*  Wales - Wikipedia

NHS Wales. Retrieved 8 September 2010. Davies (2008), p.361 "NHS Wales - About Us". NHS Wales website. NHS Wales. Retrieved 8 ... North Wales Police and South Wales Police. Four prisons are in Wales; all in the southern half of the country. Wales has no ... which covers north Wales); South Wales Evening Post (Swansea); South Wales Echo (Cardiff); and South Wales Argus (Newport). Y ... Technically Wales is represented by the flag of England, as the Laws in Wales Act of 1535 annexed Wales to England, following ...

*  wales - Wikipedia

wales is one of two geographic top level domains for Wales (the other being .cymru) which were put forth by Nominet UK in 2012 ... "New domain names set to 'sell' Wales to the world". BBC News. Retrieved 5 August 2015. Nominet: Cymru - Wales (in English) Our ... wales". ourhomeonline.org.uk. Retrieved 5 August 2015. "How .cymru and .wales will work - rules and processes published today ... Final approval for both top level domains for Wales was granted by ICANN in June 2014. A phased launch of the new domains was ...

*  Wales, Minnesota - Wikipedia

Wales is located within Lake No. 2 Unorganized Territory of Lake County. Lake County Highway 2 is in the area. The ... Wales is an unincorporated community in Lake County, Minnesota, United States. The community is located 18 miles north of the ... "Wales". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. ... city of Two Harbors at the intersection of Lake County Road 14 (Wales Road) and Wickholm Road. The boundary line between Lake ...

*  HealthWise Wales - Wikipedia

HealthWise Wales is a project surrounding the health of the population of Wales. It is led by Cardiff University and was ... "HealthWise Wales". Cardiff University. 29 February 2016. Retrieved 13 September 2016. "HealthWise Wales survey on nation's ... Smith, Mark (29 February 2016). "More than 260,000 people needed for Wales' largest ever health project". Wales Online. Media ... The project is the first of its kind in Europe and hopes to "build a picture" of the future health requirements in Wales. " ...

*  Wales Site - Wikipedia

The Wales site is located on the south shore of the Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska, very near Cape Prince of Wales, ... is a well-documented archeological site on the Cape Prince of Wales, near Wales, Alaska. This site has artifacts from the ... Re-examining Wales' Role in Bering Strait Prehistory: Some Preliminary Results of Recent Work by Roger Harritt of the ... "Wales Site". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-07-03. NHL Alaska details ...

*  Community (Wales) - Wikipedia

A community (Welsh: cymuned) is a division of land in Wales that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. Welsh ... In 2016 there were 870 communities in Wales. Until 1974 Wales was divided into civil parishes. These were abolished by section ... Wales Online. Retrieved 9 April 2017. "Community reviews - Orders". Local Democracy and Boundary Commission for Wales. ... The Welsh Academy Encyclopaedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. [page needed] "Parishes and Communities". Office ...

*  Woodfest Wales - Wikipedia

Forestry Commission Wales. April 2005. Retrieved 14 March 2012. "Carve Cymru at Gwyl Coed Cymru, Woodfest Wales 2003". Edge of ... Woodfest Wales (Welsh: Gŵyl Coed Cymru) is an annual wood carving event that was first held on 8-9 June 2002 in St Asaph, and ... "Woodfest Wales". Forestry & British Timber. HighBeam Business. 6 June 2002. Retrieved 14 March 2012. "Efficient Use of ... a second event has been held in May at Margam Country Park near Port Talbot in South Wales, and in addition to activities and ...

*  Wales & Edwards - Wikipedia

Wales & Edwards saw a drop in orders of 70 per cent in a single year. Attempts to find other markets for the vehicles failed, ... Wales & Edwards was a British manufacturer of milk floats based in Harlescott, Shrewsbury. They were particularly well known ... ISBN 978-0-7478-0316-4. "Wales & Edwards Engineers". Made In Shrewsbury. Retrieved 27 June 2016. "Hartleys". Made In Shrewsbury ...

*  Lissa Wales - Wikipedia

Wales grew up in Valley and studied at the Arizona State University. Lissa Wales was known for her photographs of drummers that ... Wales developed leukemia. At a big benefit concert, held on 10 September 2005, she was honored at the Celebrity Theatre in ... Lissa Wales (1957-2005) was an American photographer known for her photographs of drummers. ... As a tribute to Lissa Wales, the 2005 book by Jules Follet Sticks 'n' Skins featured photos and biographies of over 500 ...

