L-Iditol 2-Dehydrogenase: An alcohol oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of L-iditol to L-sorbose in the presence of NAD. It also acts on D-glucitol to form D-fructose. It also acts on other closely related sugar alcohols to form the corresponding sugar. EC 1.1.1.14Aldehyde Reductase: An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the oxidation of an aldose to an alditol. It possesses broad specificity for many aldoses. EC 1.1.1.21.Sugar Alcohol Dehydrogenases: Reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of sugar alcohols to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2. and EC 1.1.99.Sugar Alcohols: Polyhydric alcohols having no more than one hydroxy group attached to each carbon atom. They are formed by the reduction of the carbonyl group of a sugar to a hydroxyl group.(From Dorland, 28th ed)Fructose: A monosaccharide in sweet fruits and honey that is soluble in water, alcohol, or ether. It is used as a preservative and an intravenous infusion in parenteral feeding.Galactitol: A naturally occurring product of plants obtained following reduction of GALACTOSE. It appears as a white crystalline powder with a slight sweet taste. It may form in excess in the lens of the eye in GALACTOSEMIAS, a deficiency of GALACTOKINASE.Xylitol: A five-carbon sugar alcohol derived from XYLOSE by reduction of the carbonyl group. It is as sweet as sucrose and used as a noncariogenic sweetener.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Imidazolidines: Compounds based on reduced IMIDAZOLINES which contain no double bonds in the ring.Inositol: An isomer of glucose that has traditionally been considered to be a B vitamin although it has an uncertain status as a vitamin and a deficiency syndrome has not been identified in man. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1379) Inositol phospholipids are important in signal transduction.Mannitol: A diuretic and renal diagnostic aid related to sorbitol. It has little significant energy value as it is largely eliminated from the body before any metabolism can take place. It can be used to treat oliguria associated with kidney failure or other manifestations of inadequate renal function and has been used for determination of glomerular filtration rate. Mannitol is also commonly used as a research tool in cell biological studies, usually to control osmolarity.Dihydroxyacetone: A ketotriose compound. Its addition to blood preservation solutions results in better maintenance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels during storage. It is readily phosphorylated to dihydroxyacetone phosphate by triokinase in erythrocytes. In combination with naphthoquinones it acts as a sunscreening agent.FructosephosphatesMalus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.Hypertonic Solutions: Solutions that have a greater osmotic pressure than a reference solution such as blood, plasma, or interstitial fluid.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Plantago: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. The small plants usually have a dense tuft of basal leaves and long, leafless stalks bearing a terminal spike of small flowers. The seeds, known as PSYLLIUM, swell in water and are used as laxatives. The leaves have been used medicinally.Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.Pharmaceutic Aids: Substances which are of little or no therapeutic value, but are necessary in the manufacture, compounding, storage, etc., of pharmaceutical preparations or drug dosage forms. They include SOLVENTS, diluting agents, and suspending agents, and emulsifying agents. Also, ANTIOXIDANTS; PRESERVATIVES, PHARMACEUTICAL; COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS; OINTMENT BASES.Mannitol Dehydrogenases: Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases that have specificity for MANNITOL. Enzymes in this category are generally classified according to their preference for a specific reducing cofactor.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental: Diabetes mellitus induced experimentally by administration of various diabetogenic agents or by PANCREATECTOMY.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.RhodanineErythritol: A four-carbon sugar that is found in algae, fungi, and lichens. It is twice as sweet as sucrose and can be used as a coronary vasodilator.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Kidney Medulla: The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.Sucrose: A nonreducing disaccharide composed of GLUCOSE and FRUCTOSE linked via their anomeric carbons. It is obtained commercially from SUGARCANE, sugar beet (BETA VULGARIS), and other plants and used extensively as a food and a sweetener.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Cation Exchange Resins: High molecular weight insoluble polymers which contain functional anionic groups that are capable of undergoing exchange reactions with cations.4-Chloromercuribenzenesulfonate: A cytotoxic sulfhydryl reagent that inhibits several subcellular metabolic systems and is used as a tool in cellular physiology.Glycerol: A trihydroxy sugar alcohol that is an intermediate in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. It is used as a solvent, emollient, pharmaceutical agent, and sweetening agent.HexosesMalabsorption Syndromes: General term for a group of MALNUTRITION syndromes caused by failure of normal INTESTINAL ABSORPTION of nutrients.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Sweetening Agents: Substances that sweeten food, beverages, medications, etc., such as sugar, saccharine or other low-calorie synthetic products. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Prunus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of edible fruits such as apricot, plum, peach, cherry, and almond.Ribitol: A sugar alcohol formed by the reduction of ribose.GluconatesWater-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Flowering Tops: Tops of plants when in flower, including the stems, leaves and blooms.Alcohol Oxidoreductases: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Sodium Nitrite: Nitrous acid sodium salt. Used in many industrial processes, in meat curing, coloring, and preserving, and as a reagent in ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES. It is used therapeutically as an antidote in cyanide poisoning. The compound is toxic and mutagenic and will react in vivo with secondary or tertiary amines thereby producing highly carcinogenic nitrosamines.NAD: A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.PhloretinBetaine: A naturally occurring compound that has been of interest for its role in osmoregulation. As a drug, betaine hydrochloride has been used as a source of hydrochloric acid in the treatment of hypochlorhydria. Betaine has also been used in the treatment of liver disorders, for hyperkalemia, for homocystinuria, and for gastrointestinal disturbances. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1341)Pseudomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria usually found in soil or water and including many plant pathogens and a few animal pathogens.Hydantoins: Compounds based on imidazolidine dione. Some derivatives are ANTICONVULSANTS.Cathartics: Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Caesalpinia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The common name of "Bird-Of-Paradise" is also used for other plants such as Heliconia (HELICONIACEAE) and Strelitzia (STRELITZIACEAE) and some birds. The common name of "Cat's-Claw" is more often used with UNCARIA. The common name of "Pernambuco" also refers to a state in Brazil. Furanoditerpenoid lactones and caesalpin are produced by members of this genus.Diabetic Neuropathies: Peripheral, autonomic, and cranial nerve disorders that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS. These conditions usually result from diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (VASA NERVORUM). Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third nerve palsy (see OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES); MONONEUROPATHY; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful POLYNEUROPATHY; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1325)PhlorhizinCytochalasins: 11- to 14-membered macrocyclic lactones with a fused isoindolone. Members with INDOLES attached at the C10 position are called chaetoglobosins. They are produced by various fungi. Some members interact with ACTIN and inhibit CYTOKINESIS.Phloem: Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.GlyceraldehydeHydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Diuretics, Osmotic: Compounds that increase urine volume by increasing the amount of osmotically active solute in the urine. Osmotic diuretics also increase the osmolarity of plasma.Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Spiro Compounds: A group of compounds consisting in part of two rings sharing one atom (usually a carbon) in common.Glucokinase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and D-glucose to ADP and D-glucose 6-phosphate. They are found in invertebrates and microorganisms, and are highly specific for glucose. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.2.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Imidazoles: Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES).Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Cariogenic Agents: Substances that promote DENTAL CARIES.Sorbose: A ketose sugar that is commonly used in the commercial synthesis of ASCORBIC ACID.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Carbohydrate Dehydrogenases: Reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of carbohydrates to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2.; and 1.1.99.HexosephosphatesAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.TrehaloseGlycerylphosphorylcholine: A component of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES or LECITHINS, in which the two hydroxy groups of GLYCEROL are esterified with fatty acids. (From Stedman, 26th ed) It counteracts the effects of urea on enzymes and other macromolecules.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Cefixime: A third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic that is stable to hydrolysis by beta-lactamases.Serum Globulins: All blood proteins except albumin ( = SERUM ALBUMIN, which is not a globulin) and FIBRINOGEN (which is not in the serum). The serum globulins are subdivided into ALPHA-GLOBULINS; BETA-GLOBULINS; and GAMMA-GLOBULINS on the basis of their electrophoretic mobilities. