Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Medical Indigency: The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.Hospitals, Proprietary: Hospitals owned and operated by a corporation or an individual that operate on a for-profit basis, also referred to as investor-owned hospitals.Patient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Hospitals, Voluntary: Private, not-for-profit hospitals that are autonomous, self-established, and self-supported.Hospital Restructuring: Reorganization of the hospital corporate structure.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Reimbursement, Disproportionate Share: Payments that include adjustments to reflect the costs of uncompensated care and higher costs for inpatient care for certain populations receiving mandated services. MEDICARE and MEDICAID include provisions for this type of reimbursement.Tax Exemption: Status not subject to taxation; as the income of a philanthropic organization. Tax-exempt organizations may also qualify to receive tax-deductible donations if they are considered to be nonprofit corporations under Section 501(c)3 of the United States Internal Revenue Code.Charities: Social welfare organizations with programs designed to assist individuals in need.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.New JerseySocial Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.FloridaHospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.CaliforniaUnited StatesHealth Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.

*  AHA News: Study: ACA repeal would increase uncompensated care by $1.1 trillion over 10 years

A partial repeal of the Affordable Care Act could increase the number of uninsured Americans by 29.8 million over 10 years, ... Study: ACA repeal would increase uncompensated care by $1.1 trillion over 10 years. AHA News Now. Jan 6, 2017. A partial repeal ... The resulting increase in uncompensated care could total $1.1 trillion between 2019 and 2028, including $296.1 billion in ... Study: ACA repeal would increase uncompensated care by $1.1 trillion over 10 years ...

*  Search Index

HFMA, Navigant Analysis Suggests Provider Executives Focused on Technology Enhancements to Better Manage Uncompensated Care and ...

*  Ted Siefer's City Hall: Could city-run ambulance service pay for itself? | New Hampshire

AMR wrote off more than $3 million in uncompensated care. Mayor Gatsas, for his part, says he'll withhold judgment on the idea ...

*  State unsure on Medicaid enrollment launch; headaches expected | Crain's Detroit Business

Michigan estimates it will save $320 million in uncompensated care costs by 2022. ... Government Health Care Health care reform Who funds Healthy Michigan?. The Affordable Care Act mandates that federal funds ... Under the Affordable Care Act, most individuals must either enroll in Medicaid or purchase a private health insurance plan by ... health savings fund to cover Michigan's future health care liabilities over the next 21 years. ...

*  Detroit Institute for Children closes outpatient clinics | Crain's Detroit Business

The institute provided $2.5 million in uncompensated care each year, according to its website. ... Health Care Health care reform The Detroit Institute for Children last week shut down three outpatient clinics serving 250 ... "The last couple years we had a reduction in the volume of patients relative to changes in the health care industry." ... LaRuffa said health benefit changes over the past several years, including those contained in the Affordable Care Act, have ...

*  The Automatic Earth: Debt Rattle, November 30 2008: How to Build a Lifeboat

Last year, nearly 5,000 community hospitals provided uncompensated care costing $34 billion, according to the AHA.) But while ... to help reimburse hospitals for some of the cost for uncompensated care. But because McNamara is a New Hampshire resident, she ... Unpaid care is up by 8 percent.. With their own solvency at stake, hospitals are doing everything in their power to collect on ... 7) If you have already taken care of the basics, then you may want to put at least some of whatever excess you still have into ...

*  Federally Qualified Health Centers FAQ

Section 330 grant funds to offset the costs of uncompensated care and enabling services (i.e. education, translation and ... Continuity of care is prized by all health professionals. As the family was satisfied with the quality interdisciplinary care ... Provide comprehensive primary health care services as well as supportive/enabling services that promote access to health care. ... Public Housing Primary Care Programs serve residents of public housing and are located in or adjacent to the communities they ...

*  Obama Administration's proposed FY 2014 budget includes $401 billion in health program savings - Lexology

Align Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payments with expected levels of uncompensated care to save $3.6 billion ... Payments would be bundled for at least half of the total payments for post-acute care providers. Rates based on patient ... Reduce payment for post-acute care services in several ways. * Reduce payment updates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities ( ... Reduce by up to 3% payments to SNFs with high rates of care-sensitive, preventable hospital readmissions, beginning in 2017, ...

