Salmonella Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Salmonella Infections, Animal: Infections in animals with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Salmonella typhimurium: A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.Salmonella enterica: A subgenus of Salmonella containing several medically important serotypes. The habitat for the majority of strains is warm-blooded animals.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.Salmonella enteritidis: A serotype of Salmonella enterica which is an etiologic agent of gastroenteritis in man and other animals.Salmonella typhi: A serotype of SALMONELLA ENTERICA which is the etiologic agent of TYPHOID FEVER.Salmonella Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with SALMONELLA. This includes vaccines used to prevent TYPHOID FEVER or PARATYPHOID FEVER; (TYPHOID-PARATYPHOID VACCINES), and vaccines used to prevent nontyphoid salmonellosis.Salmonella arizonae: Gram-negative rods widely distributed in LIZARDS and SNAKES, and implicated in enteric, bone (BONE DISEASES), and joint infections (JOINT DISEASES) in humans.Salmonella Phages: Viruses whose host is Salmonella. A frequently encountered Salmonella phage is BACTERIOPHAGE P22.Salmonella paratyphi A: A serotype of SALMONELLA ENTERICA that causes mild PARATYPHOID FEVER in humans.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Typhoid Fever: An acute systemic febrile infection caused by SALMONELLA TYPHI, a serotype of SALMONELLA ENTERICA.Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.Salmonella paratyphi B: A serotype of SALMONELLA ENTERICA which is an agent of PARATYPHOID FEVER in humans.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Pipidae: A family of the order Anura, distinguished by the lack of a tongue. It includes four living genera of aquatic "toads". Two of the most familiar pipids are the popularly called Surinam "toad" (Pipa pipa) and XENOPUS LAEVIS.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Eggs: Animal reproductive bodies, or the contents thereof, used as food. The concept is differentiated from OVUM, the anatomic or physiologic entity.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Paratyphoid Fever: A prolonged febrile illness commonly caused by several Paratyphi serotypes of SALMONELLA ENTERICA. It is similar to TYPHOID FEVER but less severe.Carbadox: An antibacterial agent that has been used in veterinary practice for treating swine dysentery and enteritis and for promoting growth. However, its use has been prohibited in the UK following reports of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p125)Enterocolitis: Inflammation of the MUCOSA of both the SMALL INTESTINE and the LARGE INTESTINE. Etiology includes ISCHEMIA, infections, allergic, and immune responses.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Pets: Animals kept by humans for companionship and enjoyment, as opposed to DOMESTIC ANIMALS such as livestock or farm animals, which are kept for economic reasons.Flagellin: A protein with a molecular weight of 40,000 isolated from bacterial flagella. At appropriate pH and salt concentration, three flagellin monomers can spontaneously reaggregate to form structures which appear identical to intact flagella.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.TurtlesMice, Inbred C57BLSpleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Peyer's Patches: Lymphoid tissue on the mucosa of the small intestine.Mice, Inbred BALB CDNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Bacterial Translocation: The passage of viable bacteria from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT to extra-intestinal sites, such as the mesenteric lymph node complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and blood. Factors that promote bacterial translocation include overgrowth with gram-negative enteric bacilli, impaired host immune defenses, and injury to the INTESTINAL MUCOSA resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Bacterial translocation from the lung to the circulation is also possible and sometimes accompanies MECHANICAL VENTILATION.Toll-Like Receptor 5: A pattern recognition receptor that binds FLAGELLIN. It mediates cellular responses to certain bacterial pathogens.Arthritis, Reactive: An aseptic, inflammatory arthritis developing secondary to a primary extra-articular infection, most typically of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT or UROGENITAL SYSTEM. The initiating trigger pathogens are usually SHIGELLA; SALMONELLA; YERSINIA; CAMPYLOBACTER; or CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS. Reactive arthritis is strongly associated with HLA-B27 ANTIGEN.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Focal InfectionMononuclear Phagocyte System: Mononuclear cells with pronounced phagocytic ability that are distributed extensively in lymphoid and other organs. It includes MACROPHAGES and their precursors; PHAGOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS; HISTIOCYTES; DENDRITIC CELLS; LANGERHANS CELLS; and MICROGLIA. The term mononuclear phagocyte system has replaced the former reticuloendothelial system, which also included less active phagocytic cells such as fibroblasts and endothelial cells. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 2d ed.)Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Disease Susceptibility: A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Receptors, Interleukin-12: Cell surface receptors for INTERLEUKIN-12. They exist as dimers of beta 1 and beta 2 subunits. Signaling from interleukin-12 receptors occurs through their interaction with JANUS KINASES.Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to several structurally and functionally distinct drugs simultaneously. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Intestinal Diseases: Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Ceftriaxone: A broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with a very long half-life and high penetrability to meninges, eyes and inner ears.Bacteriophage Typing: A technique of bacterial typing which differentiates between bacteria or strains of bacteria by their susceptibility to one or more bacteriophages.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Genomic Islands: Distinct units in some bacterial, bacteriophage or plasmid GENOMES that are types of MOBILE GENETIC ELEMENTS. Encoded in them are a variety of fitness conferring genes, such as VIRULENCE FACTORS (in "pathogenicity islands or islets"), ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE genes, or genes required for SYMBIOSIS (in "symbiosis islands or islets"). They range in size from 10 - 500 kilobases, and their GC CONTENT and CODON usage differ from the rest of the genome. They typically contain an INTEGRASE gene, although in some cases this gene has been deleted resulting in "anchored genomic islands".Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Streptomycin: An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.Ciprofloxacin: A broad-spectrum antimicrobial carboxyfluoroquinoline.Caspase 1: A long pro-domain caspase that has specificity for the precursor form of INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. It plays a role in INFLAMMATION by catalytically converting the inactive forms of CYTOKINES such as interleukin-1beta to their active, secreted form. Caspase 1 is referred as interleukin-1beta converting enzyme and is frequently abbreviated ICE.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Salmonella paratyphi C: A serotype of SALMONELLA ENTERICA which is an agent of PARATYPHOID FEVER in Asia, Africa, and southern Europe.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.United StatesIleum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Immunity: Nonsusceptibility to the invasive or pathogenic effects of foreign microorganisms or to the toxic effect of antigenic substances.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Carrier State: The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cation Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Mice, Inbred C3HEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Mutagenicity Tests: Tests of chemical substances and physical agents for mutagenic potential. They include microbial, insect, mammalian cell, and whole animal tests.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Flagella: A whiplike motility appendage present on the surface cells. Prokaryote flagella are composed of a protein called FLAGELLIN. Bacteria can have a single flagellum, a tuft at one pole, or multiple flagella covering the entire surface. In eukaryotes, flagella are threadlike protoplasmic extensions used to propel flagellates and sperm. Flagella have the same basic structure as CILIA but are longer in proportion to the cell bearing them and present in much smaller numbers. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Typhoid-Paratyphoid Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent TYPHOID FEVER and/or PARATYPHOID FEVER which are caused by various species of SALMONELLA. Attenuated, subunit, and inactivated forms of the vaccines exist.O Antigens: The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Shigella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that ferments sugar without gas production. Its organisms are intestinal pathogens of man and other primates and cause bacillary dysentery (DYSENTERY, BACILLARY).Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta: T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3).Macrophages, Peritoneal: Mononuclear phagocytes derived from bone marrow precursors but resident in the peritoneum.Operon: In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Phagocytosis: The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Mutagens: Chemical agents that increase the rate of genetic mutation by interfering with the function of nucleic acids. A clastogen is a specific mutagen that causes breaks in chromosomes.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Interleukin-12: A heterodimeric cytokine that plays a role in innate and adaptive immune responses. Interleukin-12 is a 70 kDa protein that is composed of covalently linked 40 kDa and 35 kDa subunits. It is produced by DENDRITIC CELLS; MACROPHAGES and a variety of other immune cells and plays a role in the stimulation of INTERFERON-GAMMA production by T-LYMPHOCYTES and NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Tetrathionic Acid: A sulfuric acid dimer, formed by disulfide linkage. This compound has been used to prolong coagulation time and as an antidote in cyanide poisoning.

