Southeastern United States: The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.Southwestern United States: The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Northwestern United States: The geographic area of the northwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.United States Virgin Islands: A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.MexicoHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Mid-Atlantic Region: A geographical area of the United States comprising the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.American Medical Association: Professional society representing the field of medicine.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.EuropeBehavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.TexasInternationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Licensure: The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.WisconsinIncome: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.New MexicoFloridaPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.ArizonaCause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.GeorgiaLife Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.National Health Insurance, United StatesCommerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.North AmericaUnited States Occupational Safety and Health Administration: An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.New YorkEnvironmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Healthy People Programs: Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.Foreign Medical Graduates: Physicians who hold degrees from medical schools in countries other than the ones in which they practice.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.WashingtonForecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.United States Environmental Protection Agency: An agency in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. It was created as an independent regulatory agency responsible for the implementation of federal laws designed to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the ENVIRONMENT.AlaskaRefugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.ColoradoHealth Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.PhilippinesWest Nile Fever: A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.JapanHospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.New York CityNew JerseyCluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Foreign Professional Personnel: Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.Consumer Product SafetyDiet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)ConnecticutLegislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Pharmacopoeias as Topic: Authoritative treatises on drugs and preparations, their description, formulation, analytic composition, physical constants, main chemical properties used in identification, standards for strength, purity, and dosage, chemical tests for determining identity and purity, etc. They are usually published under governmental jurisdiction (e.g., USP, the United States Pharmacopoeia; BP, British Pharmacopoeia; P. Helv., the Swiss Pharmacopoeia). They differ from FORMULARIES in that they are far more complete: formularies tend to be mere listings of formulas and prescriptions.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)MontanaCentral AmericaGovernment Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.West Nile virus: A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.IllinoisHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.

*  American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), 2007

United States Housing SDA, United States Population SDA.. Any state's housing and population data files can be merged via the ... United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS ... ICPSR suggests SDA online analysis for those users who wish to use the United States ACS housing and population datasets but ... The American Community Survey is conducted under the authority of Title 13, United States Code, Sections 141 and 193, and ...

*  American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), 2005

United States Housing SDA, United States Population SDA.. Any state's housing and population data files can be merged via the ... DS104: United States Population - Download All Files (5557.88 MB) large file Documentation:. Codebook.pdf Documentation.txt ( ... United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census. American Community Survey (ACS): Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS ... ICPSR suggests SDA online analysis for those users who wish to use the United States ACS housing and population datasets but ...

*  Retail trade - C08526006 - Means of Transportation to Work By Industry For Workplace Geography - American Community Survey...

The NAICS was developed to increase comparability in industry definitions between the United States, Mexico, and Canada. It ...

*  C08511. Means of Transportation to Work By Citizenship Status For Workplace Geography [30] - American Community Survey 2008 ...

1) born in the United States, (2) born in Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or Northern Marianas, (3) born abroad of ... Respondents who indicated that they were born in the United States, Puerto Rico, a U.S. Island Area (such as Guam), or abroad ... This includes respondents who indicated they were born in the United States, Puerto Rico, a U.S. Island Area (such as Guam), or ... The population surveyed includes all people who indicated that the United States was their usual place of residence on the ...

*  Genetic mutations trigger type 2 diabetes linked to obesity; carried by nearly one million Americans. | Food Exposed

scie high blood pressure cardiovascular disease fr type 2 diabetes rna Food heart disease cl indivi United States researcher ...

*  United States - Wikipedia

United States portal Index of United States-related articles Lists of U.S. state topics Outline of the United States 36 U.S.C ... "United States" was originally plural, a description of a collection of independent states-e.g., "the United States are"- ... it is a difference between a collection of states and a unit. A citizen of the United States is an "American". "United States ... The United States has the most ecoregions out of any country in the world. The United States, with its large size and ...

*  united states map

... An Amazing U.S. Map Showing Only Bodies of Water All the bodies of water, from sea to shining sea. ...

*  United States - WikiLeaks

See Category:United States for a list of articles pertaining to this country. ...

*  Shigellosis -- United States, 1982

... In 1982, 13,523 Shigella isolations from humans were reported to CDC. This represents a 9.9 ... The decreases were not confined to one state or region. From 1981 to 1982, S. sonnei decreased notably in Florida (166 to 92), ... laboratory-based system that receives reports from the 50 states and the District of Columbia. These reports do not distinguish ...

*  United States dollar - Wikipedia

Government of the United States portal Numismatics portal Coins of the United States dollar Counterfeit United States currency ... The United States dollar and the Chinese Yuan are the only accepted currencies in most Pyongyang stores. The United States ... "2009 Financial Report of the United States Government" (PDF). Retrieved August 24, 2010. Mehl, B. Max. "United States $50.00 ... 2664 (December 22, 2005). The United States Mint. "The United States Mint Pressroom". Usmint.com. Retrieved August 24, 2010. ...

*  United States observance - Wikipedia

Title 36 of the United States Code International observance List of observances in the United States by presidential ... The United States has many observances. January 13 - Stephen Foster Memorial Day February 1 - National Freedom Day [1] April 13 ...

*  Township (United States) - Wikipedia

... and are marked on the United States Geological Survey maps of the United States. Townships are normally a square approximately ... Because township government is defined by each state, the use of this form also varies by state. States using a township form ... A township in the United States is a small geographic area. The term is used in three ways. A survey township is simply a ... Towns and townships are considered minor civil divisions of counties by the United States Census Bureau for statistical ...

