No data available that match "Smoking"



*  Quit Cigarette Smokings Secrets

It offers the best quit Cigarette Smoking aid on the market so far ... The Easy to Quit Cigarette Smoking method helps people to Stop Cigarette Smoking. ... Stop Smoking Experiments (1) Stop Smoking in 3 Minutes (1) Stop Smoking In A Car (1) Stop Smoking Pill (1) Stop Smoking Tips ... Smoking Effects (1) Smoking Facts (1) Smoking Onboard - a Burning Issue (1) Start Feeling Better Fast (1) Stop Smoking And Stop ...
quit-cigarettesmoking.blogspot.com/2010/07/

*  Mortality in relation to smoking: 40 years' observations on male British doctors | The BMJ

Cigarette smoking and cancer of the large bowel. In: Wald N, Baron J, eds. Smoking and hormone related disorders. Oxford: ... Smoking and Parkinson's disease. In: Wald N, Baron J, eds. Smoking and hormone related disorders. Oxford: Oxford University ... Smoking and inflammatory bowel disease. In: Wald N, Baron J, eds. Smoking and hormone related disorders. Oxford University ... Changes in smoking habits. The smoking habits of those who replied in 1951 and survived to the end of 1990 are contrasted, in ...
bmj.com/content/309/6959/901

*  E-Cigs Tied to More Frequent, Heavier Teen Tobacco Use - Drugs.com MedNews

"The more you vape, the more likely in the future you're going to be smoking (cigarettes). You're going to be smoking more ... "Teens who start smoking and become regular smokers at this age, around 16, are more likely to become chronic smokers throughout ... "Once they start smoking, it's not a foreign sensation to them," Leventhal said. "They've experienced the act of drawing in ... But the kids who did vape were more likely to try cigarette smoking, and more frequent vaping was associated with more frequent ...
https://drugs.com/news/e-cigs-tied-more-frequent-heavier-teen-tobacco-63335.html

*  WHO | Tobacco

According to the World Health Report 2002, among industrialized countries where smoking has been common, smoking is estimated ... While consumption is levelling off and even decreasing in some countries, worldwide more people are smoking, and smokers are ... smoking more cigarettes. Substantially fewer cigarettes are smoked per day per smoker in developing countries than in developed ...
who.int/substance_abuse/facts/tobacco/en/

*  Quit Cigarette Smoking's Secrets: Quit Cigarette Smoking~Stop Smoking Tips when Drinking

It offers the best quit Cigarette Smoking aid on the market so far ... The Easy to Quit Cigarette Smoking method helps people to Stop Cigarette Smoking. ... Stop Smoking Experiments (1) Stop Smoking in 3 Minutes (1) Stop Smoking In A Car (1) Stop Smoking Pill (1) Stop Smoking Tips ... Smoking Effects (1) Smoking Facts (1) Smoking Onboard - a Burning Issue (1) Start Feeling Better Fast (1) Stop Smoking And Stop ...
quit-cigarettesmoking.blogspot.com/2009/04/quit-cigarette-smokingstop-smoking-tips.html

*  Tobacco use prevalence and correlates among adolescents in a clinician initiated tobacco prevention trial in California, USA.

Smoking / epidemiology*, ethnology. Socioeconomic Factors. Comments/Corrections. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Tobacco-use-prevalence-correlates-among/8935468.html

*  Orac on the HIV/viral load paper - Aetiology

Other smoking-related factors contributing to a higher risk include earlier age of smoking initiation, deeper inhalation of ... Does anyone in this day and age still believe that smoking doesn't cause lung cancer? ... For example, if you start smoking at age 18 and smoke two packs a day, by age 55, you have about a 5% chance of dying of lung ... A person who has been smoking from his 15th until his 30th birthday and who gets lung cancer at an age of 60, is he in the ...
scienceblogs.com/aetiology/2006/10/03/orac-on-the-hivviral-load-pape/

