Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Compliance: Distensibility measure of a chamber such as the lungs (LUNG COMPLIANCE) or bladder. Compliance is expressed as a change in volume per unit change in pressure.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Transdermal Patch: A medicated adhesive patch placed on the skin to deliver a specific dose of medication into the bloodstream.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cathartics: Agents that are used to stimulate evacuation of the bowels.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Occult Blood: Chemical, spectroscopic, or microscopic detection of extremely small amounts of blood.Tooth Movement: Orthodontic techniques used to correct the malposition of a single tooth.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Orthodontic Appliance Design: The planning, calculation, and creation of an apparatus for the purpose of correcting the placement or straightening of teeth.Drug Therapy: The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Administration, Cutaneous: The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.Drug Carriers: Forms to which substances are incorporated to improve the delivery and the effectiveness of drugs. Drug carriers are used in drug-delivery systems such as the controlled-release technology to prolong in vivo drug actions, decrease drug metabolism, and reduce drug toxicity. Carriers are also used in designs to increase the effectiveness of drug delivery to the target sites of pharmacological actions. Liposomes, albumin microspheres, soluble synthetic polymers, DNA complexes, protein-drug conjugates, and carrier erythrocytes among others have been employed as biodegradable drug carriers.Self Administration: Administration of a drug or chemical by the individual under the direction of a physician. It includes administration clinically or experimentally, by human or animal.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Cross-Over Studies: Studies comparing two or more treatments or interventions in which the subjects or patients, upon completion of the course of one treatment, are switched to another. In the case of two treatments, A and B, half the subjects are randomly allocated to receive these in the order A, B and half to receive them in the order B, A. A criticism of this design is that effects of the first treatment may carry over into the period when the second is given. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Colonoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Hypoglycemic Agents: Substances which lower blood glucose levels.Helicobacter Infections: Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.United StatesSolubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Vascular Capacitance: The measure of a BLOOD VESSEL's ability to increase the volume of BLOOD it holds without a large increase in BLOOD PRESSURE. The vascular capacitance is equal to the change in volume divided by the change in pressure.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Hand Hygiene: Practices involved in preventing the transmission of diseases by hand.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.

*  "An Investigation of Dialysis Patients' Medication Compliance and the R" by Adele Curtis

Results showed no correlation between the number of physicians involved in participants' care and medication compliance. ... Participants with a higher number of medications had lower compliance. ... care and determined if it was associated with medication compliance and additionally assessed the in-center dialysis facility ... In-center dialysis patients have multiple physicians involved in their care related to complications of end stage renal disease ...
commons.emich.edu/theses/485/

*  web-archive-net.com: patientcompliance.net - Happy Birthday Lena

PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient adherence to a medication schedule www giganano com www giganano com. Original URL path: ... PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient adherence to a medication schedule www giganano com www giganano com. Original URL path: ... Happy Holidays 2008 In the picture Anna Solvell Stefan Solvell Lena Solvell Erik Solvell jr PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient ... click to enlarge photo PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient adherence to a medication schedule www giganano com www giganano com ...
web-archive-net.com/net/p/patientcompliance.net/2016-05-01_7777346_11/Happy_Birthday_Lena/

*  A Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Medication Compliance Among Patients With Coronary Heart Disease - Full Text View -...

We are following patients for 1 year to see which intervention has the greatest impact on their medication compliance, blood ... A Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Medication Compliance Among Patients With Coronary Heart Disease. This study has been ... A Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Medication Compliance Among Patients With Coronary Heart Disease. ... However, only 50%-60% of patients take their medicines as directed. Patients who don't take their medicines regularly are ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00208832

*  Patient Compliance

The health care industry has responded with a wave of new technologies to increase compliance. ... Patient compliance is the most important factor in treating and minimizing diseases and illnesses. ... Patient Compliance: The Next Challenge in Health Care Innovation. One of the most complex and challenging situations facing ... However, patient adherence and compliance has proven to involve more than just the pharmaceutical companies developing the ...
fuld.com/patient-compliance-healthcare-innovation

