No data available that match "Stress, Psychological"



*  Mental Stress Induces Transient Endothelial Dysfunction in Humans | Circulation

Chronic stress affects immunologic but not cardiovascular responsiveness to acute psychological stress in humans. Am J Physiol. ... Kirschbaum C, Wüst S, Nellhammer D. Consistent sex differences in cortisol responses to psychological stress. Psychosom Med. ... Changes in FMD (top) and GTN dilation (bottom) in healthy subjects without mental stress (•) or after mental stress (○) and in ... Endothelial dysfunction after mental stress might be mediated via increased oxidative stress or through the release of potent ...
circ.ahajournals.org/content/102/20/2473

*  Bar graphs showing the effect of mental stress on carot | Open-i

Bar graphs showing the effect of mental stress on carotid artery diameter in hypertensive subjects with increasing mean blood ... Conclusion: Mental stress produces CA vasodilation and is accompanied by an increase in CA and MCA blood flow in healthy ... Conclusion: Mental stress produces CA vasodilation and is accompanied by an increase in CA and MCA blood flow in healthy ... Results: Mental stress by Stroop color word conflict, math or anger recall tests caused CA vasodilation in young healthy ...
https://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC2710316_1476-7120-7-32-2&req=4

*  Australian Psychological Society : Workplace stress: environmental and individual factors

Work stress is a hot topic. More workers are making psychological stress-related compensation claims than ever before, with the ... Research on work stress has focussed on occupations that implicitly involve high levels of stress, such as emergency service ... Interventions for occupational stress. Interventions for work stress range from organisational to individual-based approaches. ... Individual factors in occupational stress. Individual differences also affect how people cope with work stress. Two people ...
psychology.org.au/publications/inpsych/stress/

*  Stress response increases suicide risk ( Psychological responses to stress may c...)

Stress,response,increases,suicide,risk,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news ... Psychological responses to stress may cause significant problems inclu... Researchers at the California Psychiatric Institute ... Stress can make you overweight. 3. Stress triggers acne. 4. Stress make acne worse. 5. Stress may Worsen Acne. 6. Stress can ... Stress response increases suicide risk. Psychological responses to stress may cause significant problems inclu... Researchers ...
bio-medicine.org/medicine-news/Stress-response-increases-suicide-risk-440-1/

*  Stress can Cause Molecular Alterations in Immune Response

Chronic psychosocial and emotional stress has well-documented negative effects upon the human immune system, measurably ... changes in white blood cells that occur before and after an acute psychological stressor," said Rana. "We identified specific ... Stress and the Gender Divide. Stress has become entwined in the current lifestyle of a young working couple and has resulted in ... Research Reveals Acute Stress Alters Gene Activity Control. Researchers have reported for the first time that acute stress ...
medindia.net/news/stress-can-cause-molecular-alterations-in-immune-response-158271-1.htm

*  Work stress and risk of cardiovascular mortality: prospective cohort study of industrial employees | The BMJ

Decision latitude, psychological demands, job strain, and coronary heart disease in the Western Electric study.Am J Epidemiol ... Our findings on work stress are consistent with this interpretation.. However, excess health risk in employees with high stress ... Work stress was not associated with blood pressure at follow up.. Table 4 Serum total cholesterol concentration and body mass ... Two alternative job stress models and the risk of coronary heart disease.Am J Public Health 1998; 88:68-74. ...
bmj.com/content/325/7369/857

*  psychological stress | The Derm Blog

Tag: psychological stress. Stress Can Give You A Rash. Are you under a lot of stress lately? Do you have a rash? The two might ... psychological stress, rash, stress hormone14 Comments on Stress Can Give You A Rash ... Categories Skin Health and DiseaseTags chronic stress, eczema, function of the skin, inflammation, lipid layer, ... I commonly get asked by patients in my clinic "Is my rash because of stress?" The answer is, it might be. Continue reading " ...
thedermblog.com/tag/psychological-stress/

*  Psychological Stress for Gay and Lesbian Youth

Prevalence of various psychological disorders was assessed, and later compared with frequency of mental health problems in the ... Mental Health Disorders, Psychological Distress and Suicidal Tendency in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youths. ... In the present study, researchers wanted to study psychological problems in LGBT youths. All the previous studies had focused ... This study from Chicago measured the level of psychological distress in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youths. ...
https://fyiliving.com/uncategorized/psychological-stress-for-gay-and-lesbian-youth

