Public Health Surveillance: The ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data with the purpose of preventing or controlling disease or injury, or of identifying unusual events of public health importance, followed by the dissemination and use of information for public health action. (From Am J Prev Med 2011;41(6):636)Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Laboratory Personnel: Professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.Communicable DiseasesPublic Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Health Systems Plans: Statements of goals for the delivery of health services pertaining to the Health Systems Agency service area, established under PL 93-641, and consistent with national guidelines for health planning.United StatesGovernment Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Computer Systems: Systems composed of a computer or computers, peripheral equipment, such as disks, printers, and terminals, and telecommunications capabilities.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Animal Technicians: Assistants to a veterinarian, biological or biomedical researcher, or other scientist who are engaged in the care and management of animals, and who are trained in basic principles of animal life processes and routine laboratory and animal health care procedures. (Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Military Medicine: The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Flour: Ground up seed of WHEAT.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Great BritainPolitics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.United States Public Health Service: A constituent organization of the DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES concerned with protecting and improving the health of the nation.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Medical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.United States Department of Defense: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government whose mission is to provide the military forces needed to deter WARFARE and to protect the security of our country.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Child Guidance: The psychiatric, sociological and psychological study and treatment of the developing child with emphasis on preventive or prophylactic measures focused on the familial, educational and socio-environmental milieu of the child.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Geographic Information Systems: Computer systems capable of assembling, storing, manipulating, and displaying geographically referenced information, i.e. data identified according to their locations.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.BrazilQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.EnglandOral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Djibouti: A republic in eastern Africa, on the Gulf of Aden at the entrance to the Red Sea. Djibouti is also the name of its capital.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Animals, LaboratoryHealth Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.): An institute of the CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION which is responsible for assuring safe and healthful working conditions and for developing standards of safety and health. Research activities are carried out pertinent to these goals.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Military Personnel: Persons including soldiers involved with the armed forces.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.MassachusettsHealth Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Physician Executives: Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.EuropeOutcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Role: The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Immunologic Surveillance: The theory that T-cells monitor cell surfaces and detect structural changes in the plasma membrane and/or surface antigens of virally or neoplastically transformed cells.Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Respiratory Hypersensitivity: A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Public Health Dentistry: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance of oral health through promoting organized dental health programs at a community, state, or federal level.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).IndiaSocial Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.

*  Public Health Surveillance

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https://cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00047449.htm

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https://surv.esr.cri.nz/index.php?we_objectID=4597

*  Welcome to CDC stacks | Update from CDC's Public Health Surveillance & Informatics Program Office (PHSIPO) - 19135 | CDC Public...

The practice of public health surveillance is evolving as electronic health records (EHRs) and automated laboratory information ... Welcome to the Public Health Workforce Summit, Modernizing the Workforce for the Public's Health: Shifting the Balance. We are ... Modernizing the workforce for the public's health : shifting the balance : the Public Health Workforce Summit, December 13-14, ... Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services. Public Health Surveillance and Informatics Program Office. ...
https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/19135

*  Public health surveillance experts to tackle health equity challenges | Latest Health Technology , Healthcare News

"Public health surveillance is a core function of public health systems and countries need to invest in health surveillance and ... The book offers an overview of novel approaches to public health surveillance to propel public health practice to 21st century ... Related Items:'Transforming Public Health Surveillance', Dr. Vivek Singh, International Society for Disease Surveillance, ... Over 350 public health surveillance professionals from six continents converged in Denver, for the 14th Annual Meeting of the ...
healthtechnology.in/2015/12/14/public-health-surveillance-experts-to-tackle-health-equity-challenges/

*  Wiley: Disease Surveillance: A Public Health Informatics Approach - Joseph S. Lombardo, David L. Buckeridge

... essential reading for those learning about public health disease surveillance and for statisticians working with public health ... essential reading for those learning about public health disease surveillance and for statisticians working with public health ... and Occupational Health at McGill University. His research interests include public health informatics and surveillance systems ... Disease Surveillance: A Public Health Informatics Approach. Joseph S. Lombardo, David L. Buckeridge ...
wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470068124.html

*  Public Health Surveillance for Communicable Diseases: From Rigid and Static to Flexible and Innovative. - LSHTM Research...