*  North Carolina public health improvement plan : final report :: State Publications

Uncompensated Care 8. Assure the ability to recruit and retain an adequately trained public health workforce. 9. Measure the ... Most pregnant women receive adequate prenatal care in North Carolina. However, this care is not suicient to overcome many poor ... Most pregnant women receive adequate prenatal care in North Carolina. However, this care is not suicient to overcome many poor ... Uncompensated Care 8. Assure the ability to recruit and retain an adequately trained public health workforce. 9. Measure the ...

*  Obamacare and mental health: An unfinished story - POLITICO

The Affordable Care Act was never meant to mend every crack in the system. It did zero in on the insurance side of reform - but ... In his system, total uncompensated care costs dropped by two-thirds, from $1.2 million per month before the Affordable Care act ... The Affordable Care Act was never meant to mend every crack in the system. It did zero in on the insurance side of reform - but ... Care can be costly; people have trouble paying their out of pocket share, even if they are lucky enough to find an in-network ...

*  House panel pares Gov. Hassan's proposed budget | New Hampshire

The committee also restored $4 million in money for the uncompensated care program for hospitals which when matched with ... and assumes the state will expand Medicaid eligibility under the federal Affordable Care Act, although it approved an amendment ... Land and Community Heritage Investment Program and money for hospitals in an attempt to entice them to join the managed care ...

*  Community Report No. 11

... which has increased demand for uncompensated care; a decrease in county tax revenues that subsidize the system; new competition ... Insurance Coverage & Costs Access to Care Quality & Care Delivery Health Care Markets Employers/Consumers Health Plans ... Most primary care physicians in Miami continue to practice in small groups, and primary care physician payment rates reportedly ... While most people affected by this change obtained care through other providers, some have struggled with access to care. ...

*  Montefiore Medical Center - Code of Organizational Ethics

The ethical principles listed describe guidelines for honorable behavior for health care providers, managers and all other ... Devoting a portion of its institutional budget to funding uncompensated care for the uninsured and underserved. ... Promoting cost-effective care through cooperative clinical decision making that uses resources wisely, by avoiding both under- ... Montefiore monitors quality of care by:. * Promoting best clinical practice by using measures of quality that reflect the ...

*  The Rachel Maddow Show, Transcript 08/10/09 | MSNBC

Tonight, we will look at the latest from some of the folks who have been getting extra rich, thanks to the health care system ... It's costing every American who's insured $1,100 to pick up the cost of uncompensated care that goes on at the emergency room. ... Out of all of the kooky conspiracy theories that are being peddled right now about health care reform, that health care reform ... Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska calls for civility in the debate over health care reform right after she says that health care ...

*  Report: Cancer Will Be No. 1 Killer In U.S.

"Many smaller practices actually provide a lot of uncompensated care to those who do not have insurance or have insurance that ... "If you can't get care, you can't get good care," said American Society of Clinical Oncology President Dr. Clifford Hudis, chief ... The Affordable Care Act will also increase the need for oncologists, as millions of Americans get newly covered by health ... Survivors need ongoing care, as they're at higher risk for other types of cancer and conditions such as diabetes, ...

*  How Medicaid cuts could worsen health services in rural areas | PBS NewsHour

In the end, she added, the cost for that uncompensated care gets passed to taxpayers and consumers through higher health costs ... He said that is because most primary care visits, which include OB-GYN, pediatric and adult care, in the state's sparsely ... Nursing home or institutional care for a year, on average, is $172,280, said Jacobson, while the average home health care is $ ... rural health care. Recently in Health. * The Obamacare deadline to sign up for insurance is Friday. Here's what you need to ...

*  Joint Legislative Budget Committee Baseline Book FY ... :: Arizona State Government Publications

Disproportionate Share Uncompensated Care (DUC) Pool • As session law, continue the use of a total of $2,646,200 of DUC pool ... Disproportionate Share Uncompensated Care (DUC) Pool • As session law, continue the use of a total of $2,646,200 of DUC pool ... County Acute Care Contributions • As session law, set the County Acute Care contribution at $59,222,500. This amount includes ... County Acute Care Contributions • As session law, set the County Acute Care contribution at $59,222,500. This amount includes ...

*  State surplus sparks debate | New Hampshire

Responding to cuts in uncompensated care payments from the state, the hospitals have filed $69 million in tax claims that must ...

