Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Petrous Bone: The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.Ear Ossicles: A mobile chain of three small bones (INCUS; MALLEUS; STAPES) in the TYMPANIC CAVITY between the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and the oval window on the wall of INNER EAR. Sound waves are converted to vibration by the tympanic membrane then transmitted via these ear ossicles to the inner ear.Ear Canal: The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Skull Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.Round Window, Ear: Fenestra of the cochlea, an opening in the basal wall between the MIDDLE EAR and the INNER EAR, leading to the cochlea. It is closed by a secondary tympanic membrane.Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Stapes: One of the three ossicles of the middle ear. It transmits sound vibrations from the INCUS to the internal ear (Ear, Internal see LABYRINTH).Bone Conduction: Transmission of sound waves through vibration of bones in the SKULL to the inner ear (COCHLEA). By using bone conduction stimulation and by bypassing any OUTER EAR or MIDDLE EAR abnormalities, hearing thresholds of the cochlea can be determined. Bone conduction hearing differs from normal hearing which is based on air conduction stimulation via the EAR CANAL and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Ear, Inner: The essential part of the hearing organ consists of two labyrinthine compartments: the bony labyrinthine and the membranous labyrinth. The bony labyrinth is a complex of three interconnecting cavities or spaces (COCHLEA; VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH; and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS) in the TEMPORAL BONE. Within the bony labyrinth lies the membranous labyrinth which is a complex of sacs and tubules (COCHLEAR DUCT; SACCULE AND UTRICLE; and SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS) forming a continuous space enclosed by EPITHELIUM and connective tissue. These spaces are filled with LABYRINTHINE FLUIDS of various compositions.Ossicular Prosthesis: An implant used to replace one or more of the ear ossicles. They are usually made of plastic, Gelfoam, ceramic, or stainless steel.Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the external auditory meatus or through the eustachian tube into the nasopharynx. This is usually associated with CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE involving the TEMPORAL BONE;), NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; or other conditions, but may rarely occur spontaneously. (From Am J Otol 1995 Nov;16(6):765-71)Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Cholesteatoma, Middle Ear: A mass of KERATIN-producing squamous EPITHELIUM that resembles an inverted (suck-in) bag of skin in the MIDDLE EAR. It arises from the eardrum (TYMPANIC MEMBRANE) and grows into the MIDDLE EAR causing erosion of EAR OSSICLES and MASTOID that contains the INNER EAR.Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Mastoiditis: Inflammation of the honeycomb-like MASTOID BONE in the skull just behind the ear. It is usually a complication of OTITIS MEDIA.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Tympanic Membrane: An oval semitransparent membrane separating the external EAR CANAL from the tympanic cavity (EAR, MIDDLE). It contains three layers: the skin of the external ear canal; the core of radially and circularly arranged collagen fibers; and the MUCOSA of the middle ear.Chondroblastoma: A usually benign tumor composed of cells which arise from chondroblasts or their precursors and which tend to differentiate into cartilage cells. It occurs primarily in the epiphyses of adolescents. It is relatively rare and represents less than 2% of all primary bone tumors. The peak incidence is in the second decade of life; it is about twice as common in males as in females. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1846)Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Endolymphatic Sac: The blind pouch at the end of the endolymphatic duct. It is a storage reservoir for excess ENDOLYMPH, formed by the blood vessels in the membranous labyrinth.Vestibular Aqueduct: A small bony canal linking the vestibule of the inner ear to the posterior part of the internal surface of the petrous TEMPORAL BONE. It transmits the endolymphatic duct and two small blood vessels.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Tissue Embedding: The technique of placing cells or tissue in a supporting medium so that thin sections can be cut using a microtome. The medium can be paraffin wax (PARAFFIN EMBEDDING) or plastics (PLASTIC EMBEDDING) such as epoxy resins.