Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Radiography, Bitewing: Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.Radiographic Image Enhancement: Improvement in the quality of an x-ray image by use of an intensifying screen, tube, or filter and by optimum exposure techniques. Digital processing methods are often employed.Radiography, Abdominal: Radiographic visualization of the body between the thorax and the pelvis, i.e., within the peritoneal cavity.X-Ray Intensifying Screens: Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.X-Ray Film: A film base coated with an emulsion designed for use with x-rays.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Mass Chest X-Ray: X-ray screening of large groups of persons for diseases of the lung and heart by means of radiography of the chest.Radiography, Dual-Energy Scanned Projection: A method of producing a high-quality scan by digitizing and subtracting the images produced by high- and low-energy x-rays.Metacarpophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metacarpal bone and a phalanx.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Radiology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic services.Radiation Dosage: The amount of radiation energy that is deposited in a unit mass of material, such as tissues of plants or animal. In RADIOTHERAPY, radiation dosage is expressed in gray units (Gy). In RADIOLOGIC HEALTH, the dosage is expressed by the product of absorbed dose (Gy) and quality factor (a function of linear energy transfer), and is called radiation dose equivalent in sievert units (Sv).Tomography, X-Ray: Tomography using x-ray transmission.Radiation ProtectionSensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: Computed tomography modalities which use a cone or pyramid-shaped beam of radiation.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems or networks designed to provide radiographic interpretive information.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Technology, Radiologic: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to the field of radiology. The applications center mostly around x-ray or radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but the technological applications of any radiation or radiologic procedure is within the scope of radiologic technology.Radiographic Magnification: Use of optic and geometric techniques to enhance radiographic image quality and interpretation. It includes use of microfocal X-ray tubes and intensifying fluoroscopic screens.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Thermoluminescent Dosimetry: The use of a device composed of thermoluminescent material for measuring exposure to IONIZING RADIATION. The thermoluminescent material emits light when heated. The amount of light emitted is proportional to the amount of ionizing radiation to which the material has been exposed.Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Radiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Diagnostic Imaging: Any visual display of structural or functional patterns of organs or tissues for diagnostic evaluation. It includes measuring physiologic and metabolic responses to physical and chemical stimuli, as well as ultramicroscopy.Anatomic Landmarks: Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.Solitary Pulmonary Nodule: A single lung lesion that is characterized by a small round mass of tissue, usually less than 1 cm in diameter, and can be detected by chest radiography. A solitary pulmonary nodule can be associated with neoplasm, tuberculosis, cyst, or other anomalies in the lung, the CHEST WALL, or the PLEURA.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Computer Storage Devices: Devices capable of receiving data, retaining data for an indefinite or finite period of time, and supplying data upon demand.Anthracosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by accumulation of inhaled CARBON or coal dust. The disease can progress from asymptomatic anthracosis to massive lung fibrosis. This lung lesion usually occurs in coal MINERS, but can be seen in urban dwellers and tobacco smokers.Patient Positioning: Moving a patient into a specific position or POSTURE to facilitate examination, surgery, or for therapeutic purposes.Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Subtraction Technique: Combination or superimposition of two images for demonstrating differences between them (e.g., radiograph with contrast vs. one without, radionuclide images using different radionuclides, radiograph vs. radionuclide image) and in the preparation of audiovisual materials (e.g., offsetting identical images, coloring of vessels in angiograms).Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Unnecessary Procedures: Diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative procedures prescribed and performed by health professionals, the results of which do not justify the benefits or hazards and costs to the patient.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Frontal Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the FRONTAL SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE or HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE.Ethmoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the ETHMOID SINUS. It may present itself as an acute (infectious) or chronic (allergic) condition.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Sphenoid Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the SPHENOID SINUS. Isolated sphenoid sinusitis is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with other paranasal sinusitis.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Urography: Radiography of any part of the urinary tract.Phantoms, Imaging: Devices or objects in various imaging techniques used to visualize or enhance visualization by simulating conditions encountered in the procedure. Phantoms are used very often in procedures employing or measuring x-irradiation or radioactive material to evaluate performance. Phantoms often have properties similar to human tissue. Water demonstrates absorbing properties similar to normal tissue, hence water-filled phantoms are used to map radiation levels. Phantoms are used also as teaching aids to simulate real conditions with x-ray or ultrasonic machines. (From Iturralde, Dictionary and Handbook of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Imaging, 1990)Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Body Burden: The total amount of a chemical, metal or radioactive substance present at any time after absorption in the body of man or animal.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Maxillary Sinusitis: Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in the MAXILLARY SINUS. In many cases, it is caused by an infection of the bacteria HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE; STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE; or STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Radionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.DislocationsBarium Sulfate: A compound used as an x-ray contrast medium that occurs in nature as the mineral barite. It is also used in various manufacturing applications and mixed into heavy concrete to serve as a radiation shield.