*  Massachusetts health care reform - Wikipedia

The Fund-which replaced the Uncompensated Care Pool or Free Care-pays for medically necessary health care for those who do not ... "Romney's Mission: Massachusetts Health Care". NPR. Retrieved 2011-07-11.. *^ "Uncompensated Care Pool PFY05 Utilization Report" ... "How To Access Health Care - Massachusetts Uncompensated (Free) Care Pool". Boston Public Health Commission. Retrieved 2011-07- ... known as the Uncompensated Care Pool (or "free care pool"), was used to partially reimburse hospitals and health centers for ...

*  2009 APAC Healthcare Information Technology Outlook

... increased oversight on charity/uncompensated care. • 52% of CFOs/VPs Finance reported delaying or cutting EMR rollouts and 43% ... 2007 US$ 171m 2.6% • The Multi-Media Super Corridor initiative was aimed to establish a health- care system which could ... and safe medical care but will also play a significant role in sustaining the 2002 89.8% economy's national health insurance ... patient care effectiveness, Taiwan, PHI operational efficiency and India market attractiveness Market TPA Penetration Rate ...

*  State medicaid HIT plan (SMHP) : CMS letter - 9/3/2010, enclosure A :: Documents.OK.Gov

Were furnished uncompensated care by the provider; or (3) Were furnished services at either no cost or reduced cost based on a ... One of eight plans (SoonerCare Choice) is considered managed care. SoonerCare Choice operates under a Primary Care Case ... One of eight plans (SoonerCare Choice) is considered managed care. SoonerCare Choice operates under a Primary Care Case ... Were furnished uncompensated care by the provider; or (3) Were furnished services at either no cost or reduced cost based on a ...

*  Garry Rayno's State House Dome: Fresh-start optimism meets fiscal reality | New Hampshire

And the Medicaid Enhancement Tax hospitals pay on patient services that used to be returned as uncompensated care aid was $34 ... Whether you're circling the parking lot for a spot, or hanging your Christmas stocking with care, please take a moment to ... money cut last session from higher education and from funding for the state's largest hospitals to help with uncompensated care ... 16 million by implementing a managed care system for Medicaid patients that has yet to begin, and changes to the state ...

*  The Day - Region's health care providers brace for impact of cuts - News from southeastern Connecticut

Hospitals and other health care providers are bracing for damaging impacts they say would result under Gov. Dannel P. Malloy's ... In addition to the uncompensated care cuts, Barnes said the governor's budget includes other changes that bring the total cuts ... so an uncompensated care fund would become virtually obsolete.. The Connecticut Health Insurance Exchange is on track to begin ... 135 million in fiscal 2014 for uncompensated care reimbursements to hospitals, about half of the 2013 figure, which had been ...

*  Garry Rayno's State House Dome: Fresh-start optimism meets fiscal reality | New Hampshire

And the Medicaid Enhancement Tax hospitals pay on patient services that used to be returned as uncompensated care aid was $34 ... money cut last session from higher education and from funding for the state's largest hospitals to help with uncompensated care ... 16 million by implementing a managed care system for Medicaid patients that has yet to begin, and changes to the state ...

*  NH tobacco cash proves a windfall | New Hampshire

... a settlement with the federal government to repay uncompensated care funds and savings from managed care in the Medicaid ...

Association Residence Nursing HomeFor-profit hospital: For-profit hospitals, or alternatively investor-owned hospitals, are investor-owned chains of hospitals which have been established particularly in the United States during the late twentieth century. In contrast to the traditional and more common non-profit hospitals, they attempt to garner a profit for their shareholders.Drumcondra Hospital: Drumcondra Hospital (originally, the Whitworth Fever Hospital, and from 1852 to 1893 the Whitworth General Hospital) was a voluntary hospital on Whitworth Road in Dublin, Ireland, that became part of the Rotunda Hospital in 1970.Dow Lohnes: Washington, D.C.Lawrence Ting Charity Walk: Lawrence S. Ting Charity Walk is a charity walk event to raise fund for the poor and needy people in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.Medical state: Medical states or medical conditions are used to describe a patient's condition in a hospital. These terms are most commonly used by the news media and are rarely used by physicians, who in their daily business prefer to deal with medical problems in greater detail.Middlesex County Hospital: Middlesex County Hospital was a hospital operated by Middlesex County which was operational from the 1930s until 2001 in Waltham and Lexington, Massachusetts. Originally opened as a tuberculosis hospital, the hospital eventually became the county hospital for Middlesex until its closure in 2001.New Jersey State Park Police: The New Jersey State Park Police patrol and protect the State’s 54 parks, forests and recreation areas which encompass an excess of and are visited by more than 17 million people each year, which defines their motto, "Protecting New Jersey's Treasures and the people who visit them." All State Park Police Officers are sworn State Law Enforcement Officers who are PTC certified.Sunshine Social Welfare Foundation: Sunshine Social Welfare Foundation (Chinese: 陽光社會福利基金會) is a charity established in 1981 in Taiwan to provide comprehensive services for burn survivors and people with facial disfigurement.Miami-Dade County Corrections and Rehabilitation Department: The Miami-Dade County Corrections and Rehabilitation Department is an agency of the government of Miami-Dade County, Florida. It has its headquarters in the Gladeview census-designated place in an unincorporated area.San Diego County, California Probation: The San Diego County Probation Department is the body in San Diego County, California responsible for supervising convicted offenders in the community, either who are on probation, such as at the conclusion of their sentences, or while on community supervision orders.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,