*  Captain (United States) - Wikipedia

In the United States, the rank of captain first appeared in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. A captain was ... In the United States uniformed services, captain is a commissioned-officer rank. In keeping with the traditions of the ... The insignia for captains in the United States Army was first authorized in 1836. During the American Civil War, the rank of ... Of note, and to further complicate the confusion, seaborne services of the United States and many other nations refer to the ...

*  Piedmont (United States) - Wikipedia

The Piedmont is a plateau region located in the eastern United States. It sits between the Atlantic Coastal Plain and the main ... The portion of the Piedmont region in the southern United States is closely associated with the Piedmont blues, a style of ...

*  United States Constabulary - Wikipedia

"State Police" was discarded for "State Constabulary." Then it was thought that "State" would be confusing, as the main United ... The United States Constabulary was a United States Army military gendarmerie force. From 1946 to 1952, in the aftermath of ... Before any plans were worked out for the organization of the United States Constabulary, units of the United States Army ... United States) This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of ...

*  United States Constitution - Wikipedia

United States) Second Constitutional Convention of the United States The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis ... United States Senate (1992). "Amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America" (PDF). The Constitution of the ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States. The Constitution, originally comprising seven articles ... See, e.g., Green v. Biddle, 21 U.S. 1, 1, 36 (1823). United States v. Wood, 39 U.S. 430, 438 (1840). Myers v. United States, ...

*  Northwestern United States - Wikipedia

The Northwestern United States is a subportion of the Western United States (which is, itself, even more ambiguous). In ... The Northwestern United States is an informal geographic region of the United States. The region consistently includes the ... so did the location of the Northwestern and Southwestern United States. In the early years of the United States, newly ... Like the southwestern United States, the Northwest definition has moved westward over time. The current area includes the old ...

*  Foodtown (United States) - Wikipedia

Foodtown is a northeastern United States supermarket cooperative founded in 1955 by Twin County Grocers. Currently, there are ... as well as bribing a leader in the United Food and Commercial Workers union in New Jersey. In 2004, Foodtown closed its supply ...

*  Village (United States) - Wikipedia

In the United States, the meaning of "village" varies by geographic area and legal jurisdiction. In many areas, "village" is a ... Since the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal government from legislating on local ... Villages can be created by referendum under the general state law or by special state charter. The governing body is a board of ... in states having town governments. States that formally recognize villages vary widely in the definition of the term. Most ...

*  United States Live - Wikipedia

Originally, United States was presented over the course of two nights, running some eight hours. The United States Live box set ... United States Live was the third album release by avant-garde singer-songwriter Laurie Anderson. Released as a 5-record boxed ... United States was Anderson's magnum opus performance-art piece featuring musical numbers, spoken word pieces, and animated ... United States Live at AllMusic. Retrieved 8 April 2006. Christgau, Robert. "Laurie Anderson > Consumer Guide Reviews". Robert ...

*  Pleading (United States) - Wikipedia

Pleading in United States Federal courts is governed by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. According to Rule 7, only these ... Notice pleading is the dominant form of pleading used in the United States today. In 1938, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure ... An example is Federal Rule 9(b) which states that "in alleging fraud or mistake, a party must state with particularity the ... which states that a "pleading that states a claim for relief must contain...a short and plain statement of the claim showing ...

*  United States University - Wikipedia

In 2016, United States University moved their campus from Chula Vista, CA to Mission Valley, CA. In June 2017, monthly payment ... United States University (USU) is a private, for-profit university located in San Diego, California. It offers graduate and ... The United States University nursing program has increased in popularity in comparison to the additionally offered teaching ... In 2010, the institution changed its name to United States University to reflect the new status of University granted to the ...

*  United States Army - Wikipedia

United States Military Academy United States Army Basic Training United States Army Center of Military History United States ... It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United ... military ranks History of the United States Army List of active United States military aircraft List of former United States ... Creed Structure of the United States Army Timeline of United States military operations Transformation of the United States ...

*  United States passport - Wikipedia

United States Department of State. Retrieved 22 May 2016. "United States passport fees" (PDF). United States Department of ... United States Department of State, Passport Office, The United States Passport: Past, Present, Future (Washington, D.C.: United ... United States Department of State, Passport Office, 1976). United States Department of State, Passports, Passport Home. 22 C.F. ... citizen either unable to leave the United States, or inadmissible into the United States. The United States is a signatory of ...

*  United States Bakery - Wikipedia

United States Bakery, better known as Franz Family Bakeries, is a bread and pastry manufacturer headquartered in Portland, ... In 2013, United States Bakery paid $28.85 million for Hostess' Sweetheart, Eddy's, Standish Farms, and Grandma Emilie's brands ... Franz Family Bakeries (official website) United States Bakery profile from Hoover's Historic images of Franz Bakery from Salem ... "Franz Family Bakeries Opens New Bakery in Springfield". United States Bakery (press release). August 28, 2006. Retrieved 2007- ...

