RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.RNA Splicing: The ultimate exclusion of nonsense sequences or intervening sequences (introns) before the final RNA transcript is sent to the cytoplasm.RNA Editing: A process that changes the nucleotide sequence of mRNA from that of the DNA template encoding it. Some major classes of RNA editing are as follows: 1, the conversion of cytosine to uracil in mRNA; 2, the addition of variable number of guanines at pre-determined sites; and 3, the addition and deletion of uracils, templated by guide-RNAs (RNA, GUIDE).RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Sequence Analysis: A multistage process that includes the determination of a sequence (protein, carbohydrate, etc.), its fragmentation and analysis, and the interpretation of the resulting sequence information.RNA, Ribosomal: The most abundant form of RNA. Together with proteins, it forms the ribosomes, playing a structural role and also a role in ribosomal binding of mRNA and tRNAs. Individual chains are conventionally designated by their sedimentation coefficients. In eukaryotes, four large chains exist, synthesized in the nucleolus and constituting about 50% of the ribosome. (Dorland, 28th ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases: Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.RNA Viruses: Viruses whose genetic material is RNA.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid: The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.RNA, Double-Stranded: RNA consisting of two strands as opposed to the more prevalent single-stranded RNA. Most of the double-stranded segments are formed from transcription of DNA by intramolecular base-pairing of inverted complementary sequences separated by a single-stranded loop. Some double-stranded segments of RNA are normal in all organisms.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.RNA, Catalytic: RNA that has catalytic activity. The catalytic RNA sequence folds to form a complex surface that can function as an enzyme in reactions with itself and other molecules. It may function even in the absence of protein. There are numerous examples of RNA species that are acted upon by catalytic RNA, however the scope of this enzyme class is not limited to a particular type of substrate.Sequence Analysis, RNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, sequencing, and information analysis of an RNA SEQUENCE.RNA Polymerase II: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. It functions in the nucleoplasmic structure and transcribes DNA into RNA. It has different requirements for cations and salt than RNA polymerase I and is strongly inhibited by alpha-amanitin. EC 2.7.7.6.RNA Folding: The processes of RNA tertiary structure formation.RNA, Fungal: Ribonucleic acid in fungi having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.RNA, Transfer: The small RNA molecules, 73-80 nucleotides long, that function during translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) to align AMINO ACIDS at the RIBOSOMES in a sequence determined by the mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). There are about 30 different transfer RNAs. Each recognizes a specific CODON set on the mRNA through its own ANTICODON and as aminoacyl tRNAs (RNA, TRANSFER, AMINO ACYL), each carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome to add to the elongating peptide chains.RNA Helicases: A family of proteins that promote unwinding of RNA during splicing and translation.RNA, Antisense: RNA molecules which hybridize to complementary sequences in either RNA or DNA altering the function of the latter. Endogenous antisense RNAs function as regulators of gene expression by a variety of mechanisms. Synthetic antisense RNAs are used to effect the functioning of specific genes for investigative or therapeutic purposes.RNA Stability: The extent to which an RNA molecule retains its structural integrity and resists degradation by RNASE, and base-catalyzed HYDROLYSIS, under changing in vivo or in vitro conditions.RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional: Post-transcriptional biological modification of messenger, transfer, or ribosomal RNAs or their precursors. It includes cleavage, methylation, thiolation, isopentenylation, pseudouridine formation, conformational changes, and association with ribosomal protein.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Restriction Mapping: Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.RNA Precursors: RNA transcripts of the DNA that are in some unfinished stage of post-transcriptional processing (RNA PROCESSING, POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL) required for function. RNA precursors may undergo several steps of RNA SPLICING during which the phosphodiester bonds at exon-intron boundaries are cleaved and the introns are excised. Consequently a new bond is formed between the ends of the exons. Resulting mature RNAs can then be used; for example, mature mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER) is used as a template for protein production.RNA, Small Nuclear: Short chains of RNA (100-300 nucleotides long) that are abundant in the nucleus and usually complexed with proteins in snRNPs (RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL NUCLEAR). Many function in the processing of messenger RNA precursors. Others, the snoRNAs (RNA, SMALL NUCLEOLAR), are involved with the processing of ribosomal RNA precursors.RNA, Untranslated: RNA which does not code for protein but has some enzymatic, structural or regulatory function. Although ribosomal RNA (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) and transfer RNA (RNA, TRANSFER) are also untranslated RNAs they are not included in this scope.Open Reading Frames: A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.RNA Caps: Nucleic acid structures found on the 5' end of eukaryotic cellular and viral messenger RNA and some heterogeneous nuclear RNAs. These structures, which are positively charged, protect the above specified RNAs at their termini against attack by phosphatases and other nucleases and promote mRNA function at the level of initiation of translation. Analogs of the RNA caps (RNA CAP ANALOGS), which lack the positive charge, inhibit the initiation of protein synthesis.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.RNA, Protozoan: Ribonucleic acid in protozoa having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.RNA, Plant: Ribonucleic acid in plants having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.RNA, Ribosomal, 23S: Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Genes: A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.RNA, Ribosomal, 18S: Constituent of the 40S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 18S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.RNA, Ribosomal, 28S: Constituent of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 28S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.RNA Ligase (ATP): An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of linear RNA to a circular form by the transfer of the 5'-phosphate to the 3'-hydroxyl terminus. It also catalyzes the covalent joining of two polyribonucleotides in phosphodiester linkage. EC 6.5.1.3.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.DEAD-box RNA Helicases: A large family of RNA helicases that share a common protein motif with the single letter amino acid sequence D-E-A-D (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp). In addition to RNA helicase activity, members of the DEAD-box family participate in other aspects of RNA metabolism and regulation of RNA function.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)RNA Polymerase III: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. It functions in the nucleoplasmic structure where it transcribes DNA into RNA. It has specific requirements for cations and salt and has shown an intermediate sensitivity to alpha-amanitin in comparison to RNA polymerase I and II. EC 2.7.7.6.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.RNA Polymerase I: A DNA-dependent RNA polymerase present in bacterial, plant, and animal cells. The enzyme functions in the nucleolar structure and transcribes DNA into RNA. It has different requirements for cations and salts than RNA polymerase II and III and is not inhibited by alpha-amanitin. EC 2.7.7.6.RNA, Nuclear: RNA molecules found in the nucleus either associated with chromosomes or in the nucleoplasm.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.Sequence Homology: The degree of similarity between sequences. Studies of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY and NUCLEIC ACID SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY provide useful information about the genetic relatedness of genes, gene products, and species.DNA Restriction Enzymes: Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.RNA, Guide: Small kinetoplastid mitochondrial RNA that plays a major role in RNA EDITING. These molecules form perfect hybrids with edited mRNA sequences and possess nucleotide sequences at their 5'-ends that are complementary to the sequences of the mRNA's immediately downstream of the pre-edited regions.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.RNA, Ribosomal, 5.8S: Constituent of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. 