*  The central role of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF-41) in psychological stress in rats. - PubMed - NCBI

2. Psychological stress was induced by cage-switch stress. After rats were placed in the novel environment, blood pressure, ... The central role of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF-41) in psychological stress in rats.. Morimoto A1, Nakamori T, ... 4. The results suggest that central CRF-41 plays an important role in psychological stress-induced hypertension, hyperthermia, ... 1. We investigated the central role of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF-41) in psychological stress-induced responses, ...
https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8487193?access_num=8487193&link_type=MED&dopt=Abstract

*  Chronic peripheral administration of corticotropin-releasing factor causes colonic barrier dysfunction similar to psychological...

chronic). We have focused our studies on models of psychological stress, which mimic the life stress facing humans on a daily ... Boudry G, Jury J, Yang PC, Perdue MH. Chronic psychological stress alters epithelial cell turn-over in rat ileum. Am J Physiol ... Models of stress vary considerably depending on the nature of the stressor (psychological vs. physical) and the duration of the ... Psychological stress, in the form of WAS, causes colonic barrier dysfunction (8, 45), activates enteric neurons (27), and ...
ajpgi.physiology.org/content/295/3/G452

*  Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and psychological distress followin...: Ingenta Connect

Keywords: abortion method; anxiety; depression; dissociation; emotion; posttraumatic stress disorder Document Type: Research ... Objective: Abortion can be a difficult event to cope with and can lead to the development of psychological disturbance. The aim ... Conclusion: By providing evidence on some of the main risk factors, this study highlights the need for psychological support ... of this prospective and longitudinal study was to assess and to predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms following ...
ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cjri/2011/00000029/00000005/art00008

*  PHIT for Duty™: A Mobile Health Assessment and Intervention Application for Post Traumatic Stress and Psychological Disorders |...

PHIT for Duty™: A Mobile Health Assessment and Intervention Application for Post Traumatic Stress and Psychological Disorders. ... A Mobile Health Assessment and Intervention Application for Post Traumatic Stress and Psychological Disorders. Presented at ...
https://rti.org/publication/phit-duty™-mobile-health-assessment-and-intervention-application-post-traumatic-stress

*  L-Theanine Reduces Psychological and Physiological Stress Responses

This page contains the article L-Theanine Reduces Psychological and Physiological Stress Responses http://www.chiro.org/ ... L-Theanine Reduces Psychological and Physiological Stress Responses This section is compiled by Frank M. Painter, D.C.. Send ... Because the characteristics of L-Theanine suggest that it may influence psychological and physiological states under stress, ... Thus, it was suggested that the oral intake of L-Theanine could cause anti-stress effects via the inhibition of cortical neuron ...
chiro.org/nutrition/ABSTRACTS/L-Theanine_Reduces.shtml

*  Psychological Approach to Stress Management by Farhanaz Duymun on Prezi

Transcript of Psychological Approach to Stress Management. Psychological Approach to. Stress Management By Abbey Lamb. ... Those with a stress hardy personality hold 3 main traits:-•Commitment. •Control. •Challenge. Stress hardy people have a natural ... They aimed to reduce stress and anxiety in order to increase academic performance.After 4 weeks all students had reduced stress ... Expensive and Time Consuming Meichenbaums Stress Inoculation Training involves preparation so that you can deal with stress ...
https://prezi.com/gfev5l4zhro0/psychological-approach-to-stress-management/

*  Traditional Machismo and Caballerismo as Correlates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Psychological Distress, and Relationship...

Next article in issue: Racism-Related Stress, General Life Stress, and Psychological Functioning Among Black American Women ... Next article in issue: Racism-Related Stress, General Life Stress, and Psychological Functioning Among Black American Women ... Traditional Machismo and Caballerismo as Correlates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Psychological Distress, and Relationship ... traditional machismo and caballerismo as correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological distress, and ...
onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/j.2161-1912.2013.00024.x/abstract

*  Firefighters use this psychological strategy to overcome stress - Business Insider

VIDEO: How to stay cool under pressure.
businessinsider.com/firefighters-use-this-psychological-strategy-to-overcome-stress-2016-6

*  Workers' Mental Health Problems and Future Perspectives in Japan: Psychological Job Stress Research: Medical & Healthcare IS&T...