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Multiple Pulmonary Nodules: A number of small lung lesions characterized by small round masses of 2- to 3-mm in diameter. They are usually detected by chest CT scans (COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY, X-RAY). Such nodules can be associated with metastases of malignancies inside or outside the lung, benign granulomas, or other lesions.Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the body.Spondylolysis: Deficient development or degeneration of a portion of the VERTEBRA, usually in the pars interarticularis (the bone bridge between the superior and inferior facet joints of the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE) leading to SPONDYLOLISTHESIS.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Finger Phalanges: Bones that make up the SKELETON of the FINGERS, consisting of two for the THUMB, and three for each of the other fingers.Tooth Apex: The tip or terminal end of the root of a tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p62)Computer Peripherals: Various units or machines that operate in combination or in conjunction with a computer but are not physically part of it. Peripheral devices typically display computer data, store data from the computer and return the data to the computer on demand, prepare data for human use, or acquire data from a source and convert it to a form usable by a computer. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)PrintingPleural DiseasesData Display: The visual display of data in a man-machine system. An example is when data is called from the computer and transmitted to a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY or LIQUID CRYSTAL display.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Toe Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each toe.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Osteitis: Inflammation of the bone.Tuberculosis, Pulmonary: MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the lung.Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Osteosclerosis: An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Local Area Networks: Communications networks connecting various hardware devices together within or between buildings by means of a continuous cable or voice data telephone system.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Multidetector Computed Tomography: Types of spiral computed tomography technology in which multiple slices of data are acquired simultaneously improving the resolution over single slice acquisition technology.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Vitaceae: A plant family of the order Rhamnales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida, best known for the VITIS genus, the source of grapes.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Periostitis: Inflammation of the periosteum. The condition is generally chronic, and is marked by tenderness and swelling of the bone and an aching pain. Acute periostitis is due to infection, is characterized by diffuse suppuration, severe pain, and constitutional symptoms, and usually results in necrosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Atlanto-Axial Joint: The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.Time and Motion Studies: The observation and analysis of movements in a task with an emphasis on the amount of time required to perform the task.Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Mouth, Edentulous: Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.Chest Tubes: Plastic tubes used for drainage of air or fluid from the pleural space. Their surgical insertion is called tube thoracostomy.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Spondylitis: Inflammation of the SPINE. This includes both arthritic and non-arthritic conditions.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Sesamoid Bones: Nodular bones which lie within a tendon and slide over another bony surface. The PATELLA (kneecap) is a sesamoid bone.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Spinal DiseasesBicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Pseudarthrosis: A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Jaw Cysts: Saccular lesions lined with epithelium and contained within pathologically formed cavities in the jaw; also nonepithelial cysts (pseudocysts) as they apply to the jaw, e.g., traumatic or solitary cyst, static bone cavity, and aneurysmal bone cyst. True jaw cysts are classified as odontogenic or nonodontogenic.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Hand Bones: The CARPAL BONES; METACARPAL BONES; and FINGER PHALANGES. In each hand there are eight carpal bones, five metacarpal bones, and 14 phalanges.Mandibular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.Mediastinal Diseases: Disorders of the mediastinum, general or unspecified.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Pleural Effusion: Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.OsteomyelitisRib FracturesSacroiliitis: Inflammation of the SACROILIAC JOINT. It is characterized by lower back pain, especially upon walking, fever, UVEITIS; PSORIASIS; and decreased range of motion. Many factors are associated with and cause sacroiliitis including infection; injury to spine, lower back, and pelvis; DEGENERATIVE ARTHRITIS; and pregnancy.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Bronchoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Bronchial DiseasesEfficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Fiducial Markers: Materials used as reference points for imaging studies.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Bronchography: Radiography of the bronchial tree after injection of a contrast medium.X-Rays: Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Tomography Scanners, X-Ray Computed: X-ray image-detecting devices that make a focused image of body structures lying in a predetermined plane from which more complex images are computed.Patient Care Planning: Usually a written medical and nursing care program designed for a particular patient.Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Filing: Collections of related records treated as a unit; ordering of such files.Subtalar Joint: Formed by the articulation of the talus with the calcaneus.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Euthanasia, Animal: The killing of animals for reasons of mercy, to control disease transmission or maintain the health of animal populations, or for experimental purposes (ANIMAL EXPERIMENTATION).Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Jaw Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE unspecified. For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Decalcification Technique: Removal of minerals from bones during bone examination.Joint DiseasesCraniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Urinary Calculi: Low-density crystals or stones in any part of the URINARY TRACT. Their chemical compositions often include CALCIUM OXALATE, magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite), CYSTINE, or URIC ACID.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Hemoptysis: Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.