5.8S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis in eukaryotes.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Poly A: A group of adenine ribonucleotides in which the phosphate residues of each adenine ribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the ribose moieties.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Introns: Sequences of DNA in the genes that are located between the EXONS. They are transcribed along with the exons but are removed from the primary gene transcript by RNA SPLICING to leave mature RNA. Some introns code for separate genes.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.RNA, Archaeal: Ribonucleic acid in archaea having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.RNA, Satellite: Small, linear single-stranded RNA molecules functionally acting as molecular parasites of certain RNA plant viruses. Satellite RNAs exhibit four characteristic traits: (1) they require helper viruses to replicate; (2) they are unnecessary for the replication of helper viruses; (3) they are encapsidated in the coat protein of the helper virus; (4) they have no extensive sequence homology to the helper virus. Thus they differ from SATELLITE VIRUSES which encode their own coat protein, and from the genomic RNA; (=RNA, VIRAL); of satellite viruses. (From Maramorosch, Viroids and Satellites, 1991, p143)Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Oligoribonucleotides: A group of ribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each ribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the ribose moieties.DNA, Fungal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.RNA Transport: The process of moving specific RNA molecules from one cellular compartment or region to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Oligonucleotide Probes: Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.RNA, Spliced Leader: The small RNAs which provide spliced leader sequences, SL1, SL2, SL3, SL4 and SL5 (short sequences which are joined to the 5' ends of pre-mRNAs by TRANS-SPLICING). They are found primarily in primitive eukaryotes (protozoans and nematodes).Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Ribonucleases: Enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds within RNA. EC 3.1.-.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.Point Mutation: A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Ribonucleoproteins: Complexes of RNA-binding proteins with ribonucleic acids (RNA).Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Templates, Genetic: Macromolecular molds for the synthesis of complementary macromolecules, as in DNA REPLICATION; GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of DNA to RNA, and GENETIC TRANSLATION of RNA into POLYPEPTIDES.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Genomic Library: A form of GENE LIBRARY containing the complete DNA sequences present in the genome of a given organism. It contrasts with a cDNA library which contains only sequences utilized in protein coding (lacking introns).Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length: Variation occurring within a species in the presence or length of DNA fragment generated by a specific endonuclease at a specific site in the genome. Such variations are generated by mutations that create or abolish recognition sites for these enzymes or change the length of the fragment.Plant Viruses: Viruses parasitic on plants higher than bacteria.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Single-Strand Specific DNA and RNA Endonucleases: Enzymes that catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded regions of DNA or RNA molecules while leaving the double-stranded regions intact. They are particularly useful in the laboratory for producing "blunt-ended" DNA molecules from DNA with single-stranded ends and for sensitive GENETIC TECHNIQUES such as NUCLEASE PROTECTION ASSAYS that involve the detection of single-stranded DNA and RNA.Sequence Deletion: Deletion of sequences of nucleic acids from the genetic material of an individual.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.RNA Cleavage: A reaction that severs one of the sugar-phosphate linkages of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA. It is catalyzed enzymatically, chemically, or by radiation. Cleavage may be exonucleolytic, or endonucleolytic.Oligonucleotides: Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)Consensus Sequence: A theoretical representative nucleotide or amino acid sequence in which each nucleotide or amino acid is the one which occurs most frequently at that site in the different sequences which occur in nature. The phrase also refers to an actual sequence which approximates the theoretical consensus. A known CONSERVED SEQUENCE set is represented by a consensus sequence. Commonly observed supersecondary protein structures (AMINO ACID MOTIFS) are often formed by conserved sequences.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.5' Untranslated Regions: The sequence at the 5' end of the messenger RNA that does not code for product. This sequence contains the ribosome binding site and other transcription and translation regulating sequences.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Endoribonucleases: A family of enzymes that catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA. It includes EC 3.1.26.-, EC 3.1.27.-, EC 3.1.30.-, and EC 3.1.31.-.RNA, Heterogeneous Nuclear: Nuclear nonribosomal RNA larger than about 1000 nucleotides, the mass of which is rapidly synthesized and degraded within the cell nucleus. Some heterogeneous nuclear RNA may be a precursor to mRNA. However, the great bulk of total hnRNA hybridizes with nuclear DNA rather than with mRNA.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Codon: A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).RNA, Small Cytoplasmic: Small RNAs found in the cytoplasm usually complexed with proteins in scRNPs (RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS, SMALL CYTOPLASMIC).Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.RNA 3' End Processing: The steps that generate the 3' ends of mature RNA molecules. For most mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), 3' end processing referred to as POLYADENYLATION includes the addition of POLY A.DNA, Recombinant: Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.RNA, Long Noncoding: A class of untranslated RNA molecules that are typically greater than 200 nucleotides in length and do not code for proteins. Members of this class have been found to play roles in transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional processing, CHROMATIN REMODELING, and in the epigenetic control of chromatin.RNA, Small Untranslated: Short RNA, about 200 base pairs in length or shorter, that does not code for protein.Alternative Splicing: A process whereby multiple RNA transcripts are generated from a single gene. Alternative splicing involves the splicing together of other possible sets of EXONS during the processing of some, but not all, transcripts of the gene. Thus a particular exon may be connected to any one of several alternative exons to form a mature RNA. The alternative forms of mature MESSENGER RNA produce PROTEIN ISOFORMS in which one part of the isoforms is common while the other parts are different.Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.UridinePlant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.RNA, Small Nucleolar: Small nuclear RNAs that are involved in the processing of pre-ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus. Box C/D containing snoRNAs (U14, U15, U16, U20, U21 and U24-U63) direct site-specific methylation of various ribose moieties. Box H/ACA containing snoRNAs (E2, E3, U19, U23, and U64-U72) direct the conversion of specific uridines to pseudouridine. Site-specific cleavages resulting in the mature ribosomal RNAs are directed by snoRNAs U3, U8, U14, U22 and the snoRNA components of RNase MRP and RNase P.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Base Pairing: Pairing of purine and pyrimidine bases by HYDROGEN BONDING in double-stranded DNA or RNA.RNA Virus Infections3' Untranslated Regions: The sequence at the 3' end of messenger RNA that does not code for product. This region contains transcription and translation regulating sequences.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.RNA, Complementary: Synthetic transcripts of a specific DNA molecule or fragment, made by an in vitro transcription system. This cRNA can be labeled with radioactive uracil and then used as a probe. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Genes, Regulator: Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.Ribonuclease T1: An enzyme catalyzing the endonucleolytic cleavage of RNA at the 3'-position of a guanylate residue. EC 3.1.27.3.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Protein PrecursorsMultilocus Sequence Typing: Direct nucleotide sequencing of gene fragments from multiple housekeeping genes for the purpose of phylogenetic analysis, organism identification, and typing of species, strain, serovar, or other distinguishable phylogenetic level.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.

