugs.com
Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis - I am suffering from herpes simplex keratitis for 12 days now.my. Posted 26 Jul 2013 • 1 ...
  https://www.drugs.com/answers/support-group/refresh/
*  Tobramycin Tear Concentrations - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
epithelial herpes simplex (dendritic keratitis); Vaccinia, active or recent varicella viral disease of the cornea and/or ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00695435
*  Pirprofen in acute ocular inflammation: a controlled study.
Keratitis, Dendritic / drug therapy*. Male. Middle Aged. Phenylpropionates / therapeutic use*. Random Allocation. Time Factors ...
  http://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Pirprofen-in-acute-ocular-inflammation/3907989.html
*  Contact Lens Comfort Relative to Meibomian Gland Status - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
History of epithelial herpes simplex keratitis (dendritic keratitis); vaccinia, active or recent varicella, viral disease of ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01819194?recr=Open&intr=%22Contact+Lenses%22&rank=16
*  Comparison of Systane Free vs. Saline in the Treatment of Dry Eye - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
History or evidence of epithelial herpes simplex keratitis (dendritic keratitis); vaccinia, active or recent varicella, viral ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00388791
*  Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity in Acute Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis | IOVS | ARVO Journals
Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity in Acute Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis ... Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity in Acute Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis ... Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Mediate Adaptive Immunity in Acute Herpes Simplex Virus Keratitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. ... Purpose: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a highly functional subset of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells and play a ...
  http://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2331591
*  Vexol (rimexolone ophthalmic) dosing, indications, interactions, adverse effects, and more
Herpes simplex keratitis, herpes simplex keratitis dendritic, ocular fungal disease, ocular tuberculosis, ocular viral disease ... Effective in iritis, keratitis, conjunctivitis, and many ocular inflammatory diseases; bacterial and viral infections require ...
  https://reference.medscape.com/drug/vexol-rimexolone-ophthalmic-343627
*  Zirgan New FDA Drug Approval | CenterWatch
For the treatment of acute herpetic keratitis. New approved drug details including side effects, uses and general information. ... Zirgan is specifically indicated for the treatment of herpetic keratitis (dendritic ulcers). ... Collum LM Randomised trial of ganciclovir and acyclovir in the treatment of herpes simplex dendritic keratitis: a multicentre ... Zirgan was non-inferior to acyclovir ophthalmic ointment 3% in patients with dendritic ulcers. Clinical resolution at Day 7 was ...
  http://www.centerwatch.com/drug-information/fda-approved-drugs/drug/1056/
*  Update on Feline Infectious Upper Respiratory Tract Disease (URTD) - WSAVA2013 - VIN
... and ulcerative keratitis (dendritic ulcers, when seen, pathognomonic for FHV). Occasionally see ulcerated/erosive facial skin ...
  http://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?id=5709839&pid=11372
*  Neomycin, Polymyxin B, and Hydrocortisone (Ophthalmic) (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com
... including epithelial herpes simplex keratitis [dendritic keratitis], vaccinia, varicella); mycobacterial ophthalmic infection; ... Inadvertent contamination of multiple-dose ophthalmic bottle dropper tip has caused bacterial keratitis. ...
  https://www.drugs.com/ppa/neomycin-polymyxin-b-and-hydrocortisone-ophthalmic.html
*  Geographic ulcer | definition of geographic ulcer by Medical dictionary
Ophthalmology A sharply demarcated corneal ulcer with scalloped margins, arising in dendritic keratitis, caused by HSV; ±1⁄2 ... A sharply demarcated corneal ulcer with scalloped margins, arising in dendritic keratitis, caused by herpes simplex; ± 12 ... dendritic ulcer. linear, branching pattern of ulceration on the cornea; characteristic of herpesvirus infections. See also ... a large, superficial, irregularly shaped corneal ulcer, typically formed by the coalescence of several dendritic ulcers. ...
  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/geographic+ulcer
*  Most recent papers with the keyword Infection stone | Read by QxMD
Purpose: To report the outcome of self-retained amniotic membrane after debridement in recurrent dendritic keratitis. ... www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29260079/a-stepping-stone-in-treating-dendritic-keratitis ... Observations: A 70-year-old female with a recurrent dendritic corneal ulcer received debridement followed by placement of self- ...
  https://www.readbyqxmd.com/keyword/13671
*  Kudos - helping increase the reach and impact of research
The relationship of corneal Langerhans cells to herpes simplex antigens during dendritic keratitis. Published in:Current Eye ... Herpes simplex keratitis: Role of viral infection versus immune response. Published in:Survey of Ophthalmology. Publication ... A Comparison of Recurrent and Primary Herpes Simplex Keratitis in NIH Inbred Mice. Published in:Cornea. Publication date:1996- ... CD4+ and CD8+ cells are key participants in the development of recurrent herpetic stromal keratitis in mice. Published in: ...
  https://www.growkudos.com/profiles/106171
*  Fluorometholone/sulfacetamide sodium ophthalmic Disease Interactions - Drugs.com
... including epithelial herpes simplex keratitis (dendritic keratitis), vaccinia, and varicella; fungal diseases of ocular ... Keratitis prednisone, triamcinolone, prednisolone ophthalmic, dexamethasone, Decadron, More.... Keratoconjunctivitis diclofenac ... In addition, administration of ophthalmic corticosteroids in severe ocular disease, especially acute herpes simplex keratitis, ...
  https://www.drugs.com/disease-interactions/fluorometholone-sulfacetamide-sodium-ophthalmic.html
*  ASMscience | Lyme Borreliosis
Human dendritic cells phagocytose and process Borrelia burgdorferi. J. Immunol. 157:2998-3005.. ... Bilateral keratitis in Lyme disease. Ophthalmology 96:1194-1197.. 167. Kraiczy, P.,, C. Skerka,, M. Kirschfink,, V. Brade,, and ... independent generation of neutralizing antibodies against T-cell-dependent Borrelia burgdorferi antigens presented by dendritic ...
  http://www.asmscience.org/content/book/10.1128/9781555816490.chap11
*  Kept eye on | definition of kept eye on by Medical dictionary
... ulcerative keratitis, corneal dendritic ulcer, acute iritis, angle-closure glaucoma, orbital cellulitis, and possibly contact ...
  https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/kept+eye+on

