Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Mycorrhizae: Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.Sinorhizobium meliloti: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of sweet clover, MEDICAGO SATIVA, and fenugreek.Plant Root Nodulation: The formation of a nitrogen-fixing cell mass on PLANT ROOTS following symbiotic infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA.Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Root Nodules, Plant: Knobbed structures formed from and attached to plant roots, especially of LEGUMES, which result from symbiotic infection by nitrogen fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA. Root nodules are structures related to MYCORRHIZAE formed by symbiotic associations with fungi.Medicago truncatula: A plant species of the family FABACEAE used to study GENETICS because it is DIPLOID, self fertile, has a small genome, and short generation time.Lotus: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. This genus was formerly known as Tetragonolobus. The common name of lotus is also used for NYMPHAEA and NELUMBO.Aliivibrio fischeri: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ALIIVIBRIO, which exhibits LUMINESCENCE. A. fischeri is found in a symbiotic relationship with the SQUID Euprymna scolopes.Medicago sativa: A plant species of the family FABACEAE widely cultivated for ANIMAL FEED.Glomeromycota: A phylum of fungi that are mutualistic symbionts and form ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAE with PLANT ROOTS.Fabaceae: The large family of plants characterized by pods. Some are edible and some cause LATHYRISM or FAVISM and other forms of poisoning. Other species yield useful materials like gums from ACACIA and various LECTINS like PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS from PHASEOLUS. Many of them harbor NITROGEN FIXATION bacteria on their roots. Many but not all species of "beans" belong to this family.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Bradyrhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria usually containing granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. They characteristically invade the root hairs of leguminous plants and act as intracellular symbionts.Medicago: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. It is distinct from Sweet Clover (MELILOTUS), from Bush Clover (LESPEDEZA), and from Red Clover (TRIFOLIUM).Dinoflagellida: Flagellate EUKARYOTES, found mainly in the oceans. They are characterized by the presence of transverse and longitudinal flagella which propel the organisms in a rotating manner through the water. Dinoflagellida were formerly members of the class Phytomastigophorea under the old five kingdom paradigm.Rhizobiaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria which are saprophytes, symbionts, or plant pathogens.Mesorhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria in the family PHYLLOBACTERIACEAE. They are able to invade root-hairs of a wide range of plants, inciting the production of PLANT ROOT NODULES.Frankia: Genus of BACTERIA in the family Frankiaceae. They are nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbionts of many species of woody dicotyledonous plants.Rhizobium leguminosarum: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is found in soil and which causes formation of root nodules on some, but not all, types of field pea, lentil, kidney bean, and clover.Buchnera: A genus of gram-negative bacteria which are obligately intracellular endosymbionts of APHIDS. The bacteria are found within specialized cells in the aphid body cavity.Rhizobium etli: A species of gram-negative bacteria and nitrogen innoculant of PHASEOLUS VULGARIS.Cnidaria: A phylum of radially symmetrical invertebrates characterized by possession of stinging cells called nematocysts. It includes the classes ANTHOZOA; CUBOZOA; HYDROZOA, and SCYPHOZOA. Members carry CNIDARIAN VENOMS.Decapodiformes: A superorder of CEPHALOPODS comprised of squid, cuttlefish, and their relatives. Their distinguishing feature is the modification of their fourth pair of arms into tentacles, resulting in 10 limbs.Endophytes: An endosymbiont that is either a bacterium or fungus living part of its life in a plant. Endophytes can benefit host plants by preventing pathogenic organisms from colonizing them.Sinorhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, nonsporeforming rods which usually contain granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Hypocreales: An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that includes a number of species which are parasitic on higher plants, insects, or fungi. Other species are saprotrophic.Aphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Phaseolus: A plant genus in the family FABACEAE which is the source of edible beans and the lectin PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Alveolata: A group of three related eukaryotic phyla whose members possess an alveolar membrane system, consisting of flattened membrane-bound sacs lying beneath the outer cell membrane.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Laccaria: A genus of white-spored mushrooms in the family Tricholomataceae. They form symbiotic partnerships (MYCORRHIZAE) with trees.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Amanita: A genus of fungi of the family Agaricaceae, order Agaricales; most species are poisonous.Bivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Azorhizobium caulinodans: A species of AZORHIZOBIUM which forms nodules on the roots of the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Lichens: Any of a group of plants formed by a symbiotic combination of a fungus with an algae or CYANOBACTERIA, and sometimes both. The fungal component makes up the bulk of the lichen and forms the basis for its name.Prochloron: A genus of PROCHLOROPHYTES containing unicellular, spherical bacteria without a mucilaginous sheath. They are found almost exclusively as extracellular symbionts of colonial ASCIDIANS on subtropical or tropical marine shores.Mycelium: The body of a fungus which is made up of HYPHAE.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.Sesbania: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. Members contain piperidine alkaloids (PIPERIDINES).Photorhabdus: A genus of gram-negative bacteria existing symbiotically with nematodes of the family Heterorhabditidae (see RHABDITOIDEA). These nematodes infect a variety of soil-dwelling insects. Upon entering an insect host, the nematode releases Photorhabdus from its intestinal tract and the bacterium establishes a lethal septicemia in the insect.Animal Structures: Organs and other anatomical structures of non-human vertebrate and invertebrate animals.Lolium: Common member of the Gramineae family used as cattle FODDER. It harbors several fungi and other parasites toxic to livestock and people and produces allergenic compounds, especially in its pollen. The most commonly seen varieties are L. perenne, L. multiflorum, and L. rigidum.Cannabaceae: A plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is most notable for the members, Cannabis and Hops.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Crotalaria: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains crotalarin.Alnus: A plant genus of the family BETULACEAE that is distinguished from birch (BETULA) by its usually stalked winter buds and by cones that remain on the branches after the small, winged nutlets are released.Ulmaceae: A plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members are trees and shrubs of temperate regions that have watery sap and alternate leaves which are lopsided at the base. The flowers lack petals.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Ericaceae: The heath plant family of the order Ericales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida that are generally shrubs or small trees. Leaves are alternate, simple, and leathery; flowers are symmetrical with a 4- or 5-parted corolla of partly fused petals.Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Agrobacterium: A genus of gram negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, plants, and marine mud.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Heteroptera: A suborder of HEMIPTERA, called true bugs, characterized by the possession of two pairs of wings. It includes the medically important families CIMICIDAE and REDUVIIDAE. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Epichloe: A genus of ascomycetous fungi in the family Clavicipitaceae, order HYPOCREALES, which are fungal symbionts of grasses. Anamorphic forms are in the genus NEOTYPHODIUM.Peas: A variable annual leguminous vine (Pisum sativum) that is cultivated for its rounded smooth or wrinkled edible protein-rich seeds, the seed of the pea, and the immature pods with their included seeds. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1973)Azorhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped, obligate aerobes which are motile by peritrichous flagella on solid medium and one lateral flagellum in liquid medium. Under microaerobic conditions Azorhizobium fixes nitrogen. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Sinorhizobium fredii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is a fast-growing and soybean-nodulating innoculant.Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Vicia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is widely used as ground cover and forage and known for the edible beans, VICIA FABA.Neotyphodium: The anamorphic form of the fungus EPICHLOE. Many Neotyphodium species produce ERGOT ALKALOIDS.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Rhizobium tropici: A species of gram-negative bacteria and an nitrogen inoculum that displays a high intrinsic tolerance to acidity.Leghemoglobin: A hemoglobin-like oxygen-binding hemeprotein present in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants. The red pigment has a molecular weight approximately 1/4 that of hemoglobin and has been suggested to act as an oxido-reduction catalyst in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.Polysaccharides, Bacterial: Polysaccharides found in bacteria and in capsules thereof.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Rhodospirillales: An order of photosynthetic bacteria representing a physiological community of predominantly aquatic bacteria.Agaricales: An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.Plantago: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Burkholderia: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the PSEUDOMONAS genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Pseudomonas species, and hence, this new genus was created.Wolbachia: A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)Chlorella: Nonmotile unicellular green algae potentially valuable as a source of high-grade protein and B-complex vitamins.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Methylobacterium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, facultatively methylotrophic rods occurring singly or occasionally in rosettes. Members of this genus are usually motile and are isolated from soil, dust, fresh water, lake sediments, leaf surfaces, rice, air, and hospital environments. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cistaceae: A plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. The common name of rock rose is used with several plants of this family.

