Vulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.United StatesPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Library Materials: Print and non-print materials collected, processed, and stored by libraries. They comprise books, periodicals, pamphlets, reports, microforms, maps, manuscripts, motion pictures, and all other forms of audiovisual records. (Harrod, The Librarians' Glossary, 4th ed, p497)Surge Capacity: A health care system's ability to rapidly mobilize to meet an increased demand, to rapidly expand beyond normal services levels to meet the increased demand in the event of large-scale DISASTERS or public health emergencies.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Extreme Heat: High temperature weather exceeding the average and of several weeks duration. Extreme heat is a dangerous situation that can bring on health emergencies in susceptible people.Disaster Medicine: Branch of medicine involved with management and organization of public health response to disasters and major events including the special health and medical needs of a community in a disaster.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Los AngelesMedically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.PrisonersHuman Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Air Conditioning: The maintenance of certain aspects of the environment within a defined space to facilitate the function of that space; aspects controlled include air temperature and motion, radiant heat level, moisture, and concentration of pollutants such as dust, microorganisms, and gases. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Homeless Youth: Runaway and homeless children and adolescents living on the streets of cities and having no fixed place of residence.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Transients and Migrants: People who frequently change their place of residence.Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Prisons: Penal institutions, or places of confinement for war prisoners.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.San FranciscoPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.North CarolinaQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Early Detection of Cancer: Methods to identify and characterize cancer in the early stages of disease and predict tumor behavior.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)CaliforniaSubstance Abuse, Intravenous: Abuse, overuse, or misuse of a substance by its injection into a vein.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.IndiaData Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.

*  serving vulnerable populations - Learning4Purpose

Students need to be careful to help and not harm the vulnerable populations they may be working with during service-learning. ... Browse: Home / 2017 / March / serving vulnerable populations serving vulnerable populations. Cori Palermo / March 16, 2017 / ... College students should reflect regularly on their service to ensure that they are not harming a vulnerable population. ... Service-learning courses often occur in settings in which students work with vulnerable populations, such as children, ...
https://learning4purpose.org/2017/03/serving-vulnerable-populations/

*  Mobility of Vulnerable Elders (MOVE): Translating Knowledge to Health Care Aides in Long-term Care Facilities - Full Text View ...

We have chosen to measure mobility using the number of sit-to-stands in 30 seconds because in the frail nursing home population ... Mobility of Vulnerable Elders study: effect of the sit-to-stand activity on mobility, function, and quality of life. J Am Med ... Mobility of Vulnerable Elders (MOVE): Translating Knowledge to Health Care Aides in Long-term Care Facilities (MOVE). This ... Mobility of Vulnerable Elders (MOVE): study protocol to evaluate the implementation and outcomes of a mobility intervention in ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01474616

*  Vulnerable Populations | Smoking Cessation Leadership Center

Even among populations who smoke less than the general population (such as African American adults), death and disease is ... To end the tobacco epidemic in America, all populations must be included in developing policies and practices designed to ... greater than among the general population, partially due to lack of cessation resources and treatment options. Moreover, those ...
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*  Vulnerable Populations & Water Contaminants | City of Sanford, NC

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*  Program Offers Dental Services To California's Vulnerable Populations...

SACRAMENTO, -- Continuing its efforts to improve oral health care for the state's most vulnerable residents, the California ... by supporting the dental health profession and its efforts to increase access to care for the state's most vulnerable people. ... comprehensive care at no cost to the area's underserved populations. ... stood out and will unquestionably meet our goal of making a significant contribution to California's underserved populations." ...
blackradionetwork.com/program_offers_dental_services_to_californias_vulnerable_populations

*  Facility for Economic and Infrastructure Management: Medium-Term Development Strategy - Vulnerable Populations | Asian...