(1/118) Implications of managed care denials for pediatric inpatient care.

With the growing penetration of managed care into the healthcare market, providers continue to experience increasing cost constraints. In this environment, it is important to track reimbursement denials and understand the managed care organization's rationale for refusal of payment. This is especially critical for providers of pediatric care, as children justifiably have unique healthcare needs and utilization patterns. We developed a system for tracking and documenting denials in our institution and found that health maintenance organizations denied claims primarily for one of three reasons: medically unnecessary care, care provided as a response to social (rather than medical) need, and provider inefficiencies. Health maintenance organization denials are also growing annually at our institutions. This knowledge can not only help providers of pediatric care more effectively negotiate future contracts, but provides an opportunity to differentiate the health needs of the pediatric patient from those of the adult. This information can be used as a basis for education, pediatric outcome studies, and guideline development--all tools that can help providers receive reasonable reimbursement for pediatric services and enable them to meet the complex health needs of children. Recommendations for action are discussed.  (+info)

(2/118) Differences in physician compensation for cardiovascular services by age, sex, and race.

The purpose was to determine whether physicians receive substantially less compensation from patient groups (women, older patients, and nonwhite patients) that are reported to have low rates of utilization of cardiovascular services. Over an 18-month period we collected information on payments to physicians by 3,194 consecutive patients who underwent stress testing an 833 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous coronary angioplasty at the Yale University Cardiology Practice. Although the charges for procedures were not related to patient characteristics, there were large and significant differences in payment to physicians based on age, sex, and race. For example, physicians who performed percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty received at least $2,500 from, or on behalf of, 72% of the patients 40 to 64 years old, 22% of the patients 65 to 74 years old, and 3% of the patients 75 years and older (P < 0.001); from 49% of the men and 28% of the women (P < 0.001); and 42% of the whites and 31% of the nonwhites (P < 0.001). Similar differences were observed for stress testing. These associations were largely explained by differences in insurance status.  (+info)

(3/118) Uncompensated care and hospital conversions in Florida.

Hospital conversions to for-profit ownership have prompted concern about continuing access to care for the poor or uninsured. This DataWatch presents an analysis of the rate of uncompensated care provided by Florida hospitals before and after converting to for-profit ownership. Uncompensated care declined greatly in the converting public hospitals, which had a significant commitment to uncompensated care before conversion. Among converting nonprofit hospitals, uncompensated care levels were low before conversion and did not change following conversion. The study suggests that policymakers should assess the risk entailed in a conversion by considering the hospital's historic mission and its current role in the community.  (+info)

(4/118) Alternative funding policies for the uninsured: exploring the value of hospital tax exemption.

The tax exemption accorded private, nonprofit hospitals is being subjected to more scrutiny as the numbers of uninsured grow; meanwhile, charity care competes with market-driven priorities. Current public policies tie hospital tax exemption to the provision of charity care, but there is a gap in the size and distribution of values between tax exemption and the charity care that is provided. Most hospitals, in a study reported here, provided free care at a level below the value of their tax exemption, even when 50 percent of bad debt was included in the care value. However, hospitals in the poorest communities offered considerably more care than the value of their tax exemption, whereas those in wealthier communities offered considerably less. Policies at local, state, and federal levels should be designed to exert leverage on hospitals to provide free care at a level commensurate with the value of their tax exemptions.  (+info)

(5/118) Impact of managed MediCal on California family practice programs.

