Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Doping in Sports: Illegitimate use of substances for a desired effect in competitive sports. It includes humans and animals.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Insurance, Disability: Insurance designed to compensate persons who lose wages because of illness or injury; insurance providing periodic payments that partially replace lost wages, salary, or other income when the insured is unable to work because of illness, injury, or disease. Individual and group disability insurance are two types of such coverage. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p207)Racquet Sports: Games in which players use a racquet to hit a ball or similar type object.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Pensions: Fixed sums paid regularly to individuals.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Athletic Performance: Carrying out of specific physical routines or procedures by one who is trained or skilled in physical activity. Performance is influenced by a combination of physiological, psychological, and socio-cultural factors.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.United StatesTrack and Field: Sports performed on a track, field, or arena and including running events and other competitions, such as the pole vault, shot put, etc.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Basketball: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular court having a raised basket at each end.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Snow Sports: Sports activities in the snow.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: The World Health Organization's classification categories of health and health-related domains. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) consists of two lists: a list of body functions and structure, and a list of domains of activity and participation. The ICF also includes a list of environmental factors.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Sports for Persons with Disabilities: Activities or games played by PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, usually requiring physical effort or skill. The activities or games may be specifically created or based on existing sports, with or without modifications, to meet the needs of persons with physical or intellectual disabilities.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Multiple Sclerosis: An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)Fitness Centers: Facilities having programs intended to promote and maintain a state of physical well-being for optimal performance and health.Architectural Accessibility: Designs for approaching areas inside or outside facilities.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Martial Arts: Activities in which participants learn self-defense mainly through the use of hand-to-hand combat. Judo involves throwing an opponent to the ground while karate (which includes kung fu and tae kwon do) involves kicking and punching an opponent.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Sprains and Strains: A collective term for muscle and ligament injuries without dislocation or fracture. A sprain is a joint injury in which some of the fibers of a supporting ligament are ruptured but the continuity of the ligament remains intact. A strain is an overstretching or overexertion of some part of the musculature.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Rehabilitation, Vocational: Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)Veterans Disability Claims: Disorders claimed as a result of military service.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Recreation: Activity engaged in for pleasure.Tennis: A game played by two or four players with rackets and an elastic ball on a level court divided by a low net.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Performance-Enhancing Substances: Agents that improve the ability to carry out activities such as athletics, mental endurance, work, and resistance to stress. The substances can include PRESCRIPTION DRUGS; DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS; phytochemicals; and ILLICIT DRUGS.Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Workers' Compensation: Insurance coverage providing compensation and medical benefits to individuals because of work-connected injuries or disease.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Work Capacity Evaluation: Assessment of physiological capacities in relation to job requirements. It is usually done by measuring certain physiological (e.g., circulatory and respiratory) variables during a gradually increasing workload until specific limitations occur with respect to those variables.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Hockey: A game in which two parties of players provided with curved or hooked sticks seek to drive a ball or puck through opposite goals. This applies to either ice hockey or field hockey.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Boxing: A two-person sport in which the fists are skillfully used to attack and defend.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Mouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Exercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Physical Fitness: The ability to carry out daily tasks and perform physical activities in a highly functional state, often as a result of physical conditioning.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Veterinary Sports Medicine: The field of veterinary medicine concerned with PHYSICAL FITNESS of animals in sports (horse racing, dog racing, etc.) and the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries in animals.Education of Intellectually Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with subnormal intellectual functioning.