*  MoP] Symbiosis

Symbiosis 30 yd range. 6 sec cast. Creates a symbiotic link which grants the Druid one ability belonging to the target's class ... MoP] Symbiosis Mod edit: I took the liberty of editing the first post and turn it into an information post (Mihir). Symbiosis. ... Symbiosis. When Symbiosis is cast on you by a Druid, this button will be replaced by the new ability you have temporarily ... Abilities that are granted by Symbiosis:. Death Knight. Blood - Might of Ursoc (15%). Frost / Unholy - Wild Mushroom: Plague. ...
mmo-champion.com/threads/1103278-MoP-Symbiosis?p=16055141

*  Team sequences fungus known for plant root symbiosis | Ag Professional

An international team led by researchers from the National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA) in France sequenced the haploid genome of Rhizophagus irregularis, a fungus that forms symbiotic relationships with plant roots and contributes to phosphorus cycling.
agprofessional.com/news/Team-sequences-fungus-known-for-plant-root-symbiosis-233648451.html?source=related

*  About symbiosis | allnurses

About symbiosis - Welcome to my allnursesPage! You can learn all about me here. Together, we can learn, share, and network with ...
allnurses.com/member-1096825/

*  Circular Symbiosis Tower for the 2011 eVolo Skyscraper Competition | Inhabitat - Green Design, Innovation, Architecture, Green...