Pinguicula lutea: Pinguicula lutea, commonly known as the yellow butterwort, is a species of warm-temperate carnivorous plant in the Lentibulariaceae family. It grows in savannas and sandy bog areas of the Southeastern United States.Southwestern United States: The Southwestern United States (also known as the American Southwest) is the United States portion of the Southwest (which is situated in both the United States and Mexico). It is a region of the United States defined in different ways by different sources.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Speedway LLC: Speedway LLC is the operator of a chain of combination gas stations and convenience stores in the Midwestern United States operating under its namesake brand and along the East Coast of the United States under the Hess and WilcoHess brands. Speedway LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Marathon Petroleum Corporation and is the largest chain in central Ohio.Phyllodoce empetriformis: Phyllodoce empetriformis, the pink mountain-heather or pink mountain-heath, is found in mountainous regions of western North America in the Northwestern United States and Western Canada. Its southern range includes the Klamath Range in northern California and Oregon.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.The Complete Stevie Wonder: The Complete Stevie Wonder is a digital compilation featuring the work of Stevie Wonder. Released a week before the physical release of A Time to Love, the set comprises almost all of Wonder's officially released material, including single mixes, extended versions, remixes, and Workout Stevie Workout, a 1963 album which was shelved and replaced by With A Song In My Heart.IontocaineCanadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.List of countries that regulate the immigration of felons: This is a list of countries that regulate the immigration of felons.African-American family structure: The family structure of African-Americans has long been a matter of national public policy interest.Moynihan's War on Poverty report A 1965 report by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, known as The Moynihan Report, examined the link between black poverty and family structure.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.List of rivers of the United States Virgin Islands: List of rivers and streams in the United States Virgin Islands (U.S.Old Portal de Mercaderes (Mexico City): Old Portal de Mercaderes in the historic center of Mexico City was and is the west side of the main plaza (otherwise known as the "Zócalo"). This side of the plaza has been occupied by commercial structures since the Spanish Conquest of Mexico in 1521.The Flash ChroniclesFoundation Course for Agricultural Research ServiceNew England's Dark Day: New England's Dark Day refers to an event that occurred on May 19, 1780, when an unusual darkening of the day sky was observed over the New England states and parts of Canada. The primary cause of the event is believed to have been a combination of smoke from forest fires, a thick fog, and cloud cover.Carte Jaune: The Carte Jaune or Yellow Card is an international certificate of vaccination (ICV). It is issued by the World Health Organisation.San Juan River (Vancouver Island): The San Juan River is a river on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, draining into the Pacific Ocean at Port San Juan, the harbour for Port Renfrew,BCGNIS entry "San Juan River" which is at the limit of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, which lies south and southeast of the river. Its name is derived from that or Port San Juan, which is also the namesake of San Juan Ridge, which lies on the south side of the river's final W-E course.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingMortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Vital statistics (government records): Vital statistics are statistics on live births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces. The most common way of collecting information on these events is through civil registration, an administrative system used by governments to record vital events which occur in their populations (see Box 1).Four Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.Inequality within immigrant families in the United States: Inequality within immigrant families refers to instances in which members of the same family have differing access to resources. Much literature focuses on inequality between families, but inequality often exists within families as well.Cumberland Farms: Cumberland Farms is a regional chain of convenience stores based in Framingham, Massachusetts, and operating primarily in New England, portions of the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, and Florida. Cumberland Farms operates roughly 600 retail stores, gas stations, and a support system including petroleum and grocery distribution operations in 11 states, including Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Charles Alfred Tyrrell: Charles Alfred Tyrrell(1843–1918) was a promoter of medical devices, most notably an enema appliance. He was also author of tracts promoting the use of his device for colon cleansing as therapy for detoxification pursuant to a theory of auto-intoxication.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Health geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.List of foodborne illness outbreaks: This is a list of foodborne illness outbreaks. A foodborne illness may be from an infectious disease, heavy metals, chemical contamination, or from natural toxins, such as those found in poisonous mushrooms.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.Cancer screeningGA²LENGlobal Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Themis MedicareUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonCriticisms of globalization: Criticism of globalization is skepticism of the claimed benefits of globalization. Many of these views are held by the anti-globalization movement.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Management of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.Ethnic groups in the United Kingdom: People from various ethnic groups reside in the United Kingdom. Migration from Northern Europe has been happening for millennia, with other groups such as British Jews also well established.Influenza A virus subtype H1N1: Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu.Wisconsin Senate, District 4: The 4th District of the Wisconsin Senate is located in Southern Wisconsin, and is composed of parts of Milwaukee County.District MapCircular flow of income: The circular flow of income or circular flow is a model of the economy in which the major exchanges are represented as flows of money, goods and services, etc. between economic agents.VaccinationAlbuquerque IsotopesMiami-Dade County Corrections and Rehabilitation Department: The Miami-Dade County Corrections and Rehabilitation Department is an agency of the government of Miami-Dade County, Florida. It has its headquarters in the Gladeview census-designated place in an unincorporated area.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Health policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Arizona State Prison Complex – Perryville: Arizona State Prison Complex – Perryville is one of 13 prison facilities operated by the Arizona Department of Corrections (ADC)."Arizona State Prison Complex- Perryville.Emory University Hospital: Emory University Hospital is a 587-bed facility in Atlanta, Georgia, specializing in the care of the acutely ill adults. Emory University Hospital is staffed exclusively by Emory University School of Medicine faculty who also are members of The Emory Clinic.List of U.S. states by life expectancy: This article presents a list of United States states sorted by their life expectancy at birth and by race/ethnicity in every state where the population of that racial or ethnic group is sufficiently large for robust estimates. The data is taken from the Measure of America's third national human development report, The Measure of America 2013–2014 width="25%" align="center" |Neighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.List of largest employers: ==Largest public and private and Government employers in the world==Australian referendum, 1913 (Trade and Commerce): The Constitution Alteration (Trade and Commerce) 1912 was an Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to extend Commonwealth legislative power in respect to trade and commerce.American Medical Student Association

(1/58711) Racing problems in the U.S.A.