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Otosclerosis: Formation of spongy bone in the labyrinth capsule which can progress toward the STAPES (stapedial fixation) or anteriorly toward the COCHLEA leading to conductive, sensorineural, or mixed HEARING LOSS. Several genes are associated with familial otosclerosis with varied clinical signs.Hearing Loss, Conductive: Hearing loss due to interference with the mechanical reception or amplification of sound to the COCHLEA. The interference is in the outer or middle ear involving the EAR CANAL; TYMPANIC MEMBRANE; or EAR OSSICLES.Scala Tympani: The lower chamber of the COCHLEA, extending from the round window to the helicotrema (the opening at the apex that connects the PERILYMPH-filled spaces of scala tympani and SCALA VESTIBULI).Hearing Loss, Sensorineural: Hearing loss resulting from damage to the COCHLEA and the sensorineural elements which lie internally beyond the oval and round windows. These elements include the AUDITORY NERVE and its connections in the BRAINSTEM.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Ear Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the hearing, and the equilibrium system of the body.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Hearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Endolymphatic Duct: The part of the membranous labyrinth that traverses the bony vestibular aqueduct and emerges through the bone of posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) where it expands into a blind pouch called the endolymphatic sac.Oval Window, Ear: Fenestra or oval opening on the lateral wall of the vestibular labyrinth adjacent to the MIDDLE EAR. It is located above the cochlear round window and normally covered by the base of the STAPES.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Hearing Loss, Mixed Conductive-Sensorineural: Hearing loss due to damage or impairment of both the conductive elements (HEARING LOSS, CONDUCTIVE) and the sensorineural elements (HEARING LOSS, SENSORINEURAL) of the ear.Stapes Surgery: Surgery performed in which part of the STAPES, a bone in the middle ear, is removed and a prosthesis is placed to help transmit sound between the middle ear and inner ear.Catarrhini: An infraorder of PRIMATES comprised of the families CERCOPITHECIDAE (old world monkeys); HYLOBATIDAE (siamangs and GIBBONS); and HOMINIDAE (great apes and HUMANS). With the exception of humans, they all live exclusively in Africa and Asia.Cranial Sinuses: Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of DURA MATER, the endosteal and the meningeal layers. They are devoid of valves and are parts of the venous system of dura mater. Major cranial sinuses include a postero-superior group (such as superior sagittal, inferior sagittal, straight, transverse, and occipital) and an antero-inferior group (such as cavernous, petrosal, and basilar plexus).Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Osteoblastoma: A benign, painful, tumor of bone characterized by the formation of osteoid tissue, primitive bone and calcified tissue. It occurs frequently in the spine of young persons. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Cochlear Implants: Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.Endolymphatic Hydrops: An accumulation of ENDOLYMPH in the inner ear (LABYRINTH) leading to buildup of pressure and distortion of intralabyrinthine structures, such as COCHLEA and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS. It is characterized by SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; and sometimes VERTIGO.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Arachnoid: A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Dissection: The separation and isolation of tissues for surgical purposes, or for the analysis or study of their structures.Spiral Ligament of Cochlea: A spiral thickening of the fibrous lining of the cochlear wall. Spiral ligament secures the membranous COCHLEAR DUCT to the bony spiral canal of the COCHLEA. Its spiral ligament fibrocytes function in conjunction with the STRIA VASCULARIS to mediate cochlear ion homeostasis.Tinnitus: A nonspecific symptom of hearing disorder characterized by the sensation of buzzing, ringing, clicking, pulsations, and other noises in the ear. Objective tinnitus refers to noises generated from within the ear or adjacent structures that can be heard by other individuals. The term subjective tinnitus is used when the sound is audible only to the affected individual. Tinnitus may occur as a manifestation of COCHLEAR DISEASES; VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; and other conditions.Tympanoplasty: Surgical reconstruction of the hearing mechanism of the middle ear, with restoration of the drum membrane to protect the round window from sound pressure, and establishment of ossicular continuity between the tympanic membrane and the oval window. (Dorland, 28th ed.)Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Hearing Loss, Sudden: Sensorineural hearing loss which develops suddenly over a period of hours or a few days. It varies in severity from mild to total deafness. Sudden deafness can be due to head trauma, vascular diseases, infections, or can appear without obvious cause or warning.Scala Vestibuli: The upper chamber of the COCHLEA that is filled with PERILYMPH. It is connected to SCALA TYMPANI via helicotrema at the apex of the cochlea.Bone Diseases, MetabolicSiderosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of iron in the mining dust or welding fumes.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Vertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.