*  Wales Open - Wikipedia

Source: Wales Seniors Open - a European Seniors Tour event. Wales Ladies Championship of Europe - a former event on the Ladies ... The tournament has previously been known as the Saab Wales Open and the Celtic Manor Wales Open due to past sponsorship deals. ... "ISPS Handa sponsorship boost for Wales Open". PGA European Tour. 28 November 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2012. "Wales Open: ... The Wales Open was a professional golf tournament on the European Tour. It was founded in 2000 and played annually through 2014 ...

*  Lachlan Wales - Wikipedia

Lachlan Wales is an Australian professional footballer who plays as an attacking midfielder for the Central Coast Mariners FC. ...

*  Ike Wales - Wikipedia

List of New South Wales representative cricketers "Ike Wales". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2015. Ike Wales at ... Isaac F Wales (31 January 1865 - 11 January 1949) was an Australian cricketer. Primarily a wicket-keeper, he played 16 first- ... class cricket matches for New South Wales between 1886 and 1894, taking 28 catches, stumping 5 batsmen and scoring 121 runs. ...

*  Wales, Massachusetts - Wikipedia

Sturbridge and Wales. The Wales Public Library opened in 1897. In fiscal year 2008, the town of Wales spent 1.28% ($45,480) of ... Wales Elementary School, serving grades K-6, has its own school committee, part of School Union 61. Wales students attend ... Wales is a town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 1,838 at the 2010 census. It is part of the ... Wales is in southeastern Hampden County and is bounded on the west by Monson; on the south by Stafford and Union, Connecticut; ...

*  Miss Wales - Wikipedia

Miss Wales is a national Beauty pageant in Wales. Miss Wales is open to unmarried women from age 16 to age 24, and organized by ... "Hannah Williams crowned as Miss Wales 2017". Angelopedia. 9 April 2017. "Miss Wales 2016 Ffion Moyle". 16 Apr 2016. "Miss Wales ... Wales has been taking part in the Miss World pageant directly since 1999, since devolution. The first woman to compete at Miss ... 1974's Miss Wales, Helen Morgan, achieved exactly the same feat as Rosemarie Frankland, when she finished as 1st runner-up at ...

*  Jimmy Wales - Wikipedia

She is Tony Blair's former diary secretary, whom Wales met in Davos, Switzerland. Wales and Garvey have two daughters. Wales is ... Wikipedia:Role of Jimmy Wales, Wales's role in the English Wikipedia as described by its editors Wales, Jimmy (December 9, 2016 ... Wikia userpage Jimmy Wales on IMDb Jimmy Wales on Charlie Rose Appearances on C-SPAN Roberts, Russ (March 9, 2009). "Wales on ... Jimmy Wales Foundation User:Jimmy Wales Hough, Stephen (March 11, 2012). "Jimmy Wales: Wikipedia chief to advise Whitehall on ...

*  Susanna Wales - Wikipedia

Wales was the daughter of Scottish artist James Wales. Wales appears to have travelled with her father to India in the 1790s, ... "Susannah Wales (1779-1868), Lady Malet , Art UK Art UK , Discover Artworks Susannah Wales (1779-1868), Lady Malet". artuk.org. ... Wales is credited to a portrait of Sir Alexander Malet and his wife Marian Malet, posed in Wilbury House. Engraver Charles ... Susanna (sometimes spelled Susannah) Wales, Lady Malet was a British artist. ...

*  Contemporary Wales - Wikipedia

Contemporary Wales is published by the University of Wales Press on behalf of the Board of Celtic Studies. Contemporary Wales ... It has been digitised by the Welsh Journals Online project at the National Library of Wales. Contemporary Wales from Welsh ...

*  Wakestock (Wales) - Wikipedia

Founded by Mark Durston, the festival began in Abersoch, North Wales back in 2000, when it was a wakeboard contest with a party ... It was held on the Llŷn Peninsula in North Wales, in between Pwllheli and Llanbedrog. ... www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/music-nightlife-news/north-wales-wakestock-festival-not-10991839 Wakestock 2014 [@WakestockUK] (14 ... Official website Wakestock information from BBC Wales. ... www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/music-nightlife-news/north-wales- ...

*  Peter Wales - Wikipedia

Wales was a right-handed batsman who bowled right-arm medium pace. He was born at Hove, Sussex. Wales made a single first-class ... Peter Wales at ESPNcricinfo Peter Wales at CricketArchive. ... Peter John Wales (born 30 October 1928) is a former English ... In Hampshire's first-innings, Wales took the wickets of Jimmy Gray, Leo Harrison and Derek Shackleton for the cost of 12 runs ... Despite a strong showing in the match, this was Wales' only major appearance for Sussex. "First-Class Matches played by Peter ...

