Connective Tissue Diseases: A heterogeneous group of disorders, some hereditary, others acquired, characterized by abnormal structure or function of one or more of the elements of connective tissue, i.e., collagen, elastin, or the mucopolysaccharides.Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: A syndrome with overlapping clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The disease is differentially characterized by high serum titers of antibodies to ribonuclease-sensitive extractable (saline soluble) nuclear antigen and a "speckled" epidermal nuclear staining pattern on direct immunofluorescence.Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Scleroderma, Systemic: A chronic multi-system disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. It is characterized by SCLEROSIS in the SKIN, the LUNGS, the HEART, the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, the KIDNEYS, and the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM. Other important features include diseased small BLOOD VESSELS and AUTOANTIBODIES. The disorder is named for its most prominent feature (hard skin), and classified into subsets by the extent of skin thickening: LIMITED SCLERODERMA and DIFFUSE SCLERODERMA.Antibodies, Antinuclear: Autoantibodies directed against various nuclear antigens including DNA, RNA, histones, acidic nuclear proteins, or complexes of these molecular elements. Antinuclear antibodies are found in systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease.Raynaud Disease: An idiopathic vascular disorder characterized by bilateral Raynaud phenomenon, the abrupt onset of digital paleness or CYANOSIS in response to cold exposure or stress.Collagen Diseases: Historically, a heterogeneous group of acute and chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, etc. This classification was based on the notion that "collagen" was equivalent to "connective tissue", but with the present recognition of the different types of collagen and the aggregates derived from them as distinct entities, the term "collagen diseases" now pertains exclusively to those inherited conditions in which the primary defect is at the gene level and affects collagen biosynthesis, post-translational modification, or extracellular processing directly. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1494)Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Connective Tissue Growth Factor: A CCN protein family member that regulates a variety of extracellular functions including CELL ADHESION; CELL MIGRATION; and EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX synthesis. It is found in hypertrophic CHONDROCYTES where it may play a role in CHONDROGENESIS and endochondral ossification.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases: A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue.Sjogren's Syndrome: Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.snRNP Core Proteins: The protein components that constitute the common core of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. These proteins are commonly referred as Sm nuclear antigens due to their antigenic nature.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.CREST Syndrome: A mild form of LIMITED SCLERODERMA, a multi-system disorder. Its features include symptoms of CALCINOSIS; RAYNAUD DISEASE; ESOPHAGEAL MOTILITY DISORDERS; sclerodactyly, and TELANGIECTASIS. When the defect in esophageal function is not prominent, it is known as CRST syndrome.Dermatomyositis: A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)Connective Tissue Cells: A group of cells that includes FIBROBLASTS, cartilage cells, ADIPOCYTES, smooth muscle cells, and bone cells.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Rheumatic Diseases: Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.Breast Implants: Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.Myositis: Inflammation of a muscle or muscle tissue.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Ribonucleoprotein, U1 Small Nuclear: A nuclear RNA-protein complex that plays a role in RNA processing. In the nucleoplasm, the U1 snRNP along with other small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (U2, U4-U6, and U5) assemble into SPLICEOSOMES that remove introns from pre-mRNA by splicing. The U1 snRNA forms base pairs with conserved sequence motifs at the 5'-splice site and recognizes both the 5'- and 3'-splice sites and may have a fundamental role in aligning the two sites for the splicing reaction.Autoantigens: Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.Polymyositis: Diseases characterized by inflammation involving multiple muscles. This may occur as an acute or chronic condition associated with medication toxicity (DRUG TOXICITY); CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISEASES; infections; malignant NEOPLASMS; and other disorders. The term polymyositis is frequently used to refer to a specific clinical entity characterized by subacute or slowly progressing symmetrical weakness primarily affecting the proximal limb and trunk muscles. The illness may occur at any age, but is most frequent in the fourth to sixth decade of life. Weakness of pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles, interstitial lung disease, and inflammation of the myocardium may also occur. Muscle biopsy reveals widespread destruction of segments of muscle fibers and an inflammatory cellular response. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1404-9)Scleroderma, Localized: A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.Polyarteritis Nodosa: A form of necrotizing non-granulomatous inflammation occurring primarily in medium-sized ARTERIES, often with microaneurysms. It is characterized by muscle, joint, and abdominal pain resulting from arterial infarction and scarring in affected organs. Polyarteritis nodosa with lung involvement is called CHURG-STRAUSS SYNDROME.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Mucinoses: Mucoid states characterized by the elevated deposition and accumulation of mucin (mucopolysaccharides) in dermal tissue. The fibroblasts are responsible for the production of acid mucopolysaccharides (GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS) in the ground substance of the connective tissue system. When fibroblasts produce abnormally large quantities of mucopolysaccharides as hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, or heparin, they accumulate in large amounts in the dermis.Ribonucleoproteins, Small Nuclear: Highly conserved nuclear RNA-protein complexes that function in RNA processing in the nucleus, including pre-mRNA splicing and pre-mRNA 3'-end processing in the nucleoplasm, and pre-rRNA processing in the nucleolus (see RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL NUCLEOLAR).Ribonucleoproteins: Complexes of RNA-binding proteins with ribonucleic acids (RNA).Vasculitis: Inflammation of any one of the blood vessels, including the ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Skin DiseasesNails: The thin, horny plates that cover the dorsal surfaces of the distal phalanges of the fingers and toes of primates.