*  Smoking

Fact sheet on smoking materials (PDF). *Changes in Origin in Home Structure Fires Started by Smoking Materials fact sheet (PDF) ... Smoking & Home Fire Safety Tip Sheet. The place where we feel safest - at home - is where most smoking-materials structure ... Smoking materials are the leading cause of fire deaths. Smoking material fires are preventable. ... Smoking safety messages in American Sign Language. In this presentation, safety tips are provided for the precautions that ...
nfpa.org/smoking

*  Smoking

... is on the decline, but some people are still lighting up. Why? The answer is addiction. Find out more in this article ... How Smoking Affects Your Health. There are no physical reasons to start smoking. The body doesn't need tobacco the way it needs ... The consequences of smoking may seem very far off, but long-term health problems aren't the only hazard of smoking. Nicotine ... Today we're more aware about how bad smoking is for our health. Smoking is restricted or banned in almost all public places and ...
kidshealth.org/ChildrensHospitalPittsburgh/en/teens/smoking.html?WT.ac=ctg

*  Smoking - Wiktionary

Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Smoking&oldid=47365301" ...
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Smoking

*  Smoking Stinks!

Everyone says smoking is bad for you. Why? Find out in this article for kids. ... Smoking is one of the worst things you can do to your body. Yet every single day, about 3,200 kids and teens start smoking. ... When people try smoking for the first time, they often cough a lot and feel pain or burning in their throat and lungs. This is ... What Are Smoking and Smokeless Tobacco?. Tobacco (say: tuh-BA-ko) is a plant that can be smoked in cigarettes, pipes, or cigars ...
kidshealth.org/ChildrensHospitalPittsburgh/en/kids/smoking.html

*  Smoking Cessation

QuitWorks is a solution for providers to help patients quit smoking. It is a free, telephone-based service from DPH. Call 1-800 ... Prevention Program is a statewide government program dedicated to addressing the severe health risks associated with smoking. ...
mass.gov/eohhs/provider/guidelines-resources/services-planning/smoking-cessation/

*  Smoking Popes

... at The High Noon Saloon with special guests Tim Schweiger and The Middlemen and The Friendly Lens. ... Smoking Popes "Ever wonder what a traditional saloon singer would sound like backed up by a punk band? The Smoking Popes take ... In 1997, the Smoking Popes released Destination Failure. The album challenged the idea of what a pop punk band could do, with ... Smoking Popes first burst onto the scene in 1991 and released several albums on various local labels. They signed to Capitol ...
brownpapertickets.com/event/193912

*  smoking | eBay

Find great deals on eBay for smoking and smoking paper. Shop with confidence. ...
https://ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=smoking

*  smoking cessation : NPR

smoking cessation
npr.org/tags/214483802/smoking-cessation/archive?date=10-31-1998

*  Smoking and Asthma

Smoking - or even breathing in secondhand smoke - can make asthma worse. Find out more in this article for kids. ... Smoking and Asthma. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving the ...
kidshealth.org/en/kids/smoking-asthma.html?view=rr

*  Kids and Smoking

... yet every year many young people take up smoking. Here's how to help your kids avoid smoking or using chewing tobacco - or quit ... The health risks of smoking are well known, ... Kids and Smoking. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to ... QuitNet offers tips, tools, and help for those who want to quit smoking. ... This site includes links to online anti-smoking resources.. Smokefree.gov. http://www.smokefree.gov. This site contains facts ...
kidshealth.org/NicklausChildrens/en/parents/smoking.html?view=rr

*  Smoking and Asthma

Find out why smoking is a bad idea - especially for people with asthma. ... Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse?. Yes. If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage it does to the ... Why Should I Quit Smoking?. You may have started smoking because friends do or because you grew up in a house where other ... That's why smoking can cause asthma flare-ups (or "attacks") to happen more often. They also might be more severe and harder to ...
kidshealth.org/Renown/en/teens/smoking-asthma.html

*  Smoking and Asthma

Find out why smoking is a bad idea - especially for people with asthma. ... Smoking and Asthma. Resources. Please Note: By clicking a link to any resource listed on this page, you will be leaving this ... Contact ASH at: Action on Smoking and Health 2013 H St., NW Washington, DC 20006 (202) 659-4310 ... Action on Smoking and Health (ASH). http://www.ash.org. ASH is a nonprofit educational organization that fights for the rights ...
kidshealth.org/NicklausChildrens/en/teens/smoking-asthma.html?view=rr