Psychological Job Stress Research: 10.4018/978-1-4666-2113-8.ch038: This chapter reviews data on the mental health problems of ... "Workers' Mental Health Problems and Future Perspectives in Japan: Psychological Job Stress Research." Biomedical Engineering ... Tamba, H. (2013). Workers' Mental Health Problems and Future Perspectives in Japan: Psychological Job Stress Research. In J. Wu ... "Workers' Mental Health Problems and Future Perspectives in Japan: Psychological Job Stress Research." In Biomedical Engineering ...
https://igi-global.com/chapter/workers-mental-health-problems-future/69937

*  Shoulder Arthritis / Rotator Cuff Tears: causes of shoulder pain: Shoulder pain, psychological stress, perceived disability

Comment: The items in the different psychological scales are:. Pain Catastrophizing Scale I feel I can't go on.. It's terrible ... Psychological Distress Is Associated with Greater Perceived Disability and Pain in Patients Presenting to a Shoulder Clinic.. ... In order to determine how psychological factors (namely depression, catastrophic thinking, and self-efficacy) affect pain and ... patient-to-patient variation in symptom intensity and magnitude of disability is more strongly related to psychological ...
shoulderarthritis.blogspot.com/2016/01/shoulder-pain-psychological-stress.html

*  Improving Access to Psychological Therapies | Stress Control

Regular Stress Control classes in Sheffield commenced in October 2009.. As stress is so common, there may be between 50 - 100 ... Stress Control is a class - not a group therapy - so you do not have to talk about your problems in front of others. You just ... Stress Control is a course which runs over six consecutive weeks. If you want to learn better ways to handle common problems ... As a part of the Stress Control classes, there are booklets to read before or as soon as the course starts. These will tell you ...
sheffieldiapt.shsc.nhs.uk/how-do-i-get-help/how-can-we-help-you/stress-control

*  Risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder among UK Armed Forces personnel | Psychological Medicine | Cambridge Core

Risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder among UK Armed Forces personnel - Volume 38 Issue 4 - A. C. Iversen, N. T. Fear ... S Cohen , TA Willis (1985). Stress, social support, and the buffering hypothesis. Psychological Bulletin 98, 310-357. ... Beyond symptom self-report: use of a computer "avatar" to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Stress, Vol. ... M Basoglu , S Mineka , M Paker , T Aker , M Livanou , S Gok (1997). Psychological preparedness for trauma as a protective ...
https://cambridge.org/core/journals/psychological-medicine/article/risk-factors-for-posttraumatic-stress-disorder-among-uk-armed-forces-personnel/2F7DD261F345C0B784D410B74D06EB9E

*  Southern California Conferences for Undergraduate Research - Southern California Conferences for Undergraduate Research: The...

... can be predictors in how one copes when faced with psychological distress, such as perceived stress, depression, and anxiety ( ... Discussion focuses on individuals' self-esteem and global wellbeing in relationship with our perceived stress. keywords: stress ... that the more individuals perceive stress in their lives can be indicative of poor adjustment to coping with life stresses, ... stress, and Andrew and Withey's (1976) wellbeing scales. It was hypothesized that low self-esteem would be associated with ...
sccur.org/sccur/fall_2016_conference/oral_talks/53/

*  Health Protocols | Life Extension

Mood, Stress, & Psychological Health. * Anxiety * Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) * Depression * Insomnia ...
lifeextension.com/protocols?c=2

*  Fact Sheets

Psychological Stress and Cancer (Fact Sheet) This fact sheet explores the effect of existing stress on cancer risk and cancer ...
oncologynurseadvisor.com/fact-sheets/section/2326/

*  The Awareness Center, Inc. (International Jewish Coaltion Against Sexual Assault): The Cruelest Crime - Sexual Abuse Of...

If he cannot reconcile his behavior with his beliefs, he suffers severe psychological stress known as cognitive dissonance. " ... "Something I really stress in training professionals is that they must teach the children these things. They're very prone to ... "Molesting a child is psychological violence of the worst kind," says FBI expert Kenneth Lanning. "All the ills of society can't ... As a group, they explore the emotions and ramifications and, finally, learn problem-solving methods to handle stress and the ...
theawarenesscenter.blogspot.com/1984/12/the-cruelest-crime-sexual-abuse-of.html

*  ChiroCare - Chiropractor In Bedford, Nova Scotia Canada :: Active Ingredients of Food

... protects the heart against stress; important for the carbohydrate metabolism. Leek, sweet corn, cabbage, zucchini, peas, ... functions and controls healthy psychological behavior. Cabbage, asparagus, watercress, liver, seedlings. ...
chirocarehealth.ca/food-as-medicine/active-ingredients-of-food.html?page=home

No data available that match "Stress, Psychological"



(1/10358) Health status of Persian Gulf War veterans: self-reported symptoms, environmental exposures and the effect of stress.