The major problems of racing in the United States at the present time are caused by too much racing. This has led to too few horses and small fields. Consequently many owners and trainers are trying to enter their horses too frequently and to race them when they are not really fit to run. The desire to race horses as frequently as possible has led to constant pressure from horsemen through their organizations for so called "permissive medication". Started in the state of Colorado approximately ten years ago this has grown until finally there are only a few states, notably New York and New Jersey that have resisted the pressure. The drug that gave the opening wedge to permissive medication was phenylbutazone, but this in many states has led to the inclusion of other drugs including analgesics and drugs that veterinarians claim are needed for therapeutic purposes. Some states have endeavoured to control phenylbutazone medication by quantitation and while lower limits cause little difficulty, maximum allowable limits have caused problems and are not practical. While there has been no publicity to my knowledge about frusemide (furosemide, lasix) the abuse of this drug for so called "bleeders" is an example that may seriously interfere with drug detection in urine and its use should be confined to proven "bleeders" (i.e. horses suffering from epistaxis). Pre-race blood testing began roughly ten years ago at the harness tracks and has been resisted by our flat tracks rather successfully up to the present time. The blood testing methods and those used by the same laboratories in post-race urine testing is inadequate and will not detect many illegal drugs.  (+info)

(2/58711) Myths, models and mitigation of resistance to pesticides.

Resistance to pesticides in arthropod pests is a significant economic, ecological and public health problem. Although extensive research has been conducted on diverse aspects of pesticide resistance and we have learned a great deal during the past 50 years, to some degree the discussion about 'resistance management' has been based on 'myths'. One myth involves the belief that we can manage resistance. I will maintain that we can only attempt to mitigate resistance because resistance is a natural evolutionary response to environmental stresses. As such, resistance will remain an ongoing dilemma in pest management and we can only delay the onset of resistance to pesticides. 'Resistance management' models and tactics have been much discussed but have been tested and deployed in practical pest management programmes with only limited success. Yet the myth persists that better models will provide a 'solution' to the problem. The reality is that success in using mitigation models is limited because these models are applied to inappropriate situations in which the critical genetic, ecological, biological or logistic assumptions cannot be met. It is difficult to predict in advance which model is appropriate to a particular situation; if the model assumptions cannot be met, applying the model sometimes can increase the rate of resistance development rather than slow it down. Are there any solutions? I believe we already have one. Unfortunately, it is not a simple or easy one to deploy. It involves employing effective agronomic practices to develop and maintain a healthy crop, monitoring pest densities, evaluating economic injury levels so that pesticides are applied only when necessary, deploying and conserving biological control agents, using host-plant resistance, cultural controls of the pest, biorational pest controls, and genetic control methods. As a part of a truly multi-tactic strategy, it is crucial to evaluate the effect of pesticides on natural enemies in order to preserve them in the cropping system. Sometimes, pesticide-resistant natural enemies are effective components of this resistance mitigation programme. Another name for this resistance mitigation model is integrated pest management (IPM). This complex model was outlined in some detail nearly 40 years ago by V. M. Stern and colleagues. To deploy the IPM resistance mitigation model, we must admit that pest management and resistance mitigation programmes are not sustainable if based on a single-tactic strategy. Delaying resistance, whether to traditional pesticides or to transgenic plants containing toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis, will require that we develop multi-tactic pest management programmes that incorporate all appropriate pest management approaches. Because pesticides are limited resources, and their loss can result in significant social and economic costs, they should be reserved for situations where they are truly needed--as tools to subdue an unexpected pest population outbreak. Effective multi-tactic IPM programmes delay resistance (= mitigation) because the number and rates of pesticide applications will be reduced.  (+info)

(3/58711) Bioterrorism alleging use of anthrax and interim guidelines for management--United States, 1998.

From October 30 through December 23, 1998, CDC received reports of a series of bioterroristic threats of anthrax exposure. Letters alleged to contain anthrax were sent to health clinics on October 30, 1998, in Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. During December 17-23 in California, a letter alleged to contain anthrax was sent to a private business, and three telephone threats of anthrax contamination of ventilation systems were made to private and public buildings. All threats were hoaxes and are under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and local law enforcement officials. The public health implications of these threats were investigated to assist in developing national public health guidelines for responding to bioterrorism. This report summarizes the findings of these investigations and provides interim guidance for public health authorities on bioterrorism related to anthrax.  (+info)

(4/58711) Physician advice and individual behaviors about cardiovascular disease risk reduction--seven states and Puerto Rico, 1997.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) (e.g., heart disease and stroke) is the leading cause of death in the United States and accounted for 959,227 deaths in 1996. Strategies to reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke include lifestyle changes (e.g., eating fewer high-fat and high-cholesterol foods) and increasing physical activity. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that, as part of a preventive health examination, all primary-care providers counsel their patients about a healthy diet and regular physical activity. AHA also recommends low-dose aspirin use as a secondary preventive measure among persons with existing CVD. To determine the prevalence of physician counseling about cardiovascular health and changes in individual behaviors, CDC analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for seven states and Puerto Rico. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate a lower prevalence of counseling and behavior change among persons without than with a history of heart disease or stroke.  (+info)

(5/58711) Cardiovascular disease in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: similar rates but different risk factors in the US compared with Europe.