*  Smoking Questionnaire

Therapeutic Questions For Quitting SmokingIf you wish to give up smoking then this questionnaire can help. If you answer these ... Barry Moore (Smoking - How to Quit Smoking or Stop Smoking) Based on my experience in my Toronto (Ontario, Canada) Stop Smoking ... Therapeutic Questions For Quitting Smoking. If you wish to give up smoking then this questionnaire can help. If you answer ... the key to getting free is dealing with the unresolved and unconscious emotional needs behind the habit of smoking. These ...
selfgrowth.com/articles/Smoking_Questionnaire.html

*  Quitting smoking

More than 400,000 deaths occur each year as a result of cigarette smoking. In addition, exposure to secondhand smoke is ... Cigarette smoking is a major cause of disease in the United States. ... Cardiovascular risk of smoking and benefits of smoking cessation. *Cigarette smoking and other possible risk factors for lung ... Cardiovascular risk of smoking and benefits of smoking cessation. Cigarette smoking and other possible risk factors for lung ...
uptodate.com/contents/quitting-smoking-beyond-the-basics

*  Stop Smoking Tobacco

... Taken Wednesday, September 16, 2009, 07:33:19AM. Original image size: 2699x3374, 2.2Mb. Technical details ...
ics.uci.edu/~eppstein/pix/dublin/StopSmokingTobacco.html

*  Search : bf-smoking

No results were found for "bf-smoking." Please choose another term and try again. ...
kidshealth.org/NortonChildrens/en/teens/?search=y&q=bf-smoking&site=nortonchildrens&client=lic_t_en&output=xml_no_dtd&filter=p

*  Smoking and hamsters - YouTube

Smoking is bad - for you, for hamsters. Hamsters!?!? ... Smoking hamster stop motion - Duration: 0:39. ten0k 290 views 0 ...
https://youtube.com/watch?v=tXE2zCMHcfM&feature=plcp

*  No Smoking...! - Wikipedia

No Smoking...! (No Smoking) è un film del 2007 diretto da Anurag Kashyap, con John Abraham e Ayesha Takia. Nel film vengono ... EN) No Smoking...!, su Internet Movie Database, IMDb.com. Scheda su Mymovies, mymovies.it.. ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Smoking...!

No data available that match "Smoking"



(1/22632) Comparative total mortality in 25 years in Italian and Greek middle aged rural men.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Mortality over 25 years has been low in the Italian and very low in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study; factors responsible for this particularity were studied in detail. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTINGS: 1712 Italian and 1215 Greek men, aged 40-59 years, cohorts of the Seven Countries Study, representing over 95% of the populations in designated rural areas. DESIGN: Entry (1960-61) data included age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), smoking habits, total serum cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), arm circumference, vital capacity (VC), and forced expiratory volume in 3/4 seconds (FEV); the same data were obtained 10 years later. Multivariate Cox analysis was performed with all causes death in 25 years as end point. MAIN RESULTS: Italian men had higher entry levels of SBP, arm circumference, BMI, and VC; Greek men had higher cholesterol levels, smoking habits, and FEV. Mortality of Italian men was higher throughout; at 25 years cumulative mortality was 48.3% and 35.3% respectively. Coronary heart disease and stroke mortality increased fivefold in Italy and 10-fold in Greece between years 10 and 25. The only risk factor with a significantly higher contribution to mortality in Italian men was cholesterol. However, differences in entry SBP (higher in Italy) and FEV (higher in Greece) accounted for, according to the Lee method, 75% of the differential mortality between the two populations. At 10 years increases in SBP, cholesterol, BMI, and decreases in smoking habits, VC, FEV, and arm circumference had occurred (deltas). SBP increased more and FEV and VC decreased more in Italy than in Greece. Deltas, fed stepwise in the original model for the prediction of 10 to 25 years mortality, were significant for SBP, smoking, arm circumference, and VC in Greece, and for SBP and VC in Italy. CONCLUSION: Higher mortality in Italian men is related to stronger positive effects of entry SBP and weaker negative (protective) effects of FEV; in addition 10 year increases in SBP are higher and 10 year decreases in FEV are larger in Italy. Unaccounted factors, however, related to, for example, differences in the diet, may also have contributed to the differential mortality of these two Mediterranean populations.  (+info)