*  Contrast transesophageal echocardiography in diagnosing congenital enlargement of the right atrium--a case report.

Radiography, Thoracic. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine ... Heart Atria / abnormalities*, radiography, ultrasonography*. Humans. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Middle Aged. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Contrast-transesophageal-echocardiography-in-diagnosing/14565640.html

*  Combined endovascular and vascular surgical therapy of a blister-like distal internal carotid aneurysm in a patient with a...

Aorta, Thoracic / abnormalities*, radiography. Carotid Artery Diseases / complications, radiography, surgery, therapy*. Carotid ... Intracranial Aneurysm / complications, radiography, surgery, therapy*. Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Male. Subarachnoid ... Artery, Internal / radiography, surgery*. Cerebral Angiography. Combined Modality Therapy. Embolization, Therapeutic*. ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Combined-Endovascular-Vascular-Surgical-Therapy/20979925.html

*  Factors favoring stent-graft collapse after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

Our objective was to assess potential causative factors of stent-graft collapse after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. ... Aorta, Thoracic / radiography, surgery*. Aortic Diseases / radiography, surgery*. Aortography / methods. Blood Vessel ... Title: The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Volume: 139 ISSN: 1097-685X ISO Abbreviation: J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. ... RESULTS: We report 4 cases of stent-graft collapse among 285 patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. All 4 ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Factors-favoring-stent-graft-collapse/19660344.html

*  Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid...

Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack ... Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in ... Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic / radiography, surgery*. Aortic Rupture / radiography, surgery*. Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation ... We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year- ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Endovascular-repair-ruptured-descending-thoracic/18346569.html

*  Diagnosis with ECG-gated MDCT of floating thrombus in aortic arch in a patient with type-A dissection.

The motion artifacts of the thoracic aorta and the supra-aortic vessels were significantly reduced in the electrocardiogram ( ... Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic / complications*. Artifacts. Brachiocephalic Trunk / radiography. Carotid Artery, Common / ... Subclavian Artery / radiography. Thrombosis / complications*, radiography*. Tomography, X-Ray Computed / methods*. Comments/ ... In the study of Ko and colleagues (2005) aortic motion artifacts were frequently seen on thoracic MDCT, with an overall ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Diagnosis-with-ECG-gated-MDCT/18827925.html

*  Hydrodynamic evaluation of axillary artery perfusion for normal and diseased aorta.