*  Why Are There Many Rna-Seq Hits To Intronic Regions?
By RNA mass in a human cell, transcripts emanating from intronic sequences approximately equal that of exonic sequences but ... Also, based on our global analyses of intronic RNA-seq coverage it seems like co-transcriptional splicing is a very common ... which is that the sequences may arise from stable lariat RNA. Stable lariats have been observed in polyA minus fractions of RNA ... Rna-Seq Read Mapping Stats/Metrics Hi I am trying to get some stats regarding my RNA-seq alignment to see how many reads are ...
  https://www.biostars.org/p/42890/
*  RNA STRAND molecule page
Comparative sequence analysis. Number of molecules [?]:. 1. Length [?]:. 2880. Fragments used [?]:. No. ... RNA STRAND v2.0 - The RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database [ Home , Search , Analyse , Submit structures ... Duplicated sequence [?]:. No other molecule in the database has the same sequence. ... The Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site: An Online Database of Comparative Sequence and Structure Information for Ribosomal, Intron ...
  http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand/show_results.php?molecule_ID=CRW_00491
*  4:42 pm
Abstract: comparative high-throughput sequencing assays, a fundamental task is the analysis of count data, such as read counts ... Moderated estimation of fold change and dispersion for RNA-seq data with DESeq2, Genome Biology, 15:550 (2014). ... This enables a more quantitative analysis focused on the strength rather than the mere presence of differential expression. The ... We present DESeq2, a method for differential analysis of count data, using shrinkage estimation for dispersions and fold ...
  http://www.huber.embl.de/deseq2-paper-published/
*  Single-Cell mRNA-Seq Overview
The SMARTer Ultra Low RNA Kit for Illumina Sequencing and SMARTer Ultra Low Input RNA for Illumina Sequencing - HV kit are the ... RNA Extraction and Protein Analysis for Real-Time qPCR * Direct cDNA Synthesis from ... The SMARTer Ultra Low Input RNA Kit for Sequencing - v3 generated libraries with improved sequencing metrics, particularly for ... from 1 ng total RNA) and qPCR data available for Universal Human Reference Total RNA (UHR) and Human Brain Reference RNA. The ...
  http://www.clontech.com/US/Products/cDNA_Synthesis_and_Library_Construction/Next_Gen_Sequencing_Kits/Single_cell_RNA_Seq_Kits_for_mRNA_seq/Overview?sitex=10020:22372:US&PEBCL1=DKQ6xy1Dch3LzG6Of6DkCNwQGh&PEBCL1_pses=ZGC04342D7980DB3CC193EEAD6090217B9F2D99E61443A3AA693070A66A88D7FB648CEA024DF59161FDD42E323C41849F5E5DC42BE533D2837
*  RNA-seq analysis - Authorea
lane effects: sample loading, cluster amplification, sequencing reaction. Consider spike-in of artificial RNA (ERCC spike-in ... 2015) show that aberrant replicates can skew the entire analysis as a significant fraction of gene counts cannot be captured by ... standard) for calibration of the RNA concentrations in each sample and of the measured fold‐changes between the two conditions ...
  https://www.authorea.com/users/4176/articles/25921/_show_article
*  High-Sensitivity mRNA-Seq for Ultra-Low Inputs
Sequence analysis:. Reads from both Mouse and Human Brain Total RNA were trimmed by CLC Genomics Workbench and mapped to rRNA ... Sequencing metrics are consistent across RNA input amounts. 10 pg-10 ng of Human Brain Total RNA were used to generate cDNA ... Excellent Metrics Across RNA Input Amount. The SMART-Seq v4 Ultra Low Input RNA Kit for Sequencing produces libraries that ... 10 pg-10 ng of Human Brain Total RNA was used as input for the SMART-Seq v4 Ultra Low Input RNA Kit for Sequencing as described ...
  http://www.clontech.com/US/Products/cDNA_Synthesis_and_Library_Construction/NGS_Learning_Resources/Technical_Notes/SMART-Seq-v4?sitex=10020:22372:US&PEBCL1=HSr2bp5TysxZVu1MBDVbsU5HsE&PEBCL1_pses=ZG7F4275112C71F3BBB6E5FFF14F515519099539060623F3C3442902DEE48EAC5A47D47565334783CDD9417E3B9265E0728F4694C9FE3D8E86
*  RNA Sequence Analysis of Single Cells by NGS - QIAGEN
QIAseq FX Single Cell RNA Library Kit Single cell RNA-seq libraries that provide a deeper view of the transcriptome Show ... Only on a single-cell level, can you eliminate the biological noise that is inherent to standard gene expression analysis - ... Get more powerful data from single cells - detect more transcripts with the same sequencing depth, including both mRNA and ... Our new solutions for single-cell RNA-seq deliver a deeper understanding of the transcriptome, providing new biological ...
  https://www.qiagen.com/no/resources/knowledge-area/single-cell-resource/repli-g-rna-sequencing/
*  The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene | Sequence analysis of the small RNA segment of guinea pig-passaged...
We have compared the nucleotide sequences of the small RNA segments of two attenuated, low-passage variants of the PIC virus ... f Sequence analysis of the small RNA segment of guinea pig-passaged Pichinde virus variants. * Authors: L Zhang, K Marriott, J ... We have compared the nucleotide sequences of the small RNA segments of two attenuated, low-passage variants of the PIC virus ...
  http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1999.61.220
*  Third-generation RNA-sequencing analysis: graph alignment and transcript assembly with long reads
A common analysis workflow of RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data consists of mapping the sequencing reads to a reference genome, ... Third-generation RNA-sequencing analysis: graph alignment and transcript assembly with long reads. Visa fullständig post ... Third-generation RNA-sequencing analysis: graph alignment and transcript assembly with long reads. ... The first part of this thesis focuses on the analysis of short-read RNA-seq data. As short-read mapping is an already well- ...
  https://helda.helsinki.fi/handle/10138/228812?locale-attribute=sv
*  Abstract W P73: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of Whole Blood RNA-Sequencing Analysis in Patients With Intracranial...
Abstract W P73: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of Whole Blood RNA-Sequencing Analysis in Patients With Intracranial ... Abstract W P73: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of Whole Blood RNA-Sequencing Analysis in Patients With Intracranial ... Abstract W P73: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of Whole Blood RNA-Sequencing Analysis in Patients With Intracranial ... Abstract W P73: Feasibility and Preliminary Results of Whole Blood RNA-Sequencing Analysis in Patients With Intracranial ...
  http://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/45/Suppl_1/AWP73
*  Sequence Analysis, RNA | Colorado PROFILES
"Sequence Analysis, RNA" by people in this website by year, and whether "Sequence Analysis, RNA" was a major or minor topic of ... "Sequence Analysis, RNA" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Sequence Analysis, RNA*Sequence Analysis, RNA. *Analyses, RNA Sequence. *RNA Sequence Analyses ... A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, sequencing, and information analysis of an RNA ...
  https://profiles.ucdenver.edu/display/198543
*  League of Reason • View topic - Mindboggling result of Ribosomal RNA sequence analysis
Mindboggling result of Ribosomal RNA sequence analysis. Page 1 of 14. [ 270 posts ] 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 14 Next ... Re: Mindboggling result of Ribosomal RNA sequence analysis. Bernhard.visscher wrote:. Life is eternal. That is the answer.. ... Re: Mindboggling result of Ribosomal RNA sequence analysis. Sparhafoc wrote:. I think LEROY should be banned - he lies about ... Re: Mindboggling result of Ribosomal RNA sequence analysis. Greetings,. Rumraket wrote:. Sparhafoc wrote:. I think LEROY should ...
  http://theleagueofreason.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=14780
*  Detection and sequence analysis of borna disease virus p24 RNA...
Detection and sequence analysis of borna disease virus p24 RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with mood ... Sequence analysis of BDV p24 RNA from the PBMCs of patients and blood donors showed a high nucleotide sequence conservation but ... Detection and sequence analysis of borna disease virus p24 RNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with mood ... definite nucleotide mutations compared with horse BDV p24 RNA sequences. In comparison with human BDV p24 RNA sequences ...
  https://www.mysciencework.com/publication/show/detection-sequence-analysis-borna-disease-virus-p24-rna-from-peripheral-blood-mononuclear-cells-patients-mood-disorders-e911b1f9