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Dyslexia: A cognitive disorder characterized by an impaired ability to comprehend written and printed words or phrases despite intact vision. This condition may be developmental or acquired. Developmental dyslexia is marked by reading achievement that falls substantially below that expected given the individual's chronological age, measured intelligence, and age-appropriate education. The disturbance in reading significantly interferes with academic achievement or with activities of daily living that require reading skills. (From DSM-IV)Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting: The most common clinical variant of MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, characterized by recurrent acute exacerbations of neurologic dysfunction followed by partial or complete recovery. Common clinical manifestations include loss of visual (see OPTIC NEURITIS), motor, sensory, or bladder function. Acute episodes of demyelination may occur at any site in the central nervous system, and commonly involve the optic nerves, spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebellum. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp903-914)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Wrestling: A sport consisting of hand-to-hand combat between two unarmed contestants seeking to pin or press each other's shoulders to the ground.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Leisure Activities: Voluntary use of free time for activities outside the daily routine.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Neck Pain: Discomfort or more intense forms of pain that are localized to the cervical region. This term generally refers to pain in the posterior or lateral regions of the neck.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Absenteeism: Chronic absence from work or other duty.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Baseball: A competitive nine-member team sport including softball.Wheelchairs: Chairs mounted on wheels and designed to be propelled by the occupant.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Schools: Educational institutions.Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Harmful and painful condition caused by overuse or overexertion of some part of the musculoskeletal system, often resulting from work-related physical activities. It is characterized by inflammation, pain, or dysfunction of the involved joints, bones, ligaments, and nerves.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.FinlandMagnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Great BritainNew Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Eye Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of the eyes from impact, flying objects, glare, liquids, or injurious radiation.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Running: An activity in which the body is propelled by moving the legs rapidly. Running is performed at a moderate to rapid pace and should be differentiated from JOGGING, which is performed at a much slower pace.ArthritisHealth Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.ConnecticutHousing for the Elderly: Housing arrangements for the elderly or aged, intended to foster independent living. The housing may take the form of group homes or small apartments. It is available to the economically self-supporting but the concept includes housing for the elderly with some physical limitations. The concept should be differentiated from HOMES FOR THE AGED which is restricted to long-term geriatric facilities providing supervised medical and nursing services.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Institutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).SwedenLife Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Abbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.United States Social Security Administration: An independent agency within the Executive Branch of the United States Government. It administers a national social insurance program whereby employees, employers, and the self-employed pay contributions into pooled trust funds. Part of the contributions go into a separate hospital insurance trust fund for workers at age 65 to provide help with medical expenses. Other programs include the supplemental social security income program for the aged, blind, and disabled and the Old Age Survivors and Disability Insurance Program. It became an independent agency March 31, 1995. It had previously been part of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, later the Department of Health and Human Services. (From United States Government Manual, 1994-95)EnglandGymnastics: Systematic physical exercise. This includes calisthenics, a system of light gymnastics for promoting strength and grace of carriage.Work: Productive or purposeful activities.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Great Lakes Region: The geographic area of the Great Lakes in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. It usually includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Skating: Using ice skates, roller skates, or skateboards in racing or other competition or for recreation.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Communication Aids for Disabled: Equipment that provides mentally or physically disabled persons with a means of communication. The aids include display boards, typewriters, cathode ray tubes, computers, and speech synthesizers. The output of such aids includes written words, artificial speech, language signs, Morse code, and pictures.