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: A group of interstitial lung diseases with no known etiology. There are several entities with varying patterns of inflammation and fibrosis. They are classified by their distinct clinical-radiological-pathological features and prognosis. They include IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS; CRYPTOGENIC ORGANIZING PNEUMONIA; and others.Marfan Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE with abnormal features in the heart, the eye, and the skeleton. Cardiovascular manifestations include MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE, dilation of the AORTA, and aortic dissection. Other features include lens displacement (ectopia lentis), disproportioned long limbs and enlarged DURA MATER (dural ectasia). Marfan syndrome is associated with mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin, a major element of extracellular microfibrils of connective tissue.Prednisolone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Microscopic Angioscopy: The noninvasive microscopic examination of the microcirculation, commonly done in the nailbed or conjunctiva. In addition to the capillaries themselves, observations can be made of passing blood cells or intravenously injected substances. This is not the same as endoscopic examination of blood vessels (ANGIOSCOPY).Toes: Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Wegener Granulomatosis: A multisystemic disease of a complex genetic background. It is characterized by inflammation of the blood vessels (VASCULITIS) leading to damage in any number of organs. The common features include granulomatous inflammation of the RESPIRATORY TRACT and kidneys. Most patients have measurable autoantibodies (ANTINEUTROPHIL CYTOPLASMIC ANTIBODIES) against neutrophil proteinase-3 (WEGENER AUTOANTIGEN).ArthritisRNA, Small Cytoplasmic: Small RNAs found in the cytoplasm usually complexed with proteins in scRNPs (RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL CYTOPLASMIC).Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Hydroxychloroquine: A chemotherapeutic agent that acts against erythrocytic forms of malarial parasites. Hydroxychloroquine appears to concentrate in food vacuoles of affected protozoa. It inhibits plasmodial heme polymerase. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p970)Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Rheumatoid Nodule: Subcutaneous nodules seen in 20-30% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. They may arise anywhere on the body, but are most frequently found over the bony prominences. The nodules are characterized histologically by dense areas of fibrinoid necrosis with basophilic streaks and granules, surrounded by a palisade of cells, mainly fibroblasts and histiocytes.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Rheumatoid Factor: Antibodies found in adult RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS patients that are directed against GAMMA-CHAIN IMMUNOGLOBULINS.Counterimmunoelectrophoresis: Immunoelectrophoresis in which immunoprecipitation occurs when antigen at the cathode is caused to migrate in an electric field through a suitable medium of diffusion against a stream of antibody migrating from the anode as a result of endosmotic flow.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Microscopic Polyangiitis: A primary systemic vasculitis of small- and some medium-sized vessels. It is characterized by a tropism for kidneys and lungs, positive association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), and a paucity of immunoglobulin deposits in vessel walls.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Skin Aging: The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia: An interstitial lung disease of unknown etiology, occurring between 21-80 years of age. It is characterized by a dramatic onset of a "pneumonia-like" illness with cough, fever, malaise, fatigue, and weight loss. Pathological features include prominent interstitial inflammation without collagen fibrosis, diffuse fibroblastic foci, and no microscopic honeycomb change. There is excessive proliferation of granulation tissue within small airways and alveolar ducts.Esophageal Motility Disorders: Disorders affecting the motor function of the UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; the ESOPHAGUS body, or a combination of these parts. The failure of the sphincters to maintain a tonic pressure may result in gastric reflux of food and acid into the esophagus (GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX). Other disorders include hypermotility (spastic disorders) and markedly increased amplitude in contraction (nutcracker esophagus).Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Scleritis: Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.HLA-DR4 Antigen: An HLA-DR antigen which is associated with HLA-DRB1 CHAINS encoded by DRB1*04 alleles.Nucleoproteins: Proteins conjugated with nucleic acids.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Antibody Specificity: The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.Antigens, Nuclear: Immunologically detectable substances found in the CELL NUCLEUS.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Immediate-Early Proteins: Proteins that are coded by immediate-early genes, in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. The term was originally used exclusively for viral regulatory proteins that were synthesized just after viral integration into the host cell. It is also used to describe cellular proteins which are synthesized immediately after the resting cell is stimulated by extracellular signals.Behcet Syndrome: Rare chronic inflammatory disease involving the small blood vessels. It is of unknown etiology and characterized by mucocutaneous ulceration in the mouth and genital region and uveitis with hypopyon. The neuro-ocular form may cause blindness and death. SYNOVITIS; THROMBOPHLEBITIS; gastrointestinal ulcerations; RETINAL VASCULITIS; and OPTIC ATROPHY may occur as well.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Regulatory proteins and peptides that are signaling molecules involved in the process of PARACRINE COMMUNICATION. They are generally considered factors that are expressed by one cell and are responded to by receptors on another nearby cell. They are distinguished from HORMONES in that their actions are local rather than distal.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Methylprednisolone: A PREDNISOLONE derivative with similar anti-inflammatory action.