*  Articular fossa of temporal bone | definition of articular fossa of temporal bone by Medical dictionary
Looking for online definition of articular fossa of temporal bone in the Medical Dictionary? articular fossa of temporal bone explanation free. What is articular fossa of temporal bone? Meaning of articular fossa of temporal bone medical term. What does articular fossa of temporal bone mean?
  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/articular+fossa+of+temporal+bone
*  Articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone | definition of articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone...
Looking for online definition of articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone in the Medical Dictionary? articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone explanation free. What is articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone? Meaning of articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone medical term. What does articular surface of mandibular fossa of temporal bone mean?
  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/articular+surface+of+mandibular+fossa+of+temporal+bone
*  Anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone | definition of anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone by Medical...
Looking for online definition of anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone in the Medical Dictionary? anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone explanation free. What is anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone? Meaning of anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone medical term. What does anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone mean?
  https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anterior+surface+of+petrous+part+of+temporal+bone
*  DSpace at EWHA: Vestibular Schwannoma Atypically Invading Temporal Bone
Vestibular schwannoma (VS) usually present the widening of internal auditory canal (IAC), and these bony changes are typically limited to IAC, not extend to temporal bone. Temporal bone invasion by VS is extremely rare. We report 51-year-old man who revealed temporal bone destruction beyond IAC by unilateral VS. The bony destruction extended anteriorly to the carotid canal and inferiorly to the jugular foramen. On histopathologic examination, the tumor showed typical benign schwannoma and did not show any unusual vascularity or malignant feature. Facial nerve was severely compressed and distorted by tumor, which unevenly eroded temporal bone in surgical field. Vestibular schwannoma with atypical invasion of temporal bone can be successfully treated with combined translabyrinthine and lateral suboccipiral approach without facial nerve ...
  http://dspace.ewha.ac.kr/handle/2015.oak/217193
*  Temporal Bone Dissection Guide
Provides a step-by-step approach to learning the anatomy and principal procedures of temporal bone dissection starting with mastoidectomy and including approaches to the internal auditory canal and jugular foramen.
  http://www.ovid.com/site/catalog/books/13995.jsp
*  Transverse petrous temporal bone fracture | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org
This is an example of a transverse petrous temporal bone fracture. Checking the ossicular chain is important because if this is missed it may have serious consequences for the patient in terms of hearing loss.
  https://radiopaedia.org/cases/transverse-petrous-temporal-bone-fracture
*  A 3D cone beam computed tomography study of the styloid process of the temporal bone | Andrei | Folia Morphologica
Materials and methods: Forty-four patients undergoing temporal bone evaluation for different reasons were randomly selected and included in the present study. The length, angulation in the coronal and sagittal planes, as well as morphological variations of the styloid processes were assessed using conebeam computer tomography. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to test possible associations between the length of styloid process and angulations, as well as between angulations. Student's t-test was used to compare the ...
  https://journals.viamedica.pl/folia_morphologica/article/view/19529
*  Postgraduate Course in Temporal Bone Dissection - 18th Edition
The course has additional interest to demonstrate techniques which have been used increasingly in current clinical practice, such as intra-operative electrophysiological monitoring of the facial nerve.. Another aspect to note is the availability of at least three temporal bones fresh (not frozen and preserved in formaldehyde), which highly values the anatomical exhibition and conservation of structures that will expose and dissect.. Objectives ...
  http://www.nms.unl.pt/main/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2201:cpgdot-18-ed-ing&catid=2:uncategorised&Itemid=390&lang=en
*  Temporal Bone of the Human Skull | ClipArt ETC
Temporal bone of the human skull. The temporal bones are situated at the sides and base of the skull. Labels: 1, squamous portion; 2, placed below external opening of auditory canal in petrous portion; 3, placed below mastoid portion; 4, placed below glenoid cavity for reception of condyle of lower jaw.. ...
  http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/35300/35366/frontal_35366.htm
*  Temporal Bone Notebooks | TeePublic
Be Unique. Shop temporal bone notebooks created by independent artists from around the globe. We print the highest quality temporal bone notebooks on the internet.
  https://www.teepublic.com/notebook/temporal-bone
*  Temporal Bone - M. Sanna
Zobacz szczeg y ksi ki pt. Temporal Bone napisanej przez M. Sanna. Temporal Bone to Medycyna i zdrowie wydany w 2005 roku. Zobacz recenzje i opinie naszych u ytkownik w o tej ksi ce.
  https://www.granice.pl/ksiazka,temporal-bone,236025
*  Multiple cerebral contusions and temporal bone fracture | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org
These serial scans illustrate the progression of intracerebral bleeds in this case following traumatic brain injury. Collateral history revealed a history of significant alcohol intake and previous seizures in the context of withdrawal.
  https://radiopaedia.org/cases/multiple-cerebral-contusions-and-temporal-bone-fracture
*  temporal bone
The temporal bone is one of the two irregular bones on either side of the skull which form part of the lateral surfaces and base of the skull.
  http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/T/temporal_bone.html
*  styloid process
Definition of styloid process - a slender projection of bone, such as that from the lower surface of the temporal bone of the skull, or those at the lower ends of
  https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/styloid_process