*  CDC - Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry - Salmonella

Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks ... Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles *Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas *Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 *Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles, 2017 en Español ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/live-poultry-05-12/

*  Salmonella | Saintpaul Infections Linked to Imported Cucumbers | Apr, 2013 | CDC

Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul Infections Linked to Imported Cucumbers ... Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles *Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas *Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 *Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles, 2017 en Español ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/saintpaul-04-13/index.html

*  Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Panama Infections Linked to Cantaloupe (Final Update) | Salmonella | CDC

Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Panama Infections Linked to Cantaloupe (Final Update) ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/panama0311/062311/index.html

*  July 8, 2008: Investigation of Outbreak of Infections Caused by Salmonella Saintpaul | Salmonella CDC

Content page for Salmonella Saintpaul Investigation for June 2008 involving raw tomatoes. ... Salmonella Salmonella, Salmonella Outbreak Investigations , Investigation of Outbreak of Infections Caused by Salmonella ... Investigation of Outbreak of Infections Caused by Salmonella Saintpaul Cases infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella ... Clinical features of Salmonella Infection. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/saintpaul/jalapeno/archive/070808.html

*  Outbreak of Salmonella Serotype Saintpaul Infections Associated with Multiple Raw Produce Items --- United States, 2008

Salmonella infection are reported in the United States through national serotype-based surveillance (2). Salmonella Saintpaul ... Outbreak of Salmonella Serotype Saintpaul Infections Associated with Multiple Raw Produce Items --- United States, 2008. ... A case was defined as laboratory-confirmed infection with Salmonella Saintpaul with XbaI pattern JN6X01.0048, the outbreak ... FoodNet estimate of the burden of illness caused by nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in the United States. Clin Infect Dis ...
https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5734a1.htm