*  Newport, Wales - Wikipedia

Wales Landmarks in Newport, Wales Visitor attractions in Newport, Wales Many of the landmarks of Newport are in Newport city ... South Wales Argus. 31 October 2013. The Welsh Academy Encyclopedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press 2008. ... The Wales constituency elects four Members of the European Parliament (MEP). In the 2014 European Parliament election the Wales ... Newport became one of the largest towns in Wales and the focus for the new industrial eastern valleys of South Wales. By 1830 ...

*  Wild Wales - Wikipedia

In effect, Wild Wales is a tourist's snapshot, albeit a valuable and unique one. Borrow, George Henry (1907). Wild Wales: Its ... Wild Wales: The People, Language, & Scenery (1906 J. M. Dent edition) at Project Gutenberg Wild Wales: The People, Language, & ... Wild Wales: Its People, Language and Scenery is a travel book by the English Victorian gentleman writer George Borrow (1803- ... He never returned to deepen his knowledge and failed to cover the many parts of Wales he left out of this work. ...

*  Malavika Wales - Wikipedia

Malavika was born to P. G. Wales and Sudina Wales at Thrissur. She has an elder brother, Mithun Wales. She did her schooling at ... "Malavika Wales: God save you from Rajasenan's ire!". Times of India. Retrieved 2012-03-12. "Malavika Wales and her love for ... Malavika Wales(Malayalam:മാളവിക വെയിൽസ്) is an Indian film and television actress and classical dancer. She hails from a ... "Malavika Wales and her love for dance". The New Indian Express. Retrieved 2013-04-08. " ...

*  Gary Wales - Wikipedia

Gary Wales (born 4 January 1979) is a Scottish former professional football player. Wales, a striker, started his career at ... Wales settled to become a regular goalscorer. In April 2009, with Raith he won the Scottish Second Division championship, Wales ... "Wales delight at Kirkcaldy switch". BBC Sport. 2008-09-25. Retrieved 2008-09-25. "Wales walks out on Rovers". Fife Free Press. ... Towards the end of May 2009, Wales joined North Queensland Fury on their pre-season tour of Singapore. "Gary Wales". Barry ...

*  Wales, Wisconsin - Wikipedia

Law enforcement in Wales is provided by the Waukesha County Sheriff. Welsh immigrants settled the village of Wales in 1840. The ... Village of Wales, Wisconsin Village of Wales, Wisconsin. ... Wales Community Park Wales Firemans' Park Breconshire park ... Wales is a village in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, United States, first settled by Welsh immigrants. The population was 2,549 at ... Wales is located at 43°0′14″N 88°22′39″W / 43.00389°N 88.37750°W / 43.00389; -88.37750 (43.003882, -88.377558). According to ...

*  Andrew Wales - Wikipedia

Andrew Wales (1737-1799) was an American brewer. As the first commercial brewer in Alexandria, Virginia, Wales also became the ... Mercer wrote in a 1767 letter that, "Wales affirmed that he had some years the charge of a brewhouse at Edinburgh." Wales ... Washington purchased a cask of Wales' beer from the Marlborough Brewery in 1768 and would remain a customer of Wales' for ... George Washington frequently purchased beer and barley from Wales over the course of thirty years. Andrew Wales was born in ...

(1/2280) Patterns of care and survival for adolescents and young adults with acute leukaemia--a population-based study.

We report a population-based study of patterns of care and survival for people with acute leukaemia diagnosed at age 15-29 years during 1984-94 in regions of England and Wales covered by specialist leukaemia registries. There were 879 patients: 417 with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 462 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). For ALL, actuarial survival rates were 43% at 5 years after diagnosis and 37% at 10 years. Survival improved significantly between 1984-88 and 1989-94 for those aged 15-19 at diagnosis. Patients entered in national clinical trials and those not entered had similar survival rates. Survival rates were similar at teaching and non-teaching hospitals and at hospitals treating different numbers of study patients per year. For AML, survival rates were 42% at 5 years after diagnosis and 39% at 10 years. Survival improved significantly between 1984-88 and 1989-94. Patients entered in the Medical Research Council AML10 trial had a higher survival rate than those who were in the earlier AML9 trial. Survival did not vary with category of hospital. We conclude that survival has improved for adolescents and young adults with acute leukaemia but that there is at present no evidence that centralized treatment results in a survival benefit for patients in this age group.  (+info)

(2/2280) A community outbreak of invasive and non-invasive group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal disease in a town in South Wales.