*  Preparation of cDNA libraries for high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis of RNA 5' ends | Dr. Bryce E. Nickels
Preparation of cDNA libraries for high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis of RNA 5' ends. Vvedenskaya, IO, Goldman SR, Nickels ... Preparation of cDNA libraries for high-throughput RNA sequencing analysis of RNA 5' ends. Methods Mol Biol. 1276:211-228.. ... Interactions between RNA polymerase and the core recognition element are a determinant of transcription start site selection.. ... The mechanism of RNA 5′ capping with NAD+, NADH, and desphospho-CoA. Nature. 535(7612):444-447. ...
  https://www.waksman.rutgers.edu/nickels/publications/preparation-cdna-libraries-high-throughput-rna-sequencing-analysis-rna-5-ends
*  Opportunity: Bioinformatician with focus on high throughput sequence data analysis (RNA-seq) & pathway analysis/modeling @ U....
Opportunity: Bioinformatician with focus on high throughput sequence data analysis (RNA-seq) & pathway analysis/modeling @ U. ... Bioinformatician with focus on high throughput sequence data analysis (RNA-seq) & pathway analysis/modeling @ U. of Bern, ... analysis and interpretation as well as pathway analysis and network modeling of the complex RNA-seq data generated within the ... Experience in pathway analyses or network modeling will be considered as an advantage. Furthermore, a strong background in at ...
  http://www.bioinformatics.org/forums/forum.php?forum_id=10898
*  Quantification of Gene Transcripts with Deep Sequencing Analysis of Gene Expression (DSAGE) Using 1 to 2 µg Total RNA - Current...
... measures global gene transcript levels from only 1 to 2 µg total RNA by massively parallel sequencing of cDNA tags ... Deep sequencing analysis of gene expression (DSAGE) measures global gene transcript levels from only 1 to 2 µg total RNA by ... Quantification of Gene Transcripts with Deep Sequencing Analysis of Gene Expression (DSAGE) Using 1 to 2 µg Total RNA. ... massively parallel sequencing and analysis of the resulting sequence data. The adapter oligonucleotides used are optimized for ...
  http://www.currentprotocols.com/WileyCDA/CPUnit/refId-mb25b09.html?quicktabs_cp=toc
*  Abstract 4867: Comparative analysis of RNA sequencing methods for characterization of cancer transcriptomics | Cancer Research
Abstract 4867: Comparative analysis of RNA sequencing methods for characterization of cancer transcriptomics. Ryan P. Abo, Ling ... Comparative analysis of RNA sequencing methods for characterization of cancer transcriptomics. [abstract]. In: Proceedings of ... Abstract 4867: Comparative analysis of RNA sequencing methods for characterization of cancer transcriptomics ... Abstract 4867: Comparative analysis of RNA sequencing methods for characterization of cancer transcriptomics ...
  http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/75/15_Supplement/4867
*  Bioinformatics analysis of RNA sequencing data reveals multiple key genes in uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma
... *Authors: * ... Shen, L., Liu, M., Liu, W., Cui, J., Li, C.'Bioinformatics analysis of RNA sequencing data reveals multiple key genes in ... Shen, L., Liu, M., Liu, W., Cui, J., Li, C.'Bioinformatics analysis of RNA sequencing data reveals multiple key genes in ... Shen, L., Liu, M., Liu, W., Cui, J., & Li, C. (2018). Bioinformatics analysis of RNA sequencing data reveals multiple key genes ...
  https://www.spandidos-publications.com/ol/15/1/205
*  Abstract 15820: Early and Pre-clinical Transcriptome Analysis by RNA Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Dysfunction and...
Abstract 15820: Early and Pre-clinical Transcriptome Analysis by RNA Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Dysfunction and ... Abstract 15820: Early and Pre-clinical Transcriptome Analysis by RNA Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Dysfunction and ... Abstract 15820: Early and Pre-clinical Transcriptome Analysis by RNA Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Dysfunction and ... Abstract 15820: Early and Pre-clinical Transcriptome Analysis by RNA Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Dysfunction and ...
  http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/134/Suppl_1/A15820
*  Mitochondrial Genomics: Computational analysis of RNA sequencing data to unravel post-transcriptional processes influencing...
Computational analysis of RNA sequencing data to unravel post-transcriptional processes influencing mitochondrial function at ... Computational Analysis of RNA modifications using Nanopore direct RNA sequencing University of Cambridge Department of ... Mitochondrial Genomics: Computational analysis of RNA sequencing data to unravel post-transcriptional processes influencing ... Mitochondrial Genomics: Computational analysis of RNA sequencing data to unravel post-transcriptional processes influencing ...
  https://www.findaphd.com/search/projectdetails.aspx?PJID=65907
*  Frontiers | Unraveling the Transcriptional Basis of Temperature-Dependent Pinoxaden Resistance in Brachypodium hybridum | Plant...
Analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was conducted at several time points after treatment using a probe detecting H2O2/ ... Sequencing was carried out at the Technion Genome Center (Haifa, Israel).. RNA-Sequencing Analysis. B. hybridum transcript ... RNA samples used for RNA-seq analysis (n = 3) as well as additional three plants that were grown and treated with the plants ... B) Principal-component (PC) analysis of rlog transformed gene expression data, generated by RNA-sequencing. Each treatment ...
  https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2017.01064/full
*  Frontiers | Novel Insights into miRNA Regulation of Storage Protein Biosynthesis during Wheat Caryopsis Development under...
Functional enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that four pathways may be involved in storage protein biosynthesis. ... Functional enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that four pathways may be involved in storage protein biosynthesis. ... To address this, two small RNA libraries of wheat caryopsis under control and drought stress conditions were constructed and ... sequenced. A total of 125 miRNAs were identified in the two samples, of which 110 were known and 15 were novel. A total of 1981 ...
  https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2017.01707/full
*  Integration of Kinase and Calcium Signaling at the Level of Chromatin Underlies Inducible Gene Activation in T Cells | The...
DNase sequencing. GSEA. gene set enrichment analysis. IKK. IκB kinase. PKC. protein kinase C. RNA-seq. RNA sequencing. TEM. T ... RNA isolation and RNA sequencing analysis. Wild-type Jurkat T cells were plated at a density of 5 × 106 cells/ml in 2 ml of ... RNA analysis by NanoString. RNA was extracted from Jurkat T cells as outlined above, either untreated or stimulated with PMA/ ... transposase-accessible chromatin analysis. ATAC-seq. ATAC using sequencing. DHS. DNase I hypersensitive site. DNase-seq. ...
  http://www.jimmunol.org/content/199/8/2652
*  MicroRNA Sequence and Expression Analysis in Breast Tumors by Deep Sequencing | Cancer Research
Small RNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. We used a barcoded small RNA sequencing approach (described in ref. 31 and ... MicroRNA Sequence and Expression Analysis in Breast Tumors by Deep Sequencing. Thalia A. Farazi, Hugo M. Horlings, Jelle J. ten ... MicroRNA Sequence and Expression Analysis in Breast Tumors by Deep Sequencing. Thalia A. Farazi, Hugo M. Horlings, Jelle J. ten ... MicroRNA Sequence and Expression Analysis in Breast Tumors by Deep Sequencing. Thalia A. Farazi, Hugo M. Horlings, Jelle J. ten ...
  http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/71/13/4443
*  Sequence Comparative Analysis using Networks (SCAN) - software for evaluating de novo transcript assembly from RNA-Seq Data |...
2013) Sequence Comparative Analysis using Networks (SCAN): software for evaluating de novo transcript assembly from next ... called Sequence Comparative Analysis using Networks (SCAN) to perform statistical comparisons between distinct assemblies. SCAN ... Moreover, they sequenced the transcriptome of the oomycete Achlya hypogyna and compared de novo assemblies from Velvet, ABySS, ... As researchers begin to sequence novel transcriptomes, most of these datasets lack a reference genome and will have to rely on ...
  http://www.rna-seqblog.com/sequence-comparative-analysis-using-networks-scan-software-for-evaluating-de-novo-transcript-assembly-from-rna-seq-data/