The Circular Symbiosis Tower for the 2011 eVolo Skyscraper Competition raises cows and chickens in a symbiotic relationship in ... That's exactly the premise of the Circular Symbiosis Tower, which is one of the first vertical farm concepts we've seen that is ...
inhabitat.com/grassy-green-vertical-farm-designed-to-raise-happy-cows-and-chickens/

*  Symbiosis-Interactive Lesson by OnBoard Academics | TpT

Students will: 1. understand that organisms interact, 2. understand that one or all organisms may benefit from the interaction, or one or more organisms may be harmed by the interaction, 3. understand mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism, and be able to give examples of each relationship.
https://teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Symbiosis-Interactive-Lesson-1022719

*  HIDRIA SPACEFOLK Symbiosis reviews

This page includes Symbiosis's : cover picture, songs / tracks list, members/musicians and line-up, different releases details ... Symbiosis is a music studio album recording by HIDRIA SPACEFOLK (Psychedelic/Space Rock/Progressive Rock) released in 2002 on ... SYMBIOSIS. Hidria Spacefolk. • Psychedelic/Space Rock. From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website. ... Post a review of HIDRIA SPACEFOLK "Symbiosis". You must be a forum member to post a review, please register here if you are not ...
progarchives.com/album.asp?id=6070

*  Symbiosis as a source of selectable epigenetic variation: taking the heat for the big guy | Philosophical Transactions of the...

Such symbiosis can provide selectable variation. The symbioses of corals with their dinoflagellates and aphids with their ... We will focus on symbioses in coral reef cnidarians symbiosis, pea aphids and cactuses, wherein the symbiotic system provides ... the persistence of symbioses such as the coral-algae symbiosis that evolved approximately 240 Myr ago, and continues to this ... 2006 Symbiosis: the way of all life. In Life as we know it (ed. Seckbach J.), pp. 325-339. New York, NY: Springer. ...
rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/365/1540/671

*  Looking for symbiosis chart - Page 2

Trying to figure out what spells I give/receive depending on what class and spec I give symbiosis too. Is there a chart or ... As a Moonkin, only mages are worth casting Symbiosis on, as you get Mirror Image.. As Bear, DK and Paladin are good choices and ... WAIT...he said that misdirection isn t worth the cast of symbiosis? any boss that spawns some add would like to say HI! ... The symbiosis addon is very helpful in my opinion! Saves the hassel of looking it up everytime! ...
mmo-champion.com/threads/1204897-Looking-for-symbiosis-chart/page2

*  Interesting change for Symbiosis?

Like a druid tank could symbiosis with a healer and his enraged regeneration also dispels a harmful effect and the healers ... What if they kept symbiosis and instead of providing new abilities maybe they gave new passive effects to abilities you already ... Interesting change for Symbiosis? Idk if this has been said already maybe something similar to it. What if they kept symbiosis ... I do prefer the new SI over Symbiosis, but I think Symbiosis was a really fun spell. Giving a CR to a paladin so the melee ...
mmo-champion.com/threads/1497825-Interesting-change-for-Symbiosis?p=26548649&viewfull=1

*  Symbiosis Baby: Buy Online from Fishpond.com.au

Symbiosis Baby from Fishpond.com.au online store. Millions of products all with free shipping Australia wide. Lowest prices ...
https://fishpond.com.au/c/Baby/p/Symbiosis

*  Antievolution.org - Antievolution.org Discussion Board -Topic::The Blind Leading the Blind

Sunny, moist, nitrogen-poor conditions are most likely to favor nitrogen-fixing symbioses, as they do carnivores. However, the ... nitrogen-fixing symbioses are more likely to occur in well-drained or seasonally arid sites than carnivores. Second, legumes ... nitrogen-fixing symbioses should thus be excluded from molybdenum-poor soils, as they indeed are (Pate, 1986). This same ...
antievolution.org/cgi-bin/ikonboard/ikonboard.cgi?s=50c157a62d4e5ee6

*  Two Ways to Plant Symbiosis | Science Signaling

Parasponia uses a mycorrhizal signaling receptor essential for arbuscle formation to control rhizobium nodule symbiosis. ... Parasponia uses a mycorrhizal signaling receptor essential for arbuscle formation to control rhizobium nodule symbiosis. ... LysM-type mycorrhizal receptor recruited for rhizobium symbiosis in nonlegume Parasponia. Science 331, 909-912 (2011). [ ... analyzed the molecular pathways underlying the early stages of mycorrhizal and rhizobial symbioses. The nonleguminous small ...
stke.sciencemag.org/content/4/161/ec57

*  symbiosis is NOT bad for pve, stop thinking this! - Page 7

i made a short list of what moonkin (my main spec) could have done with symbiosis in cataclysm. can you add to this? make a ... i keep reading about people being disappointed with symbiosis, calling it just a pvp move and how they wont ever even use it in ... I don't think symbiosis is bad, but I forget to use it constantly. I do like putting it on a paladin when I'm tanking, though. ...
mmo-champion.com/threads/1198349-symbiosis-is-NOT-bad-for-pve-stop-thinking-this

*  Reprogramming Plant Cells for Endosymbiosis | Science

The establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses, formed by most flowering plants in association with glomeromycotan ... commonalities are observed in the signaling components and the modulation of host cell responses in both AM and RN symbioses, ... fungi, and the root-nodule (RN) symbiosis, formed by legume plants and rhizobial bacteria, requires an ongoing molecular ...
science.sciencemag.org/content/324/5928/753