Aorta, Thoracic / physiology, physiopathology*, radiography. Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic / physiopathology*, radiography. ... Title: General thoracic and cardiovascular surgery Volume: 56 ISSN: 1863-6705 ISO Abbreviation: - Publication Date: 2008 May ... Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, 5 Zaifu-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036- ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Hydrodynamic-evaluation-axillary-artery-perfusion/18470685.html

*  PPT - Spine Radiography PowerPoint Presentation - ID:3733645

Spine Radiography. Learning Objectives. By the end of this Lecture the student will be able to:. List and identify the major ... List the common indications for the vertebral column Identify the common technical factors for the vertebral column radiography ... PAO (or APO) thoracic spine B *To show Zygoapophyseal joints of the thoracic spine. ... Projection Radiography -Chapter 5 (in more detail). projection radiography(conventional radiography)- most common used method ...
slideserve.com/jabir/spine-radiography

*  Thoracic Imaging: Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Radiology book by Charles B Higgins (Editor), W Richard Webb, M.D. (Editor) | 1...

Thoracic Imaging: Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Radiology has 1 available editions to buy at Alibris ... Thoracic Imaging: Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Radiology by Charles B Higgins (Editor), W Richard Webb, M.D. (Editor) starting ... Coverage of all current imaging modalities includes CT, high-resolution CT, MRI, plain field radiography, and MR angiography. ... Thoracic Imaging: Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Radiology. by Charles B Higgins (Editor), W Richard Webb, M.D. (Editor) Write ...
https://alibris.com/search/books/qwork/9033815/used/Thoracic Imaging: Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Radiology

*  Patent US7258968 - Thermally developable materials with buried conductive backside coatings - Google Patents

... general medical radiography, therapeutic radiography, veterinary radiography, and autoradiography. When used with X-radiation, ... Such applications include, but are not limited to, thoracic imaging, mammography, dental imaging, orthopedic imaging, ... The materials are also useful for non-medical uses of X-radiation such as X-ray lithography and industrial radiography. ... They can be used in microfilm applications, in radiographic imaging (for example digital medical imaging), X-ray radiography, ...
google.com/patents/US7258968?dq=5166694

*  Tension pneumothorax-time for a re-think? | Emergency Medicine Journal

CHEST RADIOGRAPHY IN TENSION PNEUMOTHORAX. Box 6⇓ lists the chest radiological findings of tension pneumothorax. It should be ... Daly RC, Mucha P, Pairolero PC, et al. The risk of percutaneous chest tube thoracostomy for blunt thoracic trauma. Ann Emerg ... Dunlop MG, Beattie TF, P. G. P. Clinical assessment and radiography following blunt chest trauma. Arch Emerg Med1989;6:125-7. ... Chest radiography has been used (apparently without adverse outcome) to confirm TPT diagnosis in stable patients with equivocal ...
emj.bmj.com/content/22/1/8

*  P209 The Burden of Hospital Acquired Pneumonia: A cohort study | Thorax

Results There were 790 people with a diagnosis of HAP during the study period. 396 (50.1%) were male and mean age at admission was 78.0 years (standard deviation [SD] 13.1). 56 (7.1%) people were admitted from a nursing home. 706 (89.4%) patients were admitted under medical specialities. 186 (23.5%) had a Charlson Index Score of 0, and 62 (7.9%) had dementia coded as a co-morbid illness. 48.9% of patients were reported to have consolidation on chest radiograph, whilst 19.9% were reported to have clear lungs. 598 (75.7%) patients had been admitted to hospital for at least 48 h prior to starting antibiotics for HAP, with a median stay of 5 days in hospital prior to starting antibiotics for HAP (Interquartile range [IQR]: 2 to 11). 240 (30.4%) patients died within 30 days of first being prescribed antibiotics for HAP. Features strongly associated with increased mortality at 30 days were older age, higher Charlson Index Score and high CRP (see Table 1). ...
thorax.bmj.com/content/70/Suppl_3/A181.2

*  6dpo AF/Ovulation pains? - BabyandBump

Has anyone else experienced this? From midday I've been feeling really nauseas and like I would have an upset tummy but didn't. I got a slight shadow on an IC which I've put down to an evap... and now
babyandbump.momtastic.com/two-week-wait/2441669-6dpo-af-ovulation-pains.html

