Religion: A set of beliefs concerning the nature, cause, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency. It usually involves devotional and ritual observances and often a moral code for the conduct of human affairs. (Random House Collegiate Dictionary, rev. ed.)Religion and Psychology: The interrelationship of psychology and religion.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Religion and SexReligion and ScienceSpirituality: Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Clergy: Persons ordained for religious duties, who serve as leaders and perform religious services.Buddhism: The teaching ascribed to Gautama Buddha (ca. 483 B.C.) holding that suffering is inherent in life and that one can escape it into nirvana by mental and moral self-purification. (Webster, 3d ed)Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Hinduism: A complex body of social, cultural, and religious beliefs and practices evolved in and largely confined to the Indian subcontinent and marked by a caste system, an outlook tending to view all forms and theories as aspects of one eternal being and truth, and the practice of the way of works, the way of knowledge, or the way of devotion as a means of release from the round of rebirths. (From Webster, 3d ed)Spiritualism: Religious philosophy expressing the fundamental belief that departed spirits may be contacted by the living through a medium.Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Protestantism: The name given to all Christian denominations, sects, or groups rising out of the Reformation. Protestant churches generally agree that the principle of authority should be the Scriptures rather than the institutional church or the pope. (from W.L. Reese, Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion, 1999)Bible: The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Suicide, Assisted: Provision (by a physician or other health professional, or by a family member or friend) of support and/or means that gives a patient the power to terminate his or her own life. (from APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed).Thanatology: The study of the theory, philosophy, and doctrine of death.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Posthumous Conception: Conception after the death of the male or female biological parent through techniques such as the use of gametes that have been stored during his or her lifetime or that were collected immediately after his or her death.IndiaBehaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)LebanonPastoral Care: Counseling or comfort given by ministers, priests, rabbis, etc., to those in need of help with emotional problems or stressful situations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Superstitions: A belief or practice which lacks adequate basis for proof; an embodiment of fear of the unknown, magic, and ignorance.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.SyriaMedicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Women's Rights: The rights of women to equal status pertaining to social, economic, and educational opportunities afforded by society.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Circumcision, Female: A general term encompassing three types of excision of the external female genitalia - Sunna, clitoridectomy, and infibulation. It is associated with severe health risks and has been declared illegal in many places, but continues to be widely practiced in a number of countries, particularly in Africa.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Advance Directives: Declarations by patients, made in advance of a situation in which they may be incompetent to decide about their own care, stating their treatment preferences or authorizing a third party to make decisions for them. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Arabs: Members of a Semitic people inhabiting the Arabian peninsula or other countries of the Middle East and North Africa. The term may be used with reference to ancient, medieval, or modern ethnic or cultural groups. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Circumcision, Male: Excision of the prepuce of the penis (FORESKIN) or part of it.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.United StatesAttitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Spouses: Married persons, i.e., husbands and wives, or partners. Domestic partners, or spousal equivalents, are two adults who have chosen to share their lives in an intimate and committed relationship, reside together, and share a mutual obligation of support for the basic necessities of life.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.IsraelTissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Jews: An ethnic group with historical ties to the land of ISRAEL and the religion of JUDAISM.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.SwitzerlandEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.PakistanMarriage: The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.BrazilRisk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.

*  salvation | religion | Britannica.com

In religion, the deliverance of humankind from such fundamentally negative or disabling conditions as suffering, evil, finitude ... A Study of Religion: Fact or Fiction?. Take this religion True or False Quiz at Encyclopedia Britannica to test your knowledge ... World Religions Quiz. Take this World Religions Quiz at Encyclopedia Britannica and test your knowledge of Buddhism, Judaism, ... Hellenistic religions (in Hellenistic religion: Nature and significance) *iconography (in religious symbolism and iconography: ...
https://britannica.com/topic/salvation-religion

*  There is no god

Also referred to as "American HandEgg." And it is more of a religion amongst some religious folk than religion is a religion. ... Second definition (emphasis mine) says nothing about faith, religion, Christianity, God, etc. Proselytizing can include any and ...
https://freethoughtblogs.com/pharyngula/2012/01/14/there-is-no-god/

*  Science Questions, Religion Accepts Answers - WSJ

Townes then says he believes 'the same can be said of religion.' ... The history of the relationship between science and religion is ...
https://wsj.com/articles/SB111154267242387214