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high potassium concentration in the blood, most often due to defective renal excretion. It is characterized clinically by electrocardiographic abnormalities (elevated T waves and depressed P waves, and eventually by atrial asystole). In severe cases, weakness and flaccid paralysis may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Zymomonas: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that is not known to be pathogenic for man, animals, or plants. Its organisms are spoilers for beers and ciders and in sweet English ciders they are the causative agents of a secondary fermentation known as "cider sickness." The species Z. mobilis is used for experiments in molecular genetic studies.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases: A superfamily of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that are activated by diverse stimuli via protein kinase cascades. They are the final components of the cascades, activated by phosphorylation by MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE KINASES, which in turn are activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP KINASE KINASE KINASES).Taurine: A conditionally essential nutrient, important during mammalian development. It is present in milk but is isolated mostly from ox bile and strongly conjugates bile acids.Zinc Sulfate: A compound given in the treatment of conditions associated with zinc deficiency such as acrodermatitis enteropathica. Externally, zinc sulfate is used as an astringent in lotions and eye drops. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Glycyrrhiza: A genus of leguminous herbs or shrubs whose roots yield GLYCYRRHETINIC ACID and its derivative, CARBENOXOLONE.Thionucleosides: Nucleosides in which the base moiety is substituted with one or more sulfur atoms.GlutaratesEnzyme Stability: The extent to which an enzyme retains its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to storage, isolation, and purification or various other physical or chemical manipulations, including proteolytic enzymes and heat.Lactates: Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Shiga Toxin 1: A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It is closely related to SHIGA TOXIN produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE.Luminescent Agents: Compound such as LUMINESCENT PROTEINS that cause or emit light (PHYSICAL LUMINESCENCE).PhthalazinesUrea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Ribonuclease, Pancreatic: An enzyme that catalyzes the endonucleolytic cleavage of pancreatic ribonucleic acids to 3'-phosphomono- and oligonucleotides ending in cytidylic or uridylic acids with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate intermediates. EC 3.1.27.5.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Maltose: A dextrodisaccharide from malt and starch. It is used as a sweetening agent and fermentable intermediate in brewing. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Sugar PhosphatesRats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases: A mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamily that regulates a variety of cellular processes including CELL GROWTH PROCESSES; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; APOPTOSIS; and cellular responses to INFLAMMATION. The P38 MAP kinases are regulated by CYTOKINE RECEPTORS and can be activated in response to bacterial pathogens.Fruit: The fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a plant, enclosing the seed or seeds.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Osmotic Fragility: RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.Galactose: An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Pyruvic Acid: An intermediate compound in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. In thiamine deficiency, its oxidation is retarded and it accumulates in the tissues, especially in nervous structures. (From Stedman, 26th ed)PyruvatesDNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Glucosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glucose from a nucleoside diphosphate glucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Quercetin: A flavonol widely distributed in plants. It is an antioxidant, like many other phenolic heterocyclic compounds. Glycosylated forms include RUTIN and quercetrin.Monosaccharides: Simple sugars, carbohydrates which cannot be decomposed by hydrolysis. They are colorless crystalline substances with a sweet taste and have the same general formula CnH2nOn. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Fructose-Bisphosphate Aldolase: An enzyme of the lyase class that catalyzes the cleavage of fructose 1,6-biphosphate to form dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The enzyme also acts on (3S,4R)-ketose 1-phosphates. The yeast and bacterial enzymes are zinc proteins. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) E.C. 4.1.2.13.Lactobacillus plantarum: A species of rod-shaped, LACTIC ACID bacteria used in PROBIOTICS and SILAGE production.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Sperm Tail: The posterior filiform portion of the spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) that provides sperm motility.Alcohols: Alkyl compounds containing a hydroxyl group. They are classified according to relation of the carbon atom: primary alcohols, R-CH2OH; secondary alcohols, R2-CHOH; tertiary alcohols, R3-COH. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.NADP: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)Zinc: A metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. It is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with ANEMIA, short stature, HYPOGONADISM, impaired WOUND HEALING, and geophagia. It is known by the symbol Zn.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases: A subgroup of mitogen-activated protein kinases that activate TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR AP-1 via the phosphorylation of C-JUN PROTEINS. They are components of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate CELL PROLIFERATION; APOPTOSIS; and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Rats, Transgenic: Laboratory rats that have been produced from a genetically manipulated rat EGG or rat EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. They contain genes from another species.Phosphotransferases: A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.Streptozocin: An antibiotic that is produced by Stretomyces achromogenes. It is used as an antineoplastic agent and to induce diabetes in experimental animals.Arsenites: Inorganic salts or organic esters of arsenious acid.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Hypotonic Solutions: Solutions that have a lesser osmotic pressure than a reference solution such as blood, plasma, or interstitial fluid.Diabetic Retinopathy: Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.Hexokinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ATP and a D-hexose to ADP and a D-hexose 6-phosphate. D-Glucose, D-mannose, D-fructose, sorbitol, and D-glucosamine can act as acceptors; ITP and dATP can act as donors. The liver isoenzyme has sometimes been called glucokinase. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.1.1.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.XyloseSolvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hyperglycemia: Abnormally high BLOOD GLUCOSE level.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Salts: Substances produced from the reaction between acids and bases; compounds consisting of a metal (positive) and nonmetal (negative) radical. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Enterobacter: Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.CitratesTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Immunomagnetic Separation: A cell-separation technique where magnetizable microspheres or beads are first coated with monoclonal antibody, allowed to search and bind to target cells, and are then selectively removed when passed through a magnetic field. Among other applications, the technique is commonly used to remove tumor cells from the marrow (BONE MARROW PURGING) of patients who are to undergo autologous bone marrow transplantation.Gene Expression Regulation, Plant: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in plants.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Glycolysis: A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Protein Denaturation: Disruption of the non-covalent bonds and/or disulfide bonds responsible for maintaining the three-dimensional shape and activity of the native protein.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Pichia: Yeast-like ascomycetous fungi of the family Saccharomycetaceae, order SACCHAROMYCETALES isolated from exuded tree sap.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Formates: Derivatives of formic acids. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are formed with a single carbon carboxy group.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Glucans: Polysaccharides composed of repeating glucose units. They can consist of branched or unbranched chains in any linkages.Monensin: An antiprotozoal agent produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis. It exerts its effect during the development of first-generation trophozoites into first-generation schizonts within the intestinal epithelial cells. It does not interfere with hosts' development of acquired immunity to the majority of coccidial species. Monensin is a sodium and proton selective ionophore and is widely used as such in biochemical studies.Diuresis: An increase in the excretion of URINE. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).MethylaminesSpores, Fungal: Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Deuterium: Deuterium. The stable isotope of hydrogen. It has one neutron and one proton in the nucleus.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Streptococcus mutans: A polysaccharide-producing species of STREPTOCOCCUS isolated from human dental plaque.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Drug-Induced Liver Injury: A spectrum of clinical liver diseases ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to ACUTE LIVER FAILURE, caused by drugs, drug metabolites, and chemicals from the environment.Chromatography, DEAE-Cellulose: A type of ion exchange chromatography using diethylaminoethyl cellulose (DEAE-CELLULOSE) as a positively charged resin. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Potassium Chloride: A white crystal or crystalline powder used in BUFFERS; FERTILIZERS; and EXPLOSIVES. It can be used to replenish ELECTROLYTES and restore WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE in treating HYPOKALEMIA.Freezing: Liquids transforming into solids by the removal of heat.