Facility for Economic and Infrastructure Management: Medium-Term Development Strategy - Vulnerable Populations. Consultants' ...
https://adb.org/projects/documents/facility-economic-and-infrastructure-management-mtds-vulnerable-populations

*  Study Finds Opioid Laws Don't Curb Opioid Addiction in Most Vulnerable Populations - Addiction Treatment Forum

Study Finds Opioid Laws Don't Curb Opioid Addiction in Most Vulnerable Populations. June 28, 2016. ... digital.vpr.net/post/study-finds-opioid-laws-dont-curb-opioid-addiction-most-vulnerable-populations#stream/0 ... and found they did little to reduce the amount of opioids this population group obtained. ...
atforum.com/2016/06/study-finds-opioid-laws-dont-curb-opioid-addiction-most-vulnerable-populations/

*  Restoration and maintenance of household food security and promotion of diversification of livelihood coping mechanisms for...

... of household food security and promotion of diversification of livelihood coping mechanisms for vulnerable populations in the ... To improve the food production and capacity of vulnerable households in the Three Transitional Areas and Eastern Sudan. ... Restore food security and build the resilience of vulnerable households in the Central African Republic. 01/09/2017 ...
fao.org/emergencies/fao-in-action/projects/detail/en/c/179455/

*  Use of the PREPARE website for upstream care planning discussions and informed medical decision-making among vulnerable...

... of the PREPARE website for upstream care planning discussions and informed medical decision-making among vulnerable populations ...
nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/HealthServices/QualityCareforSeriousIllnessRoundtable/2016-DEC-15/Videos/Session-4-Videos/22-Sudore-Video.aspx

*  State Strategies to Use Federally Qualified Health Centers as Community Utilities to Support Medical Homes for Vulnerable...

Strategies to Use Federally Qualified Health Centers as Community Utilities to Support Medical Homes for Vulnerable Populations ... particularly for society's most vulnerable, including low-income people, the uninsured, minority Americans, young children, and ...
commonwealthfund.org/grants-and-fellowships/grants/2010/jun/state-strategies-to-use-federally-qualified

*  Elder Abuse: ERs Learn How To Protect A Vulnerable Population - Lifestyle - The Herald News, Fall River, MA - Fall River, MA

Elder Abuse: ERs Learn How To Protect A Vulnerable Population. Friday. Sep 15, 2017 at 2:01 AM ... The team's ultimate goal is to optimize acute care for these vulnerable victims and ensure their safety. They plan to work at ... founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team (VEPT), a program launched in April at the New York- ... founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable ...
heraldnews.com/lifestyle/20170915/elder-abuse-ers-learn-how-to-protect-vulnerable-population

*  Impact of Sociopolitical Variation on Vulnerable Populations in Low-income Countries: 10-year trends in developmental...

Impact of Sociopolitical Variation on Vulnerable Populations in Low-income Countries: 10-year trends in developmental ... Health Sciences is dedicated to improving health and reducing the burden of disease in the world's most vulnerable populations. ...
globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/event/impact-sociopolitical-variation-vulnerable-populations-low-income-countries-10-year-trends

*  Largest Deployment of Law Students to Serve Veterans, Victims of Natural Disasters and other Vulnerable Population | Equal...

... and other vulnerable populations. Services include disability benefits claims, removing barriers to housing and employment, ... Largest Deployment of Law Students to Serve Veterans, Victims of Natural Disasters and other Vulnerable Population ... and other vulnerable populations. Services include disability benefits claims, removing barriers to housing and employment, ...
equaljusticeworks.org/news/12-04-13-AmeriCorps-JD-Program

*  What are the practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations affected by urban humanitarian emergencies? A...

Patel, R.B.; Phelps, L.; Sanderson, D.; King, J. What are the practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations ... What are the practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations affected by urban humanitarian emergencies? A ... What are the practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations affected by urban humanitarian emergencies? A ... research questions and methodology for an evidence synthesis on practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations ...
https://gov.uk/dfid-research-outputs/what-are-the-practices-to-identify-and-prioritize-vulnerable-populations-affected-by-urban-humanitarian-emergencies-a-systematic-review-protocol-of-methods-and-specific-tools-used-to-target-the-most-at-need-individuals-househol

*  Health Affairs Blog: Making Smoking Cessation Work For People With Mental Illnesses And Other Vulnerable Populations | Smoking...