*  True Religion profit rises 2.1% - MarketWatch

30, True Religion posted a profit of $12.3 million, or 49 cents a share, up from $12.1 million, or 48 cents a share, a year ... True Religion Apparel Inc.'s TRLG third-quarter profit rose 2.1% as the jeans maker's U.S. sales improved, but weaker ... True Religion has seen double-digit quarterly revenue growth for most of the past two years, driven by direct sales of jeans ... True Religion also expects current-quarter earnings of 52 cents to 58 cents a share on sales of $128 million to $133 million. ...
marketwatch.com/story/true-religion-profit-rises-21-2012-11-05

*  Science and Religion: A Very Short Introduction - Thomas Dixon - Google Books

... science and religion' such a fraught and interesting topic in the modern world, offering perspectives from non-Christian ... religions and examples from across the physical, biological, and social sciences.. Along the way, he examines landmark ... The debate between science and religion is never out of the news: emotions run high, fuelled by polemical bestsellers like The ... Tennessee in 1925 and the Dover Area School Board case of 2005 are explained with reference to the interaction between religion ...
https://books.google.com/books?id=qpT3QAVZ9nsC&pg=PT81&lpg=PT80&vq=gaps&dq=related:ISBN0195392981&hl=en

*  Romney's Religion Speech - EvolutionBlog

No religion should dictate to the state nor should the state interfere with the free practice of religion. But in recent years ... Secularism isn't religion, or a religion. What is being done here is to diminish rationalism and secularism down to the level ... Freedom requires religion just as religion requires freedom. Freedom opens the windows of the soul so that man can discover his ... It is as if they are intent on establishing a new religion in America - the religion of secularism. They are wrong. ...
scienceblogs.com/evolutionblog/2007/12/07/romneys-religion-speech/

*  Oh boy...how do I phrase this.... - Mothering Forums

Can someone point me into a direction on research of other religions (I guess thats the term I ... Spirit is the foundation of religion but religion is a human institution that interprets spirituality into a code of conduct/ ... By comparison, "religion" is Quote:. a. Belief in and reverence for a supernatural power or powers.. b. A personal or ... So one thing you might consider before you pick a religion is to look at how you think.. Try reading the first chapter of ...
mothering.com/forum/265-religious-studies/735914-oh-boy-how-do-i-phrase.html

*  Religion, Inc. - Wikipedia

EN) Religion, Inc., su Internet Movie Database, IMDb.com. (EN) Religion, Inc., su AllMovie, All Media Network. (EN) Religion, ... Religion, Inc. (noto anche con il titolo A Fool And His Money) è un film del 1989 diretto da Daniel Adams con Sandra Bullock e ... Sandra Bullock brilla in un ruolo di supporto". ^ - Rotten Tomatoes su Religion Inc. ( ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion,_Inc.

*  Scotland Church Records Union Lists Genealogy - FamilySearch Wiki

Those who believed that secular authorities had no power in matters of religion were known as 'New Lights.' In 1820, the New ... a declaration of independence from England and the Crown and of loyalty to the Presbyterian religion) was signed in 1638. ...
https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/index.php?title=Scotland_Church_Records_Union_Lists&oldid=527493

*  Eliza Griswold Archives - Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly

"In a lot of places where there had been conflict in the name of religion there is now peace in the name of religion, and that's ... Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. Additional funding is provided by individual ...
pbs.org/wnet/religionandethics/tag/eliza-griswold/

*  New Perspectives on Psychology & Religion

Religion. Bei der Büchersuchmaschine eurobuch.com können Sie antiquarische und Neubücher VERGLEICHEN UND SOFORT zum Bestpreis ... Religion & Spirituality, 1025612, Subjects, 266239, Books, 125175031, General AAS, 277147, Bible, 58, Religion & Spirituality, ... Religion & Spirituality, 1025612, Subjects, 266239, Books, 125175031, General AAS, 277147, Bible, 58, Religion & Spirituality, ... Religion & Spirituality, 1025612, Subjects, 266239, Books, 125174031, General AAS, 58, Religion & Spirituality, 1025612, ...
https://eurobuch.com/buch/isbn/1424101484.html

*  The Smoke of the Soul - Medicine, Physiology and Religion | R. Sugg | Palgrave Macmillan

Medicine, Physiology and Religion in Early Modern England. Authors. * R. Sugg Copyright. 2013. Publisher. Palgrave Macmillan UK ...
palgrave.com/us/book/9781137345592

*  Religion | MSNBC

In a new Financial Times interview, Ivanka Trump pushes back on criticism about her influence on her father, particularly his reaction to the violence in Charlottesville.. ...
msnbc.com/religion?page=1