*  Old bone dates human hand evolution | Liquid Level Sensing
The styloid process can be clearly seen in the Kaitio bone. Prof Carol Ward and her colleagues note that a lack of the styloid process created challenges for apes and earlier humans when they attempted to make and use tools. This lack of a styloid process may have increased the chances of having arthritis earlier.. Prof Ward, professor of pathology and anatomical sciences at the University of Missouri, Columbia, said: "The styloid process reflects an increased dexterity that allowed early human species to use powerful yet precise grips when manipulating objects. "This was something that their predecessors couldn't do as well due to the lack of this styloid process and its associated anatomy.. "With this discovery, we are closing the gap on the evolutionary history of the human hand. This may not be the first appearance of the modern human hand, but we believe that it is close to the origin, given that we do not see this anatomy in any human fossils older than 1.8 million years. "Our ...
  https://www.liquidlevelsensing.com/old-bone-dates-human-hand-evolution
*  Metastase til os temporale som årsag til akut vestibulært syndrom og hørenedsættelse - Danish National Research Database-Den...
Metastasis to the petrous apex of the temporal bone may cause acute peripheral vestibular syndrome and impaired hearing or be asymptomatic. Contrast computed tomography should be performed to exclude pathology in the temporal bone in patients with vestibulocochlear deficit, a history of cancer and no findings on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a case of a 61-year-old man with metastatic prostatic carcinoma to the temporal bone ...
  http://www.forskningsdatabasen.dk/catalog/247075272
*  Patología del hueso temporal en pediatría: hallazgos tomográficos característicos
BERRA, Paola et al. Pediatric pathology of temporal bone: characteristic tomographic findings. Rev. argent. radiol. [online]. 2012, vol.76, n.2, pp. 133-141. ISSN 1852-9992.. The temporal bone is the seat of frequent otologic disorders in children. Objective. To report the statistics and description of characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings of temporal bone pathology in a pediatric population. Material and Methods. Retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive review of 64 medical records taken between January 2008 and April 2011 at the Pediatric Hospital Pedro Elizalde. The classification of diseases was: inflammatory (infectious and noninfectious), congenital, histiocytosis, tumor infiltration and traumatic. Results. Males: 64%, age range: 1 month to 14 years (mean: 6.1 years). We found 53% inflammatory infectious conditions, 36% inflammatory noninfectious, 4.6% congenital, 1.5% histiocytosis, 3% ...
  http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S1852-99922012000200005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=en
*  Paparella Otopathology Laboratory - Ear Diseases
This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile ...
  http://otopathology.com/ear-diseases/
*  Paparella Otopathology Laboratory
This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile ...
  http://otopathology.com
*  Paparella Otopathology Laboratory - Home
This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile ...
  http://otopathology.com/home-2/
*  Eagle Syndrome | Otorrinos2do's Blog
Eagle syndrome (ES) is a disease characterized by cervicofacial pain caused by elongation of the styloid process, which occurs due to extensive ossification of the stylohyoid ligament . ES is noted to occur in some patients with a previous history of tonsillectomy. The disease has an incidence of 4% in the general population, with a…
  https://otorrinos2do.wordpress.com/2011/01/02/eagle-syndrome/
*  Patent US4653509 - Guided trephine samples for skeletal bone studies - Google Patents
A bone biopsy arrangement especially suited for use in obtaining axial skeleton trephine samples from the spinal vertebra centrum of a living test specimen in a safe and rapid manner. The disclosed arrangement uses radiographic mapping, precise mechanical control of the trephine with an apparatus disclosed in detail, conventional trephine energizing and a test specimen such as a rhesus monkey. Improved quality plural samples from a single test subject that were heretofore considered too inaccessible and dangerous for practicality are achieved.
  http://www.google.com/patents/US4653509?dq=7,496,943
*  A BONE-ANCHORED PERCUTANEOUS CONNECTOR SYSTEM
Figure 1 shows the titanium pedestal (Carlsson et al., 1995) against a one cent coin for size comparison. The surgical procedure for cochlear implantation is consistent with current transcutaneous devices except for the fixation of the pedestal. The stem of the pedestal is angled and is placed towards the cochlea, increasing the bending radius of the electrode array. The placement of the stem is in the thickened bone above the sino-dural angle, leaving a bridge of bone between it and the cortical mastoidectomy. A tunnel is then drilled to connect them for the passage of the electrode array. The electrode array is extremely delicate and could suffer damage if the implant was screwed into the bone. To overcome this problem the stem is tapered and is tapped into the tapered hole to provide initial fixation. This angle was found empirically on work on human temporal bones and has been used successfully in the EPI Bioglass® ...
  http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/shl10/markd/shlpap1.htm
*  Putting the 'Neural' Back in Sensorineural: Primary Cochlear... : The Hearing Journal
The inner hair cell-cochlear nerve fiber synapse is the primary conduit through which information about the acoustic environment is transmitted to the auditory nervous system. In ears that age normally, e.g., without noise exposure, synapses are lost gradually, throughout life, and are seen throughout the cochlea long before age-related loss of threshold sensitivity or hair cells (Sergeyenko et al 2013, J Neurosci. 33(34):13686-94). Cochlear nerve cell bodies (spiral ganglion cells, SGC) show proportional declines, with losses recorded in aging mice consistent with those observed in age-graded human temporal bones (Makary et al 2011, J Assoc Res Otolaryngol. 12(6):711-17).. Noise produces similar synaptic losses, but immediately, and then accelerates aging, even for exposures that produce reversible threshold shifts and no hair cell loss (Kujawa and Liberman 2006, J Neurosci. 26(7):2115-23; Kujawa and Liberman 2009, J Neurosci. 29(45):14077-85). Losses at short post-exposure ...
  http://journals.lww.com/thehearingjournal/Fulltext/2014/11000/Putting_the__Neural__Back_in_Sensorineural_Hearing.6.aspx