*  Salmonella Enteritidis Infections Linked to Raw, Frozen, Stuffed Chicken Entrees (Final Update) | July 2015 | Salmonella | CDC

Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis Infections Linked to Raw, Frozen, Stuffed Chicken Entrees Produced by Aspen Foods ... Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles *Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas *Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 *Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles, 2017 en Español ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/frozen-chicken-entrees-part2-07-15/index.html

*  International increase in Salmonella enteritidis: A new pandemic? | Epidemiology & Infection | Cambridge Core

International increase in Salmonella enteritidis: A new pandemic? - Volume 105 Issue 1 - D. C. Rodrigue, R. V. Tauxe, B. Rowe ... Louis , DL Morse , ME Potter , The emergence of grade A eggs as a major source of Salmonella enteritidis infections. New ... Salmonella infections of the ovary and peritoneum of chickens. Avian Dis 1969; 13: 668-70. ... Over the past 5 years Salmonella enteritidis infections in humans have increased on both sides of the Atlantic ocean. The WHO ...
https://cambridge.org/core/journals/epidemiology-and-infection/article/international-increase-in-salmonella-enteritidis-a-new-pandemic/A41CC08D3D6213170721E3C22F128140

*  Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Agbeni Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 | Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Agbeni...

Multistate Outbreaks of Salmonella Agbeni Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 ... Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles *Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas *Salmonella Infections Linked to Imported Maradol Papayas en Español ... Salmonella Infections Linked to Pet Turtles, 2017 *Salmonella Infections Linked to Small Turtles, 2017 en Español ...
https://cdc.gov/salmonella/agbeni-08-17/index.html

*  Outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium phage type 44 infection among attendees of a wedding reception, April 2009.

South Australia was notified of a Salmonella infection in a person who attended a wedding reception on 25 April 2009. Several ... Salmonella Food Poisoning / epidemiology*, microbiology. Salmonella Phages*. Salmonella typhimurium / isolation & purification ... On 30 April 2009, the Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) South Australia was notified of a Salmonella infection in a ... The raw egg yolk was identified as a high risk food item; however no eggs tested positive for Salmonella.. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Outbreak-Salmonella-typhimurium-phage-type/22010514.html

*  Investigation of an Outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul Infections Linked to Raw Alfalfa Sprouts - Whose Seeds are They? Why No...

35 persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Saintpaul have been reported from 7 states. The number of ... Home , Legal Cases , Investigation of an Outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul Infections Linked to Raw Alfalfa Sprouts - Whose ... Investigation of an Outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul Infections Linked to Raw Alfalfa Sprouts - Whose Seeds are They? Why No ... In February and March, an outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul infections occurred in Nebraska, South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, and ...
marlerblog.com/legal-cases/investigation-of-an-outbreak-of-salmonella-saintpaul-infections-linked-to-raw-alfalfa-sprouts---whos/

*  Severe Mycobacterial and Salmonella Infections in Interleukin-12 Receptor-Deficient Patients | Science

Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a cytokine that promotes cell-mediated immunity to intracellular pathogens by inducing type 1 helper T cell (TH1) responses and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. IL-12 binds to high-affinity β1/β2 heterodimeric IL-12 receptor (IL-12R) complexes on T cell and natural killer cells. Three unrelated individuals with severe, idiopathic mycobacterial and Salmonella infections were found to lack IL-12Rβ1 chain expression. Their cells were deficient in IL-12R signaling and IFN-γ production, and their remaining T cell responses were independent of endogenous IL-12. IL-12Rβ1 sequence analysis revealed genetic mutations that resulted in premature stop codons in the extracellular domain. The lack of IL-12Rβ1 expression results in a human immunodeficiency and shows the essential role of IL-12 in resistance to infections due to intracellular bacteria. ...
science.sciencemag.org/content/280/5368/1435