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) has been linked to renal disease. However, little is known concerning international variation in the correlations with hyperglycaemia and standard CVD risk factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional comparison was made of prevalence rates and risk factor associations in two large studies of IDDM subjects: the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC) and the EURODIAB IDDM Complications Study from 31 centres in Europe. Subgroups of each were chosen to be comparable by age and duration of diabetes. The EDC population comprises 286 men (mean duration 20.1 years) and 281 women (mean duration 19.9 years); EURODIAB 608 men (mean duration 18.1 years) and 607 women (mean duration 18.9 years). The mean age of both populations was 28 years. Cardiovascular disease was defined by a past medical history of myocardial infarction, angina, and/or the Minnesota ECG codes (1.1-1.3, 4.1-4.3, 5.1-5.3, 7.1). RESULTS: Overall prevalence of CVD was similar in the two populations (i.e. men 8.6% versus 8.0%, women 7.4% versus 8.5%, EURODIAB versus EDC respectively), although EDC women had a higher prevalence of angina (3.9% versus 0.5%, P < 0.001). Multivariate modelling suggests that glycaemic control (HbA1c) is not related to CVD in men. Age and high density lipoprotein cholesterol predict CVD in EURODIAB, while triglycerides and hypertension predict CVD in EDC. For women in both populations, age and hypertension (or renal disease) are independent predictors. HbA1c is also an independent predictor-inversely in EURODIAB women (P < 0.008) and positively in EDC women (P = 0.03). Renal disease was more strongly linked to CVD in EDC than in EURODIAB. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a similar prevalence of CVD, risk factor associations appear to differ in the two study populations. Glycaemic control (HbA1c) does not show a consistent or strong relationship to CVD.  (+info)

(6/58711) Novel endotheliotropic herpesviruses fatal for Asian and African elephants.

A highly fatal hemorrhagic disease has been identified in 10 young Asian and African elephants at North American zoos. In the affected animals there was ultrastructural evidence for herpesvirus-like particles in endothelial cells of the heart, liver, and tongue. Consensus primer polymerase chain reaction combined with sequencing yielded molecular evidence that confirmed the presence of two novel but related herpesviruses associated with the disease, one in Asian elephants and another in African elephants. Otherwise healthy African elephants with external herpetic lesions yielded herpesvirus sequences identical to that found in Asian elephants with endothelial disease. This finding suggests that the Asian elephant deaths were caused by cross-species infection with a herpesvirus that is naturally latent in, but normally not lethal to, African elephants. A reciprocal relationship may exist for the African elephant disease.  (+info)

(7/58711) Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in American Indians: the Strong Heart Study.

Studies of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in minority populations provide researchers with an opportunity to evaluate PAD risk factors and disease severity under different types of conditions. Examination 1 of the Strong Heart Study (1989-1992) provided data on the prevalence of PAD and its risk factors in a sample of American Indians. Participants (N = 4,549) represented 13 tribes located in three geographically diverse centers in the Dakotas, Oklahoma, and Arizona. Participants in this epidemiologic study were aged 45-74 years; 60% were women. Using the single criterion of an ankle brachial index less than 0.9 to define PAD, the prevalence of PAD was approximately 5.3% across centers, with women having slightly higher rates than men. Factors significantly associated with PAD in univariate analyses for both men and women included age, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c level, albuminuria, fibrinogen level, fasting glucose level, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and duration of diabetes. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to predict PAD for women and men combined. Age, systolic blood pressure, current cigarette smoking, pack-years of smoking, albuminuria (micro- and macro-), low density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and fibrinogen level were significantly positively associated with PAD. Current alcohol consumption was significantly negatively associated with PAD. In American Indians, the association of albuminuria with PAD may equal or exceed the association of cigarette smoking with PAD.  (+info)

(8/58711) Reliability of information on physical activity and other chronic disease risk factors among US women aged 40 years or older.

Data on chronic disease risk behaviors and related variables, including barriers to and attitudes toward physical activity, are lacking for women of some racial/ethnic groups. A test-retest study was conducted from July 1996 through June 1997 among US women (n = 199) aged 40 years or more who were white, black, American Indian/Alaska Native, or Hispanic. The sample was selected and interviews were conducted using a modified version of the methods of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For behavioral risk factors such as physical inactivity, smoking, and low fruit and vegetable consumption, group prevalences were generally similar between interviews 1 and 2. However, kappa values for selected physical activity variables ranged from 0.26 to 0.51 and tended to be lower for black women. Discordance was low for variables on cigarette smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (kappa = 0.64-0.92). Discordance was high (kappa = 0.33) for low consumption of fruits and vegetables. Additional variables for barriers to and access to exercise ranged widely across racial/ethnic groups and in terms of measures of agreement. These methods illustrate an efficient way to sample and assess the reliability of data collected from women of racial/ethnic minority groups.  (+info)



America

  • 100 The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous and located in North America between Canada and Mexico. (wikipedia.org)
  • The state of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States embarked on a vigorous expansion across North America throughout the 19th century, acquiring new territories, displacing Native American tribes, and gradually admitting new states until it spanned the continent by 1848. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first documentary evidence of the phrase "United States of America" is from a letter dated January 2, 1776, written by Stephen Moylan, Esq. (wikipedia.org)
  • Addressed to Lt. Col. Joseph Reed, Moylan expressed his wish to carry the "full and ample powers of the United States of America" to Spain to assist in the revolutionary war effort. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first known publication of the phrase "United States of America" was in an anonymous essay in The Virginia Gazette newspaper in Williamsburg, Virginia, on April 6, 1776. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed (14 June 1775) to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783)-before the United States of America was established as a country. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States passports are passports issued to citizens and non-citizen nationals of the United States of America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Southern United States, also known as the American South, is a region of the United States of America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. (wikipedia.org)

Jurisdiction

  • In the United States, the meaning of "village" varies by geographic area and legal jurisdiction. (wikipedia.org)