*  MedGen for PubMed (Select 18426414) - MedGen - NCBI

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases. A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [ ... Diseases affecting PIGMENTATION, including SKIN PIGMENTATION. [from MeSH]. MedGen UID: 107500. •Concept ID: C0549567. •. ... Autoimmune disease. A disorder resulting from loss of function or tissue destruction of an organ or multiple organs, arising ... Generalized vitiligo is an autoimmune disease characterized by melanocyte loss, which results in patchy depigmentation of skin ...
https://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/medgen?LinkName=pubmed_medgen&from_uid=18426414

*  Melanosis - Freckles Summary Report | CureHunter

Disorders of increased melanin pigmentation that develop without preceding inflammatory disease. ... Disease Context: Research Results. *Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases*Skin Diseases: 8226*Pigmentation Disorders: 81* ... 06/01/2009 - "From this study it became apparent that in melasma melanin is concentrated in the deeper layers of the skin but ... 11/01/2014 - "FCO2 laser resurfacing is effective and safe in treatment of facial freckles in skin phototypes II-IV. It can ...
curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD008548-Melanosis-Freckles.do

*  New Descriptors by Tree Subcategory - 2015

C17 (Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases). Lipedema. Nicolau Syndrome. Pectus Carinatum. C18 (Nutritional and Metabolic ... C10 (Nervous System Diseases). Allesthesia. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak. Hemimegalencephaly ... C13 (Female Urogenital Diseases and Pregnancy Complications). Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome. Atypical Squamous Cells of ... C16 (Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities). Congenital Microtia. Hemimegalencephaly. Hernias, ...
https://nlm.nih.gov/mesh/newbysub.html

*  Burning Mouth Syndrome: Background, Anatomy and Physiology, Pathophysiology

Examination of the joints and skin may suggest connective tissue diseases. * A complete neurologic examination with particular ... and neurologic and connective tissue disorders may be helpful. Reviewing medications that may cause xerostomia as well as ... Effect of chewing a mixture of areca nut and tobacco on periodontal tissues and oral hygiene status. Journal of Oral Science. ... Involvement of the throat may be suggestive of allergy or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The pain may be mild to ...
emedicine.medscape.com/article/1508869-overview

*  British Library EThOS: Expression and regulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3 (MCP-3) in fibrosis

Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem connective tissue disease characterised by skin thickening and widespread, but variable, ... This was supported by immunohistochemical studies on dermal tissues. Similar upregulation dermal patterns of MCP-3 protein ... A salient feature of the inflammatory response is directional migration of leucocytes into subendothelial tissues orchestrated ... type 1 tight skin mouse (Tsk1) and a transgenic mouse strain (TβRIIΔk) in which there is fibroblast-directed disruption of TGFβ ...
ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.564627

*  ISRCTN - ISRCTN17146141: Enhancing dermatological diagnoses in patients with skin diseases at the National Institute for...