(2/22632) Serum triglyceride: a possible risk factor for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the relationship between ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and serum concentrations of lipids and apolipoproteins. METHODS: A cohort of 21 520 men, aged 35-64 years, was recruited from men attending the British United Provident Association (BUPA) clinic in London for a routine medical examination in 1975-1982. Smoking habits, weight, height and blood pressure were recorded at entry. Lipids and apolipoproteins were measured in stored serum samples from the 30 men who subsequently died of ruptured AAA and 150 matched controls. RESULTS: Triglyceride was strongly related to risk of ruptured AAA. In univariate analyses the risk in men on the 90th centile of the distribution relative to the risk in men on the 10th (RO10-90) was 12 (95% confidence interval [CI] : 3.8-37) for triglyceride, 5.5 (95% CI: 1.8-17) for apolipoprotein B (apoB) (the protein component of low density lipoprotein [LDL]), 0.15 (95% CI : 0.04-0.56) for apo A1 (the protein component of high density lipoprotein [HDL]), 3.7 (95% CI: 1.4-9.4) for body mass index and 3.0 (95% CI: 1.1-8.5) for systolic blood pressure. Lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)) was not a significant risk factor (RO10-90 = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.6-3.0). In multivariate analysis triglyceride retained its strong association. CONCLUSION: Triglyceride appears to be a strong risk factor for ruptured AAA, although further studies are required to clarify this. If this and other associations are cause and effect, then changing the distribution of risk factors in the population (by many people stopping smoking and adopting a lower saturated fat diet and by lowering blood pressure) could achieve an important reduction in mortality from ruptured AAA.  (+info)

(3/22632) Respiratory symptoms and long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes in Swedish men.

BACKGROUND: Depressed respiratory function and respiratory symptoms are associated with impaired survival. The present study was undertaken to assess the relation between respiratory symptoms and mortality from cardiovascular causes, cancer and all causes in a large population of middle-aged men. METHODS: Prospective population study of 6442 men aged 51-59 at baseline, free of clinical angina pectoris and prior myocardial infarction. RESULTS: During 16 years there were 1804 deaths (786 from cardiovascular disease, 608 from cancer, 103 from pulmonary disease and 307 from any other cause). Men with effort-related breathlessness had increased risk of dying from all of the examined diseases. After adjustment for age, smoking habit and other risk factors, the relative risk (RR) associated with breathlessness of dying from coronary disease was 1.43 (95% CI : 1.16-1.77), from stroke 1.77 (95% CI: 1.07-2.93), from any cardiovascular disease 1.48 (95% CI : 1.24-1.76), cancer 1.36 (95% CI : 1.11-1.67) and from any cause 1.62 (95% CI: 1.44-1.81). An independent effect of breathlessness on cardiovascular death, cancer death and mortality from all causes was found in life-time non-smokers, and also if men with chest pain not considered to be angina were excluded. An independent effect was also found if all deaths during the first half of the follow-up were excluded. Men with cough and phlegm, without breathlessness, also had an elevated risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and cancer, but after adjustment for smoking and other risk factors this was no longer significant. However, a slightly elevated independent risk of dying from any cause was found (RR = 1.18 [95% CI: 1.02-1.36]). CONCLUSION: A positive response to a simple question about effort related breathlessness predicted subsequent mortality from several causes during a follow-up period of 16 years, independently of smoking and other risk factors.  (+info)

(4/22632) Body mass decrease after initial gain following smoking cessation.