Bismuth sulfite agar: Bismuth sulfite agar is a type of agar media used to isolate Salmonella species. It uses glucose as a primary source of carbon.George Albert II, Margrave of BrandenburgInterleukin 12: Interleukin 12 (IL-12) is an interleukin that is naturally produced by dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, and human B-lymphoblastoid cells (NC-37) in response to antigenic stimulation.Live vector vaccine: A live vector vaccine is a vaccine that uses a chemically weakened virus to transport pieces of the pathogen in order to stimulate an immune response.GlossaryArthur FelixWidal test: The Widal test, developed in 1896 and named after Georges-Fernand Widal, who introduced it, is a presumptive serological test for enteric fever or undulant fever whereby bacteria causing typhoid fever are mixed with a serum containing specific antibodies obtained from an infected individual. In cases of Salmonella infection, it is a demonstration of the presence of O-soma false-positive result.TuataraNational Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==CarvalhoiFerric uptake regulator family: In molecular biology, the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) family of proteins includes metal ion uptake regulator proteins. These are responsible for controlling the intracellular concentration of iron in many bacteria.CecectomyForced molting: Induced molting (or forced molting) is the practice by the commercial egg industry of artificially provoking a complete flock of hens to molt simultaneously. This is usually achieved by withdrawal of feed for 7-14 days.SAFE FOODSList of notifiable diseases: The following is a list of notifiable diseases arranged by country.CarbadoxFood protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES) is a severe systemic response to food protein that typically occurs 1 to 4 hours after the ingestion of the causative food and frequently develops in the first few years of life.Powell GK.BacitracinBritish Poultry Standard: [Poultry Standard.png|thumb|right|The front cover of the 6th Edition of the British Poultry Standards.Jet aeratorsVirulence: Virulence is, by MeSH definition, the degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of parasites as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenicity of an organism - its ability to cause disease - is determined by its virulence factors.EnteritisViral gastroenteritis: Viral gastroenteritis (Gastro-Enter-eye,tiss),http://www.merriam-webster.Happy Pet: The Happy Pet is a handheld digital pet released in Japan in 2003 by Bandai.Chicken as biological research model: Chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and their eggs have been used extensively as research models throughout the history of biology. Today they continue to serve as an important model for normal human biology as well as pathological disease processes.Turtle farming: Turtle farming is the practice of raising turtles and tortoises of various species commercially. Raised animals are sold for use as gourmet food, traditional medicine ingredients, or as pets.Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths: Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths (or periarterial lymphatic sheaths, or PALS) are a portion of the white pulp of the spleen. They are populated largely by T cells and surround central arteries within the spleen; the PALS T-cells are presented with blood borne antigens via myeloid dendritic cells.Subtherapeutic antibiotic use in swine: Antibiotics are commonly used in commercial swine production in the United States and around the world. They are used for disease treatment, disease prevention and control, and growth promotion.Pulsenet: PulseNet is a network run by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which brings together public health and food regulatory agency laboratories around the United States.http://www.Tingible body macrophage: A tingible body macrophage is a type of macrophage predominantly found in germinal centers, containing many phagocytized, apoptotic cells in various states of degradation, referred to as tingible bodies (tingible meaning stainable).Horst Ibelgaufts' COPE: Cytokines & Cells Online Pathfinder Encyclopaedia > tingible body macrophages Retrieved on June 27, 2010 Tingible body macrophages contain condensed chromatin fragments.Interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs: The interbreeding of dingoes with other domestic dogs is an ongoing process affecting the population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia. The current population of free ranging domestic dogs in Australia is now probably higher than in the past.Peyer's patch: Peyer's patches (or aggregated lymphoid nodules, or occasionally PP for brevity) are organized lymphoid nodules, named after the 17th-century Swiss anatomist Johann Conrad Peyer. They are aggregations of lymphoid tissue that are usually found in the lowest portion of the small intestine, the ileum, in humans; as such, they differentiate the ileum from the duodenum and jejunum.White meat: White meat or light meat refers to the lighter-colored meat of poultry as contrasted with dark meat. In a more general sense, white meat may also refer to any lighter-colored meat, as contrasted with red meats like beef and some types of game.Reactive arthritisFocal infection theory: Focal infection theory (FIT) is the idea that a localized infection, typically obscure, disseminates microorganisms or their toxins elsewhere in the infected individual's body, and thereby injuries distant sites—where ensuing dysfunction produces clinical signs and symptoms, and eventually disease. The disease may be systemic, and is usually something chronic—such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, or mental illness.Global Vaccines: Global Vaccines, Inc is a mission-driven non-profit company applying state-of-the-art science and innovative business strategies to design and develop affordable vaccines for people in poor countries.Immunization during pregnancy: Immunization during pregnancy, that is the administration of a vaccine to a pregnant woman, is not a routine event as it is generally preferred to administer vaccines either prior to conception or in the postpartum period. When widespread vaccination is used, the risk for an unvaccinated pregnant patient to be exposed to a related infection is low, allowing for postponement, in general, of routine vaccinations to the postpartum period.Triparental mating: Triparental mating is a form of Bacterial conjugation where a conjugative plasmid present in one bacterial strain assists the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid present in a second bacterial strain into a third bacterial strain. Plasmids are introduced into bacteria for such purposes as transformation, cloning, or transposon mutagenesis.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.CeftriaxoneResistome: The resistome is a proposed expression by Gerard D. Wright for the collection of all the antibiotic resistance genes and their precursors in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria.Dry matter: The dry matter (or otherwise known as dry weight) is a measurement of the mass of something when completely dried.StreptomycinOrbifloxacinPyrin domainBacteremia: (NOS) |Colt Crag Reservoir: Colt Crag Reservoir is a relatively shallow reservoir in Northumberland, England adjacent to the A68 road, and north of Corbridge. The A68 road at this point runs along the course of Dere Street, a Roman road.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Congenital chloride diarrhea: Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD, also congenital chloridorrhea or Darrow Gamble syndrome) is a genetic disorder due to an autosomal recessive mutation on chromosome 7. The mutation is in downregulated-in-adenoma (DRA), a gene that encodes a membrane protein of intestinal cells.List of strains of Escherichia coli: Escherichia coli is a well studied bacterium that was first identified by Theodor Escherich, after whom it was later named.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Mutaflor: Mutaflor is a probiotic consisting of a viable non-pathogenic bacteria strain named Escherichia coli Nissle 1917.Mutaflor Information page "The Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917-designated DSM 6601 in the German Collection for Microorganisms in Braunschweig is one of the best-examined and therapeutically relevant bacterial strains worldwide" as claimed by the manufacturerManufacturers WebsiteATC code S01: ==S01A Anti-infectives==Beef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.DMT1: The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), also known as natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 2 (NRAMP 2), and divalent cation transporter 1 (DCT1), is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SLC11A2 (solute carrier family 11, member 2) gene. DMT1 represents a large family of orthologous metal ion transporter proteins that are highly conserved from bacteria to humans.