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases Date applied. 16/07/2008 Date assigned. 17/07/2008 Last edited. 16/10/2008 Prospective/ ... previous skin diseases, physical examination, including the skin rash distribution, and the results of routine investigations ... Enhancing dermatological diagnoses in patients with skin diseases at the National Institute for Infectious and Tropical ... If a skin scraping is done, it will be sent for microscopy (KOH stain) and/or fungal culture. Fluid from vesicles may be sent ...
isrctn.com/ISRCTN17146141

*  A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Abatacept in Patients With Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma) - Full Text...

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Abatacept. Immunosuppressive Agents. Immunologic Factors. Physiological Effects of ... Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease that involves the skin and other internal organs ... Other connective tissues diseases or overlap syndromes including MCTD, SLE, RA, eosinophilic fasciitis, and limited systemic ... sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease of unknown etiology characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00442611?term=scleroderma&rank=18

*  "Angiopoietin-1 is expressed in the synovium of patients with rheumatoi" by Ellen M. Gravallese, A. R. Pettit et al.

... and compared with six synovial tissue samples from six patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Ang-1 expression in synovial tissues ... Ang-1 protein was frequently observed in the synovial lining layer and in cells within the sublining synovial tissue, in both ... RESULTS: Ang-1 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 16/18 RA synovial tissue samples. ... METHODS: Eighteen synovial tissue samples were obtained from 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA ...
escholarship.umassmed.edu/rheumatology_pubs/37/

*  "Imiquimod reactivation of lichen planus" by Erik Domingues, Keri C. Chaney et al.

Dermatology , Pharmacology , Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases. Abstract. A 44-year-old man who was previously diagnosed with ...
escholarship.umassmed.edu/derm_pubs/56/

*  "The "east-west" advancement flap for nasal defects: reexamined and ext" by David E. Geist and Mary E. Maloney

Dermatology , Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases. Abstract. Describes how the "east-west" advancement flap with modifications ...
escholarship.umassmed.edu/derm_pubs/37/

*  "White gel pen easily marks a port-wine stain margin during pulsed dye " by Julie A. Fenner, Mark J. Scharf et al.

Dermatology , Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases. Rights and Permissions. Citation: Dermatol Surg. 2011 Dec;37(12):1786. doi: ...
escholarship.umassmed.edu/derm_pubs/62/

*  "Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Case 31-2005. A 60" by Jonathan Kay and Robert T. McCluskey

Male Urogenital Diseases Commons, Rheumatology Commons, Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases Commons ... A 60-year-old man with skin lesions and renal insufficiency" (2005). Rheumatology Publications and Presentations. 142. http:// ...
escholarship.umassmed.edu/rheumatology_pubs/142/

*  Deep Breathing - How Can It Stop Skin Aging? | HubPages

Full and rhythmical breathing works wonders for our skin. It ensures the continuous flow of oxygen to cells and the swift ... It is a wonderfully energising treatment that restores the free flow of oxygen to the skin and other tissues. ... Cleansing Skin with Herbal Soap. Nothing leaves your skin feeling quite as squeaky clean as soap and water washing. The light, ... Benefits of Drinking Water for Skin. Water is skin's most essential nutrient. Plentiful supplies of this crystal-clear liquid ...
https://hubpages.com/health/Deep-Breathing-How-Can-It-Stop-Skin-Aging

*  Scleroderma

... chronic autoimmune disease. Discover scleroderma symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments. Includes video, what is scleroderma? ... or fibrous tissue. A connective tissue disease is one that affects tissues such as skin, tendons, and cartilage. NIAMS. ... Scleroderma is both a rheumatic disease and a connective tissue disease. The term rheumatic disease refers to a group of ... Scleroderma is a rare autoimmune disease that often affects the skin. It is also a form of arthritis and a connective tissue ...
https://sclero.org/scleroderma/a-to-z.html

*  Neuropsychiatric Scleroderma Study: Systematic Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Involvement in Systemic Sclerosis - Full Text...