Public Health Surveillance for Communicable Diseases: From Rigid and Static to Flexible and Innovative. ... Heymann, DL; (2017) Public Health Surveillance for Communicable Diseases: From Rigid and Static to Flexible and Innovative. ... American journal of public health, 107 (6). pp. 845-846. ISSN 0090-0036 DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2017.303795 ...
researchonline.lshtm.ac.uk/4259028/

*  Europa - Public Health - Threats to health - Communicable diseases - Surveillance - Emerging issues - Projects

Projects funded by the Commission in the domain of influenza under public health programme 2003-2008 Project title and short ... Projects funded under 5th and 6th Research Framework Programmes, and 2003-2008 Public health Programme Influenza Research - EU ... Projects funded by the Commission in the domain of influenza under public health programme 2003-2008 ... FLU SECURE - Public-private partnership on European pandemic influenza vaccines. http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_projects/2005/ ...
ec.europa.eu/health/ph_threats/com/Influenza/projects_influenza_en.print.htm

*  HIV Surveillance and Name Reporting: A Public Health Case for Protecting Civil Liberties | American Civil Liberties Union

Minority communities are often distrustful of public health authorities and coercive public health programs. 27 Existing ... HIV SURVEILLANCE AND NAME REPORTING:. A Public Health Case for Protecting Civil Liberties. An American Civil Liberties Union ... Surveillance of AIDS cases, including reporting the names of persons diagnosed with AIDS to public health authorities, began ... HIV SURVEILLANCE AND NAME REPORTING:. A Public Health Case for Protecting Civil Liberties. ...
https://aclu.org/other/hiv-surveillance-and-name-reporting-public-health-case-protecting-civil-liberties?quicktabs_content_video_podcasts=0&redirect=technology-and-liberty/hiv-surveillance-and-name-reporting-public-health-case-protecting-civil-liber

*  Organizations: : P: Pregnancy - healthfinder.gov

Program activities include supporting states' implementation of public health programs; public health surveillance; translation ... Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The Office on Women's Health (OWH), part of the U.S. ... Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration The Maternal and Child health Bureau (MCHB) of ... and infant health and quality of life by influencing public policy, health care practice, community practices, and individual ...
https://healthfinder.gov/FindServices/SearchContext.aspx?topic=688&Branch=6&show=1

*  Malaria Diagnostics and Surveillance in the Post-Genomic Era - FullText - Public Health Genomics 2013, Vol. 16, No. 1-2 -...

Malaria continues to be a major global public health challenge. There were approximately 225 million cases of malaria in 2009 ... Such tools will be highly relevant for malaria control programs and efficient public health response. ... The scope of the current review is to highlight how genomics is contributing to the immediate public health needs of malaria ... or species-specific diagnostic methods for other pathogens of public health interest is strong. This undertaking together with ...
https://karger.com/Article/FullText/345607

*  Future Internet | Special Issue : Social Web Mining

public health surveillance. Published Papers This special issue is now open for submission. ... It can tell us about the general public mood (and changes in it over time, and where 'the wisdom of the (online) crowds' is ... Interests: medical and health informatics; including telehealthcare/eHealth; geographic informatics; 3D virtual worlds and ... The Alexander Graham Bell Centre for Digital Health, Elgin, Moray, IV30 1JJ, Scotland, UK. Website , E-Mail Phone: 01343 576830 ...
mdpi.com/journal/futureinternet/special_issues/social_web

*  WHO | Estimated global incidence of Japanese encephalitis: a systematic review

Vaccine trial; enhanced (active) local public health surveillance. 11. 100. 1985-1986 (2 years). Kampangphet province. 1-14 ... all health care facilities in the province providing care for the study population were included in active surveillance system. ... all health care facilities in the province providing care for the study population were included in active surveillance system. ... Multiple hospital-based surveillance. 225. (100). 2006 (1 year). Terai & Inner Terai districts (n = 24). All. 12.46 milliong. ...
who.int/bulletin/volumes/89/10/BLT-10-085233-table-T2.html

*  PR and Public Health

... conducting public health surveillance, investigations, or interventions; reporting child abuse and neglect; and monitoring ... Public health authorities as covered health-care providers. A public health authority that conducts health care as part of its ... Public health authorities as health-care clearinghouses. Although unlikely, a public health authority might be a health-care ... Public health authorities include federal public health agencies (e.g., CDC, National Institutes of Health [NIH], Health ...
https://cdc.gov/privacyrule/Guidance/PRPH.htm