(1/1754) Risk factors for the occurrence of sporadic Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis infections in children in France: a national case-control study.

To determine risk factors associated with the occurrence of sporadic cases of Salmonella enteritidis infections among children in France, we conducted a matched case-control study. Cases were identified between 1 March and 30 September 1995. One hundred and five pairs of cases and controls matched for age and place of residence were interviewed. In the 1-5 years age group, illness was associated with the consumption of raw eggs or undercooked egg-containing foods (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8). Storing eggs more than 2 weeks after purchase was associated with Salmonella enteritidis infection (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.4-10.2), particularly during the summer period (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.3-26.8). Cases were more likely to report a case of diarrhoea in the household 10-3 days before the onset of symptoms, particularly in the age group < or = 1 year (P = 0.01). This study confirms the link between eggs and the occurrence of sporadic cases of Salmonella enteritidis among children, highlights the potential role of prolonged egg storage and underlines the role of person-to-person transmission in infants.  (+info)

(2/1754) Salmonella infections in Norway: descriptive epidemiology and a case-control study.

The epidemiological progression of human salmonellosis in Norway is parallel to trends noted elsewhere in Europe. During the past two decades, the number of reported cases has increased steadily, with a special sharp rise in the early 1980s due to the emergence of Salmonella enteritidis, followed by a levelling off in recent years. However, in contrast to the situation in most other European countries, about 90% of the cases from whom a travel history is available, have acquired their infection abroad. The incidence of indigenous salmonella infections as well as the prevalence of the microorganism in the domestic food chain, are both comparatively low. In 1993-4, a national case-control study of sporadic indigenous salmonella infections was conducted to identify preventable risk factors and guide preventive efforts. Ninety-four case patients and 226 matched population controls were enrolled. The study failed to demonstrate any statistically significant association between salmonellosis and consumption of domestically produced red meat, poultry or eggs. The only factor which remained independently associated with an increased risk in conditional logistic regression analysis, was consumption of poultry purchased abroad during holiday visits to neighbouring countries. A separate analysis of Salmonella typhimurium infections incriminated food from catering establishments and foreign travel among household members, in addition to imported poultry.  (+info)

(3/1754) Automated outbreak detection: a quantitative retrospective analysis.

An automated early warning system has been developed and used for detecting clusters of human infection with enteric pathogens. The method used requires no specific disease modelling, and has the potential for extension to other epidemiological applications. A compound smoothing technique is used to determine baseline 'normal' incidence of disease from past data, and a warning threshold for current data is produced by combining a statistically determined increment from the baseline with a fixed minimum threshold. A retrospective study of salmonella infections over 3 years has been conducted. Over this period, the automated system achieved > 90% sensitivity, with a positive predictive value consistently > 50%, demonstrating the effectiveness of the combination of statistical and heuristic methods for cluster detection. We suggest that quantitative measurements are of considerable utility in evaluating the performance of such systems.  (+info)

(4/1754) Multidrug-resistant human and animal Salmonella typhimurium isolates in France belong predominantly to a DT104 clone with the chromosome- and integron-encoded beta-lactamase PSE-1.