*  AID 182605 - In vivo inhibition of sorbitol accumulation in sciatic nerves from streptozotocin-diabetic rats dosed over 5 days....

In vivo inhibition of sorbitol accumulation in sciatic nerves from streptozotocin-diabetic rats dosed over 5 days. at a dose of ...

*  D-Sorbitol | C6H14O6 - PubChem

D-Sorbitol , C6H14O6 , CID 5780 - structure, chemical names, physical and chemical properties, classification, patents, ...

*  Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland - Volume 16, Number 5-May 2010 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC

Alpers K, Werber D, Frank C, Koch J, Friedrich AW, Karch H, Sorbitol-fermenting enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H ... Rosser T, Dransfield T, Allison L, Hanson M, Holden N, Evans J, Pathogenic potential of emergent sorbitol-fermenting ... Sorbitol-fermenting Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 in Austria. Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2009;121:108-12. DOIPubMed ... Sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2010;16(5):881-882. doi:10.3201/ ...

*  D-Sorbitol Assay Kit (Colorimetric) (ab118968) | Abcam

Quantify sorbitol levels in a variety of samples in only 40 min. ... D-Sorbitol Assay Kit (Colorimetric) images. * D-Sorbitol Assay ... D-Sorbitol Assay Kit (Colorimetric) (ab118968). Colorimetric. Sensitivity , 0.1 nmol/well. ... Abcam's D-Sorbitol Assay Kit (Colorimetric) is designed to measure sorbitol in a variety of samples such as foods, fruits, ... Interestingly, sorbitol can be used as a screen for the O154:H7 strain of E. coli, since this strain is one of the few strains ...

*  Sorbitol (Professional Patient Advice) - Drugs.com

Professional guide for Sorbitol. Includes: pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, contraindications, interactions, adverse reactions ... Unable to metabolize sorbitol: Use with caution in patients unable to metabolize sorbitol. ... Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate: Sorbitol may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate. More specifically ... Calcium Polystyrene Sulfonate: Sorbitol may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Calcium Polystyrene Sulfonate. More ...

*  Sorbitol Reviews & Ratings at Drugs.com

Reviews and ratings for sorbitol. Share your experience with this medication by writing a review. ... Reviews for Sorbitol. For Constipation: "vomitting and stomamps Cramps going to Toilet every 5 to 10 minute " ... Use of sorbitol in herbal medicine is safe and which syp it can be used? ... Is charcoal or it's real name actidose-sorbitol in the benzo family? ...

*  Activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension Information - Drugs.com

Easy to read patient leaflet for activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension. Includes indications, proper use, special ... Activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension. Generic Name: activated charcoal and sorbitol (CHAR-kole/SOR-bi-tole). Brand Name: ... Proper storage of activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension: Store activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension at room ... How to use activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension:. Use activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension as directed by your ...

*  L-Sorbitol - Cosmo Bio Co.,Ltd.

Cosmo Bio Co. is a leading distributor of biological reagents, instruments and clinical diagnostics.

*  Shampoo Products Containing: SORBITOL || Skin Deep® Cosmetics Database | EWG

Beyond providing Skin Deep® as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED™ mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWG's strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products' ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more , Legal Disclaimer ...