Yet these special populations are a part of that general population. Excluding them would bring the population smoking rate ... Health Affairs Blog: Making Smoking Cessation Work For People With Mental Illnesses And Other Vulnerable Populations. *. ... Addressing smoking among vulnerable populations requires motivating and engaging the clinical, governmental, and advocacy ... Furthermore, smoking rates remain high among the most vulnerable populations, such as people with mental illnesses or substance ...
smokingcessationleadership.ucsf.edu/news/health-affairs-blog-making-smoking-cessation-work-people-mental-illnesses-and-other-vulnerable

*  Elder Abuse: ERs Learn How To Protect A Vulnerable Population - Lifestyle - Beauregard Daily News - Beauregard, LA - DeRidder,...

... founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable Elder ... Elder Abuse: ERs Learn How To Protect A Vulnerable Population. ... The team s ultimate goal is to optimize acute care for these vulnerable victims and ensure their safety. They plan to work at ... founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team (VEPT), a program launched in April at the New York- ...
beauregarddailynews.net/lifestyle/20170915/elder-abuse-ers-learn-how-to-protect-vulnerable-population

*  HealthReformQuestions.com - Vulnerable Populations

... with little or no cost to the rest of the population. ...
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*  Free vulnerable populations downloads

Vulnerable Populations. *Cube Pattern Fpw Php Contact Php. *Back Up Systems For Suvs. *Battery Powered Hedge Trimmer. *Cropping ... Damn Vulnerable Web App (DVWA) is a PHP/MySQL web application that is damn vulnerable. Its main goals are to be light weight, ... Vulnerable Analysis and Management System is vulnerable scan software that control by central database server using Oracle, ... Recodon is a population genetic simulator that generates samples of nucleotide and codon sequences from populations with ...
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*  Document Details | ISSUE 7 - SRHR AMONGST KEY AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: A FOCUS ON PWID, SEX WORKERS, LGBT AND PRISON

Details for ISSUE 7 - SRHR AMONGST KEY AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: A FOCUS ON PWID, SEX WORKERS, LGBT AND PRISON. Property. ... ISSUE 7 - SRHR AMONGST KEY AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: A FOCUS ON PWID, SEX WORKERS, LGBT AND PRISON. ...
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*  Financial Literacy Low Among Vulnerable Populations: NBER

... Women, elderly least likely to show high levels of financial literacy ... Among the overall population, though, just 65% were able to choose the right answer. ... it is particularly severe among vulnerable groups such as women and the elderly. ...
thinkadvisor.com/2012/02/15/financial-literacy-low-among-vulnerable-population

*  Integrated Care Centers to Improve HIV Outcomes in Vulnerable Indian Populations - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Integrated Care Centers to Improve HIV Outcomes in Vulnerable Indian Populations. This study has been completed. ... and Treatment Services Among High-Risk Vulnerable Populations in India. ... ICCs, which will be either IDU or MSM-focused, will provide an accepting atmosphere in which members of vulnerable groups can ... Integrated care centers will provide HIV prevention and treatment services to high risk populations of IDU or MSM in an ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01686750?order=464

*  Harrington to discuss ways to help vulnerable student populations - University of Southern Indiana

Helping under-represented, vulnerable student populations is a passion for Xavia Harrington, instructor in English. She has ... "Sometimes we forget to think about all the nuances that may make our students vulnerable. An extra five minutes spent getting ... "USI events are a great way for faculty, staff and other students to learn about these populations and their plight." Students ... where she will speak about vulnerable student groups, their challenges, retention and success. ...
usi.edu/news/releases/2017/09/harrington-to-discuss-ways-to-help-vulnerable-student-populations/

*  39--59356-HCA 430 Week 1 DQ 2; Trends in Vulnerable Populations

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*  Zimbabwe : Sweden Backs IOM Support for Mobile and Vulnerable Populations - News from Africa

Zimbabwe : Sweden Backs IOM Support for Mobile and Vulnerable Populations. Témoignages.re / 21 February 2014. The Swedish ... The vulnerable migrants include returned Zimbabwean nationals from Botswana and South Africa, as well as asylum seekers and ... This has allowed IOM, in collaboration with the government, to reach out to hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people in ... World population will reach 10 billion in 2053. 25 August 2016, by Témoignages.re ...
en.temoignages.re/news/news-from-africa/zimbabwe-sweden-backs-iom-support-for-mobile-and-vulnerable-populations,74710