Epidemiologic relationships were investigated in 187 ampicillin-resistant Salmonella typhimurium strains (86 human, 101 animal) from >2000 strains isolated in 1994. Of 23 resistance patterns, the most frequent (ampicillin [Am], chloramphenicol [Cm], tetracycline [Tc], streptomycin and spectinomycin [Sm], and sulfonamides [Su]) was found in 69.5% of human and 64.8% of animal isolates. Four beta-lactamase genes were identified, blaTEM (24%), blaPSE-1 (78%), and blaSHV and oxa-2 (each <3%). blaPSE-1 and the integrase gene, intI1, but not blaTEM, blaSHV or oxa-2, were chromosomeborne and found almost exclusively in the AmCmTcSmSu strains. In these, polymerase chain reaction mapping revealed two distinct integrons carrying blaPSE-1 or aadA2. Lysotypes, plasmid profiles, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (IS200) were determined for 50 representative isolates and for 3 DT104 strains from the United Kingdom (UK). The phage type of the PSE-1-producing AmCmTcSmSu strains was 12 atypic, indistinguishable from that of the DT104 strains. The combined data indicate that the same multiresistant clone has spread through human and animal ecosystems in the UK and France.  (+info)

(5/1754) Integron- and carbenicillinase-mediated reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in isolates of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104 from French patients.

Fifty-seven Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) isolates were collected from human patients in two French hospitals, Hopital Antoine Beclere (Clamart, France) and Hopital Bicetre (Le Kremlin-Bicetre, France), between 1996 and 1997. Thirty of them (52 percent) were resistant to amino-, carbeni-, and ureidopenicillins, had reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, were susceptible to cephalothin, and were resistant to sulfonamides, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracyclines. All these strains possessed a blaPSE-1-like gene and were of phage type DT104. Ten of them were studied in more detail, which revealed that blaPSE-1 is located on the variable region of a class 1 integron. This integron was found to be chromosomally located, as was another class 1 integron containing aadA2, a streptomycin-spectinomycin resistance gene. The reduced susceptibility to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (and to ticarcillin-clavulanic acid) may result from the high level of hydrolysis of the beta-lactam rather than to the clavulanic acid resistance properties of PSE-1 in these clonally related S. typhimurium isolates.  (+info)

(6/1754) Zidovudine therapy protects against Salmonella bacteremia recurrence in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

Fifty-five human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Salmonella bacteremia were studied to assess the rate of and causes for recurrence and to determine the influence on relapse of zidovudine, cotrimoxazole, and antimicrobial suppressive therapy according to the susceptibility of the isolates. Overall, 22% of patients relapsed in a median time of 87 days, independent of CD4 cell count, Salmonella serotype, or duration of antibiotic therapy. The use of zidovudine was associated with the lowest rate of recurrences compared with cotrimoxazole or amoxicillin as suppressive therapy. In the microbiologic assay, zidovudine showed bactericidal effect on Salmonella species at current dosages, and resistance to zidovudine was uncommon (2 cases, 4%). Due to its direct effect on Salmonella species, a zidovudine-containing regimen may protect against the recurrence of the disease.  (+info)

(7/1754) Typing of Salmonella enterica serotype paratyphi C isolates from various countries by plasmid profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 61 Salmonella enterica serotype Paratyphi C isolates from six countries gave five distinct clusters. Twenty-four isolates from five countries were susceptible to 10 antimicrobials tested and gave similar restriction endonuclease digest patterns of the 38-MDa plasmid. In contrast, plasmid and PFGE profiles of 37 multidrug-resistant isolates from Zaire were different from those from other countries.  (+info)

(8/1754) Characteristics of septic arthritis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected haemophiliacs versus other risk groups.

The cases are presented of four haemophiliacs infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and with septic arthritis among the 340 patients followed at our centre. The data of these cases and 39 additional HIV-infected haemophiliacs with septic arthritis, identified in a literature search, are reviewed. The spectrum of bacterial pathogens is limited and somewhat different from that in other risk groups. The localization is exclusively to joints affected by haemophilic arthropathy. The laboratory picture is characterized by the absence of peripheral leucocytosis, varying CD4-helper cell counts, a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fever. The clinical picture mimics that of haemarthrosis, often causing a delay in diagnosis. Treatment with systemic antibiotics is often sufficient, obviating the need for arthrotomy and open drainage. Prognosis related to the joint function is relatively good, but poor when related to the medium- to long-term survival of the patient.  (+info)



Saintpaul


  • A total of 84 persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Saintpaul were reported from 18 states. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC collaborated with public health officials in many states and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul infections linked to imported cucumbers supplied by Daniel Cardenas Izabal and Miracle Greenhouse of Culiacán, Mexico and distributed by Tricar Sales, Inc. of Rio Rico, Arizona. (cdc.gov)
  • Related to the Outbreak of Salmonella Saintpaul infections associated with tomatoes. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC is collaborating with public health officials in many states, the Indian Health Service, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate an ongoing multi-state outbreak of human Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Since April, 991 persons infected with Salmonella Saintpaul with the same genetic fingerprint have been identified in 41 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. (cdc.gov)
  • Only 6 persons infected with this strain of Salmonella Saintpaul were identified in the country during April through June of 2007. (cdc.gov)
  • On May 22, 2008, the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) notified CDC about four persons infected with Salmonella Saintpaul strains that were indistinguishable from each other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 15 other persons with Salmonella infections whose isolates had not yet been characterized. (cdc.gov)
  • A case was defined as laboratory-confirmed infection with Salmonella Saintpaul with Xba I pattern JN6X01.0048, the outbreak strain. (cdc.gov)
  • The CDC reports that since mid-March, 35 persons infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Saintpaul have been reported from 7 states. (marlerblog.com)