*  Hemochromatosis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology

Public health surveillance for hereditary hemochromatosis. Ann Intern Med. 1998 Dec 1. 129(11):980-6. [Medline]. ... Iron overload, public health, and genetics: evaluating the evidence for hemochromatosis screening. Ann Intern Med. 1998 Dec 1. ... 2001 http://www.medscape.com/pages/editorial/resourcecenters/public/malaria/rc-malaria.ov Resource Center ... 2001 http://www.medscape.com/pages/editorial/resourcecenters/public/addiction/rc-addiction.ov Resource Center ...
https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/177216-overview

*  Study Search Results

United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public Health Surveillance ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), 2003 (ICPSR 34085) United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Center for Health Statistics 3 more results in Multiple Cause ... Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Survey, 2009 (ICPSR 34300) ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies?q=firearms&prefix=G&dataFormat[0]=SPSS&permit[0]=AVAILABLE&geography[0]=Illinois&paging.startRow=1

*  A TIME'S MEMORY: Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N8, #Germany [thirty-one #poultry and #wildbirds #outbreaks] (#OIE, Feb...

PUBLIC HEALTH (12) * PUEBLA (5) * PUERTO MONTT (4) * PUERTO RICO (33) * PULEX IRRITANS (1) ... EPIDEMICS SURVEILLANCE ASEAN (21) * epidemics surveillance hk (83) * EPIDEMICS SURVEILLANCE NEWSWIRES (4) ... Karin Schwabenbauer, Ministerial Dirigentin and Chief Veterinary Officer , Directorate of Animal Health, Animal Welfare, ...
https://hygimia69.blogspot.com/2017/02/highly-pathogenic-avian-influenza-h5n8_20.html

Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Essence (Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics): Essence is the United States Department of Defense's Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Community-based Epidemics. Essence's goal is to monitor health data as it becomes available and discover epidemics and similar health concerns before they move out of control.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Wedding anniversary: A wedding anniversary is the anniversary of the date a wedding took place. Traditional names exist for some of them: for instance, 50 years of marriage is called a "golden wedding anniversary" or simply a "golden anniversary" or "golden.Notifiable disease: A notifiable disease is any disease that is required by law to be reported to government authorities. The collation of information allows the authorities to monitor the disease, and provides early warning of possible outbreaks.Plasmatronics: Plasmatronics is a company, founded by former Air Force Weapons Laboratory (now Phillips Laboratory) scientist Dr. Alan E.Quantico (novel): Quantico is a 2005 science fiction/thriller novel by Greg Bear. The novel concerns a group of FBI agents trying to prevent a massive bioterrorist attack.Global Infectious Disease Epidemiology Network: Global Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Network (GIDEON) is a web-based program for decision support and informatics in the fields of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine. As of 2005, more than 300 generic infectious diseases occur haphazardly in time and space and are challenged by over 250 drugs and vaccines.National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==U.S.-Mexico Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project: The U.S.Human mortality from H5N1: Human mortality from H5N1 or the human fatality ratio from H5N1 or the case-fatality rate of H5N1 refer to the ratio of the number of confirmed human deaths resulting from confirmed cases of transmission and infection of H5N1 to the number of those confirmed cases. For example, if there are 100 confirmed cases of humans infected with H5N1 and 10 die, then there is a 10% human fatality ratio (or mortality rate).The Complete Stevie Wonder: The Complete Stevie Wonder is a digital compilation featuring the work of Stevie Wonder. Released a week before the physical release of A Time to Love, the set comprises almost all of Wonder's officially released material, including single mixes, extended versions, remixes, and Workout Stevie Workout, a 1963 album which was shelved and replaced by With A Song In My Heart.Ford SHO V6 engine: The Ford SHO V6 is a family of DOHC V6 engines fitted to the Ford Taurus SHO from 1989 to 1995. The designation SHO denotes Super High Output.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Companies OfficeState health agency: A state health agency (SHA), or state department of health, is a department or agency of the state governments of the United States focused on public health. The state secretary of health is a constitutional or at times a statutory official in several states of the United States.Geographical cluster: A geographical cluster is a localised anomaly, usually an excess of something given the distribution or variation of something else. Often it is considered as an incidence rate that is unusual in that there is more of some variable than might be expected.Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory: right|300px|thumb|Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory logo.Strategic National Stockpile: The Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) is the United States' national repository of antibiotics, vaccines, chemical antidotes, antitoxins, and other critical medical equipment and supplies. In the event of a national emergency involving bioterrorism or a natural pandemic, the SNS has the capability to supplement and re-supply local health authorities that may be overwhelmed by the crisis, with response time as little as 12 hours.European Immunization Week: European Immunization Week (EIW) is an annual regional initiative, coordinated by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe (WHO/Europe), to promote immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases. EIW activities are carried out by participating WHO/Europe member states.Vital statistics (government records): Vital statistics are statistics on live births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces. The most common way of collecting information on these events is through civil registration, an administrative system used by governments to record vital events which occur in their populations (see Box 1).Medix UK Limited: Medix UK Limited is a UK-based market research consultancy providing online research in healthcare.Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.Basic Occupational Health Services: The Basic Occupational Health Services are an application of the primary health care principles in the sector of occupational health. Primary health care definition can be found in the World Health Organization Alma Ata declaration from the year 1978 as the “essential health care based on practical scientifically sound and socially accepted methods, (…) it is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work (…)”.Health policy: Health policy can be defined as the "decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society."World Health Organization.Global Health Delivery ProjectLifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Influenza A virus subtype H1N1: Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu.WHO collaborating centres in occupational health: The WHO collaborating centres in occupational health constitute a network of institutions put in place by the World Health Organization to extend availability of occupational health coverage in both developed and undeveloped countries.Network of WHO Collaborating Centres in occupational health.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Internet organizations: This is a list of Internet organizations, or organizations that play or played a key role in the evolution of the Internet by developing recommendations, standards, and technology; deploying infrastructure and services; and addressing other major issues.Laboratory animal allergy: Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) is an occupational disease of laboratory animal technicians and scientists. It manifests as an allergic response to animal urine, specifically the major urinary proteins (Mups) of rodents, and can lead to the development of asthma.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health: The Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health is one of the eight colleges of Georgia Southern University, located in Statesboro, Georgia, in the United States.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Occupational hygiene: Occupational (or "industrial" in the U.S.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)United States Army Medical Research Unit-Brazil: The United States Army Medical Research Unit-Brazil (USAMRU-B) was a "Special Foreign Activity" of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research headquartered in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil with several satellite labs in the Brazilian hinterland.National Research Council (2000), Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed U.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Clonal Selection Algorithm: In artificial immune systems, Clonal selection algorithms are a class of algorithms inspired by the clonal selection theory of acquired immunity that explains how B and T lymphocytes improve their response to antigens over time called affinity maturation. These algorithms focus on the Darwinian attributes of the theory where selection is inspired by the affinity of antigen-antibody interactions, reproduction is inspired by cell division, and variation is inspired by somatic hypermutation.Unifine mill: A Unifine mill is a single one-pass impact milling system which produces ultrafine-milled whole-grain wheat flour that requires no grain pre-treatment and no screening of the flour. Like the grist or stone mills that had dominated the flour industry for centuries, the bran, germ, and endosperm elements of grain are processed into a nutritious whole wheat flour in one step.Behavior: Behavior or behaviour (see spelling differences) is the range of actions and [made by individuals, organism]s, [[systems, or artificial entities in conjunction with themselves or their environment, which includes the other systems or organisms around as well as the (inanimate) physical environment. It is the response of the system or organism to various stimuli or inputs, whether [or external], [[conscious or subconscious, overt or covert, and voluntary or involuntary.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Opinion polling in the Philippine presidential election, 2010: Opinion polling (popularly known as surveys in the Philippines) for the 2010 Philippine presidential election is managed by two major polling firms: Social Weather Stations and Pulse Asia, and several minor polling firms. The polling firms conducted surveys both prior and after the deadline for filing of certificates of candidacies on December 1, 2009.Halfdan T. MahlerUnited States Public Health ServiceSchool health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.Chronic care: Chronic care refers to medical care which addresses pre-existing or long term illness, as opposed to acute care which is concerned with short term or severe illness of brief duration. Chronic medical conditions include asthma, diabetes, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, congestive heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, hypertension and depression.Albert Baldwin Dod: Albert Baldwin Dod (March 24, 1805 – November 20, 1845) was an American Presbyterian theologian and professor of mathematics. He was born in Mendham, New Jersey to Daniel and Nancy (née Squire) Dod.International Network of Prison Ministries: The International Network of Prison Ministries (INPM) is a Dallas, Texas based crime prevention and rehabilitation trans-national organization. INPM functions through a website that serves as a clearinghouse for information about various Christian prison ministries.Contraceptive mandate (United States): A contraceptive mandate is a state or federal regulation or law that requires health insurers, or employers that provide their employees with health insurance, to cover some contraceptive costs in their health insurance plans. In 1978, the U.ESCAIDEList of geographic information systems software: GIS software encompasses a broad range of applications which involve the use of a combination of digital maps and georeferenced data. GIS software can be sorted into different categories.Aging (scheduling): In Operating systems, Aging is a scheduling technique used to avoid starvation. Fixed priority scheduling is a scheduling discipline, in which tasks queued for utilizing a system resource are assigned a priority each.University of CampinasClosed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Red Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Energy in Djibouti: Djibouti had no proven reserves of oil or natural gas, or refining capacity, as of 1 January 2003. In addition, Djibouti has no known reserves of coal.Circulation plan: A circulation plan is a schematic empirical projection/model of how pedestrians and/or vehicles flow through a given area, like, for example, a neighborhood or a Central Business District (CBD). Circulation plans are used by city planners and other officials to manage and monitor traffic and pedestrian patterns in such a way that they might discover how to make future improvements to the system.Radiation dose reconstruction: Radiation dose reconstruction refers to the process of estimating radiation doses that were received by individuals or populations in the past as a result of particular exposure situations of concern.A Review of the Dose Reconstruction Program of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