Medical radiographyDBFS: Decibels relative to full scale, commonly abbreviated dBFS, measures decibel amplitude levels in digital systems such as pulse-code modulation (PCM) which have a defined maximum available peak level.Panoramic radiographUnsharpnessThumbprint sign: In radiology, the thumbprint sign, or thumbprinting, is a radiologic sign found on a lateral C-spine radiograph that suggests the diagnosis of epiglottitis. The sign is caused by a thickened free edge of the epiglottis, which causes it to appear more radiopaque than normal, resembling the distal thumb.Amorphous Selenium Flat Panel Detectors: Amorphous Selenium Flat Panel Detectors are direct conversion x-ray imagers, used in digital radiography for medical imaging applications. Direct conversion imagers utilize photoconductors, such as amorphous selenium (a-Se), to capture and convert incident x-ray photons directly into electric charge.Carestream Health: $2.4 Billion USD (2014)Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Ulnar clawDR Systems: DR Systems, Inc. is an independent provider of enterprise imaging and information management systems for hospitals, integrated healthcare networks and diagnostic imaging centers.ArthrogramAutomatic exposure control: Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) is an X-ray exposure termination device. A medical radiography x-ray exposure is always initiated by a human operator.Ultrasound transmission tomography: Ultrasound transmission tomography (UTT) is a form of tomography involving ultrasound.Radiation protection of patients: Patients are exposed to ionizing radiations when they undergo diagnostic examinations using x-rays or radiopharmaceuticals, therapy of cancer or benign lesions using radiations emitted by radioisotopes or those by radiation generators; and in interventional procedures using fluoroscopy. There has been a tremendous increase in the use of ionizing radiation in medicine during recent decades.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.PlanmecaApical delta: Apical delta refers to the branching pattern of small accessory canals and minor foramina seen at the tip or apex of some tooth roots.Rectal foreign bodyHeberden's nodeSprainGeneralizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Cardiovascular technologistNikon AF-S Zoom-Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8D ED-IFHyperintensityHerbert M. SheltonElias Rudolph Camerarius, Sr.: Elias Rudolph Camerarius, Sr. (1641–1695) was a professor of medicine who notably wrote books on the palpitations of the heart, pleurisy, skull fractures, and the use of medicinal plants.Peripheral nerve injury classification: Classification of peripheral nerve injury assists in prognosis and determination of treatment strategy. Classification of nerve injury was described by Seddon in 1943 and by Sunderland in 1951.Thomas KolbSolitary pulmonary noduleFull-body CT scan: A full-body scan is a scan of the patient's entire body as part of the diagnosis or treatment of illnesses. If computed tomography (CAT) scan technology is used, it is known as a full-body CT scan, though many medical imaging technologies can perform full-body scans.PneumoconiosisDag Vidar Kristoffersen: Dag Vidar Kristoffersen (born 1957 in Drammen) is a Norwegian football coach, best known for his time in Strømsgodset where he led the team to two silver medals in the Norwegian Football Cup and bronze medals in the Tippeligaen. Kristoffersen is a former football and bandy player, having represented Drafn in both sports.Knee pain: Knee pain is a common complaint for many people. There are several factors that can cause knee pain.Abdominal ultrasonographyCascade storage system: A cascade storage system is a high pressure gas cylinder system which is used for the refilling of smaller compressed gas cylinders or air cylinders. Each of the large cylinders is filled by a compressor, but the cascade system allows small cylinders to be filled without a compressor.Black Lung Benefits Act of 1973: The Black Lung Benefits Act (BLBA) is a U.S.AngiographyChalkstick fracture: Chalkstick fractures are fractures, typically of long bones, in which the fracture is transverse to the long axis of the bone, like a broken stick of chalk. A healthy long bone typically breaks like a hard woody stick as the collagen in the matrix adds remarkable flexibility to the mineral and the energy can run up and down the growth rings of bone.Bruce Goldsmith: Bruce Goldsmith is a British paraglider pilot and designer, and the 2007 Paragliding World Champion. He won the title at Manilla in Australia, flying an Airwave Magic FR3.Cervical fractureCaldwell's view: Caldwell's view (or Occipitofrontal view) is a radiographic view of skull, where X-ray plate is angled at 20° to orbitomeatal line. The rays pass from behind the head and are perpendicular to radiographic plate.Senior Emergency Department: The senior emergency department is a recent hospital innovation to build separate geriatric emergency rooms for older adults akin to pediatric emergency rooms designed for children. The trend comes in response to the nation's rapidly growing population of older adults and overcrowding of emergency departments.PneumothoraxGas pyelogram: A Gas pyelogram is a pyelogram in which the kidneys, renal pelvis and ureters are filled with gas, and have a radiolucent appearance. This gas is produced by some gas producing micro organisms which infect most upper parts of urinary system.Imaging phantom: Phantom}}Lung receptor: Lung receptors sense irritation or inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli.Image fusion: In computer vision, Multisensor Image fusion is the process of combining relevant information from two or more images into a single image.Haghighat, M.Ted Lapidus: Edmond "Ted" Lapidus (23 June 1929 – 29 December 2008) was a French fashion designer. He was born in Paris the son of a Russian-Jewish émigré tailor.Mandibular fractureCephalogram: A cephalogram is an X-ray of the craniofacial area. A cephalometric analysis could be used as means for measuring growth in children.Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema: Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (abbreviated RS3PE or sometimes RS3PE) is a rare syndrome identified by symmetric polyarthritis, synovitis, acute pitting edema (swelling) of the back of the hands and/or feet, and a negative serum rheumatoid factor. If no underlying disorder can be identified (idiopathic RS3PE), this entity has an excellent prognosis and responds well to treatment.Joint dislocationBarium sulfate suspension: Barium sulfate suspension is barium sulfate powder turned into a liquid form by suspending it in a quick-flowing drink to aid in CT scans of the gastrointestinal region.Auscultation: Auscultation (based on the Latin verb auscultare "to listen") is listening to the internal sounds of the body, usually using a stethoscope. Auscultation is performed for the purposes of examining the circulatory and respiratory systems (heart and breath sounds), as well as the gastrointestinal system (bowel sounds).Pars interarticularisChronic lung diseaseBlunt splenic trauma: Blunt splenic trauma occurs when a significant impact to the spleen from some outside source (i.e.Vinculum (ligament): In anatomy, a vinculum (pl. vincula) is a band of connective tissue, similar to a ligament, that connect a flexor tendon to a phalanx bone.Electronic apex locator: 200px|right|thumbKeyboard buffer: A keyboard buffer is a section of computer memory used to hold keystrokes before they are processed.Inkjet solar cell: Inkjet solar cells are solar cells manufactured by low-cost, low-tech methods that use an inkjet printer to lay down the semiconductor material and the electrodes onto a solar cell substrate.Asbestos-related diseases: Asbestos-related diseases are disorders of the lung and pleura caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibres. Asbestos-related diseases include non-malignant disorders such as asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis due to asbestos), diffuse pleural thickening, pleural plaques, pleural effusion, rounded atelectasis and malignancies such as lung cancer and malignant mesothelioma.Screen buffer: In computing, a screen buffer is a part of computer memory used by a computer application for the representation of the content to be shown on the computer display.Mucocele: A mucocele is any dilatation (typically pathologic) with accumulation of mucus. Examples include:ACR score for rheumatoid arthritis: ACR score is a scale to measure change in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. It is named after the American College of Rheumatology.