*  Ekklesia Worship Center Shines Light on Mental Health among Minorities | Afro

In 2008, the U.S. House of Representatives designated July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Awareness month. This was an effort to raise awareness and understanding on the issue of mental health, especially among multicultural communities. On July 12, Ekklesia International Family Life and Worship Center hosted a minority health awareness event, hoping to accomplish the same thing.. The forum featured mental health providers in D.C. and Maryland discussing the services and resources available to individuals and family members seeking understanding of and access to mental health treatment. Presenters included board member for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) of Prince George's County Chapter, Roxanne Taylor; Its Getting Better All the Time clinical supervisor, Arnetta Legree; Family Matters of Greater Washington senior clinical manager, Rashida Winslow; and founder and CEO of RIMS Center for Enrichment and Development, Yolanda Coleman.. According to a National ...
afro.com/ekklesia-worship-center-shines-light-on-mental-health-among-minorities/

*  Institute for the Bio-Cultural Study of Religion - Institute for the Bio-Cultural Study of Religion

Religion, Brain & Behavior (RBB) is the flagship journal in the bio-cultural study of religion.. The aim of RBB is to provide a ... Religion, Brain & Behavior is the flagship journal in the bio-cultural study of religion, discounted for IBCSR members. ... Science On Religion.org features news on the scientific study of religion, book reviews, and videos. ... SRP integrates multiple theories of religion and produces tools capable of testing hypotheses about religion's social and ...
ibcsr.org

*  Religion

People Religion *. Hungarian government faces anti-Semitism claims amid vilification of George Soros ...
https://cnbc.com/religion/?page=2

*  Religion : NPR

... and world religion, spirituality, ethics, and moral issues affecting society and culture. Subscribe to NPR Religion RSS feeds. ... Religion NPR's stories on U.S. and world religion, spirituality, ethics, and moral issues affecting society and culture. ... talk to Bill McQuay about the finer points of some of the religion's core concepts. ... where he learns of the religion's core values. ...
npr.org/sections/religion/archive?start=placeholder&date=1-31-2006

*  religion : NPR

religion
npr.org/tags/125951204/religion/archive?date=6-30-2002

*  religion : NPR

Millennials 'Talk To God,' But Fewer Rely On Religion, Survey Finds. April 11, 2014 The new Carnegie Mellon study found that 62 ... With Echoes Of France, Debate On Religion Divides Quebec November 14, 2013 The Canadian province has proposed a "secularism ... A new survey by Carnegie Mellon University shows that more millennials report they "talk to God" than turn to religion for ... percent of 18- to 34-year-olds report talking to God, but just 52 percent said they turned to religion for guidance. ...
npr.org/tags/125951204/religion/archive?date=5-31-2014

*  Greek religion - Wikipedia

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Greek religion.. If an internal link led you here, you may ... Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Greek_religion&oldid=591632635" ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_religion

*  Religion | Research

Cord Whitaker, assistant professor of English, has been awarded the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation/Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Career Enhancement Fellowship for junior faculty. The award supports promising research by young scholars who "are committed to eradicating racial disparities in core fields in the arts and sciences." The Career Enhancement Fellowship Program provides one year of financial support, mentoring, and a fall retreat for participants. Its goal is to "aid the scholarly research and intellectual growth of fellows." ...
https://unh.edu/research/tags/religion

*  Ancient Canaanite religion - Wikipedia

"Caananite Religion". www.mc.maricopa.edu. Retrieved 2017-08-09.. *^ "Canaanite culture and religion". history-world.org. ... Canaanite religion refers to the group of Ancient Semitic religions practiced by the Canaanites living in the ancient Levant ... According to The Encyclopedia of Religion, the Ugarit texts represent one part of a larger religion that was based on the ... Canaanite religion was influenced by its peripheral position, intermediary between Egypt and Mesopotamia, whose religions had a ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaanite_gods

*  Obama religion presentation

Prri apsa 2013 v4 rpj by Public Religion R... 732 views * Prri white working class presentati... by Public Religion R... 1294 ... 7. Perception of Obama's Religion in 2010 Source: Pew Research Center, Religion & Politics Survey, August 2010 (N=3,003) ... It is likely that favorability is affecting views about Obama's religion just as views about his religion are affecting his ... Religion & Politics Survey, August 2010. Public Religion Research Institute, American Values Survey, September 2008. Pew ...
https://slideshare.net/rjone07/obama-religion-presentation