*  Canadian Paralympic Committee (CPC) to welcome home Canada's athletes

The CPC empowers persons with physical disabilities, through sport, at all levels. For more information, visit www.paralympic. ... R E P E A T -- Media advisory / Photo & video opportunities - International sport science experts to attend VISTA 2017 ...
newswire.ca/news-releases/canadian-paralympic-committee-cpc-to-welcome-home-canadas-athletes-536631981.html

*  Suitable Volunteer and Work Experience

Coaching sports with children or adults (unless specifically with persons that have cognitive or physical disabilities) ... Athletic training with a sports team (unless specifically with persons who have cognitive or physical disabilities) ... Providing recreational programs to persons with cognitive or physical disabilities (e.g. horseback riding, skiing, summer camps ... Fitness or personal lifestyle coach/trainer (unless specifically with persons that have cognitive or physical disabilities) ...
https://ualberta.ca/physical-therapy/msc-in-physical-therapy/admissions/application-requirements/suitable-volunteer-and-work-experience

*  Special Olympics: Sports Seminar Warsaw

p>The first ever Special Olympics Europe Eurasia Sport Advisors' Seminar has taken place in Warsaw, Poland involving 13 newly ... Foundation for the Benefit of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities. Website made possible by Perfect Sense. Special Olympics ... New SOEE Sport Advisors Seminar held in Warsaw. 13 newly elected Special Olympics Sports Advisors meet in Warsaw ... The following sports were represented at the February Seminar: Athletics, Swimming, Football, Basketball, Equestrian, Judo, ...
specialolympics.org/Regions/europe-eurasia/News-and-Stories/Press-Releases/Sports-Seminar-Warsaw.aspx

*  Grant Fraser<...

This website is available in alternative formats for persons with disabilities. Campus addresses. Welland Campus. 100 Niagara ... School of Hospitality, Tourism and Sport Skip School Navigation Browse Schools of Study. *School of Academic, Liberal and ... Fraser is a Professor in the School of Hospitality, Tourism and Sport and in addition is the Program Coordinator of the three ... NC HomeSchool of Hospitality, Tourism & Sport Meet the Faculty Grant Fraser ...
niagaracollege.ca/hospitality-tourism-sport-studies/faculty/grant-fraser/

*  Special Olympics: Athletes

p>Having fun, developing skills and building self esteem, all while participating in year round sports training and competition ... Special Olympics has something for every person with an intellectual disability.. Champions in the Making. United In Sport. ... About Intellectual Disability. Special Olympics is a global movement of people who want to improve the lives of people with ... A swimmer with an intellectual disability from Saudi Arabia, he also is partially paralyzed - but at the 2007 Summer World ...
specialolympics.org/RegionsPages/content.aspx?id=19561&Region=SOAP&RegionName=Asia-Pacific&LangType=2052

*  Basic provisions of international classifications as criteria for evaluating the health status of rehabilitation of persons...

... provisions of international classifications to determine the state of health improved and effective rehabilitation of persons ... with disabilities. Scientific, methodological basis of the formation of a new medicine tools. ... Closely relation of sport and health. The harm of smoking for women, the human psyche.. ?????????? [777,7 K], ?????? 07.11.2014 ... Estimation the length of influencing factor to risk to person. Analysis of factors affecting the health and human disease. ...
revolution.allbest.ru/medicine/00654293_0.html

*  Home & Family: Parenting, Education, Seniors + Green tips & help - WKOW 27: Madison, WI Breaking News, Weather and Sports

Produced for Society6.com - To showcase each person's style check out society6.com, where you can shop millions of trendy ... Americans are living longer, but those extra years may include poor health or a disability, a new study finds. ... Cost keeps many kids from school sports, other activities. High costs are a major reason why many poor students don't take part ... Home & Family: Parenting, Education, Seniors + Green tips & help - WKOW 27: Madison, WI Breaking News, Weather and Sports. ...
wkow.com/category/120651/home-family

*  Psychological Research: Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy, Sport Psychology, Attention Studies

The impact of living arrangements and deinstitutionalization in the health status of persons with intellectual disability in ... Recherches Actuelles en Sciences du Sport: Proceedings of 14th International Congress of the French Society of Sport and ... Exploring mixed methods research designs in sport and exercise psychology'. Qualitative research in sport, exercise and health ... Moran, A. P.; (2012) Sport and Exercise Psychology: A Critical Introduction (2nd edition). London: Routledge. ...
ucd.ie/research/publications/20112012/humansciences/schoolofpsychology/

*  Functional Neurology, Rehabilitation, and Ergonomics

... nursing of disabled persons; sports medicine and sports for the disabled; rehabilitation of terror victims; electrodiagnosis; ... Developmental disabilities Autism in childhood and adults Diseases and trauma of the spinal cord Neuropathy, myopathy, and ... Functional assessment and outcome measurement at various levels: impairment; disability (activity); handicap (participation); ... Management of commonly encountered disabling conditions: pain; sexual disability; spasticity; postural instability and ...
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*  Volume 6, Issue 3, May 2011: Recreational Therapy, Exercise, & Leisure Activities for Individuals with Disabilities | National...