(1/1703) Computed radiography dual energy subtraction: performance evaluation when detecting low-contrast lung nodules in an anthropomorphic phantom.

A dedicated chest computed radiography (CR) system has an option of energy subtraction (ES) acquisition. Two imaging plates, rather than one, are separated by a copper filter to give a high-energy and low-energy image. This study compares the diagnostic accuracy of conventional computed radiography to that of ES obtained with two radiographic techniques. One soft tissue only image was obtained at the conventional CR technique (s = 254) and the second was obtained at twice the radiation exposure (s = 131) to reduce noise. An anthropomorphic phantom with superimposed low-contrast lung nodules was imaged 53 times for each radiographic technique. Fifteen images had no nodules; 38 images had a total of 90 nodules placed on the phantom. Three chest radiologists read the three sets of images in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study. Significant differences in Az were only found between (1) the higher exposure energy subtracted images and the conventional dose energy subtracted images (P = .095, 90% confidence), and (2) the conventional CR and the energy subtracted image obtained at the same technique (P = .024, 98% confidence). As a result of this study, energy subtracted images cannot be substituted for conventional CR images when detecting low-contrast nodules, even when twice the exposure is used to obtain them.  (+info)

(2/1703) Computerized analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital chest radiographs: evaluation of potential utility.