*  Sorbitol (By mouth) | University of Maryland Medical Center

Sorbitol (By mouth). Introduction. Sorbitol (SOR-bi-tol). Treats constipation by helping you have a bowel movement. Sometimes ...

*  Sorbitol Manufacturers, Sorbitol Manufacturers Suppliers and Manufacturers at Alibaba.com

Wholesale Various High Quality Sorbitol Manufacturers Products from Global Sorbitol Manufacturers Suppliers and Sorbitol ... Sorbitol Manufacturer Stable Supply Sorbitol 70% /Liquid Sorbitol/Sorbitol Solution 70 high quality and best price For ... Tags: Sorbitol 70% Solution , Sorbitol 70% Solution Food Grade , Sorbitol 70% Solution Manufacturer , View larger image ... Tags: Sorbitol 70%/sorbitol Price , Non-crystalline Sorbitol 70% Solution For Toothpaste Production , Manufacturer Price Supply ...

*  Sorbitol's Laxative Effect Might Cause Abdominal Problems | Diabetes Health

Sorbitol Not Dangerous. Sorbitol defended itself through the Calorie Control Council, a conglomeration of companies that ... Sorbitol's Laxative Effect Might Cause Abdominal Problems. December 1, 1999. Sharon Mulry Leave a comment ... Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol. Other sugar alcohols used as sugar replacers in foods are maltitol, manitol, Isomalt, xylitol and ... Sorbitol appears in many kinds of products advertised as sugar-free foods, including sugar-free candy and pancake syrup. ...

*  RCSB PDB - 1E3J: Ketose reductase (sorbitol dehydrogenase) from silverleaf whitefly Literature Report Page

1E3J: Crystal Structure of Nadp(H)-Dependent Ketose Reductase from Besimia Argentifolii at 2.3 Angstrom Resolution

*  BRENDA - 1.1.1.140: sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase

1.1.1.140: sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. This is an abbreviated version, for detailed information about sorbitol-6- ... D-glucitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, D-sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase, D-sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ... D-sorbitol 6-phosphate. + NAD+. = D-fructose 6-phosphate. + NADH. + H+. Synonyms. ... Temperature Optimum on EC 1.1.1.140 - sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase. Please wait a moment until all data is loaded. This ...

*  Sorbitol in Vadodara,Sorbitol Manufacturers and Suppliers from india

Get contact details of Sorbitol Manufacturers, Wholesale Sorbitol Exporters, Best Sorbitol Traders & Distributors Across the ... Deals in Molecular Sieves, Zinc Oxide, Hydrated Lime Powder, Guar Gum Powder, Sodium Sulphite, Poly Aluminum Chloride, sorbitol ... Deals in Ethyl Acetate, Calcitriol, Phenylephrine Hydrochloride, Misoprostol, Caustic Soda Flakes, Acetone, Sorbitol, Methylene ... Liquid Sorbitol, Liquid Glucose, Refined Glycerine, Gram Flour (besan), Linear Alkyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid, Soda Ash Light, ...

*  Sorbitol causes premature cataracts, retinopathy, heavy weight loss, and peripheral neuropathy - NaturalNews.com

Sorbitol causes premature cataracts, retinopathy, heavy weight loss, and peripheral neuropathy ... Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol that is often used to sweeten processed foods. Some tissues contain sorbitol dehydorgenase, an ... Sorbitol causes premature cataracts, retinopathy, heavy weight loss, and peripheral neuropathy. Reprinting this article: Non- ... NaturalNews) Sorbitol, a sugar alcohol, was once widely accepted as a sugar alternative for diabetics. It is also produced in ...

*  BRENDA - 2.7.1.198: protein-Npi-phosphohistidine-D-sorbitol phosphotransferase

D-sorbitol[side 1]. = [protein]-L-histidine. + D-sorbitol 6-phosphate[side 2]. ... D-sorbitol PTS permease, EIIGut, glucitol IIC, glucitol PTS permease, glucitol-specific enzyme I1, gutA, IIA Gut, sorbitol PTS ... 2.7.1.198 protein-Npi-phosphohistidine-D-sorbitol phosphotransferase. Advanced search results. Do not include text mining ... This is an abbreviated version, for detailed information about protein-Npi-phosphohistidine-D-sorbitol phosphotransferase, go ...

*  Are Xylitol, Sorbitol, and Other Sugar Alcohols Safe Replacements For Sugar?

First ingredient: SORBITOL! Then I looked at my Colgate toothpaste, which I found also had SORBITOL, tho not the first ... Were they for sure sweetened with xylitol? Or maybe sorbitol? I've read about this effect more with sorbitol! ... Are Xylitol, Sorbitol, and Other Sugar Alcohols Safe Replacements For Sugar?. on June 13, 2014. by Chris Kresser 188 comments ... I can't digest Sorbitol or Mannitol or most other sugar alcohols at all. They give me terrible GI distress. I don't have that ...

*  Actidose with Sorbitol and Actidose-Aqua (Activated Charcoal Suspension) Patient Information: Side Effects and Drug Images at...

Pictures of Actidose with Sorbitol and Actidose-Aqua (Activated Charcoal Suspension), drug imprint information, side effects ... Actidose with Sorbitol and Actidose-Aqua. *Generic Name: activated charcoal suspension. *Brand Name: Actidose with Sorbitol and ... What is charcoal (Actidose with Sorbitol and Actidose-Aqua)?. Charcoal is used to treat stomach pain caused by excess gas, ... home drugs a-z list side effects drug center actidose with sorbitol and actidose-aqua (activated charcoal suspension) drug - ...

*  Sorbitol linked to diabetes complications

... sorbitol, has been linked to the risk of diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. ... Update on Sorbitol, 1/25/2013: This is an update to an article I posted on sorbitol side effects as part of my hidden MSG ... Cutting Back on Sorbitol: If you want to cut down on sorbitol, you must become an avid label reader. In general, expect to see ... They said something about sorbitol enhancing some property of another ingredient but it made no sense to me at all. Sorbitol is ...