Frieden, L., & Kelley, J.D. (Eds.). (1989). Go for it! A book on sport and recreation for persons with disabilities. Orlando: ... including persons with disabilities on the staff, and involving persons with disabilities in the design and implementation of ... and competitive sport for athletes with disabilities.. Kasser, S.L., et al. (1997). Sport skills for students with disabilities ... ABSTRACT: Directory of sources of information on sports for persons with physical disabilities. Information resources are ...
naric.com/public/reSearch/eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/contentdelivery/servlet/?q=node/169

*  E-book Textbooks

ACSM's Exercise Management for Persons With Chronic Diseases and Disabilities 4th Edition eBook. American College of Sports ... Introduction to Sport Law With Case Studies in Sport Law 2nd Edition ebook. John O. Spengler, Paul M. Anderson, Daniel P. ... Sociology of Sport and Social Theory eBook. Earl Smith. ISBN: 9780736085564. Sport Club Management eBook. Matthew J. Robinson. ... Campus Recreational Sports eBook. NIRSA. ISBN: 9781450431705. Case Studies in Sport Law 2nd Edition eBook. Andrew T. Pittman, ...
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*  Canadian Paralympic Committee Celebrates 2016 International Day of Persons with Disabilities

3, 2016- Canadian Paralympic Committee Celebrates 2016 International Day of Persons with Disabilities. ... The fund supports the costs of sports and recreational programs for children with a disability who are financially ... Since 1992, the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities has been celebrated annually on Dec. 3 around the ... focusing on building a more inclusive and equitable world for persons with disabilities. Through the sporting lens, progress ...
newswire.ca/news-releases/canadian-paralympic-committee-celebrates-2016-international-day-of-persons-with-disabilities-604437466.html

*  Down Syndrome by steph ess on Prezi

Perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity for children with disability: a systematic review. Br J Sports Med, 46 ... 5. Lotan, M. (2007). Quality physical intervention activity for persons with Down syndrome. ScientificWorldJournal, 7, 7-19. ... Journal of Sport and Health Science, 2(1), 47-57.. 3. Archana, R., & Mukilan, R. (2016). Beneficial Effect of Preferential ... Journal of Sport and Health Science, 2(1), 47-57.. 10. Archana, R., & Mukilan, R. (2016). Beneficial Effect of Preferential ...
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*  Pain Management - Chronic Pain Expert Witnesses

... and management of persons of all ages with physical and/or cognitive impairments and disabilities. He is trained in the ... Sports Accidents Risk Management Security (Private & Public) Slip, Trip and Fall Accidents Statistics - Statistical Analysis ... Short Term Disability*Long Term Disability*Opioid Abuse / Overdose*Drug Overdose / Abuse*Wrongful Death. *Complex Regional Pain ... Disability Assessment Evaluations - Evaluations to determine ability to work and/or restrictions from work or daily activity. ...
experts.com/Expert-Witnesses/Categories/Pain-Management-Chronic-Pain-Medicine

*  Enabling Technology | definition of Enabling Technology by Medical dictionary

Enabling technology Disabilities A technology designed to improve the quality of life a person with disabilities and function ... Work-enabling activities-adjustable work tables, modified sports equipment. • Social interaction/communication-prosthetic ... A general term for any technology designed to improve the quality of life of a person with disabilities, help them function in ... Assistive technology for persons with disabilities • Hygiene-long levers for faucets, specially designed toilets. • ...
medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Enabling Technology

