In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Carcinoma in Situ: A lesion with cytological characteristics associated with invasive carcinoma but the tumor cells are confined to the epithelium of origin, without invasion of the basement membrane.Primed In Situ Labeling: A technique that labels specific sequences in whole chromosomes by in situ DNA chain elongation or PCR (polymerase chain reaction).RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ: A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating: A noninvasive (noninfiltrating) carcinoma of the breast characterized by a proliferation of malignant epithelial cells confined to the mammary ducts or lobules, without light-microscopy evidence of invasion through the basement membrane into the surrounding stroma.RNA Probes: RNA, usually prepared by transcription from cloned DNA, which complements a specific mRNA or DNA and is generally used for studies of virus genes, distribution of specific RNA in tissues and cells, integration of viral DNA into genomes, transcription, etc. Whereas DNA PROBES are preferred for use at a more macroscopic level for detection of the presence of DNA/RNA from specific species or subspecies, RNA probes are preferred for genetic studies. Conventional labels for the RNA probe include radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. RNA probes may be further divided by category into plus-sense RNA probes, minus-sense RNA probes, and antisense RNA probes.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.In Situ Nick-End Labeling: An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Digoxigenin: 3 beta,12 beta,14-Trihydroxy-5 beta-card-20(22)-enolide. A cardenolide which is the aglycon of digoxin. Can be obtained by hydrolysis of digoxin or from Digitalis orientalis L. and Digitalis lanata Ehrh.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Gene Amplification: A selective increase in the number of copies of a gene coding for a specific protein without a proportional increase in other genes. It occurs naturally via the excision of a copy of the repeating sequence from the chromosome and its extrachromosomal replication in a plasmid, or via the production of an RNA transcript of the entire repeating sequence of ribosomal RNA followed by the reverse transcription of the molecule to produce an additional copy of the original DNA sequence. Laboratory techniques have been introduced for inducing disproportional replication by unequal crossing over, uptake of DNA from lysed cells, or generation of extrachromosomal sequences from rolling circle replication.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Chromosome Banding: Staining of bands, or chromosome segments, allowing the precise identification of individual chromosomes or parts of chromosomes. Applications include the determination of chromosome rearrangements in malformation syndromes and cancer, the chemistry of chromosome segments, chromosome changes during evolution, and, in conjunction with cell hybridization studies, chromosome mapping.Oligonucleotide Probes: Synthetic or natural oligonucleotides used in hybridization studies in order to identify and study specific nucleic acid fragments, e.g., DNA segments near or within a specific gene locus or gene. The probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Paraffin Embedding: The infiltrating of tissue specimens with paraffin, as a supporting substance, to prepare for sectioning with a microtome.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Autoradiography: The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genes, erbB-2: The erbB-2 gene is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 receptor (RECEPTOR, ERBB-2), a protein with structural features similar to the epidermal growth factor receptor. Its name originates from the viral oncogene homolog (v-erbB) which is a truncated form of the chicken erbB gene found in the avian erythroblastosis virus. Overexpression and amplification of the gene is associated with a significant number of adenocarcinomas. The human c-erbB-2 gene is located at 17q21.2.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Tissue Fixation: The technique of using FIXATIVES in the preparation of cytologic, histologic, or pathologic specimens for the purpose of maintaining the existing form and structure of all the constituent elements.Mice, Inbred C57BLMicroscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Receptor, erbB-2: A cell surface protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is overexpressed in a variety of ADENOCARCINOMAS. It has extensive homology to and heterodimerizes with the EGF RECEPTOR, the ERBB-3 RECEPTOR, and the ERBB-4 RECEPTOR. Activation of the erbB-2 receptor occurs through heterodimer formation with a ligand-bound erbB receptor family member.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Interphase: The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Embryonic and Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Cytogenetic Analysis: Examination of CHROMOSOMES to diagnose, classify, screen for, or manage genetic diseases and abnormalities. Following preparation of the sample, KARYOTYPING is performed and/or the specific chromosomes are analyzed.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Gene Dosage: The number of copies of a given gene present in the cell of an organism. An increase in gene dosage (by GENE DUPLICATION for example) can result in higher levels of gene product formation. GENE DOSAGE COMPENSATION mechanisms result in adjustments to the level GENE EXPRESSION when there are changes or differences in gene dosage.Blotting, Southern: A method (first developed by E.M. Southern) for detection of DNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Nucleic Acid Probes: Nucleic acid which complements a specific mRNA or DNA molecule, or fragment thereof; used for hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms and for genetic studies.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Chromosome Deletion: Actual loss of portion of a chromosome.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Nerve Tissue ProteinsPregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Chromosomes: In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Metaphase: The phase of cell nucleus division following PROMETAPHASE, in which the CHROMOSOMES line up across the equatorial plane of the SPINDLE APPARATUS prior to separation.