Chronic superficial keratitisCorneal ulcerAcanthamoeba infection: Acanthamoeba infection is a cutaneous condition resulting from Acanthamoeba that may result in various skin lesions. Acanthamoeba strains can also infect human eyes causing acanthamoebic keratitis.Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act: The Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act (, 117 Stat. 2025, 2026, 2027, 2028 and 2029, codified at et seq.Fusariosis: Fusariosis is an infection seen in neutropenic patients, and is a significant opportunistic pathogen in patients with hematologic malignancy.Streptomyces natalensis: Streptomyces natalensis is a bacterium species in the genus Streptomyces.Automated lamellar keratoplasty: Automated Lamellar Keratoplasty, commonly abbreviated to ALK uses a device called a microkeratome to separate a thin layer of the cornea and create a flap. The flap is then folded back, and the microkeratome removes a thin disc of corneal stroma below.List of soft contact lens materials: * Alphafilcon AAdvanced Medical OpticsArtificial tearsPseudomonas infectionFusarium ear blight: 180px|thumb|right|Symptom on wheat caused by F. graminearum (right:inoculated, left:non-inoculated)Diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis: Diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN) is a rare condition that occurs in otherwise healthy, often young patients and is due to the presence of a subretinal nematode.Bullous keratopathyBlepharitisMycosisCorneal transplantationKramers' opacity law: Kramers' opacity law describes the opacity of a medium in terms of the ambient density and temperature, assuming that the opacity is dominated by bound-free absorption (the absorption of light during ionization of a bound electron) or free-free absorption (the absorption of light when scattering a free ion, also called bremsstrahlung).Phillips (1999), p.AlachrymaGranulomatous amoebic encephalitisCorneal perforation: Corneal perforation is an anomaly in the cornea resulting from damage to the corneal surface. A corneal perforation means that the cornea has been penetrated, thus leaving the cornea damaged.GyrA RNA motif: The gyrA RNA motif is a conserved RNA structure identified by bioinformatics. The RNAs are present in multiple species of bacteria within the order Pseudomonadales.Microsporidia: The microsporidia constitute a phylum (Microspora) of spore-forming unicellular parasites. They were once thought to be protists but are now known to be fungi.KeratoconjunctivitisAlta Eficacia MethodEye injuryShinglesMarine fungi: Marine fungi are species of fungi that live in marine or estuarine environments. They are not a taxonomic group but share a common habitat.LogMAR chart: A LogMAR chart comprises rows of letters and is used by ophthalmologists and vision scientists to estimate visual acuity. This chart was developed at the National Vision Research Institute of Australia in 1976, and is designed to enable a more accurate estimate of acuity as compared to other charts (e.New Zealand rabbitWound bed preparationAmitifadineRed eye (medicine)Corneal neovascularizationPotassium hydrogenacetylenedicarboxylate: Potassium hydrogenacetylenedicarboxylate is a potassium salt with chemical formula KC4HO4 or K+·HC4O4−, often abbreviated as KHadc. It is often called potassium hydrogen acetylenedicarboxylate or monopotassium acetylenedicarboxylate.ConjunctivitisDiffuse lamellar keratitis: Diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) is a sterile inflammation of the cornea which may occur after refractive surgery, such as LASIK. Its incidence has been estimated to be 1 in 500 patients, though this may be as high as 32% in some cases.ScleritisTrimidox: Trimidox is an antibacterial agent that is used in cattle and swine to prevent and treat infections by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The active ingredients in Trimidox are W/V trimethoprim (4%) and W/V sulfadoxine (20%), the rest of the solution is an organic solvent (40 mg of trimethoprim and 200 mg of sulfadoxine in each ml of solution).Voriconazole