Eagle syndrome: Eagle syndrome (also termed stylohyoid syndrome styloid syndrome, styloid-stylohyoid syndrome, or styloid–carotid artery syndrome) is a rare condition caused by an elongated or deviated styloid process and/or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which interferes with adjacent anatomical structures giving rise to pain.Cancellous bone: Cancellous bone, synonymous with trabecular bone or spongy bone, is one of two types of osseous tissue that form bones. The other osseous tissue type is cortical bone also called compact bone.ICD-10 Chapter VIII: Diseases of the ear and mastoid process: == H60–H99 – Diseases of the ear and mastoid process ==Translabyrinthine approach: The translabyrinthine approach is a surgical approach to the cerebellopontine angle, or CPA. It is used in the surgical extirpation of lesions of the cerebellopontine angle, including acoustic neuroma.Neuroendocrine adenoma middle ear: Neuroendocrine adenoma of the middle ear (NAME) is a tumor which arises from a specific anatomic site: middle ear. NAME is a benign glandular neoplasm of middle ear showing histologic and immunohistochemical neuroendocrine and mucin-secreting differentiation (biphasic or dual differentiation).Quantitative computed tomographyStapesSoundBite Hearing System: SoundBite Hearing System is a non-surgical bone conduction prosthetic device that transmits sound via the teeth. It is an alternative to surgical bone conduction prosthetic devices, which require surgical implantation into the skull to conduct sound.DeoxypyridinolineCholesteatomaAutoimmune inner ear disease: Autoimmune inner ear disease is a suspected autoimmune disease characterized by rapidly progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss.Inner Ear, Autoimmune (eMedicine, 2006) It occurs when the body's immune system attacks cells in the inner ear that are mistaken for a virus or bacteria.Bone marrow suppression: Bone marrow suppression or myelotoxicity (adjective myelotoxic) or myelosuppression is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). Bone marrow suppression is a serious side effect of chemotherapy and certain drugs affecting the immune system such as azathioprine.MastoiditisBone tumorTympanosclerosisElias Rudolph Camerarius, Sr.: Elias Rudolph Camerarius, Sr. (1641–1695) was a professor of medicine who notably wrote books on the palpitations of the heart, pleurisy, skull fractures, and the use of medicinal plants.Endolymphatic sac tumor: An endolymphatic sac tumor is a very uncommon papillary epithelial neoplasm arising within the endolymphatic sac or endolymphatic duct. This tumor shows a very high association with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL).Enlarged vestibular aqueduct: [of right osseous labyrinth]Vestibular system: The vestibular system, in most mammals, is the sensory system that provides the leading contribution about the sense of balance and spatial orientation for the purpose of coordinating movement with balance. Together with the cochlea, a part of the auditory system, it constitutes the labyrinth of the inner ear in most mammals, situated in the vestibulum in the inner ear (Figure 1).Facial nerve paralysisRande Lazar: Rande Lazar is an otolaryngologist with a primary focus in pediatric ear, nose, and throat disorders. He has special expertise in adult and pediatric sleep and snoring disorders and surgery, as well as adult and pediatric sinus disorders.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Bone pathology: Bone pathology, also known as orthopedic pathology is a subspecialty of surgical pathology which deals with the diagnosis and feature of many bone diseases. It uses gross and microscopic findings along with the findings of in vivo radiological studies, and occasionally, specimen radiographs to diagnose diseases of the bones.Ganoine: Ganoine or ganoin is a glassy, often multi-layered mineralized tissue that covers the scales, cranial bones and fin rays in some basal ray-finned fishes. It is composed of rod-like, pseudoprismatic apatite crystallites, with less than 5% of organic matter.Electroneuronography: Electroneuronography or electroneurography (ENoG) is a neurological non-invasive test that was first described by Esslen and Fisch in 1979 and is used to examine the integrity and conductivity of a peripheral nerve. It consists of a brief electrical stimulation of the nerve in one point underneath the skin, and at the same time recording the electrical activity (compound action potentials) at another point of the nerve's trajectory in the body.OtosclerosisConductive hearing lossFF Scala: FF Scala is an old style, humanist, serif typeface designed by Dutch typeface designer Martin Majoor in 1990 for the Muziekcentrum Vredenburg in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The FF Scala font family was named for the Teatro alla Scala (1776–78) in Milan, Italy.Crandall syndrome: Crandall syndrome is a very rare congenital disorder characterised by progressive sensorineural hearing loss, hair loss associated with pili torti, and hypogonadism demonstrated through low levels of luteinising hormone and growth hormone. It is thought to be an autosomal recessive disorder closely related to Björnstad syndrome which presents similarly but without hypogonadism.Hearing (person): The term hearing or hearing person, from the perspective of mainstream English-language culture, refers to someone whose sense of hearing is at the medical norm. From this point of view, someone who is not fully hearing has a hearing loss or is said to be hard of hearing or deaf.Albinism–deafness syndrome: Albinism–deafness syndrome (also known as "Woolf syndrome," and "Ziprkowski–Margolis syndrome") is a condition characterized by congenital neural deafness and a severe or extreme piebald-like phenotype with extensive areas of hypopigmentation.StapedectomyEmissary veins: The emissary veins connect the extracranial venous system with the intracranial venous sinuses. They connect the veins outside the cranium to the venous sinuses inside the cranium.Osteoblastoma: Osteoblastoma is an uncommon osteoid tissue-forming primary neoplasm of the bone.Electrocochleography: Electrocochleography (abbreviated ECochG or ECOG) is a technique of recording electrical potentials generated in the inner ear and auditory nerve in response to sound stimulation, using an electrode placed in the ear canal or tympanic membrane. The test is performed by an otologist or audiologist with specialized training, and is used for detection of elevated inner ear pressure (endolymphatic hydrops) or for the testing and monitoring of inner ear and auditory nerve function during surgery.Bone Marrow Transplantation (journal): Bone Marrow Transplantation is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering transplantation of bone marrow in humans. It is published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group.Demineralized freeze dried bone allograft: Demineralized freeze dried bone allograft, referred to as DFDBA, is a bone graft material known for its [novo] bone formation properties.Bowers, GM, et al.Arachnoid granulation: Arachnoid granulations (or arachnoid villi) are small protrusions of the arachnoid (the thin second layer covering the brain) through the dura mater (the thick outer layer). They protrude into the venous sinuses of the brain, and allow cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to exit the sub-arachnoid space and enter the blood stream.Dissection puzzle: A dissection puzzle, also called a transformation puzzle or Richter Puzzle, is a tiling puzzle where a set of pieces can be assembled in different ways to produce two or more distinct geometric shapes. The creation of new dissection puzzles is also considered to be a type of dissection puzzle.TinnitusTympanoplastyBone graftingSildenafilSuperficial siderosis: Superficial hemosiderosis of the central nervous system is a disease of the brain resulting from chronic iron deposition in neuronal tissues associated with cerebrospinal fluid. This occurs via the deposition of hemosiderin in neuronal tissue, and is associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and demyelination of neuronal cells.Chalkstick fracture: Chalkstick fractures are fractures, typically of long bones, in which the fracture is transverse to the long axis of the bone, like a broken stick of chalk. A healthy long bone typically breaks like a hard woody stick as the collagen in the matrix adds remarkable flexibility to the mineral and the energy can run up and down the growth rings of bone.Vertigo (Marvel Comics): Vertigo is a native of the Savage Land who obtained superhuman powers at a young age by genetic engineering. Her powers enable her to render a person severely dizzy and even unconscious.