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Perfusion: Treatment process involving the injection of fluid into an organ or tissue.Y Chromosome: The male sex chromosome, being the differential sex chromosome carried by half the male gametes and none of the female gametes in humans and in some other male-heterogametic species in which the homologue of the X chromosome has been retained.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Antisense Elements (Genetics): Nucleic acids which hybridize to complementary sequences in other target nucleic acids causing the function of the latter to be affected.Chromosomes, Human: Very long DNA molecules and associated proteins, HISTONES, and non-histone chromosomal proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE). Normally 46 chromosomes, including two sex chromosomes are found in the nucleus of human cells. They carry the hereditary information of the individual.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Chromosome Painting: A technique for visualizing CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS using fluorescently labeled DNA probes which are hybridized to chromosomal DNA. Multiple fluorochromes may be attached to the probes. Upon hybridization, this produces a multicolored, or painted, effect with a unique color at each site of hybridization. This technique may also be used to identify cross-species homology by labeling probes from one species for hybridization with chromosomes from another species.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Cytogenetics: A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the cytological and molecular analysis of the CHROMOSOMES, and location of the GENES on chromosomes, and the movements of chromosomes during the CELL CYCLE.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Gene Rearrangement: The ordered rearrangement of gene regions by DNA recombination such as that which occurs normally during development.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9: A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Tissue Array Analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Papillomaviridae: A family of small, non-enveloped DNA viruses infecting birds and most mammals, especially humans. They are grouped into multiple genera, but the viruses are highly host-species specific and tissue-restricted. They are commonly divided into hundreds of papillomavirus "types", each with specific gene function and gene control regions, despite sequence homology. Human papillomaviruses are found in the genera ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; BETAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; GAMMAPAPILLOMAVIRUS; and MUPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Tumor Virus Infections: Infections produced by oncogenic viruses. The infections caused by DNA viruses are less numerous but more diverse than those caused by the RNA oncogenic viruses.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Centromere: The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.Chromogenic Compounds: Colorless, endogenous or exogenous pigment precursors that may be transformed by biological mechanisms into colored compounds; used in biochemical assays and in diagnosis as indicators, especially in the form of enzyme substrates. Synonym: chromogens (not to be confused with pigment-synthesizing bacteria also called chromogens).Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Molecular Probe Techniques: The use of devices which use detector molecules to detect, investigate, or analyze other molecules, macromolecules, molecular aggregates, or organisms.Biodegradation, Environmental: Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.Lasers, Excimer: Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Formaldehyde: A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Carcinoma, Ductal: Malignant neoplasms involving the ductal systems of any of a number of organs, such as the MAMMARY GLANDS, the PANCREAS, the PROSTATE, or the LACRIMAL GLAND.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Microdissection: The performance of dissections with the aid of a microscope.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Mice, Inbred BALB CDisease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Biotin: A water-soluble, enzyme co-factor present in minute amounts in every living cell. It occurs mainly bound to proteins or polypeptides and is abundant in liver, kidney, pancreas, yeast, and milk.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect: A form of fluorescent antibody technique commonly used to detect serum antibodies and immune complexes in tissues and microorganisms in specimens from patients with infectious diseases. The technique involves formation of an antigen-antibody complex which is labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984)Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Herpesvirus 4, Human: The type species of LYMPHOCRYPTOVIRUS, subfamily GAMMAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting B-cells in humans. It is thought to be the causative agent of INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS and is strongly associated with oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY;), BURKITT LYMPHOMA; and other malignancies.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Nervous System: The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)Uranium: Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.Bowen's Disease: A persistent progressive non-elevated red scaly or crusted plaque which is due to an intradermal carcinoma and is potentially malignant. Atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The lesions may occur anywhere on the skin surface or on mucosal surfaces. The cause most frequently found is trivalent arsenic compounds. Freezing, cauterization or diathermy coagulation is often effective. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2428-9)Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Central Nervous System: The main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial: DNA constructs that are composed of, at least, a REPLICATION ORIGIN, for successful replication, propagation to and maintenance as an extra chromosome in bacteria. In addition, they can carry large amounts (about 200 kilobases) of other sequence for a variety of bioengineering purposes.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Ki-67 Antigen: A CELL CYCLE and tumor growth marker which can be readily detected using IMMUNOCYTOCHEMISTRY methods. Ki-67 is a nuclear antigen present only in the nuclei of cycling cells.