*  Prescription Drug Advertising and Patient Compliance: A Physician Agency Approach

... drug advertising toward doctors and/or patients, and the serious problem of patients' noncompliance with their doctors' ... as well as advertising aimed at both doctors and patients. Advertisement toward patients (respectively, doctors) appears to ... This paper proposes an analysis of both doctors and patients' behavior in an agency model that accounts for the interplay ... drug advertising toward doctors and/or patients, and the serious problem of patients' noncompliance with their doctors' ...
https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/bejeap/vadvances.6y2006i1n5.html

*  patient compliance Archives - ENTtoday

Articles tagged with "patient compliance". Middle Ear Implants Offer Potential: New breed of devices may stimulate compliance, ... Compliance Made Easy: High-tech systems remind patients to take their meds. November 1, 2010. ... Temporary Trial May Improve Compliance with CPAP. November 1, 2006. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the standard ... If anyone has a sense of how socioeconomic status (SES) affects the health of patients, it is Urjeet A. Patel, MD. ...
enttoday.org/tag/patient-compliance/

*  Patient Compliance Solutions from ResMed

ResMed's patient monitoring and data management solutions can help you proactively identify patient issues and address them ... ResMed's patient monitoring and data management solutions can help you proactively identify patient issues and address them ... U-Sleep is our premium CPAP compliance solution that streamlines patient population management and helps you coach patients ... solutions can help you proactively identify patient issues and address them early on for increased patient compliance. ...
https://resmed.com/us/en/commercial-partner/products/monitoring-and-data-management.html

*  Patient compliance legal definition of patient compliance

What is patient compliance? Meaning of patient compliance as a legal term. What does patient compliance mean in law? ... Definition of patient compliance in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Patient compliance legal definition of patient compliance https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/patient+compliance ... patient. (redirected from patient compliance). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia. patient. adjective ...
https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/patient compliance

*  Patient compliance with a hospital no-smoking policy | Tobacco Control

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center's RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/4/2/145

*  Improving Patient Compliance With Treatment Regimens By Using Novel Drug Delivery Systems | HubPages

There are many reasons why patients may not comply. For example, they may have difficulty swallowing their medication or the ... implants and transdermal delivery systems are making it easier for patients to adhere to their treatment regimens. ... Effective drug therapy requires that the patient fully comply with the treatment regimen. ... The relationship between doctor and patient also factors into the patient's compliance with drug therapy. A patient who does ...
https://hubpages.com/health/Improving-Patient-Compliance-With-Drugs-Regimens-By-Using-New-Drug-Delivery-Systems

*  Patient Welfare and Patient Compliance -- An Empirical Framework for Measuring the Benefits from Pharmaceutical Innovation

By focusing on compliance behavior, the proposed welfare measure reflects a specific economic choice made by patients. We ... Since physicians act as imperfect but interested agents for their patients, the welfare analysis based on compliance must ... Our proposed estimator for patient welfare depends on (a) whether patients comply with the prescriptions they receive from ... The key contribution of this paper resides in integrating the choices made by both physicians and patients into a unified ...
https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/7641.html

*  Global Anti-snoring Devices and Snoring Surgery Market: Companies will need to overcome lack of patient compliance to spur...

However, low patient compliance levels (mainly owing to discomfort in using anti-snoring devices) stand as an impediment to ... Global Anti-snoring Devices and Snoring Surgery Market: Companies will need to overcome lack of patient compliance to spur ... In contrast, a lack of patient compliance, certain side effects such as throat dryness and nasal congestion, ambiguity in ... Companies will need to overcome lack of patient compliance to spur sales ...
https://medgadget.com/2016/12/global-anti-snoring-devices-and-snoring-surgery-market-companies-will-need-to-overcome-lack-of-patient-compliance-to-spur-sales.html