*  Plant microbe symbiosis : fundamentals and advances (Livre électronique, 2013) [WorldCat.org]

Plant microbe symbiosis : fundamentals and advances. [Naveen Kumar Arora;] -- Plant microbe interaction is a complex ... Symbiosis a schema:Intangible ;. schema:name "Symbiosis"@en ;. . ... Plant Microbe Symbiosis-Fundamentals and Advances' provides a ... Plant microbe symbiosis : fundamentals and advances. Auteur :. Naveen Kumar Arora. Éditeur:. New Delhi : Springer, [2013] ©2013 ... Plant Microbe Symbiosis: Fundamentals and Advances.. Dordrecht : Springer, ©2013. Type d'ouvrage:. Document, Ressource Internet ...
worldcat.org/title/plant-microbe-symbiosis-fundamentals-and-advances/oclc/858764569?lang=fr

*  Symbiosis Towermonolith take

Very experimental. Something I did off of a basic trance style melody. I had a lot of fun on this one. I hope you enjoy as well as DoktorHansen the original author. It starts out simple but please listen all the way through!. Guest spots: Metaljonus on the solo and backing vocals ...
https://newgrounds.com/audio/listen/185076

*  Urban Symbiosis on Behance

Illustrated posters and postcards from series "Urban Symbiosis". Illustrations show everyday life situations in the fictional ... Illustrated posters and postcards from series "Urban Symbiosis". Illustrations show everyday life situations in the fictional ... Illustrated posters and postcards from series "Urban Symbiosis". Illustrations show everyday life situations in the fictional ...
https://behance.net/gallery/42537783/Urban-Symbiosis

*  Symbiosis OnlinePublishing LLC - Mendeley

Connect and collaborate with Symbiosis OnlinePublishing LLC, with research interests in Engineering and Medicine, on Mendeley. ... Symbiosis is an emerging online Open Access publishing house of high impact & peer reviewed journals in the current research ... Symbiosis Open Journals (SOJ) covers the latest advancements strictly oriented towards research in the areas of Clinical, ... Symbiosis is a self supporting, freelance organization & does not receive funds/ resources from any institution/ university/ ...
https://mendeley.com/profiles/symbiosis-onlinepublishing-llc/

*  Symbiosis - Walkthrough, Tips, Review

In Symbiosis this possibility has come real and the defenders of the world are none other than plants that need you to properly ... Symbiosis: It's important to realize that aliens doesn't necessarily equal a creature that will be faced down by Will Smith. ... Golden Symbiosis is just an auto powerup of regular symbiosis. So transferring energy from one plant to another becomes ... As far as tower defense games go Symbiosis offers a wealth of upgrade options that will make the fifteen levels go by swiftly ...
https://jayisgames.com/review/symbiosis.php

*  MoP] Symbiosis - Page 11

Symbiosis 30 yd range. 6 sec cast. Creates a symbiotic link which grants the Druid one ability belonging to the target's class ... The recipients of symbiosis does not lose the ability that the druid gains, they just gain a new ability from the druid. FFS ... The recipients of symbiosis does not lose the ability that the druid gains, they just gain a new ability from the druid. FFS ... Symbiosis - well, it'd be nice to have more than one DPS option as a balance druid (not counting Mirror Images which aren't ...
mmo-champion.com/threads/1103278-MoP-Symbiosis?p=16110075&viewfull=1