strains


  • A total of 195 persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Newport, and Salmonella Lille were reported from 27 states. (cdc.gov)
  • These were identified because clinical laboratories in all states send Salmonella strains from ill persons to their State public health laboratory for characterization. (cdc.gov)
  • Five people infected with two strains of Salmonella Enteritidis were reported from Minnesota. (cdc.gov)
  • Because the outbreak strains of Salmonella Enteritidis included in this investigation are common in the PulseNet database, WGS was performed to help identify which illnesses were related to this outbreak. (cdc.gov)

bacteria


  • In PulseNet, the national subtyping network of public health and food regulatory agency laboratories coordinated by CDC, DNA "fingerprints" of Salmonella bacteria are obtained through diagnostic testing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or PFGE, to identify cases of illness that were part of this outbreak. (cdc.gov)
  • Public health investigators used DNA "fingerprints" of Salmonella bacteria obtained through diagnostic testing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to identify cases of illness that may be part of this outbreak. (cdc.gov)
  • DNA "fingerprinting" is performed on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people using techniques called pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). (cdc.gov)
  • All turtles, regardless of size, can carry Salmonella bacteria even if they look healthy and clean. (cdc.gov)

Multistate Outbreak


  • CDC and multiple states are investigating a multistate outbreak of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with pet turtles. (cdc.gov)

conducted a multistate


  • To identify the source, NMDOH, the Texas Department of State Health Services (TXDSHS), Navajo Nation, the Indian Health Service (IHS), and CDC conducted a multistate case-control study of laboratory-confirmed infections. (cdc.gov)

enterica


  • A Role for the Non-Canonical Wnt-β-Catenin and TGF-β Signaling Pathways in the Induction of Tolerance during the Establishment of a Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Persistent Cecal Infection in Chickens. (cambridge.org)
  • Survival of Salmonella enterica Serovar Infantis on and within Stored Table Eggs. (cambridge.org)
  • Of concern is intrinsic contamination of the formula with (for example) Western Avenue, Cardiff, Salmonella enterica as well as extrinsic contamination from inappropriate handling or ineffective CF5 2YB, UK disinfection. (slideshare.net)

Enteritidis


  • This outbreak was not connected with an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed chicken entrees produced by Barber Foods and sold under many different brands. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC, the Minnesota Department of Health , and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA-FSIS) investigated an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to raw, frozen, stuffed and breaded chicken entrees produced by Aspen Foods. (cdc.gov)
  • On October 2, 2015, Aspen Foods issued an expanded recall of approximately 561,000 pounds of frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken products that may be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis. (cdc.gov)
  • As part of the ongoing investigation, on September 17, 2015, USDA-FSIS reported that frozen, raw, stuffed and breaded chicken entrees produced by Aspen Foods have been confirmed as having the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis. (cdc.gov)
  • International increase in Salmonella enteritidis: A new pandemic? (cambridge.org)
  • High voltage atmospheric cold plasma treatment of refrigerated chicken eggs for control of Salmonella Enteritidis contamination on egg shell. (cambridge.org)
  • Distinct Salmonella Enteritidis lineages associated with enterocolitis in high-income settings and invasive disease in low-income settings. (cambridge.org)
  • Aptamer-based detection of Salmonella enteritidis using double signal amplification by Klenow fragment and dual fluorescence. (cambridge.org)
  • Risks Involved in the Use of Enrofloxacin for Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Heidelberg in Commercial Poultry. (cambridge.org)

isolates


  • Whole genome sequencing showed that the Salmonella Agbeni isolated from ill people in this outbreak is closely related genetically to the Salmonella Agbeni isolates from turtles. (cdc.gov)

Infantis


  • CDC collaborated with public health and agriculture officials in many states and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Poultry Improvement Plan, and Veterinary Services to investigate an outbreak of human Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Newport, and Salmonella Lille infections linked to chicks, ducklings, and other live poultry from Mt. Healthy Hatchery in Ohio. (cdc.gov)

strain


  • however, CDC and state health departments are continuing to conduct surveillance for cases of infection with the outbreak strain. (cdc.gov)
  • Protection AgainstSalmonellaTyphimurium,SalmonellaGallinarum, andSalmonellaEnteritidis Infection in Layer Chickens Conferred by a Live AttenuatedSalmonellaTyphimurium Strain. (cambridge.org)
  • Thirty-seven people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Agbeni have been reported from 13 states. (cdc.gov)