*  Principles and Applications of PRINS in Cytogenetics - Current Protocols
A flexible, low‐cost alternative to FISH, primed in situ labeling (PRINS) has traditionally been used to detect tandemly ... PRINS: PRimed IN Situ labeling and hybridization in one step. In Nonradioactive Labelling and Detection of Biomolecules, 2nd ed ... Oligonucleotide‐priming methods for the chromosome‐specific labelling of alpha satellite DNA in situ. Chromosoma 98:259‐265. ... Localization of SRY by primed in situ labeling in XX and XY sex reversal. Am. J. Med. Genet. 95:71‐74. ...
  http://www.currentprotocols.com/WileyCDA/CPUnit/refId-cy0811.html
*  Protocols and Video Articles Authored by Manish Jain (Translated to Hebrew)
Jan, 2013 , Pubmed ID: 23901188 Primed in situ labeling/synthesis (PRINS) technique is an alternative to fluorescent in situ ... Rapid Detection of Chromosome X, Y, 13, 18, and 21 Aneuploidies by Primed in Situ Labeling/synthesis Technique Indian Journal ... The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis had shown a microdeletion on the chromosome 22q11.2 in both twins. The ... Using fluorescently labeled cysteine mutant A90C, we have shown that different aggregating species of α-syn formed in the ...
  https://www.jove.com/author/Manish_Jain?language=Hebrew
*  Binary trader pro download
1994) Fast, sensitive multicolor detection of nucleic acids in situ by primed in situ labeling (PRINS). Probability data are ... Slot-blots hybridized to labeled nuclear RNA from either PCC3 cells (an embryonal carcinoma cell line) or clone 38 cells (an ...
  http://4gamers-market.ru/binary-trader-pro-download-2.html
*  Et binary options ltd
1994) Fast, sensitive multicolor detection of nucleic acids in srtu by primed in situ labeling (PRINS). Eds, abstinence e be ...
  http://4gamers-market.ru/et-binary-options-ltd.html
*  List of MeSH codes (E05) - Wikipedia
... primed in situ labeling MeSH E05.200.500.620.670.520 --- negative staining MeSH E05.200.500.620.670.620 --- periodic acid- ... primed in situ labeling MeSH E05.200.750.600.670.520 --- negative staining MeSH E05.200.750.600.670.620 --- periodic acid- ... primed in situ labeling MeSH E05.393.620.500.687 --- random amplified polymorphic dna technique MeSH E05.393.620.500.725 --- ... primed in situ labeling MeSH E05.393.661.640 --- oligonucleotide array sequence analysis MeSH E05.393.760.640 --- ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(E05)
*  Plus it
... was used as the DNA template for T7 or SP6-primed in vitro transcription to synthesize 35S-labeled riboprobes for in situ ... Serial sagittal sections, 12 μm thick, were cut throughout the brain, and 35S-labeled riboprobe in situ hybridization was ... A 1.7 μg sample of total amplified cDNA was converted into Cy3-labeled cDNA using the Genomic DNA ULS labeling kit (Agilent ... Modules were defined as branches of the dendrogram obtained from clustering and were labeled by colors beneath the dendrograms ...
  http://www.jneurosci.org/content/35/3/878
*  Human Cardiac Troponin T: Cloning and Expression of New Isoforms in the Normal and Failing Heart | Circulation Research
This PCR product was labeled with biotinyl-11-dUTP (Sigma) by random priming. In situ hybridization was done using 25 ng/mL of ... A, The labeled riboprobe was hybridized to 5 μg of adult human left ventricular RNA (1, 2, and 3) and to 5 μg of yeast RNA ... A, The labeled riboprobe was hybridized to 5 μg of human fetal (F), normal adult (A), and failing adult (P) ventricles and to 5 ... In this work we located the human cTnT gene by means of fluorescent in situ hybridization to 1q32 and, by sequencing thirteen ...
  http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/76/4/687.long
*  US Patent # 5,534,631. Cellular factor ILF - Patents.com
For in situ hybridization, the ILF cDNA insert was labeled by random priming with .sup.3 H-labeled deoxynucleotides to a ... This fragment was labeled by random priming and used to screen a HeLa cDNA ZAP library (Stratagene) in an attempt to identify ... A 706 bp fragment which contained the ILF DNA binding domain was labeled by random priming and used to screen a human HeLa cDNA ... An ILF fragment was labeled by random priming and used in Southern analysis. The position of the 2.0-kb HindIII fragment in ...
  http://www.patents.com/us-5534631.html
*  Plus it
As a control, a 32P-labeled GAPDH cDNA was used.D, RT-PCR analysis in various tissues of P7 mice.E, In situ localization of ... The blot was hybridized with a random-primed [α-32P]dCTP-labeled full-length Cupidin cDNA probe. ... In situ hybridization. Digoxigenin-labeled antisense or sense riboprobes were prepared from the nucleotide positions 647-1220 [ ... As shown in Figure3 A, GST-CPD (lane 1) and GST-CPD/C (lane 3) were intensely labeled with the [35S]GTPγS-bound form of GST- ...
  http://www.jneurosci.org/content/19/19/8389
*  Binary options working strategy