WOW Worship: Orange: [ Allmusic review]Daesun Jinrihoe: Daesun Jinrihoe (Also transliterated as Daesunjinrihoe, Daesun Chillihoe, Taesunchillihoe, Daesoonjinrihoe, Daesoon Jinrihoe and Taesŏn Chillihoe) is a Korean new religious movement, founded in April 1969 by Park Han-gyeong (박한경) (1918–96). It is a splinter of the syncretic religion founded by Gang Il-Sun (1871–1909, also known as Chungsan Kang).Science, Evolution, and Creationism: Science, Evolution, and Creationism is a publication by the United States National Academy of Sciences. The book's authors intended to provide a current and comprehensive explanation of evolution and "its importance in the science classroom".Secular spirituality: Secular spirituality refers to the adherence to a spiritual ideology without the advocation of a religious framework. Secular spirituality emphasizes the inner peace of the individual, rather than a relationship with the divine.Kazi Nazrul IslamSt. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church (Calgary, Alberta): St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church is an historic Carpenter Gothic style Roman Catholic church building located at 14608 Macleod Trail in the Midnapore neighbourhood in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Seventh-day Adventist theology: The theology of the Seventh-day Adventist Church resembles that of Protestant Christianity, combining elements from Lutheran, Wesleyan/Arminian, and Anabaptist branches of Protestantism. Adventists believe in the infallibility of Scripture and teach that salvation comes through faith in Jesus Christ.Henry Hopkins (clergy): Henry Hopkins (30 November 1837 – 28 August 1908) was an American clergyman and a president of Williams College.Engaged Buddhism: Engaged Buddhism refers to Buddhists who are seeking ways to apply the insights from meditation practice and dharma teachings to situations of social, political, environmental, and economic suffering and injustice. Finding its roots in Vietnam through the Zen Buddhist teacher Thích Nhất Hạnh, Engaged Buddhism has grown in popularity in the West.Ritual washing in JudaismWorship in Hinduism: Worship in Hinduism is an act of religious devotion usually directed to one or more Hindu deities. A sense of Bhakti or devotional love is generally invoked.Spiritualism: Spiritualism is a belief that spirits of the dead have both the ability and the inclination to communicate with the living. The afterlife, or "spirit world", is seen by spiritualists, not as a static place, but as one in which spirits continue to evolve.Ceremonial (Pink Cream 69 album)Anssi JoutsenlahtiAdventist Health Studies: Adventist Health Studies (AHS) is a series of long-term medical research projects of Loma Linda University with the intent to measure the link between lifestyle, diet, disease and mortality of Seventh-day Adventists.Crime and punishment in the Bible: The Hebrew Bible is considered a holy text in most Abrahamic religions. It records a large number of events and laws that are endorsed or proscribed by the God of Israel.Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory: Hofstede's cultural dimensions theory is a framework for cross-cultural communication, developed by Geert Hofstede. It describes the effects of a society's culture on the values of its members, and how these values relate to behavior, using a structure derived from factor analysis.Spanking Shakespeare: Spanking Shakespeare (2007) is the debut novel by Jake Wizner. It is a young adult novel that tells the story of the unfortunately named Shakespeare Shapiro and his struggles in high school, dating and friendship.Society for Old Age Rational Suicide: The Society for Old Age Rational Suicide (SOARS) is a group based in the United Kingdom concerned with choice at the end of life. It was established on December 10, 2009 (Human Rights Day) by Dr.Dysthanasia: In medicine, dysthanasia means "bad death" and is considered a common fault of modern medicine:Swadeshi Jagaran Manch: The Swadeshi Jagaran Manch or SJM is an economic wing of Sangh Parivar that again took the tool of Swadeshi advocated in India before its independence to destabilize the British Empire. SJM took to the promotion of Swadeshi (indigenous) industries and culture as a dote against LPG.Avoidance coping: In psychology, avoidance coping, escape coping, or cope and avoid is a maladaptive coping mechanism characterized by the effort to avoid dealing with a stressor. Coping refers to behaviors that attempt to protect oneself from psychological damage.Karin Dubsky: Karin Dubsky (born 1954), is a German-Irish marine ecologist working in Trinity College Dublin, and is the coordinator and co-founder of Coastwatch Europe, an environmental NGO and a member of the European Environmental Bureau.Tamil Nadu Dr. M.G.R. Medical UniversityThirteen Steps To Mentalism: Thirteen Steps to Mentalism is a book on mentalism by Tony Corinda. It was originally published as thirteen smaller booklets as a course in mentalism, and was later, in 1961, republished as a book.Voluntary euthanasia: Voluntary euthanasia is the practice of ending a life in a painless manner. Voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) have been the focus of great controversy in recent years.Beit Beirut: Beit Beirut (; literally "the house of Beirut") is a museum and urban cultural center that was scheduled to open in 2013 in Beirut's Ashrafieh neighborhood. The cultural center is in the restored Barakat building, also known as the "Yellow house", a historic landmark designed by Youssef Aftimus.Lancaster University Chaplaincy CentreClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Mark Siegler: Mark Siegler (born June 20, 1941) is an American physician who specializes in internal medicine. He is the Lindy Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Chicago.Superstition in Pakistan: Superstition in Pakistan (}}) is widespread and many adverse events are attributed to the supernatural effect. Superstition is a belief in supernatural causality: that one event leads to the cause of another without any physical process linking the two events, such as astrology, omens, witchcraft, etc.Cross-cultural psychiatry: Cross-cultural psychiatry, transcultural psychiatry, or cultural psychiatry is a branch of psychiatry concerned with the cultural context of mental disorders and the challenges of addressing ethnic diversity in psychiatric services. It emerged as a coherent field from several strands of work, including surveys of the prevalence and form of disorders in different cultures or countries; the study of migrant populations and ethnic diversity within countries; and analysis of psychiatry itself as a cultural product.China–Syria relations: China–Syria relations are foreign relations between China and Syria. Diplomatic relations between both countries were established on August 1, 1956.