*  Image:UV-vis of 12.1mg p-sorbitol phosphate Buffer in 1mL Ethyl Acetate (after sonication) .png - OpenWetWare

Image:UV-vis of 12.1mg p-sorbitol phosphate Buffer in 1mL Ethyl Acetate (after sonication) .png. From OpenWetWare. ... Retrieved from "http://www.openwetware.org/wiki/Image:UV-vis_of_12.1mg_p-sorbitol_phosphate_Buffer_in_1mL_Ethyl_Acetate_% ...

*  British Library EThOS: Physiological studies on the biotransformation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose by 'Gluconobacter suboxydans'

Physiological studies on the biotransformation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose by 'Gluconobacter suboxydans' ...

Sorbitol dehydrogenase: Sorbitol dehydrogenase (or SDH) is a cytosolic enzyme. In humans this protein is encoded by the SORD gene.Aldose reductase inhibitor: Aldose reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs being studied as a way to prevent eye and nerve damage in people with diabetes.D-arabitol-phosphate dehydrogenase: D-arabitol-phosphate dehydrogenase (, APDH, D-arabitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, D-arabitol 5-phosphate dehydrogenase) is an enzyme with system name D-arabitol-phosphate:NAD+ oxidoreductase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionFructose malabsorptionGalactitolXylitolOncotic pressure: Oncotic pressure, or colloid osmotic pressure, is a form of osmotic pressure exerted by proteins, notably albumin, in a blood vessel's plasma (blood/liquid) that usually tends to pull water into the circulatory system. It is the opposing force to capillary filtration pressure and interstitial colloidal osmotic pressure.SorbinilPinitolMannitol motility medium: Mannitol motility medium is a bacterial growth medium used to detect the ability of bacteria to ferment mannite and produce nitrogen gas; and to indicate the motility of the organism.DihydroxyacetoneSooty blotch and flyspeck: Sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) or 'apple summer disease' is a plant disease caused by a complex of saprophytic fungi which colonize the epicuticular wax layer of apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.).Glucose transporterPlantago: Plantain}}Lens Controller: A Lens Controller is device that controls motorized photographic lens functions such as zoom, focus, and iris or aperture.Kruegle, Herman (2007).Fenclozic acidMannitolSalting in: Salting in refers to the effect where increasing the ionic strength of a solution increases the solubility of some solute (such as a protein). This effect tends to be observed at lower ionic strengths.Xuzhou Medical CollegeRhodanineErythritolHalotolerance: Halotolerance is the adaptation of living organisms to conditions of high salinity.Walter Larcher, 2001 Halotolerant species tend to live in areas such as hypersaline lakes, coastal dunes, saline deserts, salt marshes, and inland salt seas and springs.Renal medullaSucrose gap: The sucrose gap technique is used to create a conduction block in nerve or muscle fibers. A high concentration of sucrose is applied to the extracellular space to increase resistance between two groups of cells, which prevents the correct opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels.Sciatic nerve: The sciatic nerve (; also called ischiadic nerve, ischiatic nerve) is a large nerve in humans and other animals. It begins in the lower back and runs through the buttock and down the lower limb.Lipofectamine: Lipofectamine or Lipofectamine 2000 is a common transfection reagent, produced and sold by Invitrogen, used in molecular and cellular biology. Invitrogen (2012).Glycerol 3-phosphate: -glycerol 1-phosphate-glycerol 3-phosphate-α-glycerophosphate-α-phosphoglycerolGlucuronamideMalabsorptionLiver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GISweetness: Sweetness is one of the five basic tastes and is universally regarded as a pleasurable experience, except perhaps in excess. Foods rich in simple carbohydrates such as sugar are those most commonly associated with sweetness, although there are other natural and artificial compounds that are sweet at much lower concentrations, allowing their use as non-caloric sugar substitutes.Pepsi Wild Cherry: Pepsi Wild Cherry is a cherry-flavored cola first introduced in 1988 by PepsiCo as a replacement for Cherry Cola Slice, introduced as part of the line in 1986. A sugar-free version is also available, with zero calories, named Diet Pepsi Wild Cherry.RibitolAldonic acidOsmoregulation: Osmoregulation is the active regulation of the osmotic pressure of an organism's fluids to maintain the homeostasis of the organism's water content; that is, it keeps the organism's fluids from becoming too diluted or too concentrated. Osmotic pressure is a measure of the tendency of water to move into one solution from another by osmosis.Eagle's minimal essential medium: Eagle's minimal essential medium (EMEM) is a cell culture medium developed by Harry Eagle that can be used to maintain cells in tissue culture.Corriedale: Corriedale sheep are a dual purpose breed, meaning they are used both in the production of wool and meat. The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New ZealandStock Types, The Land, North Richmond, c.Burst kinetics: Burst kinetics is a form of enzyme kinetics that refers to an initial high velocity of enzymatic turnover when adding enzyme to substrate. This initial period of high velocity product formation is referred to as the "Burst Phase".MyosmineLactic acid fermentationPhloretinBetaine: A betaine (BEET-ah-een, ) in chemistry is any neutral chemical compound with a positively charged cationic functional group such as a quaternary ammonium or phosphonium cation (generally: onium ions) which bears no hydrogen atom and with a negatively charged functional group such as a carboxylate group which may not be adjacent to the cationic site. A betaine thus may be a specific type of zwitterion.Pseudomonadaceae: Pseudomonadaceae is a family of bacteria that includes the genera Azomonas, Azomonotrichon, Azorhizophilus, Azotobacter, Cellvibrio, Mesophilobacter, Pseudomonas (the type genus), Rhizobacter, Rugamonas, and Serpens.Skerman, McGowan and Sneath (editors): Approved Lists of Bacterial Names.HydantoinCathartic: In medicine, a cathartic is a substance that accelerates defecation. This is in contrast to a laxative, which is a substance which eases defecation, usually by softening feces.Coles PhillipsDiabetic neuropathyPhlorizinSieve tube elementAlkaliphile: Alkaliphiles are a class of extremophilic microbes capable of survival in alkaline (pH roughly 8.5-11) environments, growing optimally around a pH of 10.Osmotic diuretic: An osmotic diuretic is a type of diuretic that inhibits reabsorption of water and sodium (Na). They are pharmacologically inert substances that are given intravenously.Congenital cataractAlcohol dehydrogenaseStanley SpiroGlucokinase regulatory protein: The glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP) also known as glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator (GCKR) is a protein produced in hepatocytes (liver cells). GKRP binds and moves glucokinase (GK), thereby controlling both activity and intracellular location of this key enzyme of glucose metabolism.PolystyreneImidazoleCarbohydrate chemistry: Carbohydrate chemistry is a subdiscipline of chemistry primarily concerned with the synthesis, structure, and function of carbohydrates. Due to the general structure of carbohydrates, their synthesis is often preoccupied with the selective formation of glycosidic linkages and the selective reaction of hydroxyl groups; as a result, it relies heavily on the use of protecting groups.Happy Tooth: 72px|thumb|right|"Happy Tooth" logoSorboseMediated transportEscherichia coli O121: Escherichia coli O121 is a serotype of Escherichia coli, a species of bacteria that lives in the lower intestines of mammals.http://www.Uptake hexose phosphateProtein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Alpha,alpha-trehalose synthase: Alpha,alpha-trehalose synthase (, trehalose synthase, trehalose synthetase, UDP-glucose:glucose 1-glucosyltransferase, TreT, PhGT) is an enzyme with system name ADP-glucose:D-glucose 1-alpha-D-glucosyltransferase. This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reactionErythrocrine: Erythrocrine describes red blood cell or erythrocyte for production and release of signaling molecules. The term “erythrocrine“ was coined by Song et al.CefiximeOutline of water: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to water:Compound muscle action potential: The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) or compound motor action potential is an electromyography investigation (electrical study of muscle function).Extracellular signal-regulated kinases: In molecular biology, extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) or classical MAP kinases are widely expressed protein kinase intracellular signalling molecules that are involved in functions including the regulation of meiosis, mitosis, and postmitotic functions in differentiated cells. Many different stimuli, including growth factors, cytokines, virus infection, ligands for heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors, transforming agents, and carcinogens, activate the ERK pathway.TaurineGlycyrrhiza lepidota: Glycyrrhiza lepidota (American licorice) is a species of Glycyrrhiza (a genus in the pea/bean family, Fabaceae) native to most of North America, from central Canada south through the United States to California, Texas and Virginia, but absent from the southeastern states. It is also sometimes known in the United States as "wild licorice", to distinguish it from the related European liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) which is occasionally cultivated.Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coliOlaparibUrea reduction ratio: For the Scottish river see: Urr Water