Symbiosis Center of Health Care: Symbiosis Center of Health Care (SCHC) is an organization under Symbiosis Society which takes care of health of symbiosis family be it student or staff.http://www.Arbuscular mycorrhiza: An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (plural mycorrhizae or mycorrhizas, a.k.Nod factorDiazotroph: Diazotrophs are bacteria and archaea that fix atmospheric nitrogen gas into a more usable form such as ammonia.Medicago truncatula: Medicago truncatula (barrel medic or barrel medick or barrel clover) is a small annual legume native to the Mediterranean region that is used in genomic research. It is a low-growing, clover-like plant 10–60 cm tall with trifoliate leaves.Water supply in Miyakojima: The water supply in Miyakojima involves the history and development of the current water supply in Miyakojima, a small coral island with only one river, which is administered by Okinawa Prefecture, in Japan.Euprymna scolopes: __NOTOC__Geosiphon: Geosiphon is a genus of fungi in the Geosiphonaceae family. The genus is monotypic, containing the single species Geosiphon pyriformis, first described by Kützing in 1849 as Botrydium pyriforme.Lonchocarpus: Lonchocarpus is a plant genus in the legume family (Fabaceae). The species are called lancepods due to their fruit resembling an ornate lance tip or a few beads on a string.Endodermis: The endodermis is the central, innermost layer of cortex in some land plants. It is made of compact living cells surrounded by an outer ring of endodermal cells that are impregnated with hydrophobic substances (Casparian Strip) to restrict apoplastic flow of water to the inside.RhizobiaBradyrhizobium elkaniiMedicago lupulina: Medicago lupulina, commonly known as black medick, nonesuch, or hop clover, is a familiar lawn plant belonging to the legume or clover family. Plants of the genus Medicago, or bur clovers, are closely related to the true clovers (Trifolium) and sweet clover (Melilotus).Lingulodinium polyedrum: Lingulodinium polyedrum is the name for a motile dinoflagellate (synonym Gonyaulax polyedra), which produces a dinoflagellate cyst called Lingulodinium machaerophorum (synonym Hystrichosphaeridium machaerophorum).Candidatus Liberibacter: Candidatus Liberibacter is a genus of gram-negative bacteria in the Rhizobiaceae family. The term Candidatus is used to indicate that it has not proved possible to maintain this bacterium in culture.Casuarina glauca: Casuarina glauca, commonly known as the swamp she-oak, swamp oak, grey oak, or river oak, is a species of Casuarina native to the east coast of Australia. It is found from central Queensland south to southern New South Wales.Rhizobium leguminosarum exopolysaccharide glucosyl ketal-pyruvate-transferase: Rhizobium leguminosarum exopolysaccharide glucosyl ketal-pyruvate-transferase (, PssM) is an enzyme with system name phosphoenolpyruvate:(D-GlcA-beta-(1->4)-2-O-Ac-D-GlcA-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-(3-O-CH3-CH2CH(OH)C(O)-D-Gal-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->4)-D-Glc-beta-(1->6))-2(or3)-O-Ac-D-Glc-alpha-(1->6))n 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethan-1,1-diyl)transferase . This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionBuchnera (bacterium): Buchnera aphidicola, a member of the Proteobacteria, is the primary endosymbiont of aphids, and has been studied in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Buchnera is believed to have had a free-living, Gram-negative ancestor similar to a modern Enterobacteriaceae, such as Escherichia coli.Carboxyl transferase domain: In molecular biology, proteins containing the carboxyl transferase domain include biotin-dependent carboxylases. This domain carries out the following reaction: transcarboxylation from biotin to an acceptor molecule.Sea pansyOnykia robusta: Onykia robusta, also known as the robust clubhook squid and often cited by the older name Moroteuthis robusta,Bolstad, K.S.Endophyte: An endophyte is an endosymbiont, often a bacterium or fungus, that lives within a plant for at least part of its life cycle without causing apparent disease. Endophytes are ubiquitous and have been found in all species of plants studied to date; however, most of the endophyte/plant relationships are not well understood.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Marine fungi: Marine fungi are species of fungi that live in marine or estuarine environments. They are not a taxonomic group but share a common habitat.Pochonia: Pochonia is a genus of fungi within the order Hypocreales and is described as anamorphic Metacordyceps; eight species are described. Previously placed in the genus Verticillium, these fungi are known to be pathogenic to nematodes and are being developed and commercialized as biological pesticides.Acyrthosiphon pisum: Acyrthosiphon pisum, commonly known as the pea aphid (and colloquially known as the green dolphin, pea louse, and clover louse ), is a sap-sucking insect in the Aphididae family. It feeds on several species of legumes (plant family Fabaceae) worldwide, including forage crops, such as pea, clover, alfalfa, and broad bean, and ranks among the aphid species of major agronomical importance.Coles PhillipsPhaseolus maculatus: Phaseolus maculatus (Metcalfe bean, prairie bean, spotted bean) is a plant native to Mexico and the southwestern United States from Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. It is found on dry, rocky hillsides in meadows and in wooded areas from 1500–2400 m (5000–8000 ft) in elevation.Camponotus vagus: Camponotus vagus is a species of large, black, West Palaearctic carpenter ant with a wide range that includes much of Europe, a large area of Asia, and part of Africa.Norwegian Journal of EntomologyEncyclopedia of Life: Camponotus vagus (Scopoli, 1763)White band disease: White band disease is a coral disease that affects acroporid corals and is distinguishable by the white band of dead coral tissue that it forms. The disease completely destroys the coral tissue of Caribbean acroporid corals, specifically elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata) and staghorn coral (A.Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Chromera velia: Chromera velia, also known as a "chromerid", is a unicellular photosynthetic organism in the superphylum Alveolata. It is of interest in the study of apicomplexan parasites, specifically their evolution and accordingly, their unique vulnerabilities to drugs.Squamosa promoter binding protein: The SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like (SBP or SPL) family of transcription factors are defined by a plant-specific DNA-binding domain. The founding member of the family was identified based on its specific in vitro binding to the promoter of the snapdragon SQUAMOSA gene.Odostomia proxima: Odostomia proxima is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pyramidellidae, the pyrams and their allies.WoRMS (2011).Glycine soja: Glycine soja, or wild soybean (previously G. ussuriensis) is an annual plant in the legume family.Amanita xanthocephala: The vermilion grisette, also known as pretty grisette or vermilion Amanita (Amanita xanthocephala) is a colourful mushroom of the genus Amanita. However, although it is often referred to by the common name "grisette", it is not closely related to other edible species that carry this common name, such as Amanita vaginata and Amanita fulva.Razor strop: A razor strop (or razor strap) is a flexible strip of leather or canvas used to straighten and polish the blade of a straight razor, a knife, or a woodworking tool like a chisel. Unlike honing or sharpening a blade, in which a whetstone removes metal bent out of alignment from the blade's edge, stropping the blade re-aligns the indentations without removing any material.Azorhizobium caulinodans: Azorhizobium caulinodans is a species of bacteria that forms a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with plants of the genus Sesbania.Cladonia rangiferina: Cladonia rangiferina, also known as reindeer lichen (c.p.ProchloronMycelium Running: Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the World is the sixth book written by American mycologist Paul Stamets.Medicinal plants of the American West: Many plants that grow in the American West have use in traditional and herbal medicine.Photorhabdus: Photorhabdus is a genus of bioluminescent, gram-negative bacilli which lives symbiotically within entomopathogenic nematodes, hence the name photo (which means light-producing) and rhabdus (rod-shape)TPCN2: Two pore segment channel 2 (TPC2) is a human protein encoded by the TPCN2 is a protein which in humans is encoded by the TPCN2 gene. TPC2 is an ion channel, however, in contrast to other calcium and sodium channels which have four homologous domains, each containing 6 transmembrane segments (S1 to S6), TPCN1 only contains two domain (each containing segments S1 to S6).DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Crotalaria longirostrataAlnus sieboldiana: Alnus sieboldiana (オオバヤシャブシ in Japanese) is an alder species found on the islands of Honshū, Shikoku, and Suwanose-jima in Japan.Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant FamiliesPlanera aquatica: Planera aquatica, the planertree or water elm, is a single species in the southeastern United States, a small deciduous tree 10–15 m tall, closely related to the elms but with a softly, prickly nut 10–15 mm diameter, instead of a winged seed. It is the sole species in the genus Planera.Pelagibacter ubique: Pelagibacter, with the single species P. ubique, was isolated in 2002 and given a specific name, although it has not yet been validly published according to the bacteriological code.Monotropa hypopitys: Monotropa hypopitys — called Dutchman's pipe, false beech-drops, pinesap, or yellow bird's-nest — is a herbaceous perennial plant, formerly classified in the families Monotropaceae or Pyrolaceae, but now included within the subfamily Monotropoideae of the blueberry family (Ericaceae). It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, and is scarce or rare in many areas.African coral reefs: African coral reefs are coral reefs mainly found along the south and east coasts of Africa. The east coast corals extend from the Red Sea to Madagascar in the south, and are an important resource for the fishersmen of Kenya, Tanzania and Madagascar.Nitrogen deficiencyStrider Knives: Strider Knives, Inc. is a custom and production knifemaking facility headed by Mick Strider and Duane Dwyer based in San Marcos, California.Mushy peasVicia cracca: Vicia cracca (tufted vetch, cow vetch, bird vetch, blue vetch, boreal vetch), is a species of vetch native to Europe and Asia. It occurs on other continents as an introduced species, including North America, where it is a common weed.Loline alkaloidSilent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.Global microbial identifier: The genomic epidemiological database for global identification of microorganisms or global microbial identifier (GMI) is a platform for storing whole genome sequencing (WGS) data of microorganisms, for the identification of relevant genes and for the comparison of genomes to detect and track-and-trace infectious disease outbreaks and emerging pathogens. The database holds two types of information: 1) genomic information of microorganisms, linked to, 2) metadata of those microorganism such as epidemiological details.Leghemoglobin: Leghemoglobin (also leghaemoglobin or legoglobin) is a nitrogen or oxygen carrier, because naturally occurring oxygen and nitrogen interact similarly with this protein; and a hemoprotein found in the nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants. It is produced by legumes in response to the roots being colonized by nitrogen-fixing bacteria, termed rhizobia, as part of the symbiotic interaction between plant and bacterium: roots not colonized by Rhizobium do not synthesise leghemoglobin.Polysaccharide encapsulated bacteriaCoprinellus curtus: Coprinellus curtus is a species of mushroom in the Psathyrellaceae family. It was first described as Coprinus curtus by Károly Kalchbrenner in 1876 before being transferred to the genus Coprinellus in 2001.Plantago: Plantain}}Carbon–carbon bond: A carbon–carbon bond is a covalent bond between two carbon atoms. The most common form is the single bond: a bond composed of two electrons, one from each of the two atoms.Burkholderia kururiensis: Burkholderia kururiensis is a species of proteobacteria.Cytoplasmic incompatibility: Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is a phenomenon that results in sperm and eggs being unable to form viable offspring. The effect arises from changes in the gamete cells caused by intracellular parasites like Wolbachia, which infect a wide range of insect species.Chlorella pyrenoidosa: Chlorella pyrenoidosa is a species of the freshwater green algae genus Chlorella. It occurs world wide.Signature-tagged mutagenesis: Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) is a genetic technique used to study gene function. Recent advances in genome sequencing have allowed us to catalogue a large variety of organisms' genomes, but the function of the genes they contain is still largely unknown.Methylobacterium mesophilicum: Methylobacterium mesophilicum is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium, reported to be an opportunistic pathogen in immunocomprimised patients.Fish gill: Most fish exchange gases using gills on either side of the pharynx (throat). Gills are tissues which consist of cloth and fabric structures called filaments.Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.Exogenous bacteria: Exogenous bacteria are microorganisms introduced to closed biological systems from the external world. They exist in aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as the atmosphere.Hudsonia tomentosa: Hudsonia tomentosa is a species of flowering plant in the rockrose family known by the common names woolly beachheather, beach heather, and sand heather. It is native to northeastern North America, including central and eastern Canada and the northeastern United States.