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Lucretia MottGroningen Protocol: The Groningen Protocol is a text created in September 2004 by Eduard Verhagen, the medical director of the department of pediatrics at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in Groningen, the Netherlands. It contains directives with criteria under which physicians can perform "active ending of life on infants" (child euthanasia) without fear of legal prosecution.Dignitas Personae: Dignitas Personae is the title of a 2008 instruction by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith giving doctrinal directives on certain embryonic ethical controversies that had emerged since 1987, after Donum Vitae was released.Public opinion on nuclear issues: Public opinion on nuclear issues is the aggregate of attitudes or beliefs held by the adult population concerning nuclear power, nuclear weapons and uranium mining.Morality and religion: Morality and religion is the relationship between religious views and morals. Many religions have value frameworks regarding personal behavior meant to guide adherents in determining between right and wrong.DelusionDay One (TV news series): Day One is a television news magazine produced by ABC News from 1993 to 1995, hosted by Forrest Sawyer and Diane Sawyer.Positivity offset: Positivity offset is a psychological term referring to two phenomena: People tend to interpret neutral situations as mildly positive, and most people rate their lives as good, most of the time. The positivity offset stands in notable asymmetry to the negativity bias.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Yamtuan Besar: Yamtuan Besar, also known as Yang di-Pertuan Besar, is the royal title of the ruler of the Malaysian state of Negeri Sembilan. The ruler of Negeri Sembilan is selected by a council of ruling chiefs in the state, or the datuk-datuk undang.Motivations for joining the Special OlympicsPride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (2010) is a parody novel by Steve Hockensmith. It is a prequel to Seth Grahame-Smith's 2009 novel Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, focusing on "the early life and training of Elizabeth Bennet, heroine of the earlier Pride and Prejudice and Zombies as she strove to become a gifted zombie hunter, with some mishaps in her early romantic encounters also included.Samuel Bard (physician): Samuel Bard (April 1, 1742 – May 24, 1821) was an American physician. He founded the first medical school in New York.Large Combustion Plant Directive: The Large Combustion Plant Directive (LCPD, 2001/80/EC) is a European Union directive which requires member states of the European Union to legislatively limit flue gas emissions from combustion plant having thermal capacity of 50 MW or greater. The directive applies to fossil-fuel power stations, and other large thermal plant such as petroleum refineries and steelworks.National Arab American Medical Association: United StatesIntact America: Intact America is a registered non-governmental Intactivist (pro-intact or anti-infant circumcision) organization created in 2008 to advance the view that the circumcision of non-consenting minors is unethical and medically unnecessary, and therefore should be abandoned. They also claim that circumcision reduces sexual sensation in males and that it is a violation of modern bio-ethical standards to forcibly remove erogenous tissue from children.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,African-American family structure: The family structure of African-Americans has long been a matter of national public policy interest.Moynihan's War on Poverty report A 1965 report by Daniel Patrick Moynihan, known as The Moynihan Report, examined the link between black poverty and family structure.Teenage suicide in the United States: Teenage suicide in the United States remains comparatively high in the 15 to 24 age group with 10,000 suicides in this age range in 2004, making it the third leading cause of death for those aged 15 to 24. By comparison, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death for all those age 10 and over, with 33,289 suicides for all US citizens in 2006.Fritz Heider: Fritz Heider (February 19, 1896 – January 2, 1988)American Psychologist., "Fritz Heider (1896 - 1988)".Laureen Harper: borderTel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center: Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (commonly referred to as Ichilov Hospital) is the main hospital serving Tel Aviv, Israel, and its metropolitan area. It is the third-largest hospital complex in the country.Organ procurement organization: In the United States, an organ procurement organization (OPO) is a non-profit organization that is responsible for the evaluation and procurement of deceased-donor organs for organ transplantation. There are 58 such organizations in the United States, each responsible for organ procurement in a specific region, and each a member of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, a federally mandated network created by and overseen by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS).Opinion polling in the Philippine presidential election, 2010: Opinion polling (popularly known as surveys in the Philippines) for the 2010 Philippine presidential election is managed by two major polling firms: Social Weather Stations and Pulse Asia, and several minor polling firms. The polling firms conducted surveys both prior and after the deadline for filing of certificates of candidacies on December 1, 2009.Cigarette smoking among college students: The rates of college students smoking in the United States have fluctuated for the past twenty years. Majority of lifelong smokers begin smoking habits before the age of 24, which makes the college years a crucial time in the study of cigarette consumption.Jewish Community Council of Victoria: The Jewish Community Council of Victoria Inc (JCCV) is the peak representative body for Victorian Jewry, representing nearly 60 Jewish community organisations and over 52,000 Victorian Jews. The JCCV’s mission is to represent the Victorian Jewish community, the largest Jewish community in Australia, on all matters that affect its status, welfare and interests.Stressor: A stressor is a chemical or biological agent, environmental condition, external stimulus or an event that causes stress to an organism.Lausanne Marathon: The Lausanne Marathon or Marathon of Lausanne is an annual marathon race held in the Swiss city of Lausanne since 1993. This road running takes place in autumn (October) and the 20 km of Lausanne takes place in spring (April).List of countries that regulate the immigration of felons: This is a list of countries that regulate the immigration of felons.