(1/226) Herpetic keratitis. Proctor Lecture.

Although much needs to be learned about the serious clinical problem of herpes infection of the cornea, we have come a long way. We now have effective topical antiviral drugs. We have animal models which, with a high degree of reliability, clearly predict the effect to be expected clinically in man, as well as the toxicity. We have systemically active drugs and the potential of getting highly active, potent, completely selective drugs, with the possibility that perhaps the source of viral reinfection can be eradicated. The biology of recurrent herpes and stromal disease is gradually being understood, and this understanding may result in new and better therapy of this devastating clinical disease.  (+info)

(2/226) Effect of 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine 5'-monophosphate and 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate on experimental herpes simplex keratitis.

Treatment of established experimental keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus with 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosyladenine 5'-monophosphate (Ara-AMP) or 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate (Ara-HxMP) showed that the Ara-AMP, in a concentration of 2 or 20%, had a significant effect on the keratitis but that 0.4% Ara-HxMP showed only minimal activity. Ara-AMP was also effective in the treatment of idoxuridine-resistant keratitis. No local toxicity with a high concentration (20%) of Ara-AMP was seen, but the duration of therapy was brief.  (+info)

(3/226) Ara-A and IDU therapy of human superficial herpetic keratitis.

Ara-A ointment was compared to IDU ointment in patients with dendritic herpes simplex virus infection of the corneal epithelium. Twenty-eight patients were treated with Ara-A ointment and twenty-four with IDU ointment. The lesions healed in 5.1 days with Ara-A and in 6.9 days with IDU. This drug was given in a double-controlled manner, so that neither the patient, nor the investigator knew which drug the patient was receiving. The patient groups were comparable as to length of the dendritic lesion and duration of symptoms. The adverse reactions to each of these drugs were comparable and in no case was there any permanent ocular change from drug use.  (+info)

(4/226) Treatment of amoeboid herpetic ulcers with adenine arabinoside or trifluorothymidine.

In previous studies adenine arabinoside and trifluorothymidine were found to be equally effective treatments for dendritic ulcers of the cornea, but a trend emerged which suggested that in amoeboid ulcers trifluorothymidine was more effective. The collection of additional cases confirms the superiority of trifluorothymidine in such cases.  (+info)

(5/226) Treatment of experimental herpes simplex keratitis with acycloguanosine.