(1/808) Sorbitol accumulation in rats kept on diabetic condition for short and prolonged periods.

AIM: To study the influence of the course of diabetes, aging, and glycemia on the sorbitol accumulation in diabetic rats. METHODS: Streptozocin (Str) diabetic rats were obtained by Str i.v. (35 mg.kg-1). Glycemia and sorbitol levels from sciatic nerve and lens were measured after 1 d, 2, 5, and 8 months of diabetes. Sorbitol concentrations in serum, heart, diaphragm, small intestine, and kidney after 8 months of diabetes were measured. RESULTS: Diabetic rats after Str injection showed hyperglycemia (> 1.7 g.L-1), hyperphagia, polyuria, polydipsia, and loss of body weight. Sorbitol levels in lens and sciatic nerve increased in normal and diabetic rats; the increase was higher in diabetic rats. No relationship was shown between glycemia and sorbitol levels. An increased sorbitol level after 8 months of diabetes was found in small intestine and kidney. CONCLUSION: The sorbitol levels increased in lens and sciatic nerve with aging and this process was accelerated by diabetes.  (+info)

(2/808) Requirement of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) for tumor necrosis factor-induced cytokine expression.

The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase is activated by treatment of cells with cytokines and by exposure to environmental stress. The effects of these stimuli on p38 MAP kinase are mediated by the MAP kinase kinases (MKKs) MKK3, MKK4, and MKK6. We have examined the function of the p38 MAP kinase signaling pathway by investigating the effect of targeted disruption of the Mkk3 gene. Here we report that Mkk3 gene disruption caused a selective defect in the response of fibroblasts to the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor, including reduced p38 MAP kinase activation and cytokine expression. These data demonstrate that the MKK3 protein kinase is a critical component of a tumor necrosis factor-stimulated signaling pathway that causes increased expression of inflammatory cytokines.  (+info)

(3/808) A large outbreak of hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by an unusual sorbitol-fermenting strain of Escherichia coli O157:H-.

Escherichia coli O157:H7 does not ferment sorbitol, a factor used to differentiate it from other E. coli. From December 1995 to March 1996, 28 children with hemolytic uremic syndrome in Bavaria, Germany, were identified; many had a sorbitol-fermenting (sf) E. coli O157:H- cultured. A case-control study showed a dose-response relationship between sausage consumption and illness. A second case-control study showed a relationship between mortadella and teewurst consumption and illness, particularly during December (mortadella odds ratio [OR], 10.5, P=.004; teewurst OR, 6.2, P=.02). Twelve sf O157:H- were characterized to determine clonality and virulence traits. The strains possessed the Stx2, eae, and EHEC-hlyA genes but were nonhemolytic on blood agar plates. The O157:H- isolates belonged to phage type 88 and had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. This outbreak was caused by sf E. coli O157:H-, which is not detectable by culture on sorbitol MacConkey's agar. Consumption of two sausages, including a raw beef-containing sausage, was statistically related to illness.  (+info)

(4/808) SHIP is a negative regulator of growth factor receptor-mediated PKB/Akt activation and myeloid cell survival.

SHIP is an inositol 5' phosphatase that hydrolyzes the PI3'K product PI(3,4,5)P3. We show that SHIP-deficient mice exhibit dramatic chronic hyperplasia of myeloid cells resulting in splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and myeloid infiltration of vital organs. Neutrophils and bone marrow-derived mast cells from SHIP-/- mice are less susceptible to programmed cell death induced by various apoptotic stimuli or by growth factor withdrawal. Engagement of IL3-R and GM-CSF-R in these cells leads to increased and prolonged PI3'K-dependent PI(3,4,5)P3 accumulation and PKB activation. These data indicate that SHIP is a negative regulator of growth factor-mediated PKB activation and myeloid cell survival.  (+info)

(5/808) Hypertonicity-induced accumulation of organic osmolytes in papillary interstitial cells.