*  People With Intellectual Disabilities: Where Are They? | HuffPost UK

I have done research with persons with intellectual disabilities during my Disability Studies doctorate. However, when I get ... Cultural groups, places of leisure, schools, residential homes, sport teams, workplaces, restaurants, places of worship...these ... quality of life in persons with intellectual disabilities. The advocacy and disability pride movements have brought some of ... I share life and work with persons that have intellectual disabilities in a L'Arche community, an inclusive reality in which ...
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*  Golf and Sports Turf Management

View the technical standards for success in SUNY Delhi's Golf and Sports Turf Management bachelor degree programs. ... These standards are not conditions of admission to the program, but persons interested in applying for admission to the program ... and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; therefore, the college will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations for ... Technical Standards for Golf and Sports Turf Management BBA Program The technical standards listed below are intended to inform ...
delhi.edu/academics/majors-programs/bachelors/golf-sports-turf-management/technical-standards/index.php

*  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Development Program: Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury

Persons with disabilities having difficulty accessing information on this page may contact us for assistance. Please select the ... Although sports- and recreation-related injuries account for 3 percent of hospitalized persons with TBI, approximately 90 ... Alcohol is reported to be associated with half of all TBI, either in the person causing the injury or in the person with the ... Rehabilitation of persons with TBI should include cognitive and behavioral assessment and intervention. *Persons with TBI and ...
https://consensus.nih.gov/1998/1998traumaticbraininjury109html.htm

*  Special Olympics: Special Olympics AF Senegal

Since the establishment of Special Olympics in 1968, the number of people with and without intellectual disabilities who are ... involved with the organization has been growing, but the unmet need to reach more people with intellectual disabilities is ... Special Olympics is a global organization that serves athletes with intellectual disabilities working with hundreds of ... Zayed Sports City Stadium. Zayed Sports City, Abu Dhabi. United Arab Emirates. Zayed Sports City Stadium, is an iconic multi- ...
specialolympics.org/RegionsPages/content.aspx?id=17529&Region=SONA&RegionName=North America&LangType=2052

*  Paralympic sprinter Jonnie Peacock and his refusal to accept defeat - Telegraph

Now Jonnie himself is the sports star. Miss Roberts has bought tickets so a small army of friends and family can see him on the ... "When he was seven, they reviewed his disability living allowance. "I was the proud mum saying what he could do. They stopped ... Next summer, Jonnie Peacock, now 18, hopes to run, not in a school sports day, but in the 100 metres final of the London 2012 ... "So," he asked, "Please can I run at school sports day next summer?" ...
telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/paralympic-sport/8999641/Paralympic-sprinter-Jonnie-Peacock-and-his-refusal-to-accept-defeat.html

*  Team GLAMOUR's Running Blog | Glamour UK

How do you think the Paralympics changed perceptions towards disability and sport?. London 2012 has changed views on disability ... not the disability. The Paralympics has made us more accepted in society and community. As a disabled person, I don't get ... Is sport just about winning?. No! It's not just about gold shiny things. Sport is about challenging yourself. It's about ... Boutique Sport hosts free events for women across London. For further details regarding Boutique Sport or to request further ...
glamourmagazine.co.uk/gallery/team-glamour-running-blog

*  Special Olympics: Multinational Attitudes Study

... many have believed that the doors to inclusion of individuals with intellectual disabilities in mainstream society have been ... Foundation for the Benefit of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities. Sitio web hecho posible por Perfect Sense Digital, LLC. ... sports and community organizers, and government leaders to address what can be done to promote the inclusion of individuals ... "One of the greatest challenges persons with intellectual disabilities face is overcoming the barriers to inclusion in society ...
specialolympics.org/RegionsPages/content.aspx?id=23749&Region=SOLA&RegionName=Latin-America&LangType=1034

*  UNIVERSAL CLOSED-LOOP ELECTRICAL STIMULATION SYSTEM - Patent application

The use of the present invention as a universal trunk stimulator to help restore motor function to persons with disabilities, ... The present invention will also improve the longevity of performance in general sports, and/or advanced sports performance by ... only to restore motor function to persons with disabilities and/or paralysis, but also address FES exercise for people who are ... 0066] The present universal closed-loop FES system invention can be used to restore function in numerous body parts of persons ...
patentsencyclopedia.com/app/20130123568