(1/756) Vitamin D status in different subgroups of British Asians.

To assess the effect of religious dietary practices and social customs on the vitamin D status of Asian immigrants, we kept records of the dietary intake and time spent out of doors of 81 Ugandan Asian men, women, and girls (9-19 years old). Sera were analysed for 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHD3), and 28% of the subjects were found to have levels below the lower limit of normal. The (vegetarian) Hindus had the lowest dietary intakes, least time out of doors, and lowest serum 25-OHD3. The Goan (Roman Catholic) Asians, despite more pigmentation, had 25-OHD3 levels similar to those found among indigenous British people and had the most satisfactory vitamin D intakes. Among Asians, whose exposure to sunlight may be limited, dietary vitamin D becomes the major determinant of serum 25-OHD3.  (+info)

(2/756) How patients perceive the role of hospital chaplains: a preliminary exploration.

OBJECTIVE: An exploratory study of the attitudes of hospital patients to the service provided by hospital chaplains. DESIGN: Questionnaire study of hospital inpatients in December 1992. SETTING: One large teaching hospital in London. PATIENTS: 180 hospital inpatients in 14 different general wards, 168 (93%) of whom agreed to take part. MAIN MEASURES: Attitudes to chaplains and their role contained in 12 questions developed during a pilot study on hospital inpatients (16) and staff (14) and their relation to patients' age, sex, length of hospital stay, and religious beliefs, according to Kendall rank order correlations. RESULTS: Of 168(93%) respondents, 72(43%) were women; mean age of patients was 63.1 (SD 16.8) years. Forty five (27%) were inpatients of three days or less and 22(13%) for one month or more. 136(81%) were Christian; 17(10%) atheist, agnostic, or had no religion; and 15(9%) were of other religions. In general, patients showed positive attitudes towards the role of hospital chaplains and to the services they provided. The correlation analysis showed that there was a significant tendency for older patients, those who had been inpatients for longer, and those with religious beliefs to be more sympathetic to the role of hospital chaplains. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital chaplains provide a service which is appreciated by patients. This study provides a simple instrument for assessing patients' attitudes to chaplains.  (+info)

(3/756) Changes at the high end of risk in cigarette smoking among US high school seniors, 1976-1995.

OBJECTIVES: This study identified high school seniors at low, moderate and high risk for cigarette use to examine changes in the prevalence of daily smoking within risk groups from 1976 to 1995. METHODS: Data were taken from the Monitoring the Future Projects national surveys of high school seniors. Risk classification was based on grade point average, truancy, nights out per week, and religious commitment. Logistic regression models were used to estimate trends for all seniors and separately for White (n = 244,221), African American (n = 41,005), and Hispanic (n = 18,457) made and female subgroups. RESULTS: Risk group distribution (low = 45%, moderate = 30%, high = 25%) changed little over time. Between 1976 and 1990, greater absolute declines in smoking occurred among high-risk students (17 percentage points) than among low-risk students (6 percentage points). Particularly large declines occurred among high-risk African Americans and Hispanics. Smoking increased in all risk groups in the 1990s. CONCLUSIONS: Among high school seniors, a large part of the overall change in smoking occurred among high-risk youth. Policies and programs to reduce smoking among youth must have broad appeal, especially to those at the higher end of the risk spectrum.  (+info)

(4/756) Fruit and vegetable consumption and prevention of cancer: the Black Churches United for Better Health project.

OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the effects of the Black Churches United for Better Health project on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among rural African American church members in North Carolina. METHODS: Ten counties comprising 50 churches were pair matched and randomly assigned to either intervention or delayed intervention (no program until after the follow-up survey) conditions. A multicomponent intervention was conducted over approximately 20 months. A total of 2519 adults (77.3% response rate) completed both the baseline and 2-year follow-up interviews. RESULTS: The 2 study groups consumed similar amounts of fruits and vegetables at baseline. AT the 2-year follow-up, the intervention group consumed 0.85 (SE = 0.12) servings more than the delayed intervention group (P < .0001). The largest increases were observed among people 66 years or older (1 serving), those with education beyond high school (0.92 servings), those widowed or divorced (0.96 servings), and those attending church frequently (1.3 servings). The last improvement occurred among those aged 18 to 37 years and those who were single. CONCLUSIONS: The project was a successful model for achieving dietary change among rural African Americans.  (+info)

(5/756) Association between illegal drugs and weapon carrying in young people in Scotland: schools' survey.

OBJECTIVES: To identify the type and extent of weapons being carried among young people in Scotland, and to determine the relation between use of illegal drugs and weapon carrying. DESIGN: Questionnaire school survey. SETTING: Independent schools in central Scotland and schools in Lanarkshire and Perth and Kinross. PARTICIPANTS: 3121 students aged 11 to 16 in 20 schools. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self completion questionnaire reporting history of drug use and weapon carrying. RESULTS: Overall, 34.1% of males and 8. 6% of females reported having carried a weapon (P<0.0001), ranging from 29.2% of boys aged 11-13 (classes S1 to S2) to 39.3% of boys aged 13-15 (S3 to S4). These values are higher than those in a recent survey of young people in England. Weapon carrying in Lanarkshire was 70% higher for males than in the rural area of Perth and Kinross. Both males and females who had taken drugs were more likely to carry weapons (63.5% of male drug users versus 20.5% of non-users and 22.8% of female drug users versus 3.7% of non-users; both P<0.0001). The proportions of males carrying weapons who used none, one, two, three or four, or five or more illegal drugs were 21%, 52%, 68%, 74%, and 92% respectively. A similar trend was found among females. CONCLUSIONS: Better information is needed on the nature and extent of weapon carrying by young people in the United Kingdom, and better educational campaigns are needed warning of the dangers of carrying weapons.  (+info)

(6/756) Death--whose decision? Euthanasia and the terminally ill.

In Australia and Oregon, USA, legislation to permit statutory sanctioned physician-assisted dying was enacted. However, opponents, many of whom held strong religious views, were successful with repeal in Australia. Similar opposition in Oregon was formidable, but ultimately lost in a 60-40% vote reaffirming physician-assisted dying. This paper examines the human dilemma which arises when technological advances in end-of-life medicine conflict with traditional and religious sanctity-of-life values. Society places high value on personal autonomy, particularly in the United States. We compare the potential for inherent contradictions and arbitrary decisions where patient autonomy is either permitted or forbidden. The broader implications for human experience resulting from new legislation in both Australia and Oregon are discussed. We conclude that allowing autonomy for the terminally ill, within circumscribed options, results in fewer ethical contradictions and greater preservation of dignity.  (+info)

(7/756) Diabetes in the Old Order Amish: characterization and heritability analysis of the Amish Family Diabetes Study.