(1/406) Spontaneous CSF otorrhea caused by abnormal development of the facial nerve canal.

In two patients with surgically proved CSF fistula through the facial nerve canal, MR and CT examinations showed smooth enlargement of the geniculate fossa with CSF signal. In the clinical setting of CSF otorrhea or rhinorrhea, the presence of an enlarged labyrinthine facial nerve canal and enlarged geniculate fossa on CT scans and CSF intensity on MR images strongly suggests a CSF fistula through the facial nerve canal.  (+info)

(2/406) Evaluation of CSF leaks: high-resolution CT compared with contrast-enhanced CT and radionuclide cisternography.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Radiologic evaluation of CSF leaks is a diagnostic challenge that often involves multiple imaging studies with the associated expense and patient discomfort. We evaluated the use of screening noncontrast high-resolution CT in identifying the presence and site of CSF rhinorrhea and otorrhea and compared it with contrast-enhanced CT cisternography and radionuclide cisternography. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging studies and medical records of all patients who were evaluated for CSF leak during a 7-year period. Forty-two patients with rhinorrhea and/or otorrhea underwent high-resolution CT of the face or temporal bone and then had CT cisternography and radionuclide cisternography via lumbar puncture. The results of the three studies were compared and correlated with the surgical findings in 21 patients. RESULTS: High-resolution CT showed bone defects in 30 of 42 patients (71%) with CSF leak. High-resolution, radionuclide cisternography and CT cisternography did not show bone defects or CSF leak for 12 patients (29%) who had clinical evidence of CSF leak. Among the 30 patients with bone defects, 20 (66%) had positive results of their radionuclide cisternography and/or CT cisternography. For the 21 patients who underwent surgical exploration and repair, intraoperative findings correlated with the defects revealed by high-resolution CT in all cases. High-resolution CT identified significantly more patients with CSF leak than did radionuclide cisternography and CT cisternography, with a moderate degree of agreement. CONCLUSION: Noncontrast high-resolution CT showed a defect in 70% of the patients with CSF leak. No radionuclide cisternography or CT cisternography study produced positive results without previous visualization of a defect on high-resolution CT. CT cisternography and radionuclide cisternography may be reserved for patients in whom initial high-resolution CT does not identify a bone defect or for patients with multiple fractures or postoperative defects.  (+info)