BACTERIAL INFECTIONS


  • could the cmv create similar wasting effects on a person with an already burdoned immune system due to various bacterial infections? (thebody.com)

poultry


  • Epidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback findings linked this outbreak of human Salmonella infections to contact with live poultry from Mt. Healthy Hatchery in Ohio. (cdc.gov)
  • This should include information about the risk of acquiring a Salmonella infection from contact with live poultry. (cdc.gov)
  • Because contact with any live poultry can be a source of human Salmonella infections, you should know how to protect yourself and your family from illness . (cdc.gov)
  • However, it is important to remember that contact with live poultry, including baby or adult birds, can be a source of human Salmonella infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. (aafp.org)

epidemiologic


  • Epidemiologic and laboratory findings link the outbreak of human Salmonella Agbeni infections to contact with turtles or their environments, such as water from a turtle habitat. (cdc.gov)

contamination


  • 2. PAPER Contamination of bottles used for feeding reconstituted powdered infant formula and implications for public health Contamination of bottles used for feeding reconstituted powdered infant formula and implications for public health Authors Elizabeth C Redmond Abstract PhD, Food Research and Aims: Microbial contamination of powdered infant formula (PIF) is known to cause gastrointestinal Consultancy Unit, University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, infections in infants. (slideshare.net)
  • The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the company revealed the presence of Salmonella in one lot of 1.69 oz. packages of the Puppy Starter Kit. (fda.gov)
  • The potential for contamination was noted after a Colorado Department of Agriculture inspection of the product revealed the presence of Salmonella in a sample taken from a 12oz package of 12' Tremenda Sticks. (fda.gov)

stool


  • Because many persons with Salmonella illness do not have a stool specimen tested, it is likely that many more illnesses have occurred than those reported. (cdc.gov)
  • Nine wedding reception attendees' stool samples tested positive for Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 44. (biomedsearch.com)

risk


  • More information about Salmonella , and steps people can take to reduce their risk of infection, can be found on the CDC Salmonella Web Page and the CDC Vital Signs Web Page . (cdc.gov)
  • This outbreak is expected to continue since consumers might be unaware of the risk of Salmonella infection from small turtles. (cdc.gov)
  • This should include information about the risk of acquiring a Salmonella infection from turtles or from water in their habitats (tanks or aquariums), and instructions for proper cleaning of the turtle habitat. (cdc.gov)
  • The Increasing Risk of Salmonella Infections: Food industry practices, inadequate regulation, and antimicrobial resistance heighten concerns. (lww.com)
  • Salmonella can affect animals ingesting the product and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products. (fda.gov)
  • control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. (aafp.org)
  • Reptiles and amphibians are not recommended pets for children younger than five years because of increased risk of Salmonella infection. (aafp.org)

illness


  • Salmonella is an important cause of human illness in the United States. (cdc.gov)

laboratories


  • They used data from PulseNet , the national subtyping network made up of state and local public health laboratories and federal food regulatory laboratories that performs molecular surveillance of foodborne infections. (cdc.gov)

Septicemia


  • Preventing Bloodstream Infection: Septicemia is life threatening, expensive to treat, and on the rise. (lww.com)

people


  • This close genetic relationship means that people in this outbreak are more likely to share a common source of infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. (fda.gov)

Eggs


Update


  • APIC Conference Update: Infection control specialists and epidemiologists converge. (lww.com)

pets


  • Since 1975, the FDA has banned selling and distributing turtles with shells less than 4 inches long as pets because they are often linked to Salmonella infections, especially in young children. (cdc.gov)
  • Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. (fda.gov)
  • Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. (aafp.org)
  • It is unnecessary for families to rehome pets diagnosed with dermatophytosis (ringworm), scabies, toxoplasmosis, bartonellosis, tick-borne infection, salmonellosis, or leptospirosis if infections are managed appropriately. (aafp.org)

deaths


  • Two deaths were reported, one in New York and one in Maryland, but it is unclear whether Salmonella infection contributed to either of these deaths. (cdc.gov)
  • At least 286 persons have been hospitalized, and the infection might have contributed to two deaths. (cdc.gov)

often


  • How heightened global surveillance efforts made it possible to track the emergence of this new, often deadly infection. (lww.com)

food


  • An environmental inspection of the wedding reception premise and food supplier premise, including food sampling was conducted to identify plausible sources of infection. (biomedsearch.com)

sample


  • A sample of garlic aioli also tested positive for Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 44. (biomedsearch.com)

Control


  • A Plant-Produced Bacteriophage Tailspike Protein for the Control of Salmonella. (cambridge.org)
  • On 30 April 2009, the Communicable Disease Control Branch (CDCB) South Australia was notified of a Salmonella infection in a person who attended a wedding reception on 25 April 2009. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Infection Control and Hurricane Katrina: What nurses can learn in the aftermath of the disaster. (lww.com)

Public


  • CDC is also currently working with public health officials in several states and FDA to investigate an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections linked with eating alfalfa sprouts. (marlerblog.com)

time


  • Any chronic infection could contribute to weight loss over time. (thebody.com)