BACKGROUND: An important source of patients for California's family practice program is MediCal. During the past 5 years, MediCal has established a variety of capitated managed care plans. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of California's managed MediCal program on the state's 38 family practice training programs. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, retrospective descriptive survey. METHODS: A 3-page, 11-question survey was developed by family practice residency directors and staff from the California Academy of Family Physicians, San Francisco. The 38 family practice programs in existence in California in September 1997 were stratified by type of managed MediCal in their county and by type of sponsoring institution--university, county, community based, staff-model health maintenance organization, or managed care system. RESULTS: Of the 38 family practice programs, 27 responded; 19 of 27 programs participated in managed MediCal. The total number of family health center patients, and the percentage of MediCal patients (48%-60%) at family practice programs was similar when stratified by programs with and without managed MediCal and by type of sponsorship. Most programs reported that they were able to compete effectively, although most also reported increased administrative, nursing, and front office costs. Managed MediCal patients were directly assigned to residents in only 3 of 19 programs. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of managed MediCal has not adversely affected the number of patients cared for in California's family practice programs. Continued vigilance regarding California family practice programs' involvement in managed MediCal, including collection of accurate data on the number of MediCal patients and the financial and educational implications for California's family practice programs, is warranted.  (+info)

(6/118) ADEA annual survey of clinic fees and revenue: 1998-1999 academic year.

The American Dental Education Association's 1998-1999 Survey of Clinic Fees and Revenue obtained data by which to report, by school, clinic revenue information per undergraduate student. Fifty of the fifty-five U.S. dental schools responded to the survey. The median revenue per third-year student was $6,313. It was $11,680 for fourth-year students. Clinic revenue data was also obtained by type of postdoctoral program. The postdoctoral general dentistry programs had the highest per student clinic revenues, at over $59,000 per AEGD student and almost $35,000 per student of GPR programs. Other areas of the survey provided information regarding clinic fees by type of program, levels of uncompensated care by type of program, clinic revenue by source of payment, and dental school fees as a percent of usual and customary private practice fees.  (+info)

(7/118) Primary care office policies regarding care of uninsured adult patients.

OBJECTIVE: To describe primary care office policies regarding care of uninsured patients. DESIGN: Telephone survey of all adult primary care sites advertising in the area telephone directory. Sites were defined by ownership status, number of physicians, use of physician-extenders, and location. Policies assessed were whether the site was accepting new uninsured patients, billing policies, the availability of free or discounted care, and payment plans. SETTING: Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. PARTICIPANTS: Of the 359 sites identified, 240 (66.9%) responded, representing 794 physicians. Survey respondents included receptionists (40.4%), office managers (36.2%), and physicians (22.9%). RESULTS: While the majority of all sites reported accepting new patients without health insurance (87.5%), policies regarding these patients varied significantly by ownership status and the number of physicians. Sites with 3 or fewer physicians were more likely to accept uninsured patients. Self-owned practices were more likely to require payment at the time of service, and provide discounted care, free care, and payment plans compared with hospital/health system practices or multisite group practices. CONCLUSIONS: Willingness to accept uninsured patients does not always equate to affordable or accessible care. Office policies have the potential to be substantial obstacles to primary care.  (+info)

(8/118) Impact of Medicare denials on noninvasive vascular diagnostic testing.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of Medicare coverage limitations and claim denials on noninvasive vascular diagnostic testing. METHODS: All Medicare claims for noninvasive vascular diagnostic studies from January 1, 1999, to December 31, 1999, were identified from the hospital billing database according to Current Procedural Terminology codes for carotid artery duplex ultrasound scan, venous duplex ultrasound scan, and lower-extremity arterial Doppler scan. Reasons for Medicare denial of payment for these tests were reviewed and a cost analysis was performed. RESULTS: During the 1-year period, there were 1096 noninvasive vascular diagnostic studies performed on Medicare patients. Of these 1096 tests, 176 (16.1%) were denied by Medicare (19.6% of 408 carotid duplex ultrasound scans, 16.8% of 345 venous duplex ultrasound scans, and 11.1% of 343 lower-extremity arterial Doppler scans). Of the noninvasive vascular tests denied by Medicare, an abnormal result was present in 72.5% of carotid duplex ultrasound scans, 32.8% of venous duplex ultrasound scans, and 78.9% of lower-extremity arterial Doppler scans. Overall, 88.1% of all initially denied claims (N = 176) were ultimately reimbursed by Medicare after resubmission, including 77.1% of the 118 claims denied based on compliance rules for "medical necessity." CONCLUSION: Because of coverage limitations, Medicare denials of noninvasive vascular diagnostic tests can lead to potential uncompensated physician and hospital technical fees if denied claims are unrecognized. Vascular laboratories performing these tests need to review compliance with Medicare guidelines. Improvements may need to be made at both the provider and Medicare carrier levels in obtaining reimbursement for appropriately ordered noninvasive vascular diagnostic studies.  (+info)