YjdF RNA motifDNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Coles PhillipsSymmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Protein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Transfer-messenger RNA: Transfer-messenger RNA (abbreviated tmRNA, also known as 10Sa RNA and by its genetic name SsrA) is a bacterial RNA molecule with dual tRNA-like and messenger RNA-like properties. The tmRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein complex (tmRNP) together with Small Protein B (SmpB), Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), and ribosomal protein S1.MT-RNR2: Mitochondrially encoded 16S RNA (often abbreviated as 16S) is a mitochondrial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that in humans is encoded by the MT-RNR2 gene. The MT-RNR2 gene also encodes the Humanin polypeptide that has been the target of Alzheimer's disease research.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Mature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Core enzyme: A core enzyme consists of the subunits of an enzyme that are needed for catalytic activity, as in the core enzyme RNA polymerase.Genetics: Analysis & Principles, 3rd Edition.Ligation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Mycovirus: Mycoviruses (ancient Greek μύκης mykes: fungus and Latin virus) are viruses that infect fungi. The majority of mycoviruses have double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes and isometric particles, but approximately 30% have positive sense, single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) genomes.RNAi-Based Identification System and interference of Specific Cancer Cells: A “classifier” was created to classify cells by identifying specific characteristics of Cervical Cancer. These characteristics were consistent with HeLa cells, which served as the target cell line for cell death.RNA interference: RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit gene expression, typically by causing the destruction of specific mRNA molecules. Historically, it was known by other names, including co-suppression, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), and quelling.Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis: Amplified rDNA (Ribosomal DNA) Restriction Analysis is the extension of the technique of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) to the gene encoding the small (16s) ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The technique involves an enzymatic amplification using primers directed at the conserved regions at the ends of the 16s gene, followed by digestion using tetracutter Restriction enzymes.Hairpin ribozymeTranscription preinitiation complex: The preinitiation complex (abbreviated PIC) is a large complex of proteins that is necessary for the transcription of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes (+archaea). The preinitiation complex helps position RNA polymerase II over gene transcription start sites, denatures the DNA, and positions the DNA in the RNA polymerase II active site for transcription.Thermal cyclerNucleic acid structure: Nucleic acid structure refers to the structure of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA. Chemically speaking, DNA and RNA are very similar.T-box leaderArmitage–Doll multistage model of carcinogenesis: The Armitage–Doll model is a statistical model of carcinogenesis, proposed in 1954 by Peter Armitage and Richard Doll, which suggested that a sequence of multiple distinct genetic events preceded the onset of cancer. The original paper has recently been reprinted with a set of commentary articles.Masayori Inouye: Masayori Inouye is a Japanese biochemist who, along with his team, discovered natural antisense RNA.Cryptic unstable transcript: Cryptic Unstable Transcripts (CUTs) are a subset of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are produced from intergenic and intragenic regions. CUTs were first observed in S.CS-BLASTSilent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.U6 spliceosomal RNADark matter halo: A dark matter halo is a hypothetical component of a galaxy that envelops the galactic disc and extends well beyond the edge of the visible galaxy. The halo's mass dominates the total mass.Open reading frame: In molecular genetics, an open reading frame (ORF) is the part of a reading frame that has the potential to code for a protein or peptide. An ORF is a continuous stretch of codons that do not contain a stop codon (usually UAA, UAG or UGA).Ferric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.Eukaryotic transcription: Eukaryotic transcription is the elaborate process that eukaryotic cells use to copy genetic information stored in DNA into units of RNA replica. Gene transcription occurs in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.Triparental mating: Triparental mating is a form of Bacterial conjugation where a conjugative plasmid present in one bacterial strain assists the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid present in a second bacterial strain into a third bacterial strain. Plasmids are introduced into bacteria for such purposes as transformation, cloning, or transposon mutagenesis.Protein subcellular localization prediction: Protein subcellular localization prediction (or just protein localization prediction) involves the computational prediction of where a protein resides in a cell.DNA binding site: DNA binding sites are a type of binding site found in DNA where other molecules may bind. DNA binding sites are distinct from other binding sites in that (1) they are part of a DNA sequence (e.DExD/H box proteins: DEAD box, DEAH, and the Ski families of proteins are all referred to as DExD/H box proteins. They are all quite distinct from one another and there is not one protein that belongs to more than one of these families.Translational regulation: Translational regulation refers to the control of the levels of protein synthesized from its mRNA. The corresponding mechanisms are primarily targeted on the control of ribosome recruitment on the initiation codon, but can also involve modulation of the elongation or termination of protein synthesis.GC box: In molecular biology, a GC box is a distinct pattern of nucleotides found in the promoter region of some eukaryotic genes upstream of the TATA box and approximately 110 bases upstream from the transcription initiation site. It has a consensus sequence GGGCGG which is position dependent and orientation independent.Molar mass distribution: In linear polymers the individual polymer chains rarely have exactly the same degree of polymerization and molar mass, and there is always a distribution around an average value. The molar mass distribution (or molecular weight distribution) in a polymer describes the relationship between the number of moles of each polymer species (Ni) and the molar mass (Mi) of that species.ParaHox: The ParaHox gene cluster is an array of homeobox genes (involved in morphogenesis, the regulation of patterns of anatomical development) from the Gsx, Xlox (Pdx) and Cdx gene families.Chromosome regionsLibrary (biology): In molecular biology, a library is a collection of DNA fragments that is stored and propagated in a population of micro-organisms through the process of molecular cloning. There are different types of DNA libraries, including cDNA libraries (formed from reverse-transcribed RNA), genomic libraries (formed from genomic DNA) and randomized mutant libraries (formed by de novo gene synthesis where alternative nucleotides or codons are incorporated).Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.RNA-binding protein database: The RNA-binding Proteins Database (RBPDB) is a biological database of RNA-binding protein specificities that includes experimental observations of RNA-binding sites. The experimental results included are both in vitro and in vivo from primary literature.Restriction fragment: A restriction fragment is a DNA fragment resulting from the cutting of a DNA strand by a restriction enzyme (restriction endonucleases), a process called restriction. Each restriction enzyme is highly specific, recognising a particular short DNA sequence, or restriction site, and cutting both DNA strands at specific points within this site.Margaret Jope: Margaret Jope (1913–2004) was a Scottish biochemist, born as Henrietta Margaret Halliday in Peterhead, Scotland.MoniliellaCommunity Fingerprinting: Community fingerprinting refers to a set of molecular biology techniques that can be used to quickly profile the diversity of a microbial community. Rather than directly identifying or counting individual cells in an environmental sample, these techniques show how many variants of a gene are present.Extension Poly(A) Test: The extension Poly(A) Test (ePAT) describes a method to determine the poly(A) tail lengths of mRNA molecules. It was developed and described by A.Alternative splicing: Alternative splicing is a regulated process during gene expression that results in a single gene coding for multiple proteins. In this process, particular exons of a gene may be included within or excluded from the final, processed messenger RNA (mRNA) produced from that gene.Molecular evolution: Molecular evolution is a change in the sequence composition of cellular molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins across generations. The field of molecular evolution uses principles of evolutionary biology and population genetics to explain patterns in these changes.Genetic variation: right|thumbIntron: right|thumbnail|270px|Representation of intron and [[exons within a simple gene containing a single intron.]]