BACKGROUND: Most US troops returned home from the Persian Gulf War (PGW) by Spring 1991 and many began reporting increased health symptoms and medical problems soon after. This investigation examines the relationships between several Gulf-service environmental exposures and health symptom reporting, and the role of traumatic psychological stress on the exposure-health symptom relationships. METHODS: Stratified, random samples of two cohorts of PGW veterans, from the New England area (n = 220) and from the New Orleans area (n = 71), were selected from larger cohorts being followed longitudinally since arrival home from the Gulf. A group of PGW-era veterans deployed to Germany (n = 50) served as a comparison group. The study protocol included questionnaires, a neuropsychological test battery, an environmental interview, and psychological diagnostic interviews. This report focuses on self-reported health symptoms and exposures of participants who completed a 52-item health symptom checklist and a checklist of environmental exposures. RESULTS: The prevalence of reported symptoms was greater in both Persian Gulf-deployed cohorts compared to the Germany cohort. Analyses of the body-system symptom scores (BSS), weighted to account for sampling design, and adjusted by age, sex, and education, indicated that Persian Gulf-deployed veterans were more likely to report neurological, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, cardiac, dermatological, musculoskeletal, psychological and neuropsychological system symptoms than Germany veterans. Using a priori hypotheses about the toxicant effects of exposure to specific toxicants, the relationships between self-reported exposures and body-system symptom groupings were examined through multiple regression analyses, controlling for war-zone exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Self-reported exposures to pesticides, debris from Scuds, chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agents, and smoke from tent heaters each were significantly related to increased reporting of specific predicted BSS groupings. CONCLUSIONS: Veterans deployed to the Persian Gulf have higher self-reported prevalence of health symptoms compared to PGW veterans who were deployed only as far as Germany. Several Gulf-service environmental exposures are associated with increased health symptom reporting involving predicted body-systems, after adjusting for war-zone stressor exposures and PTSD.  (+info)

(2/10358) 'Home hypertension': exploring the inverse white coat response.

BACKGROUND: The classical 'white coat response' to blood pressure measurement has been studied thoroughly. However, little is known about patients showing a reverse pattern, i.e. who have lower blood pressure readings at the clinic than outside healthcare facilities. AIM: To estimate the proportion of patients whose blood pressure levels as determined by self-measurements at home are higher than those taken at the clinic and to explore possible associations with demographic, clinical, and psychological variables. METHOD: Patients consecutively attending (n = 214) an academic family medicine department in Toronto, Canada, were eligible. Subjects aged below 16 years and those on psychotropic or blood pressure-lowering agents were excluded. The clinic-home blood pressure difference (CHBPD) was calculated for each participating subject by subtracting home blood pressure from clinic blood pressure. Those who had negative values were compared with the rest of the sample. RESULTS: A considerable proportion of patients had lower blood pressure at the clinic than at home (systolic, 34.6%; diastolic, 23.8%). These subjects did not differ from the rest of the sample with regard to age, sex, levels of education attained, immigration status, body mass index, experience of current symptoms, blood pressure levels, or psychological distress. However, in patients with a 'negative CHBPD', i.e. lower blood pressure at the clinic than at home, readings taken by an automatic, self-inflating device when still at the clinic were higher than in the rest of the sample. CONCLUSION: The results point to measurement bias being at least partly responsible for higher blood pressure readings outside the clinic. Automatic measurement devices used for self/home blood pressure measurement seem to cause an alerting reaction analogous to the well-described 'white coat response'.  (+info)

(3/10358) The self-reported well-being of employees facing organizational change: effects of an intervention.