(1/4230) Sodalis gen. nov. and Sodalis glossinidius sp. nov., a microaerophilic secondary endosymbiont of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans.

A secondary intracellular symbiotic bacterium was isolated from the haemolymph of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans and cultured in Aedes albopictus cell line C6/36. Pure-culture isolation of this bacterium was achieved through the use of solid-phase culture under a microaerobic atmosphere. After isolation of strain M1T, a range of tests was performed to determine the phenotypic properties of this bacterium. Considering the results of these tests, along with the phylogenetic position of this micro-organism, it is proposed that this intracellular symbiont from G. m. morsitans should be classified in a new genus Sodalis gen. nov., as Sodalis glossinidius gen. nov., sp. nov. Strain M1T is the type strain for this new species.  (+info)

(2/4230) Diversity of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase genes of bacteria associated with the deep-sea hydrothermal vent polychaete annelid Alvinella pompejana.

A unique community of bacteria colonizes the dorsal integument of the polychaete annelid Alvinella pompejana, which inhabits the high-temperature environments of active deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise. The composition of this bacterial community was characterized in previous studies by using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes. In the present study, a pair of PCR primers (P94-F and P93-R) were used to amplify a segment of the dissimilatory bisulfite reductase gene from DNA isolated from the community of bacteria associated with A. pompejana. The goal was to assess the presence and diversity of bacteria with the capacity to use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor. A clone library of bisulfite reductase gene PCR products was constructed and characterized by restriction fragment and sequence analysis. Eleven clone families were identified. Two of the 11 clone families, SR1 and SR6, contained 82% of the clones. DNA sequence analysis of a clone from each family indicated that they are dissimilatory bisulfite reductase genes most similar to the dissimilatory bisulfite reductase genes of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Desulfovibrio gigas, Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, and Desulfobacter latus. Similarities to the dissimilatory bisulfite reductases of Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii, the sulfide oxidizer Chromatium vinosum, the sulfur reducer Pyrobaculum islandicum, and the archaeal sulfate reducer Archaeoglobus fulgidus were lower. Phylogenetic analysis separated the clone families into groups that probably represent two genera of previously uncharacterized sulfate-reducing bacteria. The presence of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase genes is consistent with recent temperature and chemical measurements that documented a lack of dissolved oxygen in dwelling tubes of the worm. The diversity of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase genes in the bacterial community on the back of the worm suggests a prominent role for anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria in the ecology of A. pompejana.  (+info)

(3/4230) Novel genes induced during an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis formed between Medicago truncatula and Glomus versiforme.

Many terrestrial plant species are able to form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Here we have identified three cDNA clones representing genes whose expression is induced during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis formed between Medicago truncatula and an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus versiforme. The three clones represent M. truncatula genes and encode novel proteins: a xyloglucan endotransglycosylase-related protein, a putative arabinogalactan protein (AGP), and a putative homologue of the mammalian p110 subunit of initiation factor 3 (eIF3). These genes show little or no expression in M. truncatula roots prior to formation of the symbiosis and are significantly induced following colonization by G. versiforme. The genes are not induced in roots in response to increases in phosphate. This suggests that induction of expression during the symbiosis is due to the interaction with the fungus and is not a secondary effect of improved phosphate nutrition. In situ hybridization revealed that the putative AGP is expressed specifically in cortical cells containing arbuscules. The identification of two mycorrhiza-induced genes encoding proteins predicted to be involved in cell wall structure is consistent with previous electron microscopy data that indicated major alterations in the extracellular matrix of the cortical cells following colonization by mycorrhizal fungi.  (+info)

(4/4230) Further studies of the role of cyclic beta-glucans in symbiosis. An NdvC mutant of Bradyrhizobium japonicum synthesizes cyclodecakis-(1-->3)-beta-glucosyl.

The cyclic beta-(1-->3),beta-(1-->6)-D-glucan synthesis locus of Bradyrhizobium japonicum is composed of at least two genes, ndvB and ndvC. Mutation in either gene affects glucan synthesis, as well as the ability of the bacterium to establish a successful symbiotic interaction with the legume host soybean (Glycine max). B. japonicum strain AB-14 (ndvB::Tn5) does not synthesize beta-glucans, and strain AB-1 (ndvC::Tn5) synthesizes a cyclic beta-glucan lacking beta-(1-->6)-glycosidic bonds. We determined that the structure of the glucan synthesized by strain AB-1 is cyclodecakis-(1-->3)-beta-D-glucosyl, a cyclic beta-(1-->3)-linked decasaccharide in which one of the residues is substituted in the 6 position with beta-laminaribiose. Cyclodecakis-(1-->3)-beta-D-glucosyl did not suppress the fungal beta-glucan-induced plant defense response in soybean cotyledons and had much lower affinity for the putative membrane receptor protein than cyclic beta-(1-->3),beta-(1-->6)-glucans produced by wild-type B. japonicum. This is consistent with the hypothesis presented previously that the wild-type cyclic beta-glucans may function as suppressors of a host defense response.  (+info)

(5/4230) Sugar- and nitrogen-dependent regulation of an Amanita muscaria phenylalanine ammonium lyase gene.