An increase in the incidence of invasive and non-invasive infections caused by group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GAS) was noted in and around the town of Glynneath (population approx. 4000) in West Glamorgan, South Wales between 1 January and 30 June 1995. A total of 133 cases was ascertained with 127 (96%) occurring between 1 March and 30 June 1995. Six patients had invasive disease (one died) and all presented at the peak of the outbreak. There were 127 non-invasive cases of whom 7 were hospitalized. The outbreak was investigated to determine its extent and whether it was caused by a single M-serotype of GAS. Serotyping showed that 13 different M-serotypes were involved with the M1 serotype predominating. The overall incidence of GAS invasive disease in West Glamorgan (population 365,000) increased sevenfold from a crude incidence of 0.5/10(5) per year in 1994 to 3.5/10(5) per year in 1995, but fell back to 0.75/10(5) per year in 1996. Eighty-two (80%) out of 102 individuals affected by GAS replied to a health questionnaire; sore throat was the commonest symptom reported (97%). Thirty-nine of these index cases identified at least one other member of their household who had experienced similar symptoms. The interval between the onset of illness in members of a single household was 0-83 days with a mean of 22 days. The mean duration of illness was 13.5 days and 61% of patients were treated with penicillin V for a mean duration of 9.3 days. Twenty-one per cent of GAS isolates were erythromycin-resistant and the M4 and M6 serotypes were especially resistant to erythromycin (87.5 and 100% resistance, respectively). Penicillin V failed to eradicate GAS from the throats of 25% of assessable patients. In this community, an outbreak of non-invasive disease caused by GAS was linked in time and place with an outbreak of serious invasive disease.  (+info)

(3/2280) Socioeconomic differences in childhood consultation rates in general practice in England and Wales: prospective cohort study.

OBJECTIVE: To establish how consultation rates in children for episodes of illness, preventive activities, and home visits vary by social class. DESIGN: Analysis of prospectively collected data from the fourth national survey of morbidity in general practice, carried out between September 1991 and August 1992. SETTING: 60 general practices in England and Wales. SUBJECTS: 106 102 children aged 0 to 15 years registered with the participating practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean overall consultation rates for any reason, illness by severity of underlying disease, preventive episodes, home visits, and specific diagnostic category (infections, asthma, and injuries). RESULTS: Overall consultation rates increased from registrar general's social classes I-II to classes IV-V in a linear pattern (for IV-V v I-II rate ratio 1.18; 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1. 22). Children from social classes IV-V consulted more frequently than children from classes I-II for illnesses (rate ratio 1.23; 1.15 to 1.30), including infections, asthma, and injuries and poisonings. They also had significantly higher consultation rates for minor, moderate, and serious illnesses and higher home visiting rates (rate ratio 2.00; 1.81 to 2.18). Consultations for preventive activities were lower in children from social classes IV-V than in children from social classes I-II (rate ratio 0.95; 0.86 to 1.05). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood consultation rates for episodes of illness increase from social classes I-II through to classes IV-V. The findings on severity of underlying illness suggest the health of children from lower social classes is worse than that of children from higher social classes. These results reinforce the need to identify and target children for preventive health care in their socioeconomic context.  (+info)

(4/2280) Transmission dynamics of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci in England and Wales.

A simple epidemiological framework for the analysis of the transmission dynamics of hospital outbreaks of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals in England and Wales is presented. Epidemic strains EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16 are becoming endemic in hospitals in the United Kingdom, and theory predicts that EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16 will reach respective endemic levels of 158 (95% confidence interval [CI], 143-173) and 116 (95% CI, 109-123) affected hospitals with stochastic fluctuations of up to 30 hospitals in each case. An epidemic of VRE is still at an early stage, and the incidence of hospitals newly affected by VRE is growing exponentially at a rate r=0.51/year (95% CI, 0.48-0.54). The likely impact of introducing surveillance policies if action is taken sufficiently early is estimated. Finally, the role of heterogeneity in hospital size is considered: "Super-spreader hospitals" may increase transmission by 40%-132% above the expected mean.  (+info)

(5/2280) Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA in type 2 diabetes: maternal history and ancient population expansion.