(1/165) Assessing North American influenza dynamics with a statistical SIRS model.

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(2/165) Biomass fuel use for cooking in Sri Lanka: analysis of data from national demographic health surveys.

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(3/165) Everybody's business: economic surveillance of public health services in Alberta, Canada.

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(4/165) Simulation Analysis Platform (SnAP): a tool for evaluation of public health surveillance and disease control strategies.

Increasingly, researchers use simulation to generate realistic population health data to evaluate surveillance and disease control methods. This evaluation approach is attractive because real data are often not available to describe the full range of population health trajectories that may occur. Simulation models, especially agent-based models, tend to have many parameters and it is often difficult for researchers to evaluate the effect of the multiple parameter values on model outcomes. In this paper, we describe Simulation Analysis Platform (SnAP) - a software infrastructure for automatically deploying and analyzing multiple runs of a simulation model in a manner that efficiently explores the influence of parameter uncertainty and random error on model outcomes. SnAP is designed to be efficient, scalable, extensible, and portable. We describe the design decisions taken to meet these requirements, present the design of the platform, and describe results from an example application of SnAP.  (+info)

(5/165) Evaluation of HL7 v2.5.1 electronic case reports transmitted from a healthcare enterprise to public health.

Public health surveillance is necessary to prevent and control communicable and non-communicable diseases. An electronic reporting system using HL7 v2.5.1 was implemented between Intermountain Healthcare and the Utah Department of Health. We conducted prospective and retrospective studies to evaluate the timeliness, completeness of content information, and completeness of the electronic reporting process, and compared these metrics against other reporting entities. The electronic reporting system was more timely than other clinical reporting facilities and included more complete information in initial case reports. During a four month period, the electronic reporting system captured 8% of the cases not reported by the paper-based reporting system but missed 5% of the cases reported by the paper-based reporting system. We believe it would be more efficient for Infection Preventionists at hospitals to use their resources to detect cases not captured by the electronic reporting system instead of manually re-reporting cases already transmitted to public health electronically.  (+info)

(6/165) The EpiCanvas infectious disease weather map: an interactive visual exploration of temporal and spatial correlations.

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(7/165) Detection of imported wild polioviruses and of vaccine-derived polioviruses by environmental surveillance in Egypt.

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(8/165) The spread of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in Madagascar described by a sentinel surveillance network.