1989) Oligonucleotide-priming methods for the chromosome-specific labelling of alpha satellite DNA in situ. 7(C)(10). k h ̄2km ... Introduction Primed dnsitu (PRINS) labeling has become an alternative to in situ hybridization (ISH) for the localization of ... We will discuss the issue of labeling in more detail in section 14. In contrast to most prokaryotic transcripts that contain ... Star formation and interstellar medium As the closest nearby spiral, M31 has been a prime target for exploring the properties ...
  http://4gamers-market.ru/binary-options-working-strategy-1.html
*  Identification and expression of the lamprey Pax6 gene: evolutionary origin of the segmented brain of vertebrates | Development
Whole-mount in situ hybridization. Digoxigenin-labeled antisense and sense riboprobes were transcribed according to the ... The blots were hybridized with randomly primed digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled DNA probes at 50°C for 16 hours, and washed under high ... Whole-mount in situ hybridization of stage 24 lamprey embryos. (A) Expression of LjPax6. (B) Expression of LjDlx1/6. ... Whole-mount in situ hybridization in stage 26 lamprey embryos. (A) Expression of LjPax6. An arrow indicates the dorsal ...
  http://dev.biologists.org/content/128/18/3521
*  Perivascular Macrophages Are the Primary Cell Type Productively Infected by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus in the Brains of...
In situ hybridization for SIV RNA was performed using DIG-labeled antisense riboprobes obtained from Drs. V. Hirsch and C. ... The probe was labeled with digoxigenin (DIG)-11-dUTP by random priming (Boehringer) and used as described previously under ... 7). Similar to double-label immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization followed by immunohistochemistry on serial sections ... double-label immunohistochemistry. For in situ hybridization followed by immunohistochemistry on serial sections, frozen ...
  http://jem.rupress.org/content/193/8/905
*  Labeled Nucleotides | Page 2 of 2 | Biotium
... end terminal labeling to synthesize labeled DNA probes for in-situ hybridization, microarray or blotting techniques. The ... Digoxigenin-dUTP can be enzymatically incorporated into DNA via nick translation, random priming, or 3′-end terminal labeling ... Antibody & Protein Labeling Kits. Protein Labeling Kits , Small Ligand Labeling Mix-n-Stain™ Antibody Labeling Kits ... The digoxigenin labeled probe could be detected by using fluorescent labeled or enzyme labeled anti-digoxigenin antibody. ...
  https://biotium.com/products/pcr-molecular-biology/labeled-nucleotides/page/2/
*  PCR probes for chromosome in situ hybridization of large-insert bacterial recombinants. - Semantic Scholar
Minimal quantities of crude DNA are amplified and labeled during the degenerate-oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain ... We have developed a procedure for efficient in situ hybridization of bacterial recombinants created with various types of large ... Minimal quantities of crude DNA are amplified and labeled during the degenerate-oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain ... PCR probes for chromosome in situ hybridization of large-insert bacterial recombinants.. *. Peter Michael Kroisel, Panos A. ...
  https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/PCR-probes-for-chromosome-in-situ-hybridization-of-Kroisel-Ioannou/9ccc3142e29f4aa0a29ad91da061a3e315589a00
*  Plus it
Metaphase Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization.. Degenerate oligonucleotide primed amplified clone DNA (amplified using primers ... DNA Labeling.. Test and control DNAs were differentially labeled using a Bioprime labeling kit (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA), as ... degenerate oligonucleotide primed 1, 2, and 3) created for array construction (25) was labeled with biotin-16-dUTP (Roche) or ... 94060845). Biotin-labeled probes were detected using Avidin TexasRed (Molecular Probes Inc., Eugene, OR), and digoxigenin- ...
  http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/64/14/4817
*  Plus it
AF164610.1). The cDNA was labeled with [32P]dATP using the random-primed labeling method. Labeled probe was hybridized ... In Situ Hybridization.. RNA probes were prepared from patient 1, HERV-K env clone #2 (Fig. 6)⇓ . One μg of the linearized ... The in vitro transcription and labeling of probe was performed at 37°C for 2 h with a digoxigenin RNA labeling kit (Roche ... A and B, breast ductal carcinoma in situ. C and D, uninvolved breast tissues. Sections depicted in A and C were hybridized with ...
  http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/7/6/1553
*  Differential regulation of maternal and paternal chromosome condensation in mitotic zygotes | Journal of Cell Science