BACKGROUND: Although smoking cessation is strongly associated with subsequent weight gain, it is not clear whether the initial gain in weight after smoking cessation remains over time. METHOD: Cross-sectional analyses were made, using data from periodic health examinations for workers, on the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the length of smoking cessation. In addition, linear regression coefficients of BMI on the length of cessation were estimated according to alcohol intake and sport activity, to examine the modifying effect of these factors on the weight of former smokers. RESULTS: Means of BMI were 23.1 kg/m2, 23.3 kg/m2, 23.6 kg/m2 for light/medium smokers, heavy smokers and never smokers, respectively. Among former smokers who had smoked > or = 25 cigarettes a day, odds ratio (OR) of BMI >25 kg/m2 were 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] : 1.05-3.35), 1.32 (95% CI : 0.74-2.34), 0.66 (95% CI: 0.33-1.31) for those with 2-4 years, 5-7 years, and 8-10 years of smoking cessation, respectively. The corresponding OR among those who previously consumed <25 cigarettes a day were 1.06 (95% CI: 0.58-1.94), 1.00 (95% CI: 0.58-1.71), and 1.49 (95% CI: 0.95-2.32). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that although heavy smokers may experience large weight gain and weigh more than never smokers in the few years after smoking cessation, they thereafter lose weight to the never smoker level, while light and moderate smokers gain weight up to the never smoker level without any excess after smoking cessation.  (+info)

(5/22632) Post-shift changes in pulmonary function in a cement factory in eastern Saudi Arabia.

This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1992 in the oldest of three Portland cement producing factories in Eastern Saudi Arabia. The respirable dust level was in excess of the recommended ACGIH level in all sections. Spirometry was done for 149 cement workers and 348 controls, using a Vitalograph spirometer. FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC% and FEF25-75% were calculated and corrected to BTPS. A significantly higher post-shift reduction FEV1, FEV1/FVC% and FEF25-75% was observed in the exposed subjects. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant relationship between post-shift changes and exposure to cement dust but failed to support any relationship with smoking. These findings may indicate an increase in the bronchial muscle tone leading to some degree of bronchoconstriction as a result of an irritant effect induced by the acute exposure to cement dust.  (+info)

(6/22632) Respiratory symptoms among glass bottle workers--cough and airways irritancy syndrome?

Glass bottle workers have been shown to experience an excess of respiratory symptoms. This work describes in detail the symptoms reported by a cohort of 69 symptomatic glass bottle workers. Symptoms, employment history and clinical investigations including radiology, spirometry and serial peak expiratory flow rate records were retrospectively analyzed from clinical records. The results showed a consistent syndrome of work-related eye, nose and throat irritation followed after a variable period by shortness of breath. The latent interval between starting work and first developing symptoms was typically 4 years (median = 4 yrs; range = 0-28). The interval preceding the development of dysponea was longer and much more variable (median = 16 yrs; range = 3-40). Spirometry was not markedly abnormal in the group but 57% of workers had abnormal serial peak expiratory flow rate charts. Workers in this industry experience upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms consistent with irritant exposure. The long-term functional significance of these symptoms should be formally investigated.  (+info)

(7/22632) Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in American Indians: the Strong Heart Study.

Studies of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in minority populations provide researchers with an opportunity to evaluate PAD risk factors and disease severity under different types of conditions. Examination 1 of the Strong Heart Study (1989-1992) provided data on the prevalence of PAD and its risk factors in a sample of American Indians. Participants (N = 4,549) represented 13 tribes located in three geographically diverse centers in the Dakotas, Oklahoma, and Arizona. Participants in this epidemiologic study were aged 45-74 years; 60% were women. Using the single criterion of an ankle brachial index less than 0.9 to define PAD, the prevalence of PAD was approximately 5.3% across centers, with women having slightly higher rates than men. Factors significantly associated with PAD in univariate analyses for both men and women included age, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin A1c level, albuminuria, fibrinogen level, fasting glucose level, prevalence of diabetes mellitus, and duration of diabetes. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to predict PAD for women and men combined. Age, systolic blood pressure, current cigarette smoking, pack-years of smoking, albuminuria (micro- and macro-), low density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and fibrinogen level were significantly positively associated with PAD. Current alcohol consumption was significantly negatively associated with PAD. In American Indians, the association of albuminuria with PAD may equal or exceed the association of cigarette smoking with PAD.  (+info)