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Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System


  • CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) have established a policy that requires state health departments to report cases of selected diseases ( Table_1 ) to CDC's National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) (1,2). (cdc.gov)
  • To provide updates on current activities and future directions for the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), BioSense 2.0, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and on the role of PHSIPO as the "home" at CDC for addressing cross-cutting issues in surveillance and informatics practice. (cdc.gov)

21st


  • The book offers an overview of novel approaches to public health surveillance to propel public health practice to 21st century solutions in order to tackle constantly emerging and re-emerging health threats. (healthtechnology.in)

Practice


  • In the third edition of Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance, the editors present an organized approach to planning, developing, and implementing public health surveillance systems in response to the rapidly changing field of public health. (oup.com)
  • The surveillance for community-based influenza-like illness (ILI) and hospital-based severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) provides evidence to inform public health and clinical practice to reduce the impact of influenza virus infection and other important respiratory pathogens. (cri.nz)
  • The practice of public health surveillance is evolving as electronic health records (EHRs) and automated laboratory information systems are increasing adopted, as new approaches for health information exchange are employed, and as new health information standards affect the entire cascade of surveillance information flow. (cdc.gov)
  • The Division's mission is to promote optimal reproductive, maternal, and infant health and quality of life by influencing public policy, health care practice, community practices, and individual behaviors through scientific and programmatic expertise, leadership, and support. (healthfinder.gov)

Informatics


  • Substantially revised and expanded on, this edition continues to examine further the expansion of surveillance of disease and health determinants, as well as the recent advances in data management and informatics. (oup.com)
  • Responding to these issues, Disease Surveillance brings together fifteen eminent researchers in the fields of medicine, epidemiology, biostatistics, and medical informatics to define the necessary elements of an effective disease surveillance program, including research, development, implementation, and operations. (wiley.com)
  • Part One sets forth the informatics knowledge needed to implement a disease surveillance system, including a discussion of data sources currently used in syndromic surveillance systems. (wiley.com)
  • Part Three addresses practical issues concerning the evaluation of disease surveillance systems and the education of future informatics and disease surveillance practitioners. (wiley.com)
  • He is the Director of the JHU/APL Center of Excellence in Public Health Informatics. (wiley.com)
  • His research interests include public health informatics and surveillance systems, outbreak simulation, and the influence of surveillance information on decision-making in public health. (wiley.com)

Salmonella


  • In April 2015, Public Health England implemented whole genome sequencing (WGS) as a routine typing tool for public health surveillance of Salmonella , adopting a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approach as a replacement for traditional serotyping. (peerj.com)
  • Approximately 8,000 isolates are referred to the Salmonella Reference Service (SRS) at Public Health England (PHE) each year from local and regional hospital laboratories. (peerj.com)
  • In April 2015, PHE implemented whole genome sequencing (WGS) as the routine typing tool for public health surveillance of Salmonella infections. (peerj.com)

communicable


  • Public Health Surveillance for Communicable Diseases: From Rigid and Static to Flexible and Innovative. (lshtm.ac.uk)

Infectious Diseases


  • This report provides updated uniform criteria * for state health department personnel to use when reporting the nationally notifiable infectious diseases listed in Part 1 of this report. (cdc.gov)
  • With the worldwide awareness of bioterrorism and drug-resistant infectious diseases, the need for surveillance systems to accurately detect emerging epidemicsis essential for maintaining global safety. (wiley.com)

practitioners


  • Without explicit criteria for identifying cases for public health surveillance purposes, state health departments and individual practitioners often applied different criteria for reporting similar cases (3). (cdc.gov)
  • It will continue to serve as the standard text in the field, an invaluable resource for public health students and the desk reference for public health practitioners. (oup.com)

Disease Surveillance


  • Over 350 public health surveillance professionals from six continents converged in Denver, for the 14th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Disease Surveillance (ISDS). (healthtechnology.in)
  • Part Two provides case studies of modern disease surveillance systems, including cases that highlight implementation and operational difficulties as well as the successes experienced by health departments in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia. (wiley.com)
  • It also assesses how future technology will shape the field of disease surveillance. (wiley.com)
  • This book's multidisciplinary approach is ideal for public health professionals who need to understand all the facets within a disease surveillance program and implement the technology needed to support surveillance activities. (wiley.com)
  • 1. Disease Surveillance (J. Lombardo & D. Ross). (wiley.com)
  • 6. Modern Disease Surveillance (S. Lewis, et al. (wiley.com)
  • The book is especially valuable for anyone interested in automated disease surveillance because of its broad scope addressing all issues related to developing and operating automated disease surveillance systems. (wiley.com)
  • This book is essential reading for those learning about public health disease surveillance and for statisticians working with public health professional to improve the sensitivity, specificity, timeliness and cost-effectiveness of current surveillance systems. (wiley.com)