The probe was biotinylated using a random-priming biotin labeling kit containing biotin-16-dUTP (Amersham) ( Collas and ... RNA in situ hybridization. An anti-rat AKAP95 cDNA probe was generated using as a template a 732 bp PCR product amplified from ... 4A, green and yellow labeling). Examination of similar Hoechst- and PI-labeled embryos at mitosis showed that anti-AKAP95 ... Dual DNA staining unequivocally discriminated the FPN (labeled red only) and the MPN (labeled blue), and indicated that AKAP95 ...
  http://jcs.biologists.org/content/115/14/2931
*  Binary options interactive broker
101) (7. Potter and Alan C. Introduction Primed dnsitu (PRINS) labeling has become an alternative to in situ hybridization (ISH ...
  http://4gamers-market.ru/binary-options-interactive-broker-2.html
*  Insulin-like Growth Factor II Signaling in Neoplastic Proliferation Is Blocked by Transgenic Expression of the...
... dCTP-labeled and random primed cDNA probes for murine IGF-II (cDNA obtained from Dr. G. Bell, University of Chicago, Chicago, ... In situ hybridization was performed as described previously (Martin et al. 1999). Specific signal appears as purple pigment. ... Digoxygenin-labeled (Boehringer Mannheim) IGF-II riboprobes were synthesized using the rat IGF-II cDNA, which was cloned in ... Immunohistochemistry and In Situ Hybridization. Paraffin sections of formalin-fixed liver tissue were generated as described ...
  http://jcb.rupress.org/content/146/4/881
*  Plus it
Transferred blots were hybridized with 32P-labeled random primed probe frombchs cDNA clones via established techniques. ... were used for in situ hybridization to bchs mRNA. Specific labeling for bchs is detected in a horizontal section through the ... Labeling is seen in cortical regions containing neuronal cell bodies and is absent from neuropil areas. Arrows point to labeled ... To label protein aggregates, we added a 1:100 dilution of thioflavine S (direct yellow 7, 1 mg/ml stock; Sigma) to the ...
  http://www.jneurosci.org/content/23/4/1254
*  Plus it
In situ hybridization of DRG neurons with 35S- labeled cDNA probes revealed a significant reduction in the level of mRNAs for ... Primed neurons (which had sustained a crush axotomy of the distal sciatic nerve 2 weeks earlier) and unprimed (normal) neurons ... SDS-PAGE revealed that the regenerating axonal sprouts of primed DRG cells incorporated and conveyed significantly less labeled ... Electron microscopy revealed that the regenerating axonal sprouts of primed DRG cells contained numerous microtubules but very ...
  http://www.jneurosci.org/content/9/8/2645
*  Prophase I arrest and progression to metaphase I in mouse oocytes are controlled by Emi1-dependent regulation of APCCdh1 | JCB
In situ hybridization. Ovaries of PMSG-primed mice were fixed in 4% PFA for 6 h followed by incubation in 0.5 M sucrose in PBS ... Labeling of tubulin with immunofluorescence showed that the GFP-hEmi1-injected oocytes were arrested at metaphase, as revealed ... Emi1 is expressed in GV-arrested oocytes. (A-C and E) RT-PCR (15 oocytes; A), in situ hybridization (B), and Western blotting ( ... After incubation with 2 U DNase I at 37°C for 30 min, the samples were subjected to oligonucleotide (dT)-primed first-strand ...
  http://jcb.rupress.org/content/176/1/65.long
*  Deletion of 1p32-p36 Is the Most Frequent Genetic Change and Poor Prognostic Marker in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Salivary...
Fluorescence in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was done on paraffin sections from cases 98E2, ... labeled with spectrum orange and target probe (RP1-163G9 and RP1-163M99-1p36) labeled with spectrum green (bottom). The ... by random priming. To avoid dye bias, we did dye swap experiments for each sample. The probe mixture is dissolved in ... Array CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was used to validate CGH results on selected cases. We correlated ...
  http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/14/16/5181.long
*  Patente WO2011142818A1 - Detection of chromosomal abnormalities associated with endometrial cancer - Google Patentes
Vysis GeneSensor labeling reagents, with Cyanine3-dCTP, and Cyanine5-dCTP (Perkin Elmer/NEN), respectively. Random priming ... "Labeling Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Probes for Genomic Targets", pages: 21 - 40. ... In certain embodiments, the probes are labeled with detectable labels, e.g., fluorescent labels. Chromosome Enumeration Probe ... Label-containing moieties can be associated directly or indirectly with chromosomal probes. Different label-containing moieties ...
  http://www.google.es/patents/WO2011142818A1?cl=en
*  Cboe binary options spx
Branke and C. Introduction Primed dnsitu (PRINS) labeling has become an alternative to can you make money in binary options ... trading situ hybridization (ISH) for the localization of nucleic acid sequencesm cell (I-4) andtissuepreparations(5; ...
  http://4gamers-market.ru/cboe-binary-options-spx.html