The purpose of this study was to develop and test a computerized method for the fully automated analysis of abnormal asymmetry in digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. An automated lung segmentation method was used to identify the aerated lung regions in 600 chest radiographs. Minimal a priori lung morphology information was required for this gray-level thresholding-based segmentation. Consequently, segmentation was applicable to grossly abnormal cases. The relative areas of segmented right and left lung regions in each image were compared with the corresponding area distributions of normal images to determine the presence of abnormal asymmetry. Computerized diagnoses were compared with image ratings assigned by a radiologist. The ability of the automated method to distinguish normal from asymmetrically abnormal cases was evaluated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, which yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.84. This automated method demonstrated promising performance in its ability to detect abnormal asymmetry in PA chest images. We believe this method could play a role in a picture archiving and communications (PACS) environment to immediately identify abnormal cases and to function as one component of a multifaceted computer-aided diagnostic scheme.  (+info)

(3/1703) A reliability study for evaluating information extraction from radiology reports.

GOAL: To assess the reliability of a reference standard for an information extraction task. SETTING: Twenty-four physician raters from two sites and two specialties judged whether clinical conditions were present based on reading chest radiograph reports. METHODS: Variance components, generalizability (reliability) coefficients, and the number of expert raters needed to generate a reliable reference standard were estimated. RESULTS: Per-rater reliability averaged across conditions was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.79-0.81). Reliability for the nine individual conditions varied from 0.67 to 0.97, with central line presence and pneumothorax the most reliable, and pleural effusion (excluding CHF) and pneumonia the least reliable. One to two raters were needed to achieve a reliability of 0.70, and six raters, on average, were required to achieve a reliability of 0.95. This was far more reliable than a previously published per-rater reliability of 0.19 for a more complex task. Differences between sites were attributable to changes to the condition definitions. CONCLUSION: In these evaluations, physician raters were able to judge very reliably the presence of clinical conditions based on text reports. Once the reliability of a specific rater is confirmed, it would be possible for that rater to create a reference standard reliable enough to assess aggregate measures on a system. Six raters would be needed to create a reference standard sufficient to assess a system on a case-by-case basis. These results should help evaluators design future information extraction studies for natural language processors and other knowledge-based systems.  (+info)

(4/1703) An approach to the problems of diagnosing and treating adult smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in high-HIV-prevalence settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

The overlap between the populations in sub-Saharan Africa infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to an upsurge in tuberculosis cases over the last 10 years. The relative increase in the proportion of notified sputum-smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases is greater than that of sputum-smear-positive PTB cases. This is a consequence of the following: the association between decreased host immunity and reduced sputum smear positivity; the difficulty in excluding other HIV-related diseases when making the diagnosis of smear-negative PTB; and an increase in false-negative sputum smears because of overstretched resources. This article examines problems in the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB in high-HIV-prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The main issues in diagnosis include: the criteria used to diagnose smear-negative PTB; the degree to which clinicians actually follow these criteria in practice; and the problem of how to exclude other respiratory diseases that can resemble, and be misdiagnosed as, smear-negative PTB. The most important aspect of the treatment of smear-negative PTB patients is abandoning 12-month "standard" treatment regimens in favour of short-course chemotherapy. Operational research is necessary to determine the most cost-effective approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB. Nevertheless, substantial improvement could be obtained by implementing the effective measures already available, such as improved adherence to diagnostic and treatment guidelines.  (+info)

(5/1703) Clinical manifestation and survival of patients with idiopathic bilateral atrial dilatation.