The objective of this study was to investigate the self-reported well-being of employees facing organizational change, and the effect of an intervention. It was a controlled intervention study. Subjects were allocated to study and control groups, and brief individual counselling was offered to the subjects in the study groups. Questionnaire measures were administered before and after counselling (a 3-month interval), and non-counselled subjects also completed questionnaires at the same times. The setting was 15 estate offices in an urban local authority Housing Department. Subjects comprised the total workforce of the Housing Management division: 193 employees, male and female, aged 22-62 years, facing compulsory competitive tendering between 1994-97. Main outcome measures were baseline and comparative measures of psychological morbidity, including the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI). Questionnaire response rates were 72% and 47% on first and second occasions respectively. The uptake of counselling was 37%. In comparison with (1) the UK norms for the OSI and (2) the norms for a similar occupational group, this group of workers were under more work-related pressure and their self-reported health was markedly poorer. They were not however at a disadvantage in terms of coping strategies. Those accepting the offer of counselling were subject to greater levels of work stress, had poorer self-reported health and markedly lower levels of job satisfaction than those who did not. Questionnaire scores were not significantly different before and after counselling, giving no evidence of treatment effects on symptomatology. However, almost all subjects rated counselling as having been extremely helpful. This study suggests that adverse effects on staff facing organizational change may be ameliorated by improved management practice.  (+info)

(4/10358) The agenda of the organization. 2: Interventions.

Many contemporary organizations, though doing well in productivity, are in chaos. Stress amongst managers and employees is still rampant and the assertion that 'people are our best assets' is confirmed more in words than in actions. What interventions are needed to best add value to the agenda of the organization and influence employee performance for the better? A philosophy of employee care includes looking at how managers take responsibility for performance management, deal with their own and others' stress and how the dynamics within organizations can be understood and harnessed for the welfare of the company. It also includes reviewing, articulating and implementing policies and systems that affect individuals in the organization and the organization as a whole.  (+info)

(5/10358) The managed care revolution: how medical technologists have tolerated the change.

A repeated cross-sectional study on the psychological profiles and interpersonal styles of highly stressed medical technologists (perfusionists) has found remarkable consistency in internal psychological profiles and differences in interpersonal dynamics over a 6-year period. Six years ago a longitudinal study was begun to track the psychological profiles of perfusionists. Surgeons can repair cardiac defects only after a beating heart has been stopped. In order for the brain and other organs to survive cardiac surgery, they must be perfused with well-oxygenated blood. As a result, the life of every cardiac surgery patient literally sits in the hands of the cardiac perfusionist. The stress of placing patients on and off the 'pump' is one that is experienced by cardiovascular perfusionists on a daily basis. This stress has been likened to that of air traffic controllers who continually prepare planes for take off and/or landing. In the 6 years between studies, medical technologists have changed very little psychologically. They remain very well balanced. However, there have been significant changes in their interpersonal behaviours. Instead of the 'well-balanced' interpersonal profiles of 6 years ago, there is a higher degree of assertiveness/aggressiveness being reported. Managed Care has begun to impact interpersonal behaviours but has not yet altered the more resilient platform of internal psychological balance.  (+info)

(6/10358) The impact of genetic counselling about breast cancer risk on women's risk perceptions and levels of distress.

Women referred to a familial breast cancer clinic completed questionnaires before and after counselling and at annual follow-up to assess their risk estimate and psychological characteristics. The aims were to determine whether those who attended the clinic overestimated their risk or were highly anxious and whether counselling influenced risk estimates and levels of distress. Women (n = 450) at this clinic were more likely to underestimate (39%) than overestimate (14%) their risk. Mean trait anxiety scores were higher than general population data (t = 4.9, n = 1059, P<0.001) but not significantly different from published data from other screening samples. Overestimators (z = 5.69, P<0.0001) and underestimators (z = -8.01, P<0.0001) reported significantly different risk estimates (i.e. increased accuracy) after counselling, but significant inaccuracies persisted. Over- (n = 12) and underestimators (n = 60) were still inaccurate in their risk estimates by a factor of 2 after counselling. Thirty per cent of the sample scored above the cut-off (5/6) for case identification on a screening measure for psychological distress, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). GHQ scores were significantly lower after counselling (t = 3.6, d.f. = 384, P = 0.0004) with no evidence of increasing risk estimate causing increased distress. The risk of distress after counselling was greater for younger women and those who were more distressed at first presentation. The counselling offered was effective in increasing the accuracy of risk perceptions without causing distress to those who initially underestimated their risk. It is worrying that inaccuracies persisted, particularly as the demand for service has since reduced the consultation time offered in this clinic. Further work is needed to evaluate alternative models of service delivery using more sophisticated methods of assessing understanding of risk.  (+info)

(7/10358) Food insecurity: consequences for the household and broader social implications.