PRINS (gene): PRINS (psoriasis associated RNA induced by stress) is a long non-coding RNA. Its expression is induced by stress, and it may have a protective role in cells exposed to stress.Mature messenger RNA: Mature messenger RNA, often abbreviated as mature mRNA is a eukaryotic RNA transcript that has been spliced and processed and is ready for translation in the course of protein synthesis. Unlike the eukaryotic RNA immediately after transcription known as precursor messenger RNA, it consists exclusively of exons, with all introns removed.Diffuse lamellar keratitis: Diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) is a sterile inflammation of the cornea which may occur after refractive surgery, such as LASIK. Its incidence has been estimated to be 1 in 500 patients, though this may be as high as 32% in some cases.Coles PhillipsRiboprobe: Riboprobes are RNA probes that can be produced by in vitro transcription of cloned DNA inserted in a suitable plasmid downstream of a viral promoter. Some bacterial viruses code for their own RNA polymerases, which are highly specific for the viral promoters.Symmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.TUNEL assayChromogenic in situ hybridization: Chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) is a cytogenetic technique that combines the chromogenic signal detection method of immunohistochemistry (IHC) techniques with in situ hybridization. It was developed around the year 2000 as an alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection of HER-2/neu oncogene amplification.Thermal cyclerProtein primary structure: The primary structure of a peptide or protein is the linear sequence of its amino acid structural units, and partly comprises its overall biomolecular structure. By convention, the primary structure of a protein is reported starting from the amino-terminal (N) end to the carboxyl-terminal (C) end.Breast cancer classification: Breast cancer classification divides breast cancer into categories according to different schemes, each based on different criteria and serving a different purpose. The major categories are the histopathological type, the grade of the tumor, the stage of the tumor, and the expression of proteins and genes.LumpectomyLigation-independent cloning: Ligation-independent cloning (LIC) is a form of molecular cloning that is able to be performed without the use of restriction endonucleases or DNA ligase. This allows genes that have restriction sites to be cloned without worry of chopping up the insert.Genetic imbalance: Genetic imbalance is to describe situation when the genome of a cell or organism has more copies of some genes than other genes due to chromosomal rearrangements or aneuploidy.Regenerative amplification: In laser science, regenerative amplification is a process used to generate short but strong pulses of laser light. It is based on a pulse trapped in a laser resonator, which stays in there until it extracts all of the energy stored in the amplification medium.Chromosome regionsAllele-specific oligonucleotide: An allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) is a short piece of synthetic DNA complementary to the sequence of a variable target DNA. It acts as a probe for the presence of the target in a Southern blot assay or, more commonly, in the simpler Dot blot assay.Oncogene: An oncogene is a gene that has the potential to cause cancer.Wilbur, Beth, editor.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingImmunoperoxidase: Immunoperoxidase is a type of immunostain used in molecular biology, medical research, and clinical diagnostics. In particular, immunoperoxidase reactions refer to a sub-class of immunohistochemical or immunocytochemical procedures in which the antibodies are visualized via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction.Branching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.Stratified squamous epithelium: A stratified squamous epithelium consists of squamous (flattened) epithelial cells arranged in layers upon a basal membrane. Only one layer is in contact with the basement membrane; the other layers adhere to one another to maintain structural integrity.Low-voltage electron microscope: Low-voltage electron microscope (LVEM) is an electron microscope which operates at accelerating voltages of a few kiloelectronvolts or less. While the low voltage electron microscopy technique will never replace conventional high voltage electron microscopes, it is quickly becoming appreciated for many different disciplines.Autoradiograph: An autoradiograph is an image on an x-ray film or nuclear emulsion produced by the pattern of decay emissions (e.g.DNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).Eukaryotic transcription: Eukaryotic transcription is the elaborate process that eukaryotic cells use to copy genetic information stored in DNA into units of RNA replica. Gene transcription occurs in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope: A total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) is a type of microscope with which a thin region of a specimen, usually less than 200 nm can be observed.Exogenous bacteria: Exogenous bacteria are microorganisms introduced to closed biological systems from the external world. They exist in aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as the atmosphere.Vital stain: A vital stain in a casual usage may mean a stain that can be applied on living cells without killing them. Vital stains have been useful for diagnostic and surgical techniques in a variety of medical specialties.Cancer biomarkers: A cancer biomarker refers to a substance or process that is indicative of the presence of cancer in the body. A biomarker may be a molecule secreted by a tumor or a specific response of the body to the presence of cancer.TrastuzumabEpithelial dysplasia: Epithelial dysplasia, a term becoming increasingly referred to as intraepithelial neoplasia, is the sum of various disturbances of epithelial proliferation and differentiation as seen microscopically. Individual cellular features of dysplasia are called epithelial atypia.Gene signature: A gene signature is a group of genes in a cell whose combined expression patternItadani H, Mizuarai S, Kotani H. Can systems biology understand pathway activation?Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis: Amplified rDNA (Ribosomal DNA) Restriction Analysis is the extension of the technique of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) to the gene encoding the small (16s) ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The technique involves an enzymatic amplification using primers directed at the conserved regions at the ends of the 16s gene, followed by digestion using tetracutter Restriction enzymes.Mauna Kea Technologies: Mauna Kea Technologies is a global medical device company focused on leading innovation in endomicroscopy, the field of microscopic imaging during endoscopy procedures. The company researches, develops and markets tools to visualize, detect and rule out abnormalities including malignant and pre-malignant tumors or lesions in the gastrointestinal and pulmonary tracts.HSD2 neurons: HSD2 neurons are a small group of neurons in the brainstem which are uniquely sensitive to the mineralocorticosteroid hormone aldosterone, through expression of HSD11B2. They are located within the caudal medulla oblongata, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS).Invasive lobular carcinomaBrain biopsyCopy number analysis: Copy number analysis usually refers to the process of analyzing data produced by a test for DNA copy number variation in patient's sample. Such analysis helps detect chromosomal copy number variation that may cause or may increase risks of various critical disorders.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.Beef cattle: Beef cattle are cattle raised for meat production (as distinguished from dairy cattle, used for milk production). The meat of adult cattle is known as beef.Fluorescent tag: In molecular biology and biotechnology, a fluorescent tag, also known as a label or probe, is a molecule that is attached chemically to aid in the labeling and detection of a biomolecule such as a protein, antibody, or amino acid. Generally, fluorescent tagging, or labeling, uses a reactive derivative of a fluorescent molecule known as a fluorophore.Pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1: POU domain, class 1, transcription factor 1 (Pit1, growth hormone factor 1), also known as POU1F1, is a transcription factor for growth hormone.YjdF RNA motifPolymethine: Polymethines are compounds made up from an odd number of methine groups (CH) bound together by alternating single and double bonds.Kachovski and Dekhtyar, Dyes and Pigments, 22 (1983) 83-97 Compounds made up from an even number of methine groups are known as polyenes.Library (biology): In molecular biology, a library is a collection of DNA fragments that is stored and propagated in a population of micro-organisms through the process of molecular cloning. There are different types of DNA libraries, including cDNA libraries (formed from reverse-transcribed RNA), genomic libraries (formed from genomic DNA) and randomized mutant libraries (formed by de novo gene synthesis where alternative nucleotides or codons are incorporated).Blood–testis barrier: The blood–testis barrier is a physical barrier between the blood vessels and the seminiferous tubules of the animal testes. The name "blood-testis barrier" is misleading in that it is not a blood-organ barrier in a strict sense, but is formed between Sertoli cells of the seminiferous tubule and as such isolates the further developed stages of germ cells from the blood.Hyperplasia: Hyperplasia (from ancient Greek ὑπέρ huper, "over" + πλάσις plasis, "formation"), or hypergenesis, is an increase in the amount of organic tissue that results from cell proliferation. It may lead to the gross enlargement of an organ and the term is sometimes confused with benign neoplasia or benign tumor.Cervical screening: Cervical screening is the process of detecting abnormal changes in the cervix before they can develop into cervical cancer. If the abnormal tissue or cells can be removed, then the disease can be prevented from developing.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.