Constitution

  • also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its insular territories per the United States Constitution since 1792. (wikipedia.org)
  • That provision of the Constitution is made specific by Section 331 of Title 31 of the United States Code. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amendments to the United States Constitution, unlike ones made to many constitutions worldwide, are appended to the document. (wikipedia.org)
  • For over two centuries the Constitution has remained in force because its framers wisely separated and balanced governmental powers to safeguard the interests of majority rule and minority rights, of liberty and equality, and of the federal and state governments. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was the first constitution of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal government from legislating on local government, the states are free to have political subdivisions called "villages" or not to and to define the word in many ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United States Constitution, Article 2, Section 2, Clause 1 and United States Code, Title 10, Subtitle B, Chapter 301, Section 3001. (wikipedia.org)

1775-1783

  • U.S. law does not prohibit U.S. citizens from holding passports of other countries, though they are required to use their U.S. passport to enter and leave the U.S. American consular officials issued passports to some citizens of some of the thirteen states during the War for Independence (1775-1783). (wikipedia.org)

thirteen

  • The United States emerged from the thirteen British colonies established along the East Coast. (wikipedia.org)
  • Article Seven establishes the procedure subsequently used by the thirteen States to ratify it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implementation of most decisions, including modifications to the Articles, required unanimous approval of all thirteen state legislatures. (wikipedia.org)

Army

  • The insignia for captains in the United States Army was first authorized in 1836. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the American Civil War, the rank of Captain was used in both the Union Army and Confederate States Army. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the rank of captain first appeared in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Constabulary was a United States Army military gendarmerie force. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before any plans were worked out for the organization of the United States Constabulary, units of the United States Army assigned to occupational duties in Germany had experimented with the organization of parts of their forces into motorized patrols for guarding the borders and maintaining order in the large areas for which they were responsible. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the direction of Lieutenant General Lucian K. Truscott, Commanding General, Third United States Army, a small group was detailed to assist General Harmon in carrying forward the planning for the new force. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Army considers itself descended from the Continental Army, and dates its institutional inception from the origin of that armed force in 1775. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Army serves as the land-based branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • State militias became the new nation's sole ground army, with the exception of a regiment to guard the Western Frontier and one battery of artillery guarding West Point's arsenal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Regular Army was at first very small and after General St. Clair's defeat at the Battle of the Wabash, the Regular Army was reorganized as the Legion of the United States, which was established in 1791 and renamed the United States Army in 1796. (wikipedia.org)

legislatures

  • Delegates to the First (1774) and then the Second (1775-1781) Continental Congress were chosen largely through the action of committees of correspondence in various colonies rather than through the colonial or later state legislatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many black people have also been elected or appointed as mayors and police chiefs in the metropolises of Columbia, Memphis, Houston, Atlanta, and New Orleans, and serve in both the U.S. Congress and state legislatures. (wikipedia.org)

country

  • At 3.8 million square miles (9.8 million km2) and with over 325 million people, the United States is the world's third- or fourth-largest country by total area and the third-most populous. (wikipedia.org)
  • The war ended in 1783 with the United States becoming the first country to gain independence from a European power. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States emerged from World War II as a global superpower, the first country to develop nuclear weapons, the only country to use them in warfare, and a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States is a highly developed country, with the world's largest economy by nominal GDP and second-largest economy by PPP, accounting for approximately a quarter of global GDP. (wikipedia.org)
  • See Category:United States for a list of articles pertaining to this country. (wikileaks.org)

Organization

  • The United States is a founding member of the United Nations, World Bank, International Monetary Fund, Organization of American States (OAS), and other international organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then the organization emerged from the planning stage, it was known as the "Zone Constabulary," but before it became operational it was named "United States Constabulary. (wikipedia.org)
  • The United States Fleet was an organization in the United States Navy from 1922 until after World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 1 February 1941, General Order 143 was issued, abolishing the "United States Fleet" organization. (wikipedia.org)

Besides

  • Besides the United States, it is also used as the sole currency in two British Overseas Territories in the Caribbean: the British Virgin Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides these, nearly every state has areas of metes-and-bounds that were never included in the grids (like along major rivers) or were removed from the grid, usually due to surveying mistakes. (wikipedia.org)

geographic

  • A township in the United States is a small geographic area. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Northwestern United States is an informal geographic region of the United States. (wikipedia.org)

1941

  • Foreign passport requirements undercut the absence of a passport requirement for Americans, under United States law, between 1921 and 1941. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] There was an absence of a passport requirement under United States law between 1921 and 1941. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel was appointed the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet (CINCUS) and the Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), on 1 February 1941, carrying the temporary rank of Admiral starting on that date. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the following day, by Executive Order 8984 of 18 December 1941, the position of Commander in Chief, United States Fleet (COMINCH) was redefined, and given operational command over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Asiatic Fleets, as well as all naval coastal forces. (wikipedia.org)

citation needed

  • citation needed] United States Bakery has a long history of growth through acquisition. (wikipedia.org)

1776

  • It was drafted by the Second Continental Congress from mid-1776 through late 1777, and ratification by all 13 states was completed by early 1781. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1776 to 1783, no state government had a passport requirement. (wikipedia.org)

offices

  • Theater Headquarters had already announced the principle that the Constabulary would be organized along geographical lines to coincide as nearly as possible with the major divisions of the German civil administration, in order to facilitate liaison with the German police and United States Offices of Military Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the late 1960s, black people have held many offices in Southern states, especially in the coastal states of Virginia and South Carolina. (wikipedia.org)