BACKGROUND: Medullary cells of the concentrating kidney are exposed to high extracellular solute concentrations. It is well established that epithelial cells in this kidney region adapt osmotically to hypertonic stress by accumulating organic osmolytes. Little is known, however, of the adaptive mechanisms of a further medullary cell type, the papillary interstitial cell [renal papillary fibroblast (RPF)]. We therefore compared the responses of primary cultures of RPFs and papillary collecting duct (PCD) cells exposed to hypertonic medium. METHODS: In RPFs and PCD cells, organic osmolytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography; mRNA expression for organic osmolyte transporters [Na+/Cl(-)-dependent betaine transporter (BGT), Na(+)-dependent myo-inositol transporter (SMIT)], and the sorbitol synthetic and degrading enzymes [aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), respectively] was determined by Northern blot analysis. RESULTS: Exposure to hypertonic medium (600 mOsm/kg by NaCl addition) caused intracellular contents of glycerophosphorylcholine, betaine, myo-inositol, and sorbitol, but not free amino acids, to increase significantly in both RPFs and PCD cells. The rise in intracellular contents of these organic osmolytes was accompanied by enhanced expression of mRNAs coding for BGT, SMIT, and AR in both RPFs and PCD cells. SDH mRNA abundance, however, was unchanged. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization studies on sections from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded, normally concentrating kidneys showed strong expression of BGT, SMIT, and AR mRNAs in interstitial and collecting duct cells of the papilla, whereas expression of SDH mRNA was much weaker in both cell types. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that both RPFs and PCD cells use similar strategies to adapt osmotically to the high interstitial NaCl concentrations characteristic for the inner medulla and papilla of the concentrating kidney.  (+info)

(6/808) Oxidative stress-induced destruction of the yeast C-type cyclin Ume3p requires phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and the 26S proteasome.

The yeast UME3 (SRB11/SSN3) gene encodes a C-type cyclin that represses the transcription of the HSP70 family member SSA1. To relieve this repression, Ume3p is rapidly destroyed in cells exposed to elevated temperatures. This report demonstrates that Ume3p levels are also reduced in cultures subjected to ethanol shock, oxidative stress, or carbon starvation or during growth on nonfermentable carbons. Of the three elements (RXXL, PEST, and cyclin box) previously shown to be required for heat-induced Ume3p destruction, only the cyclin box regulates Ume3p degradation in response to these stressors. The one exception observed was growth on nonfermentable carbons, which requires the PEST region. These findings indicate that yeast cells contain multiple, independent pathways that mediate stress-induced Ume3p degradation. Ume3p destruction in response to oxidative stress, but not to ethanol treatment, requires DOA4 and UMP1, two factors required for 26S proteasome activity. This result for the first time implicates ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in C-type cyclin regulation. Similarly, the presence of a membrane stabilizer (sorbitol) or the loss of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC1) protects Ume3p from oxidative-stress-induced degradation. Finally, a ume3 null allele suppresses the growth defect of plc1 mutants in response to either elevated temperature or the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that the growth defects observed in plc1 mutants are due to the failure to downregulate Ume3p. Taken together, these findings support a model in which Plc1p mediates an oxidative-stress signal from the plasma membrane that triggers Ume3p destruction through a Doa4p-dependent mechanism.  (+info)

(7/808) Potassium ion efflux induced by cationic compounds in yeast.

Potassium efflux in yeast induced by several cationic compounds showed different characteristics. All of the observed efflux required glucose as substrate at the concentrations used. For most of them, the phenomenon required binding of the cationic compound to the cell surface and increased with the negative cell surface charge, and for all the compounds tested, it depended on a metabolizable substrate. Efflux induced with terbium chloride appeared more likely due to the function of a K+/H+ antiporter. With DEAE-dextran and dihydrostreptomycin, potassium efflux was dependent on the cell potassium content and was also sensitive to osmotic changes of the medium. DEAE-dextran-provoked efflux was not due to cell disruption. Dihydrostreptomycin seemed to activate a potassium efflux system which could not be studied in isolation, but its inhibition of potassium uptake may also be involved. Except for cells treated with ethidium bromide, no appreciable cell disruption was observed. The potassium efflux observed appears to be a membrane phenomenon reversible after washing with magnesium chloride.  (+info)

(8/808) Different signalling pathways contribute to the control of GPD1 gene expression by osmotic stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Yeast cells respond to a shift to higher osmolarity by increasing the cellular content of the osmolyte glycerol. This response is accompanied by a stimulation of the expression of genes encoding enzymes in the glycerol production pathway. In this study the osmotic induction of one of those genes, GPD1, which encodes glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was monitored in time course experiments. The response is independent of the osmolyte and consists of four apparent phases: a lag phase, an initial induction phase, a feedback phase and a sustained long-term induction. Osmotic shock with progressively higher osmolyte concentrations caused a prolonged lag phase. Deletion of HOG1, which encodes the terminal protein kinase of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) response pathway, led to an even longer lag phase and drastically lower basal and induced GPD1 mRNA levels. However, the induction was only moderately diminished. Overstimulation of Hog1p by deletion of the genes for the protein phosphatases PTP2 and PTP3 led to higher basal and induced mRNA levels and a shorter lag phase. The protein phosphatase calcineurin, which mediates salt-induced expression of some genes, does not appear to contribute to the control of GPD1 expression. Although GPD1 expression has so far not been reported to be controlled by a general stress response mechanism, heat-shock induction of the GPD1 mRNA level was observed. However, unregulated protein kinase A activity, which strongly affects the general stress response, only marginally altered the mRNA level of GPD1. The osmotic stimulation of GPD1 expression does not seem to be mediated by derepression, since deletion of the SSN6 gene, which encodes a general repressor, did not significantly alter the induction profile. A hypoosmotic shock led to a transient 10-fold drop of the GPD1 mRNA level. Neither the HOG nor the protein kinase C pathway, which is stimulated by a decrease in external osmolarity, is involved in this effect. It was concluded that osmotic regulation of GPD1 expression is the result of an interplay between different signalling pathways, some of which remain to be identified.  (+info)



metabolize sorbitol

  • Unable to metabolize sorbitol: Use with caution in patients unable to metabolize sorbitol. (drugs.com)
  • Interestingly, sorbitol can be used as a screen for the O154:H7 strain of E. coli, since this strain is one of the few strains which cannot metabolize sorbitol. (abcam.com)