*  T45 (classification) - Wikipedia

T45 is disability sport classification for disability athletics. for people with double above or below the elbow amputations, ... the nature of a person's amputations in this class can effect their physiology and sports performance. Because they are missing ... "Queensland Sport. Queensland Sport. Retrieved July 23, 2016.. *^ "Classification 101". Blaze Sports. Blaze Sports. June 2012. ... Paralympic Sports Medicine and Science. 6 (85). Retrieved July 25, 2016.. *^ Gilbert, Keith; Schantz, Otto J.; Schantz, Otto ( ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T45_

International Disability and Development Consortium: The International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) is a global consortium of disability and development related organisations. The aim of IDDC is to promote inclusive development internationally, with a special focus on promoting human rights for all disabled people living in economically poor communities in lower and middle-income countries.Larry LemakIssa HayatouMultiple disabilitiesHyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome: Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome, HPMRS, also known as Mabry syndrome, has been described in patients recruited on four continents world-wide. Mabry syndrome was confirmed to represent an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by severe mental retardation, considerably elevated serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, hypoplastic terminal phalanges, and distinct facial features that include: hypertelorism, a broad nasal bridge and a rectangular face.Meredith EatonZhou Mi (badminton)Developmental Disability (California): In California, Developmental Disabilitymeans a disability that is attributable to mental retardation], [[cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, or disabling conditions found to be closely related to mental retardation or to require treatment similar to that required for individuals with mental retardation.Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.Arc Trainer: The Arc Trainer is a stationary, non-impact exercise machine, and is a registered trademark of Cybex International, Inc. The Arc Trainer is manufactured in Owatonna MN.Pensioner: A pensioner is a person who collects a pension, most commonly because of a retirement from the workforce. This is a term typically used in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Australia where someone of pensionable age may also be referred to as an 'old age pensioner', or OAP.Learning Disability Coalition: The Learning Disability Coalition is a group of fourteen organisations which campaigns to secure better funding for social care for people with learning disabilities in England.Coalition was formed in May 2007.Paul Edwards (athlete)Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Dan BuckinghamList of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Napier Javelin: The Napier Javelin was a British six-cylinder inline air-cooled engine designed by Frank Halford and built by Napier & Son.Lumsden 2003, p.Pain scale: A pain scale measures a patient's pain intensity or other features. Pain scales are based on self-report, observational (behavioral), or physiological data.John Mackey (American football)Anthem (The 2002 FIFA World Cup Official Anthem): Anthem (The 2002 FIFA World Cup Official Anthem) by Vangelis and produced and mixed by Takkyu Ishino is the theme song for 2002 FIFA World Cup held in South Korea and Japan. The single was commercially successful in Japan, being certified platinum for 100,000 copies shipped to stores.Supplemental Security Income: Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a United States government program that provides stipends to low-income people who are either aged (65 or older), blind, or disabled.(SSA "Supplemental Security Income (SSI)" p.Phil Henderson (basketball)QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Yamaha Phazer: Phazer is the name of a model of snowmobile produced by the Yamaha Motor Corporation. Introduced in 1984, it became a popular model for Yamaha and spawned several follow-up models (such as the Phazer II, Phazer Deluxe, Phazer Mountain Lite, Phazer FX, and Phazer GT); its design features were also incorporated into other models (such as later-model Exciters as well as the Venture Lite).Low back painSelf-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Child Health International: Child Health International (CHI) is a Winchester (UK)-based charity, with a proven record of success in improving the healthcare of children in Russia, Eastern Europe and a new project to help children with cystic fibrosis in India.Winchester City Council - Child Health International exhibition, 5 - 21 August 2005.