(8/22632) Different factors influencing the expression of Raynaud's phenomenon in men and women.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the risk profile for Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is different between men and women. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study of 800 women and 725 men participating in the Framingham Offspring Study, the association of age, marital status, smoking, alcohol use, diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia with prevalent RP was examined in men and women separately, after adjusting for relevant confounders. RESULTS: The prevalence of RP was 9.6% (n = 77) in women and 5.8% (n = 42) in men. In women, marital status and alcohol use were each associated with prevalent RP (for marital status adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.4-3.9; for alcohol use OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.0-5.2), whereas these factors were not associated with RP in men (marital status OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.6-3.5; alcohol use OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.2-4.4). In men, older age (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2) and smoking (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.3) were associated with prevalent RP; these factors were not associated with RP in women (older age OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.4-1.6; smoking OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.1). Diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia were not associated with RP in either sex. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that risk factors for RP differ between men and women. Age and smoking were associated with RP in men only, while the associations of marital status and alcohol use with RP were observed in women only. These findings suggest that different mechanisms influence the expression of RP in men and women.  (+info)



Quitting Smoking


  • And adults are often addicted, which is why so many of them have a hard time quitting smoking. (kidshealth.org)
  • Quitting smoking has major and immediate health benefits for men and women of all ages. (uptodate.com)
  • Quitting smoking is also important to those who do not smoke, since being exposed to secondhand cigarette smoke is responsible for a number of serious health conditions. (uptodate.com)
  • Cardiovascular disease - Cigarette smoking doubles the risk of developing coronary heart disease, and quitting smoking can rapidly reduce this risk. (uptodate.com)
  • In some studies, the risk of heart attack was reduced to the rate of nonsmokers within two years of quitting smoking. (uptodate.com)
  • Quitting smoking reduces the risk of lung cancer within five years of stopping, although former smokers still have a higher risk of lung cancer than people who have never smoked. (uptodate.com)
  • Quitting smoking decreases that risk and increases the rate of ulcer healing, if ulcers have developed. (uptodate.com)

Asthma


  • Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? (kidshealth.org)
  • If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage it does to the lungs . (kidshealth.org)
  • That's why smoking can cause asthma flare-ups (or "attacks") to happen more often. (kidshealth.org)
  • Worst of all, smoking can send you to the ER with a severe asthma flare-up. (kidshealth.org)
  • Some people with asthma might think that e-cigarettes ("vaping") are a safe alternative to smoking. (kidshealth.org)
  • Cigarette smoking makes it more difficult to treat asthma. (uptodate.com)

Cessation


  • The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation & Prevention Program is a statewide government program dedicated to addressing the severe health risks associated with smoking. (mass.gov)

tobacco


  • Smoking is a hard habit to break because tobacco contains nicotine, which is highly addictive. (kidshealth.org)
  • Maybe that's because more and more people have learned that smoking and tobacco use can cause cancer and heart disease . (kidshealth.org)
  • What Are Smoking and Smokeless Tobacco? (kidshealth.org)
  • Usually, people don't like smoking or chewing tobacco at first. (kidshealth.org)

Quit Smoking


  • QuitWorks is a solution for providers to help patients quit smoking. (mass.gov)
  • QuitNet offers tips, tools, and help for those who want to quit smoking. (kidshealth.org)
  • This site contains facts and information about how to quit smoking. (kidshealth.org)
  • Why Should I Quit Smoking? (kidshealth.org)
  • People who quit smoking before age 50 reduce their risk of dying over the next 15 years by one-half, as compared with those who continue to smoke. (uptodate.com)

cigarettes


  • Smoking materials, including cigarettes, pipes, and cigars, started an estimated 17,200 home structure fires reported to U.S. fire departments in 2014. (nfpa.org)

emphysema


  • Over the long term, smoking leads people to develop health problems like heart disease, stroke, emphysema (breakdown of lung tissue), and many types of cancer - including lung, throat, stomach, and bladder cancer. (kidshealth.org)

teens


  • Most adults who started smoking in their teens never expected to become addicted. (kidshealth.org)
  • Yet every single day, about 3,200 kids and teens start smoking. (kidshealth.org)