dehydrogenase

  • This is an abbreviated version, for detailed information about sorbitol-6-phosphate 2-dehydrogenase, go to the full flat file . (brenda-enzymes.org)

fructose

  • In the assay, sorbitol is oxidized to fructose with the proportional development of intense color with an absorbance maximum at 560 nm. (abcam.com)
  • Some tissues contain sorbitol dehydorgenase, an enzyme that converts sorbitol into fructose. (naturalnews.com)

activated charcoal

  • Activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension is an adsorbent and laxative combination. (drugs.com)
  • Some medical conditions may interact with activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension. (drugs.com)
  • However, no specific interactions with activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension are known at this time. (drugs.com)
  • Ask your health care provider if activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension may interact with other medicines that you take. (drugs.com)
  • Use activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension as directed by your doctor. (drugs.com)
  • If you miss a dose of activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension, contact your doctor right away. (drugs.com)
  • Ask your health care provider any questions you may have about how to use activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension. (drugs.com)
  • Activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension may cause your stools to turn black. (drugs.com)
  • PREGNANCY and BREAST-FEEDING: If you become pregnant while taking activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension, discuss with your doctor the benefits and risks of using activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension during pregnancy. (drugs.com)
  • If you are or will be breast-feeding while you are using activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension, check with your doctor or pharmacist to discuss the risks to your baby. (drugs.com)
  • Store activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension at room temperature, between 68 and 77 degrees F (20 and 25 degrees C). Store away from heat, moisture, and light. (drugs.com)
  • Keep activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension out of the reach of children and away from pets. (drugs.com)
  • If you have any questions about activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension, please talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other health care provider. (drugs.com)
  • Activated charcoal and sorbitol suspension is to be used only by the patient for whom it is prescribed. (drugs.com)

reductase

  • Moreover, an enzyme known as aldose reductase converts glucose into sorbitol. (naturalnews.com)

Glucose

  • This process occurs in everyone to a degree, but in those with diabetes, the conversion of glucose to sorbitol is greatly accelerated. (naturalnews.com)
  • As more food items are made with sorbitol and consumed by diabetics, combined with the accelerated conversion of glucose, sorbitol can build up over time. (naturalnews.com)

strains

  • Sorbitol-fermenting (SF)-O157 strains have emerged in continental Europe ( 2 , 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Some evidence suggests that SF-O157 is more frequently associated with HUS than are non-sorbitol-fermenting strains ( 3 - 6 ). (cdc.gov)

laxative

  • The laxative effect from sorbitol, a sugar substitute, is more than a discomfort, says the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). (diabeteshealth.com)

occurs

  • Lyn Nabors, vice president of the Calorie Control Council, says that sorbitol occurs naturally in fruits and berries. (diabeteshealth.com)

naturally

  • Sorbitol is produced naturally in a variety of fruits. (abcam.com)

enzyme

  • Tissues lacking this enzyme run the risk of sorbitol accumulating within the tissue. (naturalnews.com)

diabetes

  • Due to its poor ability to diffuse across the cell membrane, sorbitol can be trapped in cells and is believed to be one of the causes of damage (due to osmotic effects) in diabetes. (abcam.com)
  • Like many medical interventions, sorbitol and artificial sweeteners were initially recommended by diabetes organizations and MDs globally only to be retracted as "dangerous" due to the inherent risks. (naturalnews.com)

fruits

  • Abcam's D-Sorbitol Assay Kit (Colorimetric) is designed to measure sorbitol in a variety of samples such as foods, fruits, fruit juices, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, paper and some other biological samples. (abcam.com)
  • D-Sorbitol measured in various samples showing nmol/mg (fruits) and nmol/mL (juice). (abcam.com)

sugar

  • Sorbitol is one of the 6 carbon sugar alcohols. (abcam.com)
  • Sorbitol appears in many kinds of products advertised as sugar-free foods, including sugar-free candy and pancake syrup. (diabeteshealth.com)
  • Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol. (diabeteshealth.com)
  • NaturalNews) Sorbitol, a sugar alcohol, was once widely accepted as a sugar alternative for diabetics. (naturalnews.com)
  • Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol that is often used to sweeten processed foods. (naturalnews.com)
  • Because of its chemical constitution, sorbitol is not used by the body, so it takes a long time for the body to rid itself of the sugar molecule. (naturalnews.com)
  • Are Xylitol, Sorbitol, and Other Sugar Alcohols Safe Replacements For Sugar? (chriskresser.com)
  • Xylitol is the most popular and most extensively researched, so I'll focus my discussion on it, but the general takeaway of this article applies to other sugar alcohols as well, such as sorbitol and erythritol. (chriskresser.com)
  • Xylitol and sorbitol are commonly used as sugar replacements, but are they safe? (chriskresser.com)

food

  • Right now, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warning must appear on sorbitol-sweetened products, warning against excessive consumption of the product. (diabeteshealth.com)

Studies

  • According to studies, sorbitol can lead to severe diarrhea, and the CSPI wants its label to say so. (diabeteshealth.com)

medical

  • Since even small amounts of sorbitol can cause gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important for the FDA to inform the public of these potential problems," says Dr. Jeffrey Hyams, of the digestive diseases and nutrition department at Connecticut Children's Medical Center. (diabeteshealth.com)
  • I know of people who have undergone extensive medical testing for abdominal pain and diarrhea when the problem was simply that they were ingesting excessive amounts of sorbitol. (diabeteshealth.com)

product

  • Nabors says that some people are more sensitive to sorbitol than others, and that any gastrointestinal effects go away once people adapt to the product. (diabeteshealth.com)

cause

  • Nabors says that for the vast majority of consumers, sorbitol does not cause a problem. (diabeteshealth.com)

children

water

  • Sorbitol is osmotically active, drawing water into cells, and causes these cells to swell which can eventually result in serious diabetic complications such as vision problems (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), kidney problems (nephropathy) and blood vessel damage. (naturalnews.com)

quickly

  • Sorbitol works to help move the charcoal and poison out of the stomach and intestines more quickly. (drugs.com)