(1/3208) In vivo expression of the nucleolar group I intron-encoded I-dirI homing endonuclease involves the removal of a spliceosomal intron.

The Didymium iridis DiSSU1 intron is located in the nuclear SSU rDNA and has an unusual twin-ribozyme organization. One of the ribozymes (DiGIR2) catalyses intron excision and exon ligation. The other ribozyme (DiGIR1), which along with the endonuclease-encoding I-DirI open reading frame (ORF) is inserted in DiGIR2, carries out hydrolysis at internal processing sites (IPS1 and IPS2) located at its 3' end. Examination of the in vivo expression of DiSSU1 shows that after excision, DiSSU1 is matured further into the I-DirI mRNA by internal DiGIR1-catalysed cleavage upstream of the ORF 5' end, as well as truncation and polyadenylation downstream of the ORF 3' end. A spliceosomal intron, the first to be reported within a group I intron and the rDNA, is removed before the I-DirI mRNA associates with the polysomes. Taken together, our results imply that DiSSU1 uses a unique combination of intron-supplied ribozyme activity and adaptation to the general RNA polymerase II pathway of mRNA expression to allow a protein to be produced from the RNA polymerase I-transcribed rDNA.  (+info)

(2/3208) Nucleotide sequences and taxonomy of satsuma dwarf virus.