OBJECTIVE: The Old Order Amish (OOA) are a genetically well-defined closed Caucasian founder population. The Amish Family Diabetes Study was initiated to identify susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes. This article describes the genetic epidemiology of type 2 diabetes and related traits in this unique population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study cohort comprised Amish probands with diabetes who were diagnosed between 35 and 65 years of age and their extended adult family members. We recruited 953 adults who represented 45 multigenerational families. Phenotypic characterization included anthropometry, blood pressure, diabetes status, lipid profile, and leptin levels. RESULTS: The mean age of study participants was 46 years, and the mean BMI was 26.9 kg/m2. Subjects with type 2 diabetes were older, more obese, and had higher insulin levels. The prevalence of diabetes in the OOA was approximately half that of the Caucasian individuals who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (95% CI 0.23-0.84). The prevalence of diabetes in the siblings of the diabetic probands was 26.5% compared with a prevalence of 7.0% in spouses (lambdaS = 3.28, 95% CI 1.58-6.80). The heritability of diabetes-related quantitative traits was substantial (13-70% for obesity-related traits, 10-42% for glucose levels, and 11-24% for insulin levels during the oral glucose tolerance test; P = 0.01 to <0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Type 2 diabetes in the Amish has similar phenotypic features to that of the overall Caucasian population, although the prevalence in the Amish community is lower than that of the Caucasian population. There is significant familial clustering of type 2 diabetes and related traits. This unique family collection will be an excellent resource for investigating the genetic underpinnings of type 2 diabetes.  (+info)

(8/756) Do doctors pay attention to the religious beliefs of their patients? A survey amongst Dutch GPs.

BACKGROUND: Patients' religious beliefs can offer support at times of illness and disease. Therefore religious beliefs of patients are important in doctor-patient interaction. OBJECTIVE: To assess to what extent GPs pay attention to religious beliefs of patients in their daily work. METHODS: A postal questionnaire was sent to 120 GPs. The questionnaire consisted of five clusters of items with precoded Likert-scale answer categories related to several clinical situations. RESULTS: Response rate was 72% (n = 87). Upon registration in the practice, 16% of the GPs paid attention to the religious beliefs of patients, while in situations concerning end-of-life decisions like terminal illness or requests for euthanasia most GPs pay attention to religious beliefs of patients (79%). In general GPs brought up in Protestant families tend to pay more attention to religious beliefs of patients than GPs with a Catholic background (65% vs 36%; 95% CI 5-51) and Protestant GPs pay more attention to these aspects than Catholic GPs (81% vs 47%; 95% CI 5-63). CONCLUSIONS: Most GPs tend to pay attention to religion when their medical possibilities in patient care come to an end. GPs and trainees might be conscious of these aspects in patient management. Since most GPs are familiar just with Western religions, the increasing number of non-Western religious denominations might have consequences for patient care in general practitioners' work.  (+info)



Judaism


  • For many years Judaism was the main religion, and it all started with Abram. (markedbyteachers.com)
  • Judaism is a monotheistic religion that provides justice through the law and encourages a belief in the goodness of creation. (reference.com)

Buddhism


  • The course asks why anthropologists shied away from analysing Christianity long after studies of other world religions, such as Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism, had become widely established. (lse.ac.uk)
  • Chinese Buddhism is also marked by the interaction between Indian religions , Chinese religion , and Taoism . (wikipedia.org)
  • Buddhism was the state religion of the Kingdom of Laos, and the organization of the Buddhist community of monks and novices, the clergy ( sangha ), paralleled the political hierarchy. (countrystudies.us)
  • Theravada Buddhism is neither prescriptive, authoritative, nor exclusive in its attitude toward its followers and is tolerant of other religions. (countrystudies.us)

Islam


  • And that is precisely the problem, Americans see Islam as only a religion. (freerepublic.com)
  • Americans need to think of it as a social/political ideology, but they are so used to separating religion from politics (which was a first at the time of our country's founding) that they keep giving Islam the benefit of the doubt. (freerepublic.com)

Americans


  • It looks at the relationship between Christianity and the history of anthropological thought, and locates the place of Christianity in the writings of Mauss, Durkheim, Foucault and others, in order to defamiliarise the religion which Europeans and Americans especially often take for granted. (lse.ac.uk)

History


  • Must have book This book answers all the questions I have about my Catholic religion the history tradition saints & etc.Its wonderful book written by 2 Catholic priest with a doctorate in theology. (google.com)

world


  • This course is available on the MSc in Anthropology and Development, MSc in Anthropology and Development Management, MSc in Religion in the Contemporary World and MSc in Social Anthropology. (lse.ac.uk)
  • It is not just a religion, it is also a sophisticated, detailed political ideology with the expressed goal of taking over the entire world by any means at its disposal, even if it includes lying and killing. (freerepublic.com)
  • The religion also believes that God exists eternally and created everything in the world. (reference.com)

politics


  • Hunter Baker argues that advocates of secularism misunderstand the borders between science, religion, and politics and cannot solve the problem of religious difference. (whatswrongwiththeworld.net)

political


  • Baker serves on the political science faculty at Houston Baptist University and has written for a wide variety of publications including The American Spectator, National Review Online, Christianity Today, and the Journal of Law and Religion. (whatswrongwiththeworld.net)