*  Star Trek (2009) / Headscratchers - TV Tropes

The remaining population is fragmented in colonies: less at risk from a single catastrophe *coughNerocough* but more vulnerable ... A) Population reduction. On the reasonable assumption that most of the population lived on Vulcan, the species has been reduced ... have little to no population growth (not including immigration), and some even have population decline. It's entirely possible ... Also, um, how many do you think is reasonable? The average Earth colony in TOS seems to have a population of a few dozen. Have ...
tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Headscratchers/StarTrek2009

List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Poverty trap: A poverty trap is "any self-reinforcing mechanism which causes poverty to persist."Costas Azariadis and John Stachurski, "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth, 2005, 326.Homeless dumping: Homeless dumping is the practice of hospital employees or emergency services releasing homeless patients on the streets instead of placing them into the custody of family, a warming center or homeless shelter or retaining them in a hospital where they may require expensive medical care. Many homeless people who have mental health problems can no longer find a place in a psychiatric hospital since the trend towards mental health deinstitutionalization from the 1960s onwards.Area code 585Q Services Corps (South Africa): The establishment of the 'Q' Services Corps as part of the South African Permanent Force was promulgated in the Government Gazette dated 10 November 1939.Typed copy of Proclamation 276 of 1939Dhama Innovations Pvt. Ltd.Isaac Ashkenazi: Isaac Ashkenazi (born 1957 in Israel) is an Israeli Professor of Disaster Medicine at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel and a consultant to Harvard University. He is considered one of the world’s foremost experts in medical preparedness for complex emergencies and disasters.Los Angeles County Department of Public HealthStateville Penitentiary Malaria Study: The Stateville Penitentiary malaria study was a controlled study of the effects of malaria on the prisoners of Stateville Penitentiary near Joliet, Illinois in the 1940s. The study was conducted by the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago in conjunction with the United States Army and the State Department.Human subject research legislation in the United States: Human subject research legislation in the United States can be traced to the early 20th century. Human subject research in the United States was mostly unregulated until the 20th century, as it was throughout the world, until the establishment of various governmental and professional regulations and codes of ethics.Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association: The Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA; pronounced 'Smack'-'Nah') is an international trade association with more than 4,500 contributing contractor members http://archives.informz.Youth Action Network: The Youth Action Network (formerly the National Federation of Youth Action Agencies) was a UK-wide youth organisation that promotes volunteering by young people in their communities.Nomad Rock: Nomad Rock () is an isolated rock in Bransfield Strait, 5 nautical miles (9 km) off the north coast of Trinity Peninsula and 9 nautical miles (17 km) northeast of Cape Legoupil. So named by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) because of confusion about the identity of geographic points along this coast, and because of the wandering of features and names on charts of this vicinity.Al-Waleed (camp): Al-Waleed () is a makeshift Palestinian refugee camp in Iraq, near the border with Syria and the al-Tanf Crossing, and not far from the border with Jordan. It was set up in 2006 by Palestinian refugees stranded at the Iraqi-Syrian border The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has two field staff stationed in the camp.Northeast Community Health CentreInjustice SocietySouth Asia Disaster Report: South Asia Disaster Report is a 2006 report by Duryog Nivaran, edited by Amjad Bhatti and others, and subtitled Tackling the Tides and Tremors. It looks at disasters affecting the South Asian region's "countries and communities (that) are connected to each other geologically, geographically and culturally".Management of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.List of California state prisonsLifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Jack London's San Francisco Stories: Jack London's San Francisco Stories is an anthology of Jack London short stories set in the San Francisco Bay Area. The book was edited by Matthew Asprey.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Substance-related disorderAfrican-American family structure: The family structure of African-Americans has long been a matter of national public policy interest.Moynihan's War on Poverty report A 1965 report by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, known as The Moynihan Report, examined the link between black poverty and family structure.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Health policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Transitional care: Transitional care refers to the coordination and continuity of health care during a movement from one healthcare setting to either another or to home, called care transition, between health care practitioners and settings as their condition and care needs change during the course of a chronic or acute illness. Older adults who suffer from a variety of health conditions often need health care services in different settings to meet their many needs.Steven Zeisel: Steven H. Zeisel, M.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Ethnic groups in the United Kingdom: People from various ethnic groups reside in the United Kingdom. Migration from Northern Europe has been happening for millennia, with other groups such as British Jews also well established.Essex School of discourse analysis: The Essex School constitutes a variety of discourse analysis, one that combines theoretical sophistication – mainly due to its reliance on the post-structuralist and psychoanalytic traditions and, in particular, on the work of Lacan, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, etc. – with analytical precision, since it focuses predominantly on an in-depth analysis of political discourses in late modernity.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Global Health Delivery ProjectNational Healthy Homes Hero Award: National Healthy Homes Hero Award is an award presented by a consortium of agencies at the United States' National Healthy Homes Conference. The first year this award was presented was in 2011.Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (2010) is a parody novel by Steve Hockensmith. It is a prequel to Seth Grahame-Smith's 2009 novel Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, focusing on "the early life and training of Elizabeth Bennet, heroine of the earlier Pride and Prejudice and Zombies as she strove to become a gifted zombie hunter, with some mishaps in her early romantic encounters also included.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Mental disorderDisinhibition: In psychology, disinhibition is a lack of restraint manifested in disregard for social conventions, impulsivity, and poor risk assessment. Disinhibition affects motor, instinctual, emotional, cognitive, and perceptual aspects with signs and symptoms similar to the diagnostic criteria for mania.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Lucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}Standard evaluation frameworkPrenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Themis MedicareSan Diego County, California Probation: The San Diego County Probation Department is the body in San Diego County, California responsible for supervising convicted offenders in the community, either who are on probation, such as at the conclusion of their sentences, or while on community supervision orders.Halfdan T. MahlerProportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==Neighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Cancer screeningAge adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Canadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Von Neumann regular ring: In mathematics, a von Neumann regular ring is a ring R such that for every a in R there exists an x in R such that . To avoid the possible confusion with the regular rings and regular local rings of commutative algebra (which are unrelated notions), von Neumann regular rings are also called absolutely flat rings, because these rings are characterized by the fact that every left module is flat.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityNon-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.