Several studies have suggested a maternal excess in the transmission of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. However, the majority of these reports rely on patients recalling parental disease status and hence are open to criticism. An alternative approach is to study mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages. The hypervariable region 1 of the rapidly evolving noncoding section of mtDNA is suitable for investigating maternal ancestry and has been used extensively to study the origins of human racial groups. We have sequenced this 347-bp section of mtDNA from leukocytes of subjects with type 2 diabetes (n = 63) and age- and race-matched nondiabetic control subjects (n = 57). Consensus sequences for the two study groups were identical. Pairwise sequence analysis showed unimodal distribution of pairwise differences for both groups, suggesting that both populations had undergone expansion in ancient times. The distributions were significantly different (chi2 = 180, df = 11, P < 0.001); mean pairwise differences were 4.7 and 3.8 for the diabetic and control subjects, respectively. These data suggest that the diabetic subjects belong to an ancient maternal lineage that expanded before the major expansion observed in the nondiabetic population. Phylogenetic trees constructed using maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining, Fitch-Margolish, or maximum likelihood methods failed to show the clustering of all (or a subset) of the diabetic subjects into one or more distinct lineages.  (+info)

(6/2280) Survival after acute lymphocytic leukaemia: effects of socioeconomic status and geographic region.

National cancer registry data, linked to an areal measure of material deprivation, were used to explore possible socioeconomic and regional variation in the survival of children (0-14 years) diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) in England and Wales from 1971 to 1990. Survival analysis and Poisson regression were used to estimate observed (crude) survival probabilities and the adjusted hazard of death. There was little evidence of a socioeconomic gradient in survival. Regional differences in survival were observed over time. These differences were most pronounced in the first six months after diagnosis, and may be attributable to differential access to centralised paediatric oncology services or treatment protocols, or to the artefact of variations in regional cancer registry practice. Similar analyses should be repeated for other, less treatable childhood cancers. The results of this study can be used to help identify ways of reducing regional variation in survival.  (+info)

(7/2280) Sex dependence of human intracranial gliomata.

The age and sex distribution of 1223 cases of intracranial gliomata, diagnosed in the geographical area covered by the Mersey Regional Cancer Registry over the period 1961-70, are analysed. In children and adults, the intracranial gliomata predominates in males, the tumour incidence figures indicating a ratio of 3 : 2. For young adults, the tumour incidence increases with age and is approximately the same in males and females. It is not until the age group 45-49 years is reached that the tumour incidence in males is higher. The peak tumour incidence occurs at the same age in both sexes (60-64 years) and thereafter incidence declines with age. These results are compared with previously published human data, and with the findings of experimental studies in the rat. Factors including naturally occurring changes in the hormone levels are discussed, in an attempt to explain the observed age-related sex differences.  (+info)

(8/2280) Acute hepatitis B infection in England and Wales: 1985-96.

Confirmed acute hepatitis B infections are reported to the Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre by laboratories in England and Wales. These reports have been used to monitor trends in the incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection over time, and between exposure categories and age groups. Between 1985 and 1996 a total of 9252 cases of acute HBV infection were reported; the number of reports fell from 1761 in 1985 to 581 in 1996. Most infections were reported in adults aged 15-44 years [n = 7365 (80%)], and infections were more commonly reported in males [n = 6490 (70%)] than females [n = 2658 (29%)]. The probable means of acquisition was known for just over half of all adult cases [4827/8956 (54%)]. Injecting drug use was the most common exposure [n = 1901 (21%)], followed by sex between men and women [n = 1140 (13%)] and sex between men [n = 1025 (11%)]. The number of infections in injecting drug users fell in the late 1980s, but increased again from 1991 onwards. In children aged under 15 years, infections acquired by mother to baby transmission accounted for 35/170 (21%) of the total. Surveillance indicates that the incidence of acute hepatitis B infection fell in the late 1980s, probably reflecting changed behaviour in injecting drug users. An increase in the number of infections in injecting drug users since 1993 may indicate ongoing transmission that has not been contained by the introduction of needle exchange schemes or by selective vaccination.  (+info)