Population Health


  • These trends have been accelerated by the Federal program to promote the Meaningful Use of electronic health records, which includes explicit population health objectives. (cdc.gov)

pathogens


  • The promise of using genome sequence data to develop sensitive, genus- or species-specific diagnostic methods for other pathogens of public health interest is strong. (karger.com)

Laboratory


  • The CDC/CSTE surveillance case definitions included in this report differ in their use of clinical, laboratory, and epidemiologic criteria to define cases. (cdc.gov)
  • The Health Amendment Act 2006 provides for direct laboratory notifications and improves New Zealand's ability to respond to an outbreak of highly infectious disease. (cri.nz)

Centers


  • Drawing largely from the experience of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other experts in the field, this book provides an excellent framework that collectively improves the surveillance foundation of public health. (oup.com)
  • Other vital missions include Universal Newborn Hearing Screening, Traumatic Brain Injury, Healthy Start, Sickle Cell Service Demonstrations, Family to Family Health Information Centers, Emergency Medical Services for Children, and autism. (healthfinder.gov)

threats


  • Representatives from over 25 countries were in Denver, including eight surveillance professionals from low-resource nations who were awarded travel grants from the Skoll Global Threats Fund. (healthtechnology.in)
  • The surveillance systems and techniques presented in the text are designed to best utilize modern technology, manage emerging public health threats, and adapt to environmental changes. (wiley.com)

MMWR


  • In October 1990, in collaboration with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, CDC published Case Definitions for Public Health Surveillance (MMWR 1990;39{No. RR-13}), which, for the first time, provided uniform criteria for reporting cases. (cdc.gov)

approach


  • Based largely on the experiences of the CDC, this text presents an organized approach to planning, developing, and implementing public health surveillance systems. (oup.com)

reproductive


  • The CDC Surveillance Coordination Group has established a steering committee that is charged with the development of a broad range of case definitions for noninfectious conditions (e.g., environmental or occupational conditions, chronic diseases, adverse reproductive health events, and injuries). (cdc.gov)
  • CDC's Division of Reproductive Health is the focal point for issues related to women's and men's reproductive concerns. (healthfinder.gov)
  • The Title X program is the only Federal program devoted solely to the provision of family planning and reproductive health care. (healthfinder.gov)
  • The Office of Population Affairs (OPA) serves as the focal point to advise the Secretary and the Assistant Secretary for Health on a wide range of reproductive health topics, including family planning and reproductive health, sterilization and other population issues. (healthfinder.gov)

inform


  • Online J Public Health Inform. (cdc.gov)

approaches


  • These representatives from Cuba, Rwanda, Kenya, India, and Georgia presented One Health case studies that demonstrate successful approaches to the integration of human, animal, and environmental surveillance. (healthtechnology.in)

System


  • To meet challenges arising from increasing rates of noncoverage in US landline-based telephone samples due to cell-phone-only households, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) expanded a traditional landline-based random digit dialing survey to a dual-frame survey of landline and cell phone numbers. (biomedsearch.com)
  • First, while the goal of increased tracking of HIV infection is to bring those with HIV into the public health system and to obtain more accurate epidemiological data, name reporting will likely have the opposite effect. (aclu.org)

Epidemiology


  • David L. Buckeridge , MD, PhD, is Assistant Professor and a Canadian Research Chair in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University. (wiley.com)

prevention


  • The CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) consists of nine divisions that support a variety of activities that improve the nation's health by preventing chronic diseases and their risk factors. (healthfinder.gov)

examine


  • They developed logistic models for each of 16 health indicators to examine whether exclusion of adults with cell phones only affected estimates after adjustment for demographic characteristics. (biomedsearch.com)

laboratories


  • State and local public health officials rely on health-care providers, laboratories, and other public health personnel to report the occurrence of notifiable diseases to state and local health departments. (cdc.gov)
  • LabSurv supports the notification process by allowing laboratories to send high quality, standardised and secure health information in a timely manner. (cri.nz)

data


  • However, before 1990, the usefulness of such data was limited by the lack of uniform case definitions for public health surveillance. (cdc.gov)
  • Public health surveillance is the systematic, ongoing assessment of the health of a community, based on the collection, interpretation, and use of health data. (oup.com)
  • This weekly report summarises data obtained from the ILI and SARI surveillance platforms. (cri.nz)
  • Carrying the theme 'Harnessing Data to Advance Health Equity', the meeting highlights the importance of using data and new analytic methodologies to promote health equity worldwide. (healthtechnology.in)
  • The Center's surveillance activities provide data and statistics relevant to each of its program areas. (healthfinder.gov)

report


  • Additional ad hoc tables or items of interest may be posted from time to time if not covered by the NZ Public Health Surveillance Report . (cri.nz)