(1/928) Selecting subjects for participation in clinical research: one sphere of justice.

Recent guidelines from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate the inclusion of adequate numbers of women in clinical trials. Ought such standards to apply internationally? Walzer's theory of justice is brought to bear on the problem, the first use of the theory in research ethics, and it argues for broad application of the principle of adequate representation. A number of practical conclusions for research ethics committees (RECs) are outlined. Eligibility criteria in clinical trials ought to be justified by trial designers. Research ethics committees ought to question criteria that seem to exclude unnecessarily women from research participation. The issue of adequate representation should be construed broadly, so as to include consideration of the representation of the elderly, persons with HIV, mental illness and substance abuse disorders in clinical research.  (+info)

(2/928) Confidentiality and HIV status in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa: implications, resistances and challenges.

This article provides a contextualized comparison and analysis of the former Kwazulu and the new Kwazulu-Natal policy documents on HIV confidentiality, the differing practices within the region, and their implications for support and gender. It is based on interviews with key players in the regional NACOSA (National AIDS Convention of South Africa), and participation in meetings between August and November 1995. The main division is between those influenced by other rural African models, especially the Zambian concept of "shared confidentiality' as a way of ensuring support, and who have gone on to develop more community-based practices to destigmatize the disease, in contrast with the stronger emphasis in the new document on individual rights, assuming a more urban constituency, and where "shared confidentiality' is much more circumscribed. One of the difficulties of the new policy in which "confidentiality' is interpreted as "secrecy', is that it would seem to foreclose and neutralize lay and community support, as distinct from the earlier and unacknowledged policy of former Kwazulu. It also seeks to provide an enhanced role for professional counsellors. This psychologizing of the infection and the distancing from "community', and from women's groups, is surprising in a country in whose townships "community' remains a powerful motivating symbol, and where NGOs and peer groups have been identified everywhere as central to effective HIV/AIDS related prevention, care and support for behavior change.  (+info)

(3/928) Health outcomes and managed care: discussing the hidden issues.