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 20, 2017. ... Systemic sclerosis is a rare disease with vascular involvement and systemic fibrosis. This disease is usually thought to spare ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01488214?recr=Open&cond="Scleroderma, Systemic"&rank=18

*  A Non-Interventional Pilot Study Assessing Whether Lysyl Oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is Present in Subjects With Scleroderma - Full...

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 20, 2017. ... This study will determine if the disease is associated with an elevated expression of LOXL2 levels in tissue samples from ... Scleroderma is a chronic skin-hardening disease. There are two types of scleroderma. The first type is called limited cutaneous ... 2 Punch Skin Biopsies (one near the scleroderma lesion, the other from normal skin) ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01881529?recr=Open&cond="Scleroderma, Localized"&rank=16

*  High Dose Intravenous N-Acetylcysteine Versus Iloprost for Early, Rapidly Progressive Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis - Full Text...

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Acetylcysteine. N-monoacetylcystine. Iloprost. Antiviral Agents. Anti-Infective ... Evaluated by the modified Rodnan skin score.. Secondary Outcome Measures: *scleroderma disease activity assessed as established ... laboratory evidence of skin fibroblast activation;. *the levels of Glutathione and of oxidized glutathione (GSSG).. ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Systemic Scleroderma Diffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00428883

*  Proof of Biological Activity of SAR100842 in Systemic Sclerosis - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 18, 2017. ... Change from baseline to Week 8 in Modified Rodnan Skin Score (mRSS) [ Time Frame: Day 1 and Week 8 (core part) ]. *Change from ... Change from baseline to Week 8 in biomarkers obtained from blood and skin [ Time Frame: Day 1 and Week 8 (core part) ]. * ... Severe cardiac and/or pulmonary disease. The above information is not intended to contain all considerations relevant to a ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01651143

*  Morbidity and Mortality Follow Up for the Scleroderma Lung Study - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Cyclophosphamide. Immunosuppressive Agents. Immunologic Factors. Physiological ... While lung disease is recognized as the leading cause of death amongst patients with scleroderma, there is not a large body of ... The primary intent of this study is to add to the body of knowledge on scleroderma patients with interstitial lung disease. ... related lung disease following the end of the study. ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01762449?term=scleroderma&rank=16

*  Autologous Stem Cell Systemic Sclerosis Immune Suppression Trial - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Cyclophosphamide. Fludarabine phosphate. Antilymphocyte Serum. Fludarabine. ... Active ischemic heart disease or heart failure.. *End-stage lung disease characterized by TLC,45% of predicted value, or DLCO ... Increase of skin score (if , 14 on enrollment) by , 25% above enrollment value and must be documented on 2 occasions at least 6 ... It is the first treatment to have ever demonstrated reversal of lung disease in scleroderma with improvement in FVC, total lung ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01445821

*  Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging for Cutaneous Microvascular Dysfunction Detection in Systemic Sclerosis. - Full Text View -...

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Peripheral Vascular Diseases. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. ... without secondary disease. Procedure: laser speckle contrast imaging blood flow recording during 30 minutes after 2 post- ... concomitant serious disease: progressive cancer, liver failure, history of myocardial infarction less than 5 years, angor ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01743612?recr=Open&cond="Raynaud Disease"&rank=1

*  Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Versus UVA 1 in Treatment of Localized Scleroderma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 21, 2017. ... Skin thickness: 0-3, 0: normal; 1: thickened skin; 2: decreased ability to move the skin; 3: unable to pinch or move skin ( ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Systemic Scleroderma Morphea Localized Scleroderma ... TGFß ( transforming growth factor beta)in the pre and post treatment skin biopsies. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002897?term=scleroderma&rank=11

*  Cyclophosphamide Systemic Sclerosis Associated Interstitial Lung Disease - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Respiratory Tract Diseases. Connective Tissue Diseases. Skin Diseases. Cyclophosphamide. Prednisone. Immunosuppressive Agents. ... mixed connective tissue disease. *Patient pregnant, lactating or not using contraception considered effective by the ... Association to another connective disease : systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome of Gougerot-Sjögren with anti-SSA/SSB, ... MedlinePlus related topics: Interstitial Lung Diseases Lung Diseases Scleroderma Steroids Drug Information available for: ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01570764?recr=Open&cond="Scleroderma, Systemic"&rank=8