Systems


  • 10. Evaulating Automated Surveillance Systems (D. Buckeridge, et al. (wiley.com)
  • The largest of the programs, the Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, includes State Formula Block Grants, Special Projects of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS), and Community Integrated Service Systems (CISS) projects. (healthfinder.gov)

organizations


  • The meeting convened a multidisciplinary group of professionals from public health agencies, academia, non-governmental organizations and the private sector. (healthtechnology.in)

global


  • This book led by Prof. Scott JN McNabb, from Emory University is a collaborative project of 32 teams of global public health surveillance experts, including 3 teams from Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI). (healthtechnology.in)

professionals


  • The ISDS Conference aims to address the challenges confronting public health surveillance efforts by fostering collaborations and information sharing across sectors" says ISDS President and Board Chair, Amy Ising, who added, "In order to advance the science of human and animal health surveillance, we must provide opportunities for professionals from across the globe to share their strategies, experiences and subject matter expertise. (healthtechnology.in)

provides


  • Surveillance provides information necessary for public health decision making and interventions. (oup.com)

policy


  • Major sections of the book focus on bioresponse and preparedness, risk behaviors, and environmental exposure, while the ethical considerations and policy justification for public health surveillance are also explored. (oup.com)

necessary


  • Even though there are various methods for HIV surveillance that preserve the privacy of individuals with HIV, surveillance proponents generally argue that reporting the names of individuals who test positive for HIV is necessary for effective HIV surveillance. (aclu.org)

individual


  • The three-day event was designed to build individual and organizational capacity for public health surveillance both locally to globally. (healthtechnology.in)
  • Proponents of HIV surveillance and name reporting frequently suggest that there is a conflict between the privacy rights of individuals who have or may have HIV and the public health needs of the country, and that individual civil liberties must take a back seat in order to effectively battle the spread of HIV and AIDS. (aclu.org)
  • In the public debate concerning society's response to the AIDS epidemic the American Civil Liberties Union has consistently advocated policies that protect the public health while respecting civil liberties and individual privacy. (aclu.org)

needs


  • The Maternal and Child health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) administers a broad range of programs services to pregnant women, mothers, infants, children and their families - and children with special health care needs. (healthfinder.gov)
  • The scope of the current review is to highlight how genomics is contributing to the immediate public health needs of malaria diagnosis. (karger.com)

book


  • The annual conference also witnessed the official release of a book titled 'Transforming Public Health Surveillance' by Elsevier publications. (healthtechnology.in)

Program


  • The Family Planning program, authorized under Title X of the Public Health Service Act, is administered within the Office of Population Affairs by the Office of Family Planning (OFP). (healthfinder.gov)

Services


  • This information is displayed to Public Health Services (PHS) in New Zealand, aiding in the investigation of disease outbreaks. (cri.nz)
  • Recognizing that high-quality maternal and child health (MCH) services are vital to the health of the nation, NCEMCH was established in 1982 at Georgetown University as a national resource to the MCH community. (healthfinder.gov)
  • The Office on Women's Health (OWH), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), works to improve the health and sense of well-being of all U.S. women and girls. (healthfinder.gov)

efforts


  • Specifically, as discussed in more detail in this position paper, the evidence indicates that reporting the names of those who test positive for HIV will set back public health efforts. (aclu.org)

provide


  • For many clients, Title X clinics provide the only continuing source of health care and health education. (healthfinder.gov)

effective


  • Instead, the available evidence strongly suggests that public health measures that respect the privacy of individuals testing for HIV are more effective means of fighting the spread of HIV than intrusive measures like name reporting. (aclu.org)

evidence


  • The ACLU is issuing this position paper now because the available evidence shows that, when it comes to reporting the names of people with HIV, there is no conflict between public health and civil liberties . (aclu.org)

Cases


  • In October 1990, in collaboration with CSTE, CDC published Case Definitions for Public Health Surveillance (4), which, for the first time, provided uniform criteria for reporting cases to increase the specificity of reporting and improve the comparability of diseases reported from different geographic areas. (cdc.gov)