Too often the debate over health outcomes and managed care has glossed over a series of complex social, political, and ethical issues. Exciting advances in outcomes research have raised hopes for logical medical reform. However, science alone will not optimize our patients' health, since value judgements are necessary and integral parts of attempts to improve health outcomes within managed care organizations. Therefore, to form healthcare policy that is both fair and efficient, we must examine the fundamental values and ethical concerns that are imbedded in our efforts to shape care. We must openly discuss the hidden issues including: (1) trade-offs between standardization of care and provider-patient autonomy; (2) effects of financial incentives on physicians' professionalism; (3) opportunity costs inherent in the design of insurance plans; (4) responsibilities of managed care plans for the health of the public; (5) judicious and valid uses of data systems; and (6) the politics of uncertainty.  (+info)

(4/928) Indigenous peoples and the morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project.

In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about indigenous peoples has confused rather than illuminated the deeper issues involved, as well as causing much antagonism among indigenous peoples. There are more serious ethical issues raised by the project for all geneticists, including those who are sympathetic to the problems of indigenous peoples. With particular attention to the history and attitudes of Australian indigenous peoples, we argue that the Human Genome Diversity Project can only proceed if those who further its objectives simultaneously: respect the cultural beliefs of indigenous peoples; publicly support the efforts of indigenous peoples to achieve respect and equality; express respect by a rigorous understanding of the meaning of equitable negotiation of consent, and ensure that both immediate and long term economic benefits from the research flow back to the groups taking part.  (+info)

(5/928) Impact of therapeutic research on informed consent and the ethics of clinical trials: a medical oncology perspective.

PURPOSE: To create a more meaningful understanding of the informed consent process as it has come to be practiced and regulated in clinical trials, this discussion uses the experience gained from the conduct of therapeutic research that involves cancer patients. DESIGN: After an introduction of the ethical tenets of the consent process in clinical research that involves potentially vulnerable patients as research subjects, background that details the use of written consent documents and of the term "informed consent" is provided. Studies from the cancer setting that examine the inadequacies of written consent documents, and the outcome of the consent process itself, are reviewed. Two ethically challenging areas of cancer clinical research, the phase I trial and the randomized controlled trial, are discussed briefly as a means of highlighting many dilemmas present in clinical trials. Before concluding, areas for future research are discussed. RESULTS: Through an exclusive cancer research perspective, many current deficiencies in the informed consent process for therapeutic clinical trials can be critically examined. Also, new directions for improvements and areas of further research can be outlined and discussed objectively. The goals of such improvements and research should be prevention of further misguided or ineffective efforts to regulate the informed consent process. CONCLUSION: To ignore this rich and interesting perspective potentially contributes to continued misunderstanding and apathy toward fulfilling the regulatory and ethically obligatory requirements involved in an essential communication process between a clinician-investigator and a potentially vulnerable patient who is considering clinical trial participation.  (+info)

(6/928) Protective truthfulness: the Chinese way of safeguarding patients in informed treatment decisions.

The first part of this paper examines the practice of informed treatment decisions in the protective medical system in China today. The second part examines how health care professionals in China perceive and carry out their responsibilities when relaying information to vulnerable patients, based on the findings of an empirical study that I had undertaken to examine the moral experience of nurses in practice situations. In the Chinese medical ethics tradition, refinement [jing] in skills and sincerity [cheng] in relating to patients are two cardinal virtues that health care professionals are required to possess. This notion of absolute sincerity carries a strong sense of parental protectiveness. The empirical findings reveal that most nurses are ambivalent about telling the truth to patients. Truth-telling would become an insincere act if a patient were to lose hope and confidence in life after learning of his or her disease. In this system of protective medical care, it is arguable as to whose interests are being protected: the patient, the family or the hospital. I would suggest that the interests of the hospital and the family members who legitimately represent the patient's interests are being honoured, but at the expense of the patient's right to know.  (+info)

(7/928) Ancient Chinese medical ethics and the four principles of biomedical ethics.