cigarette


  • Smoking is restricted or banned in almost all public places and cigarette companies are no longer allowed to advertise on TV, radio, and in many magazines. (kidshealth.org)
  • Cigarette smoking is a major cause of disease in the United States. (uptodate.com)
  • More than 400,000 deaths occur each year as a result of cigarette smoking [ 1 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • Cancer - Cigarette smoking is responsible for almost 90 percent of cases of lung cancer. (uptodate.com)
  • Peptic ulcer disease - Cigarette smoking increases the risk of developing peptic ulcer disease. (uptodate.com)

cough


  • When people try smoking for the first time, they often cough a lot and feel pain or burning in their throat and lungs. (kidshealth.org)
  • Smoking can disturb your sleep by making you cough more at night. (kidshealth.org)
  • While much of the lung damage caused by smoking is not reversible, stopping smoking can reduce further damage to the lungs, and many smokers with a chronic cough and sputum (phlegm coughed up from the lungs) note an improvement in these symptoms during the first year after stopping smoking. (uptodate.com)

occur


  • The place where we feel safest - at home - is where most smoking-materials structure fires, deaths, and injuries occur. (nfpa.org)

deaths


  • Smoking materials caused 5% of reported home fires, 21% of home fire deaths, 10% of home fire injuries, and 6% of the direct property damage from home fires. (nfpa.org)
  • Smoking materials are the leading cause of fire deaths. (nfpa.org)

worst


  • Smoking is one of the worst things you can do to your body. (kidshealth.org)

long term


  • Smoking can undo the effect of any long-term control medicine you're taking. (kidshealth.org)
  • Pulmonary disease - Smoking increases the risk of long-term lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (uptodate.com)

cause


  • Smoking is a major cause of non-fatal diseases including osteoporosis, skin wrinkling, peptic ulcer disease, impotence, and pregnancy complications. (uptodate.com)

people


  • People start smoking for a variety of different reasons. (kidshealth.org)
  • That's why people say it's just so much easier to not start smoking at all. (kidshealth.org)
  • Fortunately, fewer people are starting smoking than a few years ago. (kidshealth.org)
  • In fact, each day 1300 people die from smoking alone. (kidshealth.org)
  • You may have started smoking because friends do or because you grew up in a house where other people smoked. (kidshealth.org)

smoke


  • They can help you understand why you smoke, which can greatly enhance your chances of giving up smoking. (selfgrowth.com)

start


years


  • Stopping smoking begins to reverse this risk after about 10 years. (uptodate.com)

site


  • This site includes links to online anti-smoking resources. (kidshealth.org)

help


  • If you wish to give up smoking then this questionnaire can help. (selfgrowth.com)

cancer


  • Stopping smoking is beneficial even after one of these cancers is diagnosed, since it reduces the risk of getting a second cancer and may improve the chance of survival from the first cancer. (uptodate.com)

health


  • Today we're more aware about how bad smoking is for our health. (kidshealth.org)

causes


  • Other diseases - Smoking also causes or worsens many other conditions. (uptodate.com)
  • Smoking causes premature skin wrinkling and increases the risk of sexual problems (eg, impotence). (uptodate.com)

free


  • Based on my experience in my Toronto (Ontario, Canada) Stop Smoking Hypnosis clinic, the key to getting free is dealing with the unresolved and unconscious emotional needs behind the habit of smoking. (selfgrowth.com)

heart disease


  • One year after stopping smoking, the risk of dying from coronary heart disease is reduced by about one-half and continues to decline over time. (uptodate.com)

often


  • Smoking can force you to use your quick-relief medicine more often. (kidshealth.org)

material


  • Smoking material fires are preventable. (nfpa.org)
  • Their sold out reunion show at Chicago's Metro on November 11th sparked a resurgence of Smoking Popes fans, leaving the crowd yearning for new material. (brownpapertickets.com)

physical


  • Smoking can affect how well you do in sports or other physical activities. (kidshealth.org)

benefits


  • What benefits do you get out of smoking? (selfgrowth.com)
  • This topic review discusses the benefits of stopping smoking, treatments that can aid in the process of quitting, and the difficulties of relapse for those who try to quit. (uptodate.com)