*  Posttraumatic True Aneurysm of the Axillary Artery Following Blunt Trauma

There were no signs of vasculitis or connective tissue diseases associated with arterial involvement such as hyperelastic skin ... This process contrasts the formation of pseudoaneurysms, which result when fibrous tissue surrounds a posttraumatic hematoma ... or only a portion of the wall and surrounding tissue (pseudoaneurysm) [1]. Pseudoaneurysm is characterized by focal defect in ... the arterial wall, with hemorrhage controlled by surrounding tissues [1]. This type constitutes the majority of the traumatic ...
https://hindawi.com/journals/crim/2010/210391/

*  Layman's Medical Dictionary - S

A chronic inflammatory connective tissue disease marked by skin rashes, joint pain and swelling, inflammation of the kidneys, ... It has spread to the lower part of the inner layer of skin (dermis) but not into the tissue below the skin or into nearby lymph ... soft tissue Refers to muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue of the body. ... Tumors that arise in the supporting connective tissue of an organ. strontium A metal often used in a radioactive form for ...
seniormag.com/conditions/cancer/cancerglossary/s.htm

Undifferentiated connective tissue diseaseRibonucleoprotein: Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) is a nucleoprotein that contains RNA, i.e.Dense connective tissue: Dense connective tissue, also called dense fibrous tissue, has fibers as its main matrix element.Systemic sclerodermaAnti-dsDNA antibodies: Anti-dsDNA antibodies are a group of anti-nuclear antibodies and their target antigen is double stranded DNA. Blood tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence are routinely performed to detect anti-dsDNA antibodies in diagnostic laboratories.Tour SignalOtospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia: Otospondylomegaepiphyseal dysplasia (OSMED) is an autosomal recessive disorder of bone growth that results in skeletal abnormalities, severe hearing loss, and distinctive facial features. The name of the condition indicates that it affects hearing (oto-) and the bones of the spine (spondylo-), and enlarges the ends of bones (megaepiphyses).Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy: For women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), pregnancy can present some particular challenges for both mother and child.CTGF: CTGF, also known as CCN2 or connective tissue growth factor, is a matricellular protein of the CCN family of extracellular matrix-associated heparin-binding proteins (see also CCN intercellular signaling protein). CTGF has important roles in many biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, angiogenesis, skeletal development, and tissue wound repair, and is critically involved in fibrotic disease and several forms of cancers.Autoantibody: An autoantibody is an antibody (a type of protein) produced by the immune system that is directed against one or more of the individual's own proteins. Many autoimmune diseases, (notably lupus erythematosus), are caused by such autoantibodies.Non-specific interstitial pneumonia: Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is a form of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia.Dermal equivalent: The dermal equivalent is an in vitro model of the dermal layer of skin. It is constructed by seeding dermal fibroblasts into a collagen gel.SclerodactylyDermatomyositis: - (ILDS M33.910)Wandering cell: In anatomy and histology, the term wandering cell (or ameboid cell)ameboid+cell at eMedicine Dictionary is used to describe cells that are found in connective tissue, but are not fixed in place. This term is used occasionally and usually refers to blood leukocytes (which are not fixed and organized in solid tissue) in particular mononuclear phagocytes.Pulmonary Hypertension Association: The Pulmonary Hypertension Association (PHA) is a 501(c) organization non-profit support, education, advocacy and awareness association for pulmonary hypertension (PH). It provides information to the public about the illness and acts as a support group for those with the disease, providing medical provider location services and emotional support for those suffering from the illness.Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases: The Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases is a peer-reviewed medical journal. It is co-owned by the BMJ Group and the European League Against Rheumatism and covers all aspects of rheumatology, including musculoskeletal conditions, arthritis, and connective tissue diseases.Breast prosthesesExercise therapy for idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: Although they vary in particulars, polymyositis, dermatomyositis and inclusion body myositis are idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM)primarily characterized by chronic inflammation] of human [[skeletal muscle tissueLundberg I. and Y-L Chung, 2000.ACR score for rheumatoid arthritis: ACR score is a scale to measure change in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. It is