The four principles approach to biomedical ethics (4PBE) has, since the 1970s, been increasingly developed as a universal bioethics method. Despite its wide acceptance and popularity, the 4PBE has received many challenges to its cross-cultural plausibility. This paper first specifies the principles and characteristics of ancient Chinese medical ethics (ACME), then makes a comparison between ACME and the 4PBE with a view to testing out the 4PBE's cross-cultural plausibility when applied to one particular but very extensive and prominent cultural context. The result shows that the concepts of respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice are clearly identifiable in ACME. Yet, being influenced by certain socio-cultural factors, those applying the 4PBE in Chinese society may tend to adopt a "beneficence-oriented", rather than an "autonomy-oriented" approach, which, in general, is dissimilar to the practice of contemporary Western bioethics, where "autonomy often triumphs".  (+info)

(8/928) Human rights is a US problem, too: the case of women and HIV.

Overall, US AIDS incidence and mortality have shown significant declines since 1996, probably because of new antiviral therapies. For women, however, these benefits have been much less pronounced than for men. At the heart of women's HIV risk is gender-based discrimination, which keeps women, and especially women of color, poor and dependent. Although human rights issues are often linked with AIDS issues abroad, in the US they receive insufficient attention in our response to women's HIV risk. Advocacy from public health professionals is needed to overcome the longstanding paternalistic attitudes of federal agencies toward women and to change the paradigm of women's HIV/AIDS prevention and care. Examples of unjust and punitive social policies that may affect women's HIV risk include the 1996 welfare policy legislation, drug treatment policies for women, and women's access to medical research and technology. The overriding public health response to AIDS consists of behavioral interventions aimed at the individual. But this approach will not successfully address the issues of women with AIDS until efforts are made to eliminate society's unjust and unhealthy laws, policies, and practicles.  (+info)



households


  • To improve the food production and capacity of vulnerable households in the Three Transitional Areas and Eastern Sudan. (fao.org)
  • The aim of the synthesis is to consolidate the practices (including tools, methods, and metrics) reported by practitioners and academics to identify and prioritize vulnerable people, households or communities within populations affected by humanitarian emergencies, including those displaced within and to urban areas. (www.gov.uk)

Centers


  • This is a cluster randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of integrated care centers (ICC) to improve access to HIV testing, prevention services, and treatment among high-risk populations of injection drug users (IDU) and men who have sex with men (MSM) in India. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Integrated care centers have the potential to improve access to HIV prevention and treatment services among vulnerable, high-risk populations. (clinicaltrials.gov)

victims


  • The team's ultimate goal is to optimize acute care for these vulnerable victims and ensure their safety. (heraldnews.com)
  • Washington, DC-December 4, 2013- Equal Justice Works and AmeriCorps today announced the creation of the Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps JD Program, which provides law students with an opportunity to expand the delivery of critically needed legal assistance in low-income and underserved communities across the country for veterans, military families, disaster victims, and other vulnerable populations. (equaljusticeworks.org)

tobacco


  • To end the tobacco epidemic in America, all populations must be included in developing policies and practices designed to reduce tobacco use, increase cessation, and improve access to treatment for tobacco-related disease. (ucsf.edu)
  • Furthermore, smoking rates remain high among the most vulnerable populations, such as people with mental illnesses or substance use disorders, necessitating policies and strategies targeted specifically at them, as well as support for tobacco control at the federal, state, and local levels. (ucsf.edu)
  • Other strategies that have been instrumental in driving down tobacco use to the current low level in the general population also work for vulnerable populations. (ucsf.edu)