(3/406) The functional shift of the mandible in unilateral posterior crossbite and the adaptation of the temporomandibular joints: a pilot study.

Changes in the functional shift of the mandibular midline and the condyles were studied during treatment of unilateral posterior crossbite in six children, aged 7-11 years. An expansion plate with covered occlusal surfaces was used as a reflex-releasing stabilizing splint during an initial diagnostic phase (I) in order to determine the structural (i.e. non-guided) position of the mandible. The same plate was used for expansion and retention (phase II), followed by a post-retention phase (III) without the appliance. Before and after each phase, the functional shift was determined kinesiographically and on transcranial radiographs by concurrent recordings with and without the splint. Transverse mandibular position was also recorded on cephalometric radiographs. Prior to phase I, the mandibular midline deviated more than 2 mm and, in occlusion (ICP), the condyles showed normally centred positions in the sagittal plane. With the splint, the condyle on the crossbite side was displaced 2.4 mm (P < 0.05) forwards compared with the ICP, while the position of the condyle on the non-crossbite side was unaltered. After phase III, the deviation of the midline had been eliminated. Sagittal condylar positions in the ICP still did not deviate from the normal, and the splint position was now obtained by symmetrical forward movement of both condyles (1.3 and 1.4 mm). These findings suggest that the TMJs adapted to displacements of the mandible by condylar growth or surface modelling of the fossa. The rest position remained directly caudal to the ICP during treatment. Thus, the splint position, rather than the rest position should be used to determine the therapeutic position of the mandible.  (+info)

(4/406) Supporting cells contribute to control of hearing sensitivity.