A conceptual framework showing the household and social implications of food insecurity was elicited from a qualitative and quantitative study of 98 households from a heterogeneous low income population of Quebec city and rural surroundings; the study was designed to increase understanding of the experience of food insecurity in order to contribute to its prevention. According to the respondents' description, the experience of food insecurity is characterized by two categories of manifestations, i.e., the core characteristics of the phenomenon and a related set of actions and reactions by the household. This second category of manifestations is considered here as a first level of consequences of food insecurity. These consequences at the household level often interact with the larger environment to which the household belongs. On a chronic basis, the resulting interactions have certain implications that are tentatively labeled "social implications" in this paper. Their examination suggests that important aspects of human development depend on food security. It also raises questions concerning the nature of socially acceptable practices of food acquisition and food management, and how such acceptability can be assessed. Guidelines to that effect are proposed. Findings underline the relevance and urgency of working toward the realization of the right to food.  (+info)

(8/10358) Effects of targeted disruption of the mouse angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene on stress-induced hyperthermia.

1. We have previously reported that brain angiotensin II type 2 receptors (AT2) contribute to immunological stress-induced hyperthermia (fever) in rats. Now, in mice, we report the effect of AT2 gene disruption on the hyperthermia induced by immunological (interleukin-1 (IL-1) injection) and non-immunological (saline injection or cage switch) stress. 2. AT2-deficient and control mice both showed typical circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and physical activity. During the latter half of the dark period, AT2-deficient mice exhibited a lower body temperature than the controls. 3. By comparison with the controls, AT2-deficient mice exhibited: (i) a significantly smaller hyperthermia after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of IL-1beta; (ii) significantly greater increases in body temperature and physical activity after i. p. saline; and (iii) a significantly greater hyperthermia (but a similar increase in activity) during cage-switch stress. 4. These results suggest that AT2, presumably in the brain, plays important roles in stress-induced hyperthermia in mice.  (+info)



Posttraumatic Stress D


  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and psychological distress followin. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • The aim of this prospective and longitudinal study was to assess and to predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms following abortion. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • An online survey was used to examine 45 Hispanic male veterans' traditional machismo and caballerismo as correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), psychological distress, and relationship satisfaction. (wiley.com)
  • Prevalence of probable posttraumatic stress disorder and determination of its relationship with everyday functioning in children and adolescents by using generalized estimating equations. (cambridge.org)

Distress


  • This subgroup, however, did not show any higher levels of psychological distress or mental disorders than the Caucasian Americans in the group, except for conduct disorder. (fyiliving.com)
  • The youngsters were also asked to evaluate their psychological distress over the past week using a self-reporting questionnaire. (fyiliving.com)
  • Psychological Distress Is Associated with Greater Perceived Disability and Pain in Patients Presenting to a Shoulder Clinic. (blogspot.com)
  • The authors concluded that (1) catastrophic thinking and decreased self-efficacy are associated with greater shoulder pain and disability and (2) patient-to-patient variation in symptom intensity and magnitude of disability is more strongly related to psychological distress than to the specific shoulder diagnosis. (blogspot.com)
  • Positive personality features (optimism, hope, and happiness) can be predictors in how one copes when faced with psychological distress, such as perceived stress, depression, and anxiety (Besser & Ziegler-Hill, 2014). (sccur.org)

PTSD


  • It is well-known that some people respond to major stressors - like war and natural calamities with a full-blown crisis known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) where there is emotional numbness, panic and anxiety. (bio-medicine.org)
  • It's a sign that stress symptoms of the PTSD type should be taken very seriously, because thoughts of suicide are too often put into practice. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Beyond symptom self-report: use of a computer "avatar" to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. (cambridge.org)

attenuated the stress-induced


  • The intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) injection of alpha-helical CRF(9-41), a CRF-41 receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the stress-induced hypertension, tachycardia, hyperthermia and increase in locomotive activity. (nih.gov)

disorders


  • The researchers examined various mental health problems in LGBT youths such as depression, conduct disorders, post-traumatic stress and suicidal tendencies. (fyiliving.com)
  • The current study, in addition, looked at other mental disorders such as conduct disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anorexia and bulimia. (fyiliving.com)
  • Prevalence of various psychological disorders was assessed, and later compared with frequency of mental health problems in the general population. (fyiliving.com)
  • This information may be useful in designing novel treatment strategies for stress-related gastrointestinal disorders. (physiology.org)
  • BZs such as Librium and Valium are the most prescribed drugs for psychological disorders and can be very effective against stress. (prezi.com)