among


  • Even among populations who smoke less than the general population (such as African American adults), death and disease is greater than among the general population, partially due to lack of cessation resources and treatment options. (ucsf.edu)
  • As a result, smoking is now concentrated among special populations: People with mental illnesses have smoking rates that range from 30 percent to more than 50 percent , depending on the specific diagnosis. (ucsf.edu)
  • Addressing smoking among vulnerable populations requires motivating and engaging the clinical, governmental, and advocacy organizations that serve those clients. (ucsf.edu)
  • Although it is premature to assess the effectiveness of these efforts, over the past few years smoking among people with behavioral health conditions has declined at a faster rate than for the general population, although it is still at a much higher level (Exhibit 1). (ucsf.edu)
  • A review of various studies and surveys taken in the United States as well as in other countries shows that not only is literacy low, it is particularly severe among vulnerable groups such as women and the elderly . (thinkadvisor.com)
  • Among the overall population, though, just 65% were able to choose the right answer. (thinkadvisor.com)

people


  • Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. (sanfordnc.net)
  • The CDA Foundation was formed as the philanthropic affiliate of the California Dental Association in 2001 with the mission to improve the oral health of Californians by supporting the dental health profession and its efforts to increase access to care for the state's most vulnerable people. (blackradionetwork.com)
  • The LGBTQ populations, people with less education, prisoners, and homeless people also have smoking rates that are higher, sometimes much higher, than the overall population's rate. (ucsf.edu)
  • Service-learning courses often occur in settings in which students work with vulnerable populations, such as children, immigrants, people in impoverished conditions, people with disabilities, and racial/ethnic minorities (Pitkin Derose, Escarce, & Lurie, 2007). (learning4purpose.org)
  • The health law would help the roughly 700,000 people with pre-existing health conditions, with little or no cost to the rest of the population. (healthreformquestions.com)

practices


  • What are the practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations affected by urban humanitarian emergencies? (www.gov.uk)
  • The purpose of this document is to clearly describe the proposed research questions and methodology for an evidence synthesis on practices to identify and prioritize vulnerable populations affected by urban humanitarian emergencies. (www.gov.uk)

care


  • SACRAMENTO, -- Continuing its efforts to improve oral health care for the state's most vulnerable residents, the California Dental Association Foundation today announced the latest organizations selected for support through its popular grant program. (blackradionetwork.com)
  • The CDA Foundation grant funds will support the salary for this staff position, which is considered integral to the project's ability to continue providing high-quality, comprehensive care at no cost to the area's underserved populations. (blackradionetwork.com)

general population


  • Yet these special populations are a part of that general population. (ucsf.edu)

Services


  • Program Offers Dental Services To California's Vulnerable Populations. (blackradionetwork.com)
  • ICCs, which will be either IDU or MSM-focused, will provide an accepting atmosphere in which members of vulnerable groups can drop-in, receive rapid HIV voluntary counselling and testing, risk reduction counseling and services, and antiretroviral therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • After providing services in communities for two years, we will conduct an evaluation survey (with biological and behavioral measures) of approximately 1000 subjects in the target populations in each of the 22 study sites. (clinicaltrials.gov)

health


  • UCSF Global Health Sciences is dedicated to improving health and reducing the burden of disease in the world's most vulnerable populations. (ucsf.edu)

abuse


  • Pxytest is a command line utility to test a host for open proxies that are vulnerable to spammer abuse. (filetransit.com)
  • Quinti Secure Contact Form is a contact form for Web pages that is not vulnerable to robots who would abuse such forms for sending spam. (filetransit.com)

ensure


  • College students should reflect regularly on their service to ensure that they are not harming a vulnerable population. (learning4purpose.org)

program


  • Because visits to the emergency room may be the only time an older adult leaves the house, staff in the ER can be a first line of defense, said Tony Rosen, founder and lead investigator of the Vulnerable Elder Protection Team (VEPT), a program launched in April at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center ER. (heraldnews.com)
  • This program, BayeScan aims at identifying candidate loci under natural selection from genetic data, using differences in allele frequencies between populations. (filetransit.com)

interest


  • This change in perspective may guide students to feel compassion for their population of interest, which tends to make them more competent in working with vulnerable populations (Chen, McAdams-Jones, Tay, & Packer, 2012). (learning4purpose.org)

little


  • The researchers looked at the effectiveness of those laws - such as prescription drug monitoring programs - and found they did little to reduce the amount of opioids this population group obtained. (atforum.com)