The nucleotide sequences of genomic RNA1 (6795 nt) and RNA2 (5345 nt) of satsuma dwarf virus (SDV), a tentative member of the genus Nepovirus, were determined. The deduced genome organization of SDV showed similarities to the organization in como-, faba- and nepoviruses. There is extensive amino acid sequence similarity in the N-terminal regions of the proteins encoded by RNA1 and RNA2, as reported previously only for tomato ringspot nepovirus. However, unlike definitive nepoviruses, which have a single coat protein, SDV has two coat proteins. SDV RNA2 does not contain the long (> 1300 nt) 3' non-coding region characteristic of some nepoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of SDV RNA polymerase placed SDV apart from como-, faba- and nepoviruses. These unique features suggest that SDV is distinct from the Comovirus, Fabavirus and Nepovirus genera, and needs to be separated into a new genus, probably within the family Comoviridae.  (+info)

(3/3208) Degradation of 1,2-dibromoethane by Mycobacterium sp. strain GP1.

The newly isolated bacterial strain GP1 can utilize 1, 2-dibromoethane as the sole carbon and energy source. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the organism was identified as a member of the subgroup which contains the fast-growing mycobacteria. The first step in 1,2-dibromoethane metabolism is catalyzed by a hydrolytic haloalkane dehalogenase. The resulting 2-bromoethanol is rapidly converted to ethylene oxide by a haloalcohol dehalogenase, in this way preventing the accumulation of 2-bromoethanol and 2-bromoacetaldehyde as toxic intermediates. Ethylene oxide can serve as a growth substrate for strain GP1, but the pathway(s) by which it is further metabolized is still unclear. Strain GP1 can also utilize 1-chloropropane, 1-bromopropane, 2-bromoethanol, and 2-chloroethanol as growth substrates. 2-Chloroethanol and 2-bromoethanol are metabolized via ethylene oxide, which for both haloalcohols is a novel way to remove the halide without going through the corresponding acetaldehyde intermediate. The haloalkane dehalogenase gene was cloned and sequenced. The dehalogenase (DhaAf) encoded by this gene is identical to the haloalkane dehalogenase (DhaA) of Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064, except for three amino acid substitutions and a 14-amino-acid extension at the C terminus. Alignments of the complete dehalogenase gene region of strain GP1 with DNA sequences in different databases showed that a large part of a dhaA gene region, which is also present in R. rhodochrous NCIMB 13064, was fused to a fragment of a haloalcohol dehalogenase gene that was identical to the last 42 nucleotides of the hheB gene found in Corynebacterium sp. strain N-1074.  (+info)

(4/3208) Salmon pancreas disease virus, an alphavirus infecting farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

A 5.2-kb region at the 3' terminus of the salmon pancreas disease virus (SPDV) RNA genome has been cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences show that SPDV shares considerable organizational and sequence identity to members of the genus alphavirus within the family Togaviridae. The SPDV structural proteins encoded by the 5.2-kb region contain a number of unique features when compared to other sequenced alphaviruses. Based on cleavage site homologies, the predicted sizes of the SPDV envelope glycoproteins E2 (438 aa) and E1 (461 aa) are larger than those of other alphaviruses, while the predicted size of the alphavirus 6K protein is 3.2 K (32 aa) in SPDV. The E2 and E1 proteins each carry one putative N-linked glycosylation site, with the site in E1 being found at a unique position. From amino acid sequence comparisons of the SPDV structural region with sequenced alphaviruses overall homology is uniform, ranging from 32 to 33%. While nucleotide sequence analysis of the 26S RNA junction region shows that SPDV is similar to other alphaviruses, analysis of the 3'-nontranslated region reveals that SPDV shows divergence in this region.  (+info)

(5/3208) Sequence and structural elements at the 3' terminus of bovine viral diarrhea virus genomic RNA: functional role during RNA replication.

Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a member of the genus Pestivirus in the family Flaviviridae, has a positive-stranded RNA genome consisting of a single open reading frame and untranslated regions (UTRs) at the 5' and 3' ends. Computer modeling suggested the 3' UTR comprised single-stranded regions as well as stem-loop structures-features that were suspected of being essentially implicated in the viral RNA replication pathway. Employing a subgenomic BVDV RNA (DI9c) that was shown to function as an autonomous RNA replicon (S.-E. Behrens, C. W. Grassmann, H. J. Thiel, G. Meyers, and N. Tautz, J. Virol. 72:2364-2372, 1998) the goal of this study was to determine the RNA secondary structure of the 3' UTR by experimental means and to investigate the significance of defined RNA motifs for the RNA replication pathway. Enzymatic and chemical structure probing revealed mainly the conserved terminal part (termed 3'C) of the DI9c 3' UTR containing distinctive RNA motifs, i.e., a stable stem-loop, SL I, near the RNA 3' terminus and a considerably less stable stem-loop, SL II, that forms the 5' portion of 3'C. SL I and SL II are separated by a long single-stranded intervening sequence, denoted SS. The 3'-terminal four C residues of the viral RNA were confirmed to be single stranded as well. Other intramolecular interactions, e.g., with upstream DI9c RNA sequences, were not detected under the experimental conditions used. Mutagenesis of the DI9c RNA demonstrated that the SL I and SS motifs do indeed play essential roles during RNA replication. Abolition of RNA stems, which ought to maintain the overall folding of SL I, as well as substitution of certain single-stranded nucleotides located in the SS region or SL I loop region, gave rise to DI9c derivatives unable to replicate. Conversely, SL I stems comprising compensatory base exchanges turned out to support replication, but mostly to a lower degree than the original structure. Surprisingly, replacement of a number of residues, although they were previously defined as constituents of a highly conserved stretch of sequence of the SS motif, had little effect on the replication ability of DI9c. In summary, these results indicate that RNA structure as well as sequence elements harbored within the 3'C region of the BVDV 3' UTR create a common cis-acting element of the replication process. The data further point at possible interaction sites of host and/or viral proteins and thus provide valuable information for future experiments intended to identify and characterize these factors.  (+info)

(6/3208) In vitro infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by GB virus C/Hepatitis G virus.

GB virus C (GBV-C), also known as hepatitis G virus, is a recently discovered flavivirus-like RNA agent with unclear pathogenic implications. To investigate whether human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are susceptible to in vitro GBV-C infection, we have incubated PBMC from four healthy blood donors with a human GBV-C RNA-positive serum. By means of (i) strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR, cloning, and sequencing; (ii) sucrose ultracentrifugation and RNase sensitivity assays; (iii) fluorescent in situ hybridization; and (iv) Western blot analysis, it has been demonstrated that GBV-C is able to infect in vitro cells and replicate for as long as 30 days under the conditions developed in our cell culture system. The concentration of GBV-C RNA increased during the second and third weeks of culture. The titers of the genomic strand were 10 times higher than the titers of the antigenomic strand. In addition, the same predominant GBV-C sequence was found in all PBMC cultures and in the in vivo-GBV-C-infected PBMC isolated from the donor of the inoculum. GBV-C-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization signals were confined to the cytoplasm of cells at different times during the culture period. Finally, evidence obtained by sucrose ultracentrifugation, RNase sensitivity assays, and Western blot analysis of the culture supernatants suggests that viral particles are released from in vitro-GBV-C-infected PBMC. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated, for the first time, GBV-C replication in human lymphoid cells under experimental in vitro infection conditions.  (+info)

(7/3208) Comparative sequence analysis of tmRNA.

Minimal secondary structures of the bacterial and plastid tmRNAs were derived by comparative analyses of 50 aligned tmRNA sequences. The structures include 12 helices and four pseudoknots and are refinements of earlier versions, but include only those base pairs for which there is comparative evidence. Described are the conserved and variable features of the tmRNAs from a wide phylogenetic spectrum, the structural properties specific to the bacterial subgroups and preliminary 3-dimensional models from the pseudoknotted regions.  (+info)

(8/3208) Attenuated virulence of pleconaril-resistant coxsackievirus B3 variants.

Pleconaril (VP 63843) is a novel orally bioavailable small molecule with broad antipicornavirus (enterovirus and rhinovirus) activity. Ten independently derived pleconaril-resistant variants of coxsackievirus B3 were isolated from cell culture. The molecular basis of drug resistance and the biologic properties of the drug-resistant viruses were investigated. RNA sequence analysis revealed amino acid changes in the drug-binding pocket of the resistant variants. Thermal stability studies showed the drug-resistant viruses to be significantly less stable than wild type virus. When evaluated in a murine model in which wild type virus infection is 100% lethal, the drug-resistant viruses showed attenuated virulence with both reduced mortality and delayed time to death. Virus titers in heart and spleen were dramatically lower in drug-resistant virus-infected mice than in wild type virus-infected animals. The study results indicate that pleconaril-resistant virus variants are attenuated and significantly less virulent than drug-sensitive wild type virus.  (+info)