Welsh

  • Welsh national identity emerged among the Celtic Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over 560,000 Welsh language speakers live in Wales, and the language is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and west. (wikipedia.org)
  • At many international sporting events, such as the FIFA World Cup, Rugby World Cup and the Commonwealth Games, Wales has its own national teams, though at the Olympic Games, Welsh athletes compete as part of a Great Britain team. (wikipedia.org)
  • The English words "Wales" and "Welsh" derive from the same Germanic root (singular Walh, plural Walha), which was itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe known to the Romans as Volcae and which came to refer indiscriminately to all Celts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historically in Britain, the words were not restricted to modern Wales or to the Welsh but were used to refer to anything that the Anglo-Saxons associated with the Britons, including other non-Germanic territories in Britain (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • The modern Welsh name for themselves is Cymry, and Cymru is the Welsh name for Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of the word Cymry as a self-designation derives from the location in the post-Roman Era (after the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons) of the Welsh (Brythonic-speaking) people in modern Wales as well as in northern England and southern Scotland ("Yr Hen Ogledd") (English: The Old North). (wikipedia.org)
  • It emphasised that the Welsh in modern Wales and in the Hen Ogledd were one people, different from other peoples. (wikipedia.org)
  • A community (Welsh: cymuned) is a division of land in Wales that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The councils propose changes to the Local Democracy and Boundary Commission for Wales, which prepares a report and makes recommendations to the Welsh Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Welsh Academy Encyclopaedia of Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Woodfest Wales (Welsh: Gŵyl Coed Cymru) is an annual wood carving event that was first held on 8-9 June 2002 in St Asaph, and attracted more than 18,000 visitors in 2004. (wikipedia.org)
  • Winners are expected to support "Welsh issues, charities, or other good causes ".There is also a corresponding Mister Wales contest for men. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004, Welsh Amy Guy became the only British woman to be named as one of the 15 semifinalists, after winning the fast track event Sports Competition, becoming the first contestant under the Miss Wales banner to advance to the semifinals. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been digitised by the Welsh Journals Online project at the National Library of Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • By Alison Sanders South Wales Argus GWENT walkers raised £30,000 over the last four years for a Welsh kidney charity. (causes.com)
  • For a great family holiday in Wales, try this beautiful converted Welsh farm house with excellent fa. (yha.org.uk)
  • MPN Windows is a family-run Welsh double glazing business with showrooms in Cardiff, Swansea, Neath, Port Talbot, Bridgend and Aberdare supplying customers across South Wales with quality composite doors, triple glazing, pvc windows, pvc doors, french doors, conservatories and more. (heart.co.uk)

Wikipedia

  • Wales serves on the Wikimedia Foundation Board of Trustees, the non-profit charitable organization that he helped establish to operate Wikipedia, holding its board-appointed "community founder" seat. (wikipedia.org)

19th century

  • From the late 19th century onwards, Wales acquired its popular image as the "land of song", in part due to the eisteddfod tradition. (wikipedia.org)
  • It grew significantly in the 19th century, when its port became the focus of coal exports from the eastern valleys of South Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the Industrial Revolution took off in Britain in the 19th century, the South Wales Valleys became key suppliers of coal from the South Wales Coalfield, and iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • The slate industry grew slowly until the early 18th century, then expanded rapidly until the late 19th century, at which time the most important slate producing areas were in northwest Wales, including the Penrhyn Quarry near Bethesda, the Dinorwic Quarry near Llanberis, the Nantlle Valley quarries, and Blaenau Ffestiniog, where the slate was mined rather than quarried. (wikipedia.org)
  • The slate industry dominated the economy of north-west Wales during the second half of the 19th century, but was on a much smaller scale elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)

Cymru

  • wales is one of two geographic top level domains for Wales (the other being .cymru) which were put forth by Nominet UK in 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • A new website dedicated to people with kidney disease in Wales will be launched later today, offering support to hundreds of families.Kidney Wales Foundation will launch People Like Us Cymru, a patient-led support website today. (causes.com)

Cardiff

  • Two-thirds of the population live in south Wales, mainly in and around Cardiff (the capital), Swansea and Newport, and in the nearby valleys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiff: University of Wales Press. (wikipedia.org)
  • Until the rise of Cardiff from the 1850s, Newport was Wales' largest coal-exporting port. (wikipedia.org)
  • Serving local customers in South Wales from Cardiff to Swansea, Bridgend to Barry since 1994. (heart.co.uk)
  • MPN pride themselves not only upon the craftsmanship, quality and cost effectiveness of the pvc windows, pvc doors and conservatories they offer, but also enjoy an enviable reputation for the highest standards of customer care, serving Cardiff, Swansea, and South Wales. (heart.co.uk)

2016

National Assem

  • Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters. (wikipedia.org)

1994

  • In 1994, Wales took a job with Chicago Options Associates, a futures and options trading firm in Chicago, Illinois. (wikipedia.org)

North Wales

  • It was held on the Llŷn Peninsula in North Wales, in between Pwllheli and Llanbedrog. (wikipedia.org)
  • Founded by Mark Durston, the festival began in Abersoch, North Wales back in 2000, when it was a wakeboard contest with a party in a car park for 800 people, and from then on played host to some of the industry's leading bands and DJ's, along with the biggest wakeboard competition in Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2010 partners list Relentless Malibu Boats We7 Yamaha Hyperlite Jägermeister British Army RNLI Wakestock (Canada) http://www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/music-nightlife-news/north-wales-wakestock-festival-not-10991839 https://www.facebook.com/wakestockuk/photos/a.10150146546666489.295521.21598516488/10153120790001489/?type=3&theater http://www.dailypost.co.uk/whats-on/music-nightlife-news/north-wales-wakestock-festival-not-10991839 Wakestock 2014 [@WakestockUK] (14 July 2013). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Slate industry in North Wales is on the tentative World Heritage Site list. (wikipedia.org)