(1/31) Expression of Mash1 in basal cells of rat circumvallate taste buds is dependent upon gustatory innervation.

Mash1, a mammalian homologue of the Drosophila achaete-scute proneural gene complex, plays an essential role in differentiation of subsets of peripheral neurons. In this study, using RT-PCR and in situ RT-PCR, we investigated if Mash1 gene expression occurs in rat taste buds. Further, we examined dynamics of Mash1 expression in the process of degeneration and regeneration in denervated rat taste buds. In rat tongue epithelium, Mash1 gene expression is confined to circumvallate, foliate, and fungiform papilla epithelia that include taste buds. In taste buds, Mash1-expressing cells are round cells in the basal compartment. In contrast, the mature taste bud cells do not express the Mash1 gene. Denervation and regeneration experiments show that the expression of Mash1 requires gustatory innervation. We conclude that Mash1 is expressed in cells of the taste bud lineage, and that the expression of Mash1 in rat taste buds is dependent upon gustatory innervation.  (+info)

(2/31) The TATA-box binding protein of Entamoeba histolytica: cloning of the gene and location of the protein by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy.

A 309 bp DNA fragment from Entamoeba histolytica was amplified by PCR using primers derived from the Acanthamoeba castellanii consensus TATA-box binding protein amino acid sequence. The amplified fragment was used to isolate cDNA and genomic DNA clones containing an ORF encoding the complete E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein (Ehtbp, 702 bp, 234 aa, molecular mass 26 kDa). The EhTBP functional domain showed 55% sequence identity to that of Homo sapiens, 54% to A. castellanii and 37% to Plasmodium falciparum TBPs. In Southern blot experiments we detected a single Ehtbp band, which was transcribed as a 1.3 kb mRNA containing a 420 nt 5' untranslated region. However, the probe hybridized with the 0.8 and 1.5 Mb chromosomes, suggesting that this sequence is diploid. In situ PCR assays showed two signals in 95% of trophozoites, one located in the nucleus and another in EhkO, the novel DNA-containing organelle recently reported. The recombinant E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Antibodies against it recognized two proteins of 26 and 29 kDa in E. histolytica nuclear extracts. Confocal microscopy immunofluorescence analysis located the protein in both the nucleus and EhkO.  (+info)

(3/31) Latent Varicella-zoster virus in human dorsal root ganglia.

To understand further the molecular events underlying the process of Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latency in human ganglionic tissues, in situ hybridisation (ISH) for VZV RNA and DNA, and PCR in situ amplification for VZV DNA were used in human dorsal root ganglia from 12 individuals (3 normal and 9 who had died with AIDS). The results showed that (a) two separate regions of the VZV genome, represented by genes 4 and 40, were detected in neurons in two normal and three AIDS ganglia, (b) evidence of transcription of VZV genes 4, 21, 29, and 63 was found in normal and AIDS cases, and (c) VZV DNA and RNA for the same gene (gene 29) was detected in neurons in serial tissue sections in three cases. Thus more than one region of the VZV genome is present in neurons during VZV ganglionic latency, and the presence of both a VZV gene and its corresponding RNA transcript can be shown to occur in the same localised region of DRG tissue.  (+info)

(4/31) Expression of FAS adjacent to fibrotic foci in the failing human heart is not associated with increased apoptosis.

Fibrosis in the heart may result from loss of myocytes, which are replaced by collagens. Apoptosis is now known to contribute to myocyte loss in the failing human heart. The mechanisms underlying the induction of cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and thus the expansion of fibrotic foci in the failing heart, are poorly understood. We hypothesized that viable heart cells adjacent to fibrotic foci might become "predisposed" to apoptosis by expression of the receptor FAS (APO1, CD95). We therefore studied the spatial relationship of FAS expression and fibrosis in patients with heart failure. Left ventricular biopsies were obtained from seven patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. All patients had reduced ejection fraction but varied in New York Heart Association class score at the time of surgery. Heart cell apoptosis, fibrosis, and FAS expression were studied by propidium iodide and in situ end labeling (ISEL) of DNA, Picrosirius red staining, and immunohistochemistry. All patient samples exhibited, albeit to varying degrees, apoptosis detected by ISEL, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. In all samples, fibrosis (collagen) was evident both perivascular and in isolated regions of scarring. Regardless of the extent of fibrosis or detectable apoptosis, FAS expression was observed in regions immediately adjacent to the fibrosis, but not in regions distal to fibrosis, nor in fibrotic areas devoid of nuclei. Expression of FAS was found adjacent to both perivascular and diffuse fibrosis, and ISEL-positive nuclei were found within cells reacting positively with anti-FAS antibodies. However, ISEL-positive nuclei were no more abundant in FAS-positive regions (67.6 +/- 5.8% of total nuclei) than in FAS-negative areas (69.5 +/- 9.8%). We conclude that expression of FAS occurs in remaining heart cells adjacent to fibrosis of either perivascular or presumed reparative origin. Although this phenomenon could contribute to the expansion of fibrotic foci, FAS-induced apoptosis in the failing heart may not be more prevalent than apoptosis initiated by other signaling mechanisms.  (+info)

(5/31) Localization of mariner DNA transposons in the human genome by PRINS.

Homologous recombination occurring among misaligned repeated sequences is a significant source of the molecular rearrangements resulting in human genetic disease. Studies of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease locus on chromosome 17 have implicated the involvement of an ancient DNA transposon of the mariner family (Hsmar2) in the initiation of double-strand break events leading to homologous recombination. In this study, the genomic locations of 109 Hsmar2 elements were determined by primed in situ labeling (PRINS) using primers designed to match the right and left inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) of the transposon. Although the resolution of the PRINS technique is approximately 400 chromosomal Giemsa bands, the data presented here provide the first large-scale mapping study of these elements, which may be involved in initiation of homologous recombination events in the human genome.  (+info)

(6/31) NF-kappa B modulates TNF-alpha production by alveolar macrophages in asymptomatic HIV-seropositive individuals.