million in uncompensated care

  • AMR wrote off more than $3 million in uncompensated care. (unionleader.com)
  • Michigan estimates it will save $320 million in uncompensated care costs by 2022. (crainsdetroit.com)
  • The institute provided $2.5 million in uncompensated care each year, according to its website. (crainsdetroit.com)

Affordable Care Act's

  • One of the key aims of the House and Senate bills is reversing the Affordable Care Act's expansion of Medicaid. (pbs.org)
  • As such it is one of the models of the Affordable Care Act's health insurance exchanges . (wikipedia.org)

cuts

  • NARRATOR: For seniors, this will mean long waits for care, cuts to MRIs, CAT Scans, and other vital tests. (msnbc.com)
  • Responding to cuts in uncompensated care payments from the state, the hospitals have filed $69 million in tax claims that must be resolved on a case-by-case basis. (unionleader.com)

Medicaid

  • The Affordable Care Act mandates that federal funds cover 100 percent of the cost of Medicaid expansion from 2014 to 2016. (crainsdetroit.com)
  • Under the Affordable Care Act, most individuals must either enroll in Medicaid or purchase a private health insurance plan by March 31. (crainsdetroit.com)
  • Lower Medicaid drug costs by clarifying the definition of brand drugs, excluding authorized generic drugs from average manufacturer price calculations for determining manufacturer rebate obligations for brand drugs, making a technical correction to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) alternative rebate for new drug formulations, and calculating Medicaid federal upper limits based only on generic drug prices. (lexology.com)
  • The budget includes a 30-cent increase in the tobacco tax, 10 cents more than the House approved last week, and assumes the state will expand Medicaid eligibility under the federal Affordable Care Act, although it approved an amendment 23-0 that allows the state to opt out at any time. (unionleader.com)
  • He said that is because most primary care visits, which include OB-GYN, pediatric and adult care, in the state's sparsely populated areas rely heavily on Medicaid reimbursements. (pbs.org)
  • The 2006 Massachusetts law successfully covered approximately two-thirds of the state's then-uninsured residents, half via federal-government-paid-for Medicaid expansion (administered by MassHealth) and half via the Connector's free and subsidized network-tiered health care insurance for those not eligible for expanded Medicaid. (wikipedia.org)

state's

  • The state's 2014-15 budget deposits $103 million of those savings into a new health savings fund to cover Michigan's future health care liabilities over the next 21 years. (crainsdetroit.com)

primary heal

  • Provide comprehensive primary health care services as well as supportive/enabling services that promote access to health care. (ada.org)

hospitals

  • The community is served by a relatively large number of physicians who remain largely independent in small primary care or consolidating specialty practices, yet some are exploring tighter affiliations with hospitals. (hschange.org)

Medicare

  • Align Medicare payments to rural providers with the cost of care, saving $2 billion over 10 years. (lexology.com)
  • Conspiracists from right-wing talk radio to street corner screamers to Republican members of Congress-all maintain that the provision and the health care bill that says Medicare will pay for the consultation if you want to get a living will, even though was that championed by conservative pro-life Senator Johnny Isakson of Georgia, that's actually, secretly a plot to kill your grandparents. (msnbc.com)

practices

  • Nearly two-thirds of the small oncology practices surveyed said they were likely to merge, sell or close in the upcoming year, according to the oncology group's inaugural report, "The State of Cancer Care in America. (wibw.com)
  • And as community practices disappear, patients are paying more and traveling farther for quality care. (wibw.com)
  • Many smaller practices actually provide a lot of uncompensated care to those who do not have insurance or have insurance that does not pay well. (wibw.com)

cost

  • In the end, she added, the cost for that uncompensated care gets passed to taxpayers and consumers through higher health costs and insurance premiums. (pbs.org)

2017

  • Reduce by up to 3% payments to SNFs with high rates of care-sensitive, preventable hospital readmissions, beginning in 2017, saving $2.2 billion over 10 years. (lexology.com)

provision

  • Montefiore recognizes that its primary mission is to ensure the provision of high quality, ethically based patient care. (montefiore.org)