2001

  • As of the United Kingdom Census 2001 there were 869 communities in Wales. (wikipedia.org)

Roman

  • While that course was being redeveloped for the Ryder Cup, the Wales Open was played for three years (2005-07) on the Roman Road course, a par-69 venue. (wikipedia.org)
  • The existence of a slate industry in Wales is attested since the Roman period, when slate was used to roof the fort at Segontium, now Caernarfon. (wikipedia.org)

Newport

  • The event was hosted at the Celtic Manor Resort in the city of Newport, South Wales, also the venue for the 2010 Ryder Cup. (wikipedia.org)

mainly

  • There is another band of Ordovician slate further south, running from Llangynnog to Aberdyfi, quarried mainly in the Corris area, with a few outcrops in south-west Wales, notably Pembrokeshire. (wikipedia.org)

walks

  • With access to some of the best walking in Wales, with both gentle and challenging walks nearby, thi. (yha.org.uk)

Scotland

  • The first woman to compete at Miss World as Miss Wales was Clare Daniels, who competed alongside Stephanie Norrie who was Miss Scotland. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Final Miss United Kingdom contest had already taken place earlier in the year, so at Miss World 1999, there was the unusual situation of a Miss UK competing along with the Miss Scotland and Miss Wales winners. (wikipedia.org)

Australian

  • Lachlan Wales is an Australian professional footballer who plays as an attacking midfielder for the Central Coast Mariners FC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isaac F Wales (31 January 1865 - 11 January 1949) was an Australian cricketer. (wikipedia.org)

known

  • Lissa Wales (1957-2005) was an American photographer known for her photographs of drummers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lissa Wales was known for her photographs of drummers that she documented in twenty years. (wikipedia.org)
  • The tournament has previously been known as the Saab Wales Open and the Celtic Manor Wales Open due to past sponsorship deals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "Meadow District" of Wales was originally known as "Munger's Meadow" and includes graves of early pioneers. (wikipedia.org)
  • born August 7, 1966), also known as Jimbo Wales, is an American Internet entrepreneur. (wikipedia.org)

former

  • The area is archaeologically sensitive, with a significant number of sites clustered in an area between the native village of Wales and the former Tin City Air Force Station. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peter John Wales (born 30 October 1928) is a former English cricketer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through his work at Yellow Wales, the former Cynffig Comprehensive School pupil was planning a trip to Edinburgh and was working towards a Duke of Edinburgh Award at the time of his death. (walesonline.co.uk)

Open

  • The Wales Open was a professional golf tournament on the European Tour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Source: Wales Seniors Open - a European Seniors Tour event. (wikipedia.org)
  • Miss Wales is open to unmarried women from age 16 to age 24, and organized by Vibe Models. (wikipedia.org)

world

  • 1974's Miss Wales, Helen Morgan, achieved exactly the same feat as Rosemarie Frankland, when she finished as 1st runner-up at Miss Universe 1974, before going to win the Miss United Kingdom and Miss World titles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wales has been taking part in the Miss World pageant directly since 1999, since devolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Color key Declared as Winner Ended as runner-up Ended as one of the finalists or semifinalists The winner of Miss Wales represents her country at Miss World. (wikipedia.org)
  • But Wales soon discovered that the World Book had shortcomings: no matter how much was in it, there were many more things that were not. (wikipedia.org)
  • World Book sent out stickers for owners to paste on the pages in order to update the encyclopedia, and Wales was careful to put the stickers to work, stating, "I joke that I started as a kid revising the encyclopedia by stickering the one my mother bought. (wikipedia.org)
  • To create world class renal facilities in Wales Kidney Wales Foundation is a leading charity in Wales and was established in Wales in 1967 for research and patient care. (causes.com)

local

  • Local Democracy and Boundary Commission for Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The town was renamed after James Lawrence Wales, a local benefactor. (wikipedia.org)

England

  • The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535-1542. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike in England, where unparished areas exist, no part of Wales is outside a community, even in urban areas. (wikipedia.org)

Britain

  • Wales' 2010 gross value added (GVA) was £45.5 billion (£15,145 per head, 74.0% of the average for the UK, and the lowest GVA per head in Britain). (wikipedia.org)
  • Although Wales closely shares its political and social history with the rest of Great Britain, and a majority of the population speaks English, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity and is officially bilingual. (wikipedia.org)

officially

  • Wales was first settled in 1726 and was officially incorporated on August 23, 1775, as "South Brimfield", a name it kept until February 20, 1828. (wikipedia.org)