The cDNA of a key enzyme of secondary metabolism, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, was identified for an ectomycorrhizal fungus by differential screening of a mycorrhizal library. The gene was highly expressed in hyphae grown at low external monosaccharide concentrations, but its expression was 30-fold reduced at elevated concentrations. Gene repression was regulated by hexokinase.  (+info)

(6/4230) LB-AUT7, a novel symbiosis-regulated gene from an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor, is functionally related to vesicular transport and autophagocytosis.

We have identified LB-AUT7, a gene differentially expressed 6 h after ectomycorrhizal interaction between Laccaria bicolor and Pinus resinosa. LB-Aut7p can functionally complement its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog, which is involved in the attachment of autophagosomes to microtubules. Our findings suggest the induction of an autophagocytosis-like vesicular transport process during ectomycorrhizal interaction.  (+info)

(7/4230) A GroEL homologue from endosymbiotic bacteria of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci is implicated in the circulative transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

Evidence for the involvement of a Bemisia tabaci GroEL homologue in the transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV) is presented. A approximately 63-kDa protein was identified in B. tabaci whole-body extracts using an antiserum raised against aphid Buchnera GroEL. The GroEL homologue was immunolocalized to a coccoid-shaped whitefly endosymbiont. The 30 N-terminal amino acids of the whitefly GroEL homologue showed 80% homology with that from different aphid species and GroEL from Escherichia coli. Purified GroEL from B. tabaci exhibited ultrastructural similarities to that of the endosymbiont from aphids and E. coli. In vitro ligand assays showed that tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) particles displayed a specific affinity for the B. tabaci 63-kDa GroEL homologue. Feeding whiteflies anti-Buchnera GroEL antiserum before the acquisition of virions reduced TYLCV transmission to tomato test plants by >80%. In the haemolymph of these whiteflies, TYLCV DNA was reduced to amounts below the threshold of detection by Southern blot hybridization. Active antibodies were recovered from the insect haemolymph suggesting that by complexing the GoEL homologue, the antibody disturbed interaction with TYLCV, leading to degradation of the virus. We propose that GroEL of B. tabaci protects the virus from destruction during its passage through the haemolymph.  (+info)

(8/4230) Isolation and characterization of the catalase gene from Rhizobium sp. SNU003, a root nodule symbiont of Canavalia lineata.

A catalase gene from Rhizobium sp. SNU003, a root nodule symbiont of Canavalia lineata, was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The Rhizobium DNA of about 280 bp was amplified using two PCR primers synthesized from the conserved sequences of the type I catalase gene. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified fragment revealed three regions that were conserved in the catalase, showing it as being part of the catalase gene. A genomic Southern hybridization using this fragment as a probe showed that the 5.5 kb PstI, 1.8 kb EcoRI, and 0.7 kb StyI fragments hybridized strongly with the probe. The Rhizobium genomic library constructed into the EMBL3 vector was screened, and one catalase clone was selected. The nucleotide sequence of the 5.5 kb PstI fragment from the clone revealed an open reading frame of 1455 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 485 amino acids with a molecular mass of 54,958 Da and a pI of 6.54. The predicted amino acid sequence of the catalase is 66.3% identical to that of Bacteroides fragilis, but was only 53.3% identical to the Rhizobium meliloti catalase.  (+info)



Druid


  • When Symbiosis is cast on you by a Druid, this button will be replaced by the new ability you have temporarily learned. (mmo-champion.com)
  • Like a druid tank could symbiosis with a healer and his enraged regeneration also dispels a harmful effect and the healers dispel also applies a hot. (mmo-champion.com)

Abilities


  • What if they kept symbiosis and instead of providing new abilities maybe they gave new passive effects to abilities you already have sort of similar to perks. (mmo-champion.com)

page


  • We're sorry, that page (http://www.bio-medicine.org/q-more/biology-news/Symbiosis/) was not found . (bio-medicine.org)

cast


title


  • Even though the title of the game would imply that symbiosis would be an integral part of battle it's unfortunately not needed and after even getting halfway through the upgrades available most levels won't need more than two plants on the map to be victorious. (jayisgames.com)

technology


  • Symbiosis is an emerging online Open Access publishing house of high impact & peer reviewed journals in the current research fields of science & technology. (mendeley.com)
  • Symbiosis Open Journals (SOJ) covers the latest advancements strictly oriented towards research in the areas of Clinical, Medicine, Life Sciences, Pharma, Engineering & Technology. (mendeley.com)

post


  • An alternative conceptualisation of the post-colonial identity could be in terms of an ever-forming 'symbiosis' (Kandiah 1991), which recognises the dynamic co-existence and interaction of different elements within a larger whole, sometimes in creative tension with or even radical opposition to each other, at other times in a harmony based on an acceptance of the importance of all of these elements for each other. (postcolonialweb.org)