Provide

  • Manufacturers would be required to provide a specified rebate in certain instances as determined by the Secretary "to preserve access to care. (lexology.com)
  • The law mandated that nearly every resident of Massachusetts obtain a minimum level of insurance coverage, provided free health care insurance for residents earning less than 150% of the federal poverty level (FPL) and mandated employers with more than 10 "full-time" employees to provide healthcare insurance. (wikipedia.org)

estimate

  • The resulting increase in uncompensated care could total $1.1 trillion between 2019 and 2028, including $296.1 billion in hospital care, the authors estimate. (aha.org)

years

  • A partial repeal of the Affordable Care Act could increase the number of uninsured Americans by 29.8 million over 10 years, according to a new report from the Urban Institute and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (aha.org)
  • The last couple years we had a reduction in the volume of patients relative to changes in the health care industry. (crainsdetroit.com)
  • LaRuffa said health benefit changes over the past several years, including those contained in the Affordable Care Act, have resulted in fewer patients seeking care at the institute's clinics. (crainsdetroit.com)

total

  • Payments would be bundled for at least half of the total payments for post-acute care providers. (lexology.com)

increase

  • The Affordable Care Act will also increase the need for oncologists, as millions of Americans get newly covered by health insurance. (wibw.com)

payments

  • Implement bundled payments for post-acute care providers (LTCHs, IRFs, SNFs, and HHAs) beginning in 2018. (lexology.com)

patients

  • This influx of new patients will place a bigger burden on a field of medicine already stretched by physician shortages and financial difficulties, says the report, which highlights growing problems for cancer care in the United States. (wibw.com)
  • When they retire, more patients will have to travel farther to find care. (wibw.com)

Study

  • In September 2010, a team of researchers from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC), as part of the Community Tracking Study (CTS), visited Miami to study how health care is organized, financed and delivered in that community. (hschange.org)

health care providers

  • If federal, state and local governments do not allocate more funding for this care, the financial burden would fall on health care providers," the report states. (aha.org)
  • These ethical principles describe guidelines for honorable behavior for health care providers, managers and all other associates, and volunteers. (montefiore.org)

federal

  • The law was amended significantly in 2008 and twice in 2010 to make it consistent with the federal Affordable Care Act . (wikipedia.org)
  • Major revisions related to health care industry price controls were passed in August 2012, and the employer mandate was repealed in 2013 in favor of the federal mandate (even though enforcement of the federal mandate was delayed until January 2015). (wikipedia.org)

hospital

  • If you cut back, [people] still go to the hospital, they'll still need care. (pbs.org)

patient care

  • Montefiore Medical Center strives to abide by the ethical principles embodied in this Code of Ethics in all aspects of patient care, medical education, clinical research and community service, and in all aspects of administrative functions related to those services. (montefiore.org)
  • To combat some of the issues raised in the report and improve patient care, the society is working on several projects involving "big data. (wibw.com)

organizations

  • Health centers are community-based and patient-directed organizations that serve populations with limited access to health care. (ada.org)

quality

  • its long form title is An Act Providing Access to Affordable, Quality, Accountable Health Care . (wikipedia.org)

insurance

  • The Commonwealth of Massachusetts passed a health care reform law in 2006 with the aim of providing health insurance to nearly all of its residents. (wikipedia.org)

services

  • Reduce payment for post-acute care services in several ways. (lexology.com)

higher

  • Survivors need ongoing care, as they're at higher risk for other types of cancer and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. (wibw.com)

ways

  • The law also set in motion programs that will try out new ways of caring for mental illness - including integrating primary care and behavioral health, so they work hand in hand. (politico.com)

people

  • Care is expensive, even for people who are covered. (politico.com)
  • That's who's running this non-partisan group that's currently running ads scaring old people about President Obama's health care reform plans. (msnbc.com)

medical

  • If you can't get care, you can't get good care," said American Society of Clinical Oncology President Dr. Clifford Hudis, chief of Breast Cancer Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a professor at Weill Cornell Medical College. (wibw.com)

find

  • As we've done with some of the other groups pushing this kind of misinformation about health care reform, we decided to find out exactly who they are. (msnbc.com)

free

  • Out of all of the kooky conspiracy theories that are being peddled right now about health care reform, that health care reform is going to mandate abortions, that health care reform will mandate free sex changes-there's one particular conspiracy theory that has managed to gain the most traction by far. (msnbc.com)