Congress

  • From September 5, 1774, to March 1, 1781, the Continental Congress functioned as the provisional government of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endowed by the people collectively, the Continental Congress alone possessed those attributes of external sovereignty which entitled it to be called a state in the international sense, while the separate states, exercising a limited or internal sovereignty, may rightly be considered a creation of the Continental Congress, which preceded them and brought them into being. (wikipedia.org)
  • The problems led the Congress in 1856 to give to the Department of State the sole authority to issue passports. (wikipedia.org)

contiguous

  • In Alaska, "village" is a colloquial term used to refer to small communities, which are mostly located in the rural areas of the state, often unconnected to the contiguous North American road system. (wikipedia.org)

boundaries

  • dubious - discuss] Irregular or fractional townships with fewer than a full 36 sections are created where full townships cannot be laid out due to existing senior boundaries, such as Spanish/Mexican ranchos, Indian reservations, state boundary lines, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some scholars have proposed definitions of the South that do not coincide neatly with state boundaries. (wikipedia.org)

governments

  • Articles Four, Five and Six entrench concepts of federalism, describing the rights and responsibilities of state governments and of the states in relationship to the federal government. (wikipedia.org)
  • This informal usage may be found even in states that have villages as an incorporated municipality and is similar to the usage of the term "unincorporated town" in states having town governments. (wikipedia.org)

Government

  • The sums of money reported in the "Statements" are currently being expressed in U.S. dollars (for example, see the 2009 Financial Report of the United States Government). (wikipedia.org)
  • The responsibilities and the form of the township government is specified by the state legislature. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the United States Senate: "The Constitution's first three words-We the People-affirm that the government of the United States exists to serve its citizens. (wikipedia.org)
  • United States passports are property of the United States and must be returned to the US Government upon demand. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public and private partners include automotive and power equipment manufacturers, energy and chemical companies, electric and natural gas utilities, building designers, standards development organizations, other Federal agencies, state government agencies, universities, national laboratories, and other national and international stakeholder organizations. (iea.org)

universities

  • and owns two accredited universities, Aspen University and United States University. (wikipedia.org)

organizations

  • Since the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, they became more culturally, economically, and politically aligned with the industrial Northern states, and are often identified as part of the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast by many residents, businesses, public institutions, and private organizations. (wikipedia.org)

partnership

  • Assistance is provided directly to individual state utility commissions and in partnership with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) through their Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE) Committee. (iea.org)

northwest

  • Like the southwestern United States, the Northwest definition has moved westward over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early years of the United States, newly colonized lands lying immediately west of the Allegheny Mountains were detached from Virginia and given the name Northwest Territory. (wikipedia.org)

Force

  • In October 1945, the War Department asked European Theater Headquarters to consider the feasibility of organizing the major portion of the occupational forces into an efficient military police force on the model of state police or constabulary in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the end of October 1945, General Eisenhower, then Theater Commander, announced to the proper authorities that the population of the United States Zone of Germany would ultimately be controlled by a super-police force or constabulary. (wikipedia.org)
  • The branch participates in conflicts worldwide and is the major ground-based offensive and defensive force of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • By law, a valid unexpired U.S. passport (or passport card) is conclusive (and not just prima facie) proof of U.S. citizenship, and has the same force and effect as proof of United States citizenship as certificates of naturalization or of citizenship, if issued to a U.S. citizen for the full period allowed by law. (wikipedia.org)

status

  • In 2010, the institution changed its name to United States University to reflect the new status of University granted to the college. (wikipedia.org)

confusion

  • Of note, and to further complicate the confusion, seaborne services of the United States and many other nations refer to the officer in charge of any seagoing vessel as "captain" regardless of actual rank. (wikipedia.org)
  • Passports issued by American authorities other than the Department of State breached propriety and caused confusion abroad. (wikipedia.org)

form

  • Survey townships exist in some form in most states other than the original 13 colonies, Kentucky, Tennessee, Vermont, and Maine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both New York and Pennsylvania have metes-and-bounds surveys, but in the western parts of these states, the metes-and-bounds form square townships many of which are also civil townships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Notice pleading is the dominant form of pleading used in the United States today. (wikipedia.org)
  • The directive of 6 December 1922 combined the U.S. Pacific Fleet and the U.S. Atlantic Fleet to form the United States Fleet. (wikipedia.org)

recognize

  • States that formally recognize villages vary widely in the definition of the term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some European countries refused to recognize passports not issued by the Department of State, unless United States consular officials endorsed them. (wikipedia.org)

citizens

  • It is unlawful for U.S. citizens to enter or exit the United States without a valid U.S. passport or Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative-compliant passport-replacement document, though there are many exceptions, waivers are generally granted for U.S. citizens returning without a passport, and the exit requirement is not enforced. (wikipedia.org)

region

  • The decreases were not confined to one state or region. (cdc.gov)
  • A region in the central part of the state, made up of 17 surveys, is divided into townships, but these are not oriented to true north. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Piedmont is a plateau region located in the eastern United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • The portion of the Piedmont region in the southern United States is closely associated with the Piedmont blues, a style of blues music that originated there in the late 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • The region consistently includes the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho-and usually Montana and Wyoming. (wikipedia.org)
  • The region is known for its culture and history, having developed its own customs, musical styles, and cuisines, which have distinguished it in some ways from the rest of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • As defined by the United States Census Bureau, the Southern region of the United States includes sixteen states. (wikipedia.org)