Acycloguanosine, a recently developed compound with high inhibitory activity against viruses belonging to the herpes group, has been evaluated in experimental herpes simplex keratitis in rabbits in comparison with trifluorothymidine and preparations of idoxuridine and vidarabine at present in clinical use. All compunds were used in the form of ophthalmic ointments which were applied 5 times a day at intervals of 2 hours. Treatment began on the third day of infection and was continued for 4 days. Complete cure was obtained with acycloguanosine and idoxurdine; trifluorothymidine and vidarabine were considerably less effective. Acycloguanosine was equally effective when given intravenously in the form of its sodium salt, and could be detected in the tear fluid in inhibitory concentrations when given by mouth. The compound was relatively free from toxicity.  (+info)

(6/226) The treatment of herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis.

PURPOSE: Epithelial keratitis is the most common presentation of ocular infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Quantitative assessment of available therapy is needed to guide evidence-based ophthalmology. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of various treatments for dendritic or geographic HSV epithelial keratitis and to evaluate the role of various clinical characteristics on epithelial healing. METHODS: Following a systematic review of the literature, information from clinical trials of HSV dendritic or geographic epithelial keratitis was extracted, and the methodological quality of each study was scored. Methods of epithelial cauterization and curettage were grouped as relatively equivalent physicochemical therapy, and solution and ointment formulations of a given topical antiviral agent were combined. The proportion healed with 1 week of therapy, a scheduled follow-up day that approximated the average time of resolution with antiviral therapy, was selected as the primary outcome based on a masked evaluation of maximum treatment differences in published healing curves. The proportion healed at 14 days was recorded as supplemental information. Fixed-effects and random-effects meta-analysis models were used to obtain summary estimates by pooling results from comparative treatment trials. Hypotheses about which prognostic factors might affect epithelial healing during antiviral therapy were developed by multivariate analysis of the Herpetic Eye Disease Study dataset. RESULTS: After excluding 48 duplicate reports, 14 nonrandomized studies, 15 studies with outdated or similar treatments, and 29 trials lacking sufficient data on healing or accessibility, 76 primary reports were identified. These reports involved 4,251 patients allocated to 93 treatment comparisons of dendritic epithelial keratitis in 28 categories and 9 comparisons of geographic epithelial keratitis in 6 categories. For dendritic keratitis, idoxuridine was better than placebo at 7 days (combined odds ratio [OR], 3.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.92-6.70), and at 14 days (OR, 4.17; 95% CI, 1.33-13.04), but pooling was limited by lack of homogeneity and low study quality. Direct comparisons at 1 week of treatment showed that trifluridine or acyclovir was significantly better than idoxuridine (OR, 3.12 and 4.56; 95% CI, 1.55-6.29 and 2.76-7.52, respectively), and indirect comparisons were also consistent with a clinically significant benefit. Vidarabine was not significantly better than idoxuridine in pooled treatment comparisons at 1 week (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.72-2.00) but was better in 2 indirect comparisons (OR, 4.22 and 4.78; 95% CI, 1.69-10.54 and 2.15-10.65, respectively). At 14 days, trifluridine (OR, 6.05; 95% CI, 2.50-14.66), acyclovir (OR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.39-4.78), and vidarabine (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.65-2.37) were each better than idoxuridine. Trials of geographic epithelial keratitis also suggested that trifluridine, acyclovir, and vidarabine were more effective that idoxuridine. Other topical antiviral agents, such as bromovinyldeoxuridine, ganciclovir, and foscarnet, appeared equivalent to trifluridine or acyclovir. Oral acyclovir was equivalent to topical antiviral therapy and did not hasten healing when used in combination with topical treatment. Antiviral agents did not increase the speed of healing when compared to debridement but reduced the risk of recrudescent epithelial keratitis. The combination of physicochemical treatment with an antiviral agent seemed to be better than either physicochemical or antiviral treatment alone, but the heterogeneous cauterization and curettage techniques and the various treatment combinations limited valid quantitative summary effect measures. The combination of topical interferon with an antiviral agent was significantly better than antiviral therapy at 7 days (OR, 13.49; 95% CI, 7.39-24.61) but not at 14 days (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 0.82-6.79). Finding apparent heterogeneity for some pooled estimates suggested that dissimilarities in patients, interventions, outcomes, or other logistical aspects of clinical trials occur across studies. CONCLUSIONS: The available evidence on the acute treatment of presumed HSV epithelial keratitis demonstrates the effectiveness of antiviral treatment and shows the log-logistic healing curve of treated dendritic epithelial keratitis. Topical trifluridine, acyclovir, and vidarabine were significantly more effective than idoxuridine but similar in relative effectiveness for dendritic epithelial keratitis. Physicochemical methods of removing infected corneal epithelium are effective, but adjunctive virucidal agents are needed to avert recrudescent epithelial keratitis. Whether debridement in combination with antiviral therapy is more beneficial than antiviral chemotherapy alone appears likely but remains inconclusive. The combination of topical interferon with an antiviral agent significantly speeds epithelial healing. Future trials of the acute treatment of HSV epithelial keratitis must aim to achieve adequate statistical power for assessing the primary outcome and should consider the effect of lesion size and other characteristics on treatment response.  (+info)