named after the American College of Rheumatology.PolymyositisLipodermatosclerosis: Lipodermatosclerosis (also known as "Chronic panniculitis with lipomembranous changes," "Hypodermitis sclerodermiformis," "Sclerosing panniculitis," and "Stasis panniculitis") is a skin and connective tissue disease. It is a form of lower extremity panniculitis, Bruce AJ.Polyarteritis nodosaAutoimmune diseaseHereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis: Hereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis is a very rare, benign, non-Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. An autosomal dominant or X-linked hereditary disease described on the skin, it has been found almost exclusively in women.Bullous small vessel vasculitis: Bullous small vessel vasculitis (also known as "Bullous variant of small vessel vasculitis") is a cutaneous condition in which patients with small vessel vasculitis will develop superimposed vesicles and bullae, especially on the distal extremities.Staining of the nail plate: Staining of the nail plate may occur due to nicotine, dyes (including hair dyes and nail polish), potassium permanganate, mercury compounds, hydroquinone, elemental iron, mepacrine, photographic developer, anthralin, chrysarobin, glutaraldehyde, or resorcin.James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).Silicone resin: rightAntoine MarfanPrednisoloneCombined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema describes a medical syndrome involving both pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. The combination is most commonly found in male smokers.Toe walking: Toe walking refers to a condition where a person walks on his or her toes without putting much weight on the heel or any other part of the foot. Toe walking in toddlers is common.Aesthetic Surgery Journal: Aesthetic Surgery Journal is a peer-reviewed medical journal that covers the field of plastic surgery. The journal's editor-in-chief is Foad Nahai (Emory University School of Medicine).Stephen T. Wegener: Stephen Thomas Wegener (born November 20, 1952) is an American rehabilitation psychologist specializing in the psychology of pain management.Gillis, Linda (October 3, 1991).Arthritis Research UKMALAT1-associated small cytoplasmic RNAEva Engvall: Eva Engvall, born 1940, is one of the scientists who invented ELISA in 1971.Eva Engvall, The Scientist 1995, 9(18):8HydroxychloroquineTamponadeRheumatoid factor: Rheumatoid factor (RF) is the autoantibody (antibody directed against an organism's own tissues) that was first found in rheumatoid arthritis. It is defined as an antibody against the Fc portion of IgG (an antibody against an antibody).Counterimmunoelectrophoresis: A laboratory technique used to evaluate the binding of an antibody to its antigen. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis is similar to immunodiffusion, but with the addition of an applied electrical field across the diffusion medium, usually an agar or polyacrylamide gel.CD4 immunoadhesin: CD4 immunoadhesin is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of a combination of CD4 and the fragment crystallizable region.Actinic elastosis: Actinic elastosis, also known as solar elastosis is an accumulation of abnormal elastin (elastic tissue) in the dermis of the skin, or in the conjunctiva of the eye, which occurs as a result of the cumulative effects of prolonged and excessive sun exposure, a process known as photoaging.Five Fingers GroupEsophageal motility disorder: An esophageal motility disorder is any medical disorder causing difficulty in swallowing, regurgitation of food and a spasm-type pain which can be brought on by an allergic reaction to certain foods. The most prominent one is dysphagia.Gross examinationScleritisInfluenza virus nucleoprotein: Influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a structural protein which encapsidates the negative strand viral RNA. NP is one of the main determinants of species specificity.Dermal fibroblast: Dermal fibroblasts are cells within the dermis layer of skin which are responsible for generating connective tissue and allowing the skin to recover from injury. Using organelles (particularly the rough endoplasmic reticulum), dermal fibroblasts generate and maintain the connective tissue which unites separate cell layers.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.CollagenImmunosuppressive drug: Immunosuppressive drugs or immunosuppressive agents or antirejection medications are drugs that inhibit or prevent activity of the immune system. They are used in immunosuppressive therapy to:Beck's triad (cardiology): Beck's triad is a collection of three medical signs associated with acute cardiac tamponade, an emergency condition wherein fluid accumulates around the heart and impairs its ability to pump blood. The signs are low arterial blood pressure, distended neck veins, and distant, muffled heart sounds.Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor: Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family of proteins that in humans is encoded by the HBEGF gene.Methylprednisolone