Rule

  • The rule harmonises state and federal practices and directs public utilities to amend their Order No. 888 open access transmission tariffs to offer non-discriminatory, standardised interconnection service for small generators. (iea.org)

known

  • United States Bakery, better known as Franz Family Bakeries, is a bread and pastry manufacturer headquartered in Portland, Oregon. (wikipedia.org)

areas

  • Similarly, Vermont and New Hampshire are mostly metes-and-bounds states, but have areas in the north that are surveyed into townships not oriented to true north. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most midwestern states, a civil township often corresponds to a single survey township, although in less populated areas, the civil township may be made up of all or portions of several survey townships. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American South is now among the fastest-growing areas in the United States. (wikipedia.org)

relatively

  • A relatively small unincorporated community, similar to a hamlet in New York state, or even a relatively small community within an incorporated city or town, may be termed a village. (wikipedia.org)

main

  • Then it was thought that "State" would be confusing, as the main United States Zone of Germany had been divided, for purposes of civil administration, into three states, or Länder. (wikipedia.org)

originally

  • Townships were originally surveyed and platted by the United States General Land Office, using contracted private survey crews, and are marked on the United States Geological Survey maps of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally, United States was presented over the course of two nights, running some eight hours. (wikipedia.org)

Title

  • The additional title of Commander in Chief, United States Fleet was given to one of the three fleet commanders in the event of two or more fleets operating together. (wikipedia.org)

President

  • Dr. Yoram Neumann, previously the vice president for academic affairs at California State University Dominguez Hills and the President, CEO, and founder of TUI University, was appointed president of USU. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Travel Control Act of May 22, 1918, permitted the president, when the United States was at war, to proclaim a passport requirement, and President Wilson issued such a proclamation on August 18, 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • The exact time is unknown, but James Baker, the Plimoth Plantation vice president of research, stated in 1996, "The event occurred between Sept. 21 and Nov. 11, 1621, with the most likely time being around Michaelmas (Sept. 29), the traditional time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Except for this provision, the individual commanders in chief were responsible directly to the Secretary of the Navy and to the President of the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although this waiver decision allows California to set its own standards for motor vehicles and for other states to follow the California standard, California and the other states have agreed to conform to the federal standards announced by President Obama in May 2009. (iea.org)

national

  • This is a joint initiative between EPA, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), and individual state utility commissions was designed to explore approaches that deliver significant energy cost savings and other benefits through greater use of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and clean distributed generation. (iea.org)

civil

  • A charter township is similar to a civil township, found only in the state of Michigan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pleading in United States Federal courts is governed by the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Twombly and Iqbal, the U.S. Supreme Court sought to clarify the deceptively simple mandate of Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 8(a)(2), which states that a "pleading that states a claim for relief must contain. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the states of Delaware and Maryland, as well as the District of Columbia, permitted slavery prior to the start of the Civil War, they remained with the Union. (wikipedia.org)

make

  • The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Tennessee, the entire state is surveyed into townships and ranges that make up 13 survey districts of the Tennessee State Survey. (wikipedia.org)

name

  • In September of that year, the name of the department was changed to Department of State. (wikipedia.org)

private

  • United States University (USU) is a private, for-profit university located in San Diego, California. (wikipedia.org)

District of Colum

  • Editorial Note: This report is based on CDC's Shigella Surveillance Activity, a passive, laboratory-based system that receives reports from the 50 states and the District of Columbia. (cdc.gov)

services

  • In the United States uniformed services, captain is a commissioned-officer rank. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first documented thanksgiving services in territory currently belonging to the United States were conducted by Spaniards and the French in the 16th century. (wikipedia.org)

entire

  • Thus, there would be one Constabulary Headquarters for the entire United States Zone, a brigade headquarters at each of the capitals of the three German Länder, and group, squadron, and troop headquarters established at points selected for ease in performing the mission. (wikipedia.org)

itself

  • The Northwestern United States is a subportion of the Western United States (which is, itself, even more ambiguous). (wikipedia.org)

century

  • By the end of the century, the United States had extended into the Pacific Ocean, and its economy, driven in large part by the Industrial Revolution, began to soar. (wikipedia.org)

million

  • The Twin County CEO, Martin Vitale, eventually pleaded guilty to stealing $4.2 million from the cooperative, as well as bribing a leader in the United Food and Commercial Workers union in New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013, United States Bakery paid $28.85 million for Hostess' Sweetheart, Eddy's, Standish Farms, and Grandma Emilie's brands. (wikipedia.org)

dates

  • By 1786, the United States would default on outstanding debts as their dates came due. (wikipedia.org)
  • as well, the Department of State has issued only biometric passports as standard since August 2007, though non-biometric passports remained valid until their expiration dates. (wikipedia.org)

among

  • The United States ranks among the highest nations in several measures of socioeconomic performance, including average wage, human development, per capita GDP, and productivity per person. (wikipedia.org)

program

  • The United States University nursing program has increased in popularity in comparison to the additionally offered teaching programs. (wikipedia.org)

example

  • For example, an internal passport dated 1815 was presented to Massachusetts citizen George Barker to allow him to travel as a free black man to visit relatives in Southern slave states. (wikipedia.org)

articles

  • Internationally, the Articles of Confederation did little to enhance the United States' ability to defend its sovereignty. (wikipedia.org)

word

  • United States was Anderson's magnum opus performance-art piece featuring musical numbers, spoken word pieces, and animated vignettes about life in the United States. (wikipedia.org)

approval

  • During its June 18, 2014 meeting, the Structural Change Committee of the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC) granted United States University (USU) approval for a change of ownership from Educacion Significativa, LLC, to Linden, LLC. (wikipedia.org)

model

  • In June 2009 the US EPA granted a waiver allowing California to regulate GHG emissions from motor vehicles within the state, beginning with the 2009 model year. (iea.org)

public

  • For decades thereafter, passports were issued not only by the Department of State but also by states and cities, and by notaries public. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day, is a public holiday celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States. (wikipedia.org)