depression


  • Seventeen percent of participants had conduct disorder, 15 percent suffered from depression, and 9 percent had post-traumatic stress disorder. (fyiliving.com)
  • The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been extensively studied in the maintenance of behavioral and mood changes (anxiety and depression) associated with stress and, more recently, of gastrointestinal parameters. (physiology.org)
  • In order to determine how psychological factors (namely depression, catastrophic thinking, and self-efficacy) affect pain and perceived disability in the shoulder, these authors studied 139 patients who completed a sociodemographic survey and elements from the The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-2). (blogspot.com)
  • If you want to learn better ways to handle common problems such as anxiety, depression, low self-confidence, poor sleep and panic attacks then come along to the Stress Control classes. (shsc.nhs.uk)

acute stress


  • In the intestinal tract, acute stress stimulates active ion secretion and increases paracellular permeability (passive ion transport) and macromolecular permeability via the transcellular pathway ( 20 , 41 , 46 ). (physiology.org)
  • The results showed that L-Theanine intake resulted in a reduction in the heart rate (HR) and salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) responses to an acute stress task relative to the placebo control condition. (chiro.org)

symptoms


  • Beta-Blockers such as Inderal can be very effective against symptoms of stress such as raised heart rate and blood pressure. (prezi.com)
  • Post-traumatic stress symptoms 5 years after military deployment to Afghanistan: an observational cohort study. (cambridge.org)

post-trauma


  • Association of Combat Experiences with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Canadian Military Personnel Deployed in Support of the Mission in Afghanistan. (cambridge.org)

life stress


  • In support of this association, rats exposed to stress develop an increased severity to hapten-induced colitis ( 29 ), and stress triggers colonic changes in adult rats exposed to early life stress in a rodent model of IBS ( 11 , 46 ). (physiology.org)
  • We have focused our studies on models of psychological stress, which mimic the life stress facing humans on a daily basis. (physiology.org)

effects of stress


  • Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a 41-amino acid peptide, has been identified as the primary neuroendocrine factor mediating the effects of stress. (physiology.org)
  • Targets both causes and effects of stress. (prezi.com)

anxiety


  • They aimed to reduce stress and anxiety in order to increase academic performance.After 4 weeks all students had reduced stress and anxiety and many had increased academic performance. (prezi.com)

responses


  • 1. We investigated the central role of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF-41) in psychological stress-induced responses, including cardiovascular, thermoregulatory and locomotive activity in free-moving rats. (nih.gov)
  • The changes in these responses were quite similar to those observed during cage-switch stress. (nih.gov)
  • Stress response increases suicide risk ( Psychological responses to stress may c. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Psychological responses to stress may cause significant problems inclu. (bio-medicine.org)

2001


  • Hedblad et al (2001) found that regular, low doses of a Beta-Blocker drug significantly slowed the rate of progression of atherosclerosis (clogging of arteries from stress). (prezi.com)
  • More workers are making psychological stress-related compensation claims than ever before, with the national cost of such claims estimated to be $105.5 million in 2000-2001. (psychology.org.au)
  • In 2001-2002 stress accounted for over half of all long term (12 or more weeks) compensation claims that did not involve an injury. (psychology.org.au)
  • Each variable was measured by items from Rosenburg's (2001) self-esteem, Snyder's (1991) hope, Cohen's (1983) stress, and Andrew and Withey's (1976) wellbeing scales. (sccur.org)

disability


  • And these are linked with significant psychological disability. (bio-medicine.org)

rats


  • The central role of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF-41) in psychological stress in rats. (nih.gov)
  • However, it is likely that central CRF-41 does not contribute to normal cardiovascular and body temperature regulation when rats are free from stress. (nih.gov)
  • the role of CRF receptors was confirmed since pretreatment of rats with the nonselective CRF antagonist α-helical CRF-(9-41) inhibited the stress-induced intestinal abnormalities ( 38 ). (physiology.org)