We studied the histories of eight patients who lacked clear evidence of cardiac abnormalities other than marked bilateral atrial dilatation and atrial fibrillation, which have rarely been discussed in the literature. From the time of their first visit to our hospital, the patients' chest radiographs and electrocardiograms showed markedly enlarged cardiac silhouettes and atrial fibrillation, respectively. Each patient's echocardiogram showed a marked bilateral atrial dilatation with almost normal wall motion of both ventricles. In one patient, inflammatory change was demonstrated by cardiac catheterization and endomyocardial biopsy from the right ventricle. Seven of our eight cases were elderly women. Over a long period after the diagnosis of cardiomegaly or arrhythmia, diuretics or digitalis offered good results in the treatment of edema and congestion in these patients. In view of the clinical courses included in the present study, we conclude that this disorder has a good prognosis.  (+info)

(6/1703) Concurrent infection with Legionella pneumophila and Pneumocystis carinii in a patient with adult T cell leukemia.

A 48-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with high fever, chills, cough, and exertional dyspnea. On admission, the chest roentgenogram and computed tomography scan showed bilateral alveolar infiltration in the middle and lower lung fields. Microscopic examination of the bronchial lavage fluid showed flower cells typical for adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and cysts of Pneumocystis carinii, and Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 grew on buffered charcoal yeast extract (BCYE)-alpha agar. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, and sparfloxacin. Remission of ATL was achieved after three courses of antileukemic chemotherapy. Mixed infection of opportunistic pathogens should be considered in patients with ATL.  (+info)

(7/1703) A resuscitated case from asphyxia by large bronchial cast.

A 62-year-old woman with bronchiectasis suffered from asphyxia due to a large bronchial cast that obstructed the bronchial tree. Immediate bronchoscopic suction of a bronchial cast of 17 cm in length through the intubated tube relieved the patients without any complications. Large bronchial casts appear to be rare in this century but it should be considered in patients with acute exacerbation of excessive sputa not only in patients with asthma or allergy but also in patients with respiratory tract infection.  (+info)

(8/1703) Clinical studies of styrene workers: initial findings.

Styrene monomer is a high volume chemical used chiefly in production of polystyrene. A clinical survey of 493 production workers was undertaken at the oldest and largest monomer production, polymerization, and extrusion facility in the U.S. Relative exposure durations and levels were obtained from occupational histories. Significant differences between the high and low exposure groups were found with regard to history of acute prenarcotic symptoms, acute lower respiratory symptoms, prevalence of FEV 1/FV less than 75 per cent, and elevated GCTP. Other liver function tests, chest x-ray, FVC less than 80 per cent, and hematological parameters showed no distinct pattern. A concomitant mortality study has been mounted and is in progress.  (+info)



Aorta


  • Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The motion artifacts of the thoracic aorta and the supra-aortic vessels were significantly reduced in the electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data acquisition. (biomedsearch.com)

chest


  • Patients who have undergone laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding should have chest radiography or thoracic CT scan, or both, if they present with respiratory symptoms," the team wrote in the news release. (newsinferno.com)
  • Chest radiography confirmed the clinical diagnosis of marked subcutaneous emphysema and showed huge pneumomediastinum and minor right pneumothorax. (ac.be)
  • CONCLUSION: Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. (ivteam.com)

aortic


  • Factors favoring stent-graft collapse after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. (biomedsearch.com)
  • OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess potential causative factors of stent-graft collapse after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RESULTS: We report 4 cases of stent-graft collapse among 285 patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology. (biomedsearch.com)

stent-graft


  • METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed clinical data and preoperative and postoperative computed tomographic scans of patients with thoracic stent-graft collapse in 2 French departments of vascular surgery. (biomedsearch.com)

scan


  • A thoracic CT scan revealed a large laceration of the posterior tracheal wall (a 4 cm longitudinal tear), extending from the middle of the trachea to the level of the carina. (ac.be)

Imaging


  • Written by two of the world s most respected specialists in thoracic imaging, this volume is the most comprehensive text-reference on imaging of the heart and lungs. (alibris.com)
  • Strategy to further determine these questions include contrast radiography and advanced imaging (CT) is coordinated through the Veterinary Advisor (see Special Tissue Request). (coraciiformestag.com)

surgery


studies


  • Motion artifacts caused by transmitted cardiac pulsation can frequently degrade thoracic CT studies. (biomedsearch.com)

position


  • RESULTS: Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16%) had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or the junction between the inferior vena cava and the right atrium. (ivteam.com)