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.List of multiple sclerosis organizations: List of Multiple Sclerosis Organizations in different countries around the worldJohn F. Cotton Corporate Wellness Center: The John F. Cotton Corporate Wellness Center or John F.Craig HospitalIrina Khazova: Russia}}Assistive technology service provider: Assistive technology service providers help individuals with disabilities acquire and use appropriate Assistive Technology (AT) to help them participate in activities of daily living, employment and education.Outline of martial arts: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to martial arts:Cancer pain: Pain in cancer may arise from a tumor compressing or infiltrating nearby body parts; from treatments and diagnostic procedures; or from skin, nerve and other changes caused by a hormone imbalance or immune response. Most chronic (long-lasting) pain is caused by the illness and most acute (short-term) pain is caused by treatment or diagnostic procedures.Ottawa knee rules: The Ottawa Knee Rules are a set of rules used to help physicians determine whether an x-ray of the knee is needed.http://www.High-intensity interval training: High-intensity interval training (HIIT), also called high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) or sprint interval training (SIT), is an enhanced form of interval training, an exercise strategy alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. HIIT is a form of cardiovascular exercise.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingFlorida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation: Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a federal-state program in the U.S.Prevention of concussions: Prevention of mild traumatic brain injury involves taking general measures to prevent traumatic brain injury, such as wearing seat belts and using airbags in cars.Creation of legal relations in English lawMillennium PeopleGlen Canyon National Recreation AreaAmos MansdorfIncidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Performance-enhancing drugs: Performance-enhancing drugs are substances used to improve any form of activity performance in humans. Physical performance-enhancing drugs are used by athletes and bodybuilders.Let's Move!: Let's Move! seeks to combat the epidemic of childhood obesity and encourage a healthy lifestyle through "a comprehensive, collaborative, and community-oriented initiative that addresses all of the various factors that lead to childhood obesity [.Anglican Retirement Villages, Diocese of Sydney: Anglican Retirement Villages, Diocese of Sydney (ARV) is a not-for-profit public benevolent institution formed in 1959. This inception date places ARV as one of the founding entities of the social service now referred to as retirement or seniors living.Frailty syndrome: Frailty is a common geriatric syndrome that embodies an elevated risk of catastrophic declines in health and function among older adults. Frailty is a condition associated with ageing, and it has been recognized for centuries.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.Sick leave: Sick leave (or paid sick days or sick pay) is time off from work that workers can use to stay home to address their health and safety needs without losing pay. Paid sick leave is a statutory requirement in many nations around the world.Select MedicalOffice of Workers' Compensation Programs: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs administers four major disability compensation programs which provide wage replacement benefits, medical treatment, vocational rehabilitation and other benefits to certain workers or their dependents who experience work-related injury or occupational disease.http://www.Field hockey at the All-Africa GamesRehabilitation Research and Development Service: The Veterans Health Administration Office of Research and Development's Rehabilitation Research and Development (RR&D) Service funds research to improve or restore function in veterans who have become disabled because of injury or disease. As the population of Veterans with disabilities increases, in part, due to improved survival following catastrophic events, the need for research increases.Walking on a Dream (song)Boxing at the All-Africa Games: BrazzavillePostoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Mouthguard: A mouthguard is a protective device for the mouth that covers the teeth and gums to prevent and reduce injury to the teeth, arches, lips and gums. A mouthguard is most often used to prevent injury in contact sports, as a treatment for bruxism or TMD, or as part of certain dental procedures, such as tooth bleaching.Exercise prescription software: Exercise prescription software is a branch of computer software designed to aid in the construction of exercise programmes or regimes for patients who require some kind of ongoing rehabilitation.Mental disorderComorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Annual Fitness Test: In the British Army, the Annual Fitness Test is designed to assess soldiers' lower and upper body strength and endurance. The test was formally known as the Combat Fitness Test - and is still colloquially known by soldiers as the CFT.Rating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.