Psychology


  • Dr Paula Brough, a lecturer in organisational psychology at Griffith University in Brisbane, recently studied occupational stress in fire, police and ambulance services. (psychology.org.au)

chronic


  • the role of chronic, persistent stress in mediating intestinal dysfunction has been established both in humans ( 44 ) and rodents ( 3 , 8 , 37 , 39 ). (physiology.org)
  • Models of stress vary considerably depending on the nature of the stressor (psychological vs. physical) and the duration of the exposure (acute vs. chronic). (physiology.org)

prevention


  • By providing evidence on some of the main risk factors, this study highlights the need for psychological support for women and strategies of prevention to be developed. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Psychosocial risk factors in work environments are firmly on the National Occupational Health and Safety Commission agenda and the State-based workers' compensation bodies are running programs for stress prevention, intervention and management. (psychology.org.au)

study


  • In the present study, researchers wanted to study psychological problems in LGBT youths. (fyiliving.com)
  • Because the characteristics of L-Theanine suggest that it may influence psychological and physiological states under stress, the present study examined these possible effects in a laboratory setting using a mental arithmetic task as an acute stressor. (chiro.org)
  • This current study examines the relationship between perceived stress, global well-being, self-esteem, and hope. (sccur.org)

occupational


  • Some of the main theories that analyze mental health problems are introduced, including occupational/job stress theory, work motivation, work engagement, and social skills. (igi-global.com)
  • Adelaide-based organisational psychologist Associate Professor Maureen Dollard has been researching and consulting on occupational stress for over a decade. (psychology.org.au)
  • Stress is considered to include work pressure, harassment at work, exposure to traumatic events, lack of autonomy and support, and exposure to workplace and occupational violence. (psychology.org.au)
  • There are a myriad of reasons for the escalation of occupational stress. (psychology.org.au)
  • As well as the stress associated with particular jobs, there are occupational stressors that are unique to job locations. (psychology.org.au)

risk


Health


  • Workers' Mental Health Problems and Future Perspectives in Japan: Psychological Job Stress Research. (igi-global.com)
  • Paula found that daily hassles contribute more to job satisfaction levels, while trauma contributes more to psychological health, especially in the long term. (psychology.org.au)

workers


  • In the 2007 investigation, which is closely related to the subject of this chapter, 58% of workers felt significant stress, including psychological stress, from work (Figure 1). (igi-global.com)
  • Although the number of such claims account for a minority of claims overall, stressed workers tend to stop working for longer periods, resulting in a higher relative cost to employers. (psychology.org.au)
  • Maureen, who is also the Director of the Work and Stress Research Group at the University of South Australia, says that workers are facing more demands from various sources. (psychology.org.au)

causes


  • This helps them recognise stressful situations and find out the causes of their stress. (prezi.com)

clinic


  • I commonly get asked by patients in my clinic "Is my rash because of stress? (thedermblog.com)

work


  • Work stress is a hot topic. (psychology.org.au)
  • Research on work stress has focussed on occupations that implicitly involve high levels of stress, such as emergency service work. (psychology.org.au)

Research


  • However research is suggesting that those of us who do not naturally have the stress hardy personality traits can actually learn them, with time and practice and can increase hardiness. (prezi.com)
  • However, other research argues that the more individuals perceive stress in their lives can be indicative of poor adjustment to coping with life stresses, thus hindering the individual's self-esteem, mental well-being, and hope for the future (Srivastava & Kiran, 2015). (sccur.org)

levels


  • In accordance with our hypothesis, we found statistical evidence to support a moderate negative effect for self-esteem and mental well-being as the two main independent variables relating to lower levels of stress. (sccur.org)

problems


  • Stress Control is a class - not a group therapy - so you do not have to talk about your problems in front of others. (shsc.nhs.uk)

relationship


  • Discussion focuses on individuals' self-esteem and global wellbeing in relationship with our perceived stress. (sccur.org)

long term


  • Stress inoculation training works with both long term and short term stressors. (prezi.com)

role


  • 4. The results suggest that central CRF-41 plays an important role in psychological stress-induced hypertension, hyperthermia, tachycardia and increase in locomotive activity. (nih.gov)

nature


  • Recent figures show how the nature of stress claims makes them particularly costly. (psychology.org.au)

help


  • This lead to the idea that increasing hardiness can help with stress by hardiness training. (prezi.com)

Issue


control


  • Stress Control is a course which runs over six consecutive weeks. (shsc.nhs.uk)
  • You just sit back and learn some of the ways to control stress. (shsc.nhs.uk)
  • Regular Stress Control classes in Sheffield commenced in October 2009. (shsc.nhs.uk)
  • As a part of the Stress Control classes, there are booklets to read before or as soon as the course starts. (shsc.nhs.uk)