The mammalian hearing organ, the organ of Corti, was studied in an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig temporal bone. As in vivo, the hearing organ responded with an electrical potential, the cochlear microphonic potential, when stimulated with a test tone. After exposure to intense sound, the response to the test tone was reduced. The electrical response either recovered within 10-20 min or remained permanently reduced, thus corresponding to a temporary or sustained loss of sensitivity. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, stimulus-induced changes of the cellular structure of the hearing organ were simultaneously studied. The cells in the organ were labeled with two fluorescent probes, a membrane dye and a cytoplasm dye, showing enzymatic activity in living cells. Confocal microscopy images were collected and compared before and after intense sound exposure. The results were as follows. (1) The organ of Corti could be divided into two different structural entities in terms of their susceptibility to damage: an inner, structurally stable region comprised of the inner hair cell with its supporting cells and the inner and outer pillar cells; and an outer region that exhibited dynamic structural changes and consisted of the outer hair cells and the third Deiters' cell with its attached Hensen's cells. (2) Exposure to intense sound caused the Deiters' cells and Hensen's cells to move in toward the center of the cochlear turn. (3) This event coincided with a reduced sensitivity to the test tone (i.e., reduced cochlear microphonic potential). (4) The displacement and sensitivity loss could be reversible. It is concluded that these observations have relevance for understanding the mechanisms behind hearing loss after noise exposure and that the supporting cells take an active part in protection against trauma during high-intensity sound exposure.  (+info)

(5/406) A gene for fluctuating, progressive autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss, DFNA16, maps to chromosome 2q23-24.3.

The sixteenth gene to cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), DFNA16, maps to chromosome 2q23-24.3 and is tightly linked to markers in the D2S2380-D2S335 interval. DFNA16 is unique in that it results in the only form of ADNSHL in which the phenotype includes rapidly progressing and fluctuating hearing loss that appears to respond to steroid therapy. This observation suggests that it may be possible to stabilize hearing through medical intervention, once the biophysiology of deafness due to DFNA16 is clarified. Especially intriguing is the localization of several voltage-gated sodium-channel genes to the DFNA16 interval. These cationic channels are excellent positional and functional DFNA16 candidate genes.  (+info)

(6/406) MRI examination of the masticatory muscles in the gray wolf (Canis lupus), with special reference to the M. temporalis.

We examined the head of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) using MRI methods. Although the arising surface of the M. temporalis was not so enlarged in the frontal bone, the small frontal bone did not disturb the M. temporalis from occupying the lateral space of the frontal area in the gray wolf as in the domesticated dog. In the gray wolf, it is suggested that the M. temporalis may not be well-developed in terms of size of arising area, but in the thickness of running bundles. We suggest that the dog has changed the three-dimensional plan of the M. temporalis during the domestication and that the M. temporalis has developed a large arising surface in the frontal bone and lost the thickness of belly in the frontal area in accordance with the enlargement of the frontal bone and the increase in brain size.  (+info)

(7/406) Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone: a clinicopathologic study of five cases.

Chondroblastoma is a rare benign bone tumor. It commonly affects the epiphysis of long bones during the second and third decades of life. Chondroblastoma of the temporal bone is extremely rare. We reviewed five cases of chondroblastoma arising in the temporal bone. Four cases were female and one was male. The ages ranged from 41 to 60 years (mean, 53.6 years). All cases involved the temporal bone. Three involved the left side and two the right. Chief complaints were long-standing localized pain and hearing difficulty. A sharply demarcated lobulated mass was the main radiological finding. Microscopic findings were those of chondroblastoma of usual locations. Two cases showed aneurysmal bone cyst-like areas. Immunohistochemical studies for CD34, CD99, S-100 protein and cytokeratin were performed. Tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein in three cases and weakly positive for cytokeratin in one case. CD34 and CD99 were negative in all cases. In summary, chondroblastoma of the temporal bone is rare and occurs in older age group than reported cases of chondroblastoma of the usual location in the literature.  (+info)

(8/406) Sound- and pressure-induced vertigo associated with dehiscence of the roof of the superior semicircular canal.

In many types of peripheral vertigo, imaging is not part of the initial evaluation. We present a patient with sound- and pressure-induced vertigo associated with bony dehiscence of the roof of the superior semicircular canal. The diagnosis of this new entity can only be made by high-resolution coronal CT imaging of the temporal bones. In patients with this symptom complex, CT should be performed early in the diagnostic workup.  (+info)



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