Local TNF-alpha production in different organs may affect HIV replication and pathogenesis. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from asymptomatic HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative individuals did not spontaneously release TNF-alpha, but LPS stimulation of these cells significantly increased TNF-alpha production. We tested whether NF-kappa B affects TNF-alpha production by AMs using N-tosyl-l -phenylalanine chloromethylketone (TPCK) or N-benzoyl-l -tyrosine ethyl ester (BTEE), which inhibit the degradation of I kappa B, or tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate-potassium (D609), which inhibits phospholipase C. Alveolar macrophages were exposed to LPS alone and with the chemical protease inhibitors TPCK, BTEE, and D609. NF-kappa B DNA binding induced by LPS treatment of AMs was inhibited by TPCK, BTEE, and D609. These agents also inhibited TNF-alpha mRNA and TNF-alpha protein production. After 24 h, the levels of TNF-alpha mRNA reached equilibrium, as assessed by RT-PCR. The levels of NF-kappa B mRNA remained constant under all conditions. The levels of I kappa B-alpha mRNA were similar after 30, 60, and 180 min, but the I kappa B-beta mRNA concentration was initially low and increased over time under all conditions. I kappa B-alpha and I kappa B-beta protein production was not affected by the chemical protease inhibitors. Our data show that TNF-alpha production by LPS-stimulated AMs from asymptomatic HIV-seropositive and -seronegative individuals is regulated via the phospholipase C pathway and by NF-kappa B DNA binding activity without obvious changes in I kappa B-alpha or I kappa B-beta protein concentrations.  (+info)

(7/31) Detection and characterization of micronuclei in a murine liver epithelial cell line, by application of the in vitro cytokinesis block MN assay and PRINS.

The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was applied to murine cell line C6, derived from fetal liver, after an optimal protocol had been designed. Micronucleus frequencies were assayed after exposure to three concentrations of colcemid or diepoxybutane. Two-colour primed in situ DNA synthesis (PRINS) was applied to simultaneously label telomeric and centromeric (minor satellite DNA) sequences. Both chemicals induced a highly significant increase in MN and the effect was dose dependent. Diepoxybutane did not appear to significantly increase the frequency of centromere-positive micronuclei. Colcemid, as expected, induced high frequencies of centromere-positive micronuclei at all concentrations tested; in addition a significant increase in centromere-negative micronuclei was observed at 10(-5) M. Many centromere-positive micronuclei carried three or four telomeres, thus indicating that a duplicated (non-disjoined) chromosome with two chromatids was contained in the micronucleus. This observation leads to the conclusion that micronuclei deriving from missegregation could be due to errors occurring before the onset of anaphase. The results obtained on C6 cells are in good agreement with those obtained on other cell systems, indicating that this cell line can be considered for in vitro aneuploidy evaluation.  (+info)

(8/31) Quantitative detection of apoptotic thymocytes in low-dose X-irradiated mice by an anti-single-stranded DNA antibody.

The quantitative detection of apoptotic cells in low frequency in the thymus of mice irradiated with X-rays using an anti-single-stranded DNA antibody was explored. The antibody against single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA) was obtained with rabbits hyperimmunized with complexes of alkaline-denatured calf thymus DNA. AKR female mice were irradiated with 10 to 100 cGy or 4 Gy X-rays; thereafter, thymus sections were prepared at various times after irradiation. The detection and counting of apoptotic cells in the section were performed after histochemical staining using an anti-ssDNA antibody. The results demonstrate that, although sensitive and quantitative detection of apoptotic cells in irradiated thymus using the anti-ssDNA antibody is possible, the sensitivity is lower compared to that of in situ end-labeling methods, such as TUNEL or ISEL. The antibodies could also be used for rat thymus and spleen. In addition, an increase in positively stained cells by both methods was detected as early as 6 min after the irradiation of mice.  (+info)



  • Fluorescence
  • FISH probes are generally labelled with a variety of different fluorescent tags and can only be detected under a fluorescence microscope, whereas CISH probes are labelled with biotin or digoxigenin and can be detected using a bright-field microscope after other treatment steps have been applied. (wikipedia.org)
  • The general steps common to many of these next-generation sequencing techniques include: Random fragmentation of genomic DNA Immobilization of single DNA fragments on a solid support like a bead or a planar solid surface Amplification of DNA fragments on the solid surface using PCR and making polymerase colonies Sequencing and subsequent in situ interrogation after each cycle using fluorescence scanning or chemiluminescence. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • In 1972, Wilchek showed that the method can be used to remove toxic compounds from blood, as exemplified by the removal of heme peptides from blood using immobilized human serum albumin, thus laying the grounds for modern hemoperfusion Affinity label is a molecule that is similar in structure to a particular substrate for a specific enzyme. (wikipedia.org)
  • techniques
  • While the industry has attempted to resolve these issues by developing new techniques, such as in situ extraction, environmental organizations, such as Greenpeace, have launched campaigns to delegitimize the resource, based on its greenhouse gas emission records. (wikipedia.org)
  • method
  • Dye-terminator sequencing utilizes labelling of the chain terminator ddNTPs, which permits sequencing in a single reaction, rather than four reactions as in the labelled-primer method. (wikipedia.org)
  • Library
  • At this point the chromosomes are composed of nascent strands with BrdU in place of thymidine and the original template strands are primed for DNA sequencing library preparation. (wikipedia.org)
  • system
  • Meir Wilchek is known for his research in the field of biorecognition or affinity phenomenon, and its various application, e.g. for affinity chromatography, affinity labeling, affinity therapy, and the avidin-biotin system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the late 18th century, a generous system of income support - the Speenhamland system - was established on an ad-hoc basis in parts of the country, and promoted by the Tory Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger, but others thought it was too generous, and were worried that it would lead to people not bothering to work. (wikipedia.org)