English

  • Contemporary Wales is an annual English-language journal containing academic articles and reviews relating to politics, history and current affairs. (wikipedia.org)

project

  • HealthWise Wales is a project surrounding the health of the population of Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The project is the first of its kind in Europe and hopes to "build a picture" of the future health requirements in Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ms Davies hopes anyone thinking of harming themselves will go to the Yellow Wales project at Bridgend YMCA for help, a place Thomas often went to for support and guidance. (walesonline.co.uk)

south

  • the South Wales Coalfield's exploitation caused a rapid expansion of Wales' population. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Wales site is located on the south shore of the Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska, very near Cape Prince of Wales, the westernmost point in North American. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primarily a wicket-keeper, he played 16 first-class cricket matches for New South Wales between 1886 and 1894, taking 28 catches, stumping 5 batsmen and scoring 121 runs. (wikipedia.org)
  • kasˈnɛwɨð]) is a cathedral and university city and unitary authority area in south east Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potts Point is named for Joseph Hyde Potts , who was employed by the Bank of New South Wales . (wikipedia.org)
  • Much of the area that today comprises Potts Point and the adjacent suburb of Elizabeth Bay, originally constituted part of a land grant to Alexander Macleay , who was the New South Wales Colonial Secretary from 1826 to 1837, and for whom Macleay Street is named. (wikipedia.org)

population

  • At the 2011 census it is the third largest city in Wales, with a city population of 145,700 and an urban population of 306,844. (wikipedia.org)

City

  • The community is located 18 miles north of the city of Two Harbors at the intersection of Lake County Road 14 (Wales Road) and Wickholm Road. (wikipedia.org)

near

  • The Wales Site, whose principal component is the Kurigitavik mound, is a well-documented archeological site on the Cape Prince of Wales, near Wales, Alaska. (wikipedia.org)

support

  • The run is in support of the Kidney Wales Foundation - a charity dedicated to tackling kidney disease and investing in patient care and well-being in Wales. (causes.com)

British

  • Wales & Edwards was a British manufacturer of milk floats based in Harlescott, Shrewsbury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contestants must not have had children, must be British citizens and must reside in Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Susanna (sometimes spelled Susannah) Wales, Lady Malet was a British artist. (wikipedia.org)

University

  • Wales grew up in Valley and studied at the Arizona State University. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wales was born in Huntsville, Alabama, where he attended Randolph School, a university-preparatory school. (wikipedia.org)
  • After eighth grade, Wales attended Randolph School, a university-preparatory school in Huntsville, graduating at sixteen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wales then entered the PhD finance program at the University of Alabama before leaving with a master's degree to enter the PhD finance program at Indiana University. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contemporary Wales is published by the University of Wales Press on behalf of the Board of Celtic Studies. (wikipedia.org)

town

  • In Wales, all town councils are community councils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wales is a town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fiscal year 2008, the town of Wales spent 1.28% ($45,480) of its budget on its public library-some $24 per person. (wikipedia.org)

principal

  • The principal areas of Wales are divided entirely into communities. (wikipedia.org)

made

  • Wales made a single first-class appearance for Sussex against Hampshire at Manor Sports Ground, Worthing in 1951. (wikipedia.org)

economy

  • Now that the country's traditional extractive and heavy industries have gone or are in decline, Wales' economy depends on the public sector, light and service industries and tourism. (wikipedia.org)

students

  • Wales students attend Tantasqua Regional Junior High School (grades 7-8) and Tantasqua Regional High School in Sturbridge. (wikipedia.org)

unincorporated community

  • Wales is an unincorporated community in Lake County, Minnesota, United States. (wikipedia.org)

early

  • Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • His father, Jimmy, worked as a grocery store manager, while his mother, Doris Ann (née Dudley), and his grandmother, Erma, ran the House of Learning, a small private school in the tradition of the one-room schoolhouse, where Wales and his three siblings received their early education. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wales has described himself as having been addicted to the Internet from an early stage and he wrote computer code during his leisure time. (wikipedia.org)

areas

  • Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. (wikipedia.org)

century

  • The Cilgwyn quarry in the Nantlle Valley dates from the 12th century, and is thought to be the oldest in Wales. (wikipedia.org)

political

  • As an adult, Wales was sharply critical of the government's treatment of the school, citing the "constant interference and bureaucracy and very sort of snobby inspectors from the state" as a formative influence on his political philosophy. (wikipedia.org)

school

  • Wales Elementary School, serving grades K-6, has its own school committee, part of School Union 61. (wikipedia.org)

public