(7/226) Phosphonoacetic acid in the treatment of experimental herpes simplex keratitis.

In a rabbit model of herpes simplex corneal ulceration, 5% phosphonoacetic acid solution or ophthalmic ointment suppressed clinical disease and virus replication. The effect of 5% phosphonoacetic acid ointment was equivalent to that of 0.5% idoxuridine ointment in the treatment of this established herpetic eye infection.  (+info)

(8/226) Viral keratitis-inhibitory effect of 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate.

Topical application of 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosylhypoxanthine 5'-monophosphate (ara-HxMP) significantly inhibited the development of keratitis induced by types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus and vaccinia virus in the eyes of rabbits. Parameters for evaluation of efficacy were infectivity (corneal opacity, lesion size, and type), Draize (erythema, conjunctival swelling, and discharge), and reduction in titer of recoverable virus from the eye. When the relative efficacy of the related compounds 9-beta-d-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A), ara-A 5'-monophosphate (ara-AMP), and ara-Hx was determined against type 1 herpes simplex virus in a parallel experiment, the more water-soluble compounds (ara-HxMP, ara-AMP) were the most effective. The relative efficacy of ara-A was also determined against type 2 herpes and vaccinia virus-induced keratitis. Mortality in rabbits due to central nervous system involvement caused by types 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus was inhibited. Ara-HxMP was not discernibly toxic to the eye at concentrations of at least 20%; efficacy was still discernible with a 0.1% solution.  (+info)



  • ocular
  • In addition, administration of ophthalmic corticosteroids in severe ocular disease, especially acute herpes simplex keratitis, may lead to excessive corneal and scleral thinning, increasing the risk for perforation. (drugs.com)
  • He contributed to the discovery of HSV-1 entry receptors and establishing a link between the receptors and HSV-1 induced ocular diseases such as keratitis and retinitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical
  • A specific clinical diagnosis of HSV as the cause of dendritic keratitis can usually be made by ophthalmologists and optometrists based on the presence of characteristic clinical features. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnostic testing is seldom needed because of its classic clinical features and is not useful in stromal keratitis as there is usually no live virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • The global incidence (rate of new disease) of herpes keratitis is roughly 1.5 million, including 40,000 new cases of severe monocular visual impairment or blindness each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent a highly functional subset of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells and play a key role in linking the innate and adaptive immune responses. (arvojournals.org)
  • This is known as immune-mediated stromal keratitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • Necrotizing keratitis Keratouveitis : is usually granulomatous uveitis with large keratic precipitates on the corneal endothelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy
  • Infectious keratitis can progress rapidly, and generally requires urgent antibacterial, antifungal, or antiviral therapy to eliminate the pathogen. (wikipedia.org)