*  Patient Non-Compliance a Pricey Problem | HealthLeaders Media

There's still a great deal of debate over how much influence cost really has on a patient's actions. ... What can hospital and health systems do to drive out patient non-compliance costs? The answer lies in financial incentives and ... Patient non-compliance is perhaps most easily seen in how patients fill and use prescription medications. As many as 20% to 30 ... So what can hospital and health systems do to drive out patient non-compliance costs? The answer lies in financial incentives ...
healthleadersmedia.com/finance/patient-non-compliance-pricey-problem

*  patient compliance Archives - Health Tech Insider

You are here: Home / Archives for patient compliance. Biometric Rx Dispenser Regulates Prescription Compliance. August 28, 2017 ... Digital Connections Increase Patient Compliance. November 11, 2016. By brucebrown Leave a Comment ... Lack of effective discharge procedures and patient follow-up can result in patient … [Read more...] ... of patients misunderstand, forget, or ignore healthcare advice to their detriment. Patient noncompliance with home exercises in ...
healthtechinsider.com/tag/patient-compliance/

*  HCA 230 CheckPoint Patient Compliance Part 1 | StudyDaddy.com

HCA 230 CheckPoint Patient Compliance Part 1. More than 1000 tutors online! ... HCA 230 CheckPoint Patient Compliance Part 1. This archive file comprises HCA 230 CheckPoint Patient Compliance Part 1 ...
https://studydaddy.com/question/hca-230-checkpoint-patient-compliance-part-1

*  Deaths and facility admissions caused by patient non-compliance - McKnight's Long Term Care News

... of all hospital and nursing home admissions each year can be attributed to patient non-compliance, according to a recent ... According to "Pharmaceutical Patient Compliance and Disease Management," a report from Cutting Edge Information, 70% of all ... To improve compliance, manage patient conditions over time, improve health outcomes and lower costs, some pharmaceutical ... Deaths and facility admissions caused by patient non-compliance. Share this content: *facebook ...
mcknights.com/news/deaths-and-facility-admissions-caused-by-patient-non-compliance/article/101335/

*  web-archive-net.com: patientcompliance.net - Founder & CEO

Medication Adherence / Patient Compliance. Portal by Boston based GigaNano (www.PatientCompliance.net ). Patient Compliance ... PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient adherence to a medication schedule www giganano com www giganano com. Original URL path: ... Click here for directions map to GigaNano LLC GigaNano Marketing Sales Consultants Boston PATIENT COMPLIANCE improve patient ... Personal Medication Management System Pill Container MEMS Patient Compliance Monitoring Device AARDEX The Patient Compliance ...
web-archive-net.com/net/p/patientcompliance.net/2016-05-01_7777346_2/Founder_CEO/

*  Blog | Lynch's Pharmacy | Promoting health literacy, Increasing patient compliance, Enhancing well-being

The benefits to patients who do increase their knowledge of their medicines is well documented and include: Increase in health ... The benefits to patients who do increase their knowledge of their medicines is well documented and include: Increase in health ... What is health literacy? The concept is very simple, according to the world health organisation - the more a patient knows ... What is health literacy? The concept is very simple, according to the world health organisation - the more a patient knows ...
lynchspharmacy.com/blog

*  Interventions to Enhance Medication Persistence and Compliance in Patients With Overactive Bladder - Tabular View -...

Interventions to Enhance Medication Persistence and Compliance in Patients With Overactive Bladder. The recruitment status of ... Difference in the % of the patients with the compliance rate ≥ 80% between no intervention and HEI group [ Time Frame: 1, 2, 4 ... Interventions to Enhance Medication Persistence and Compliance in Patients With Overactive Bladder : 6-month, Randomized, Open- ... Interventions to Enhance Medication Persistence and Compliance in Patients With Overactive Bladder. ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT01515722

*  Health In The News | Lynch's Pharmacy | Promoting health literacy, Increasing patient compliance, Enhancing well-being

A new resource for our Patients and Followers. We listen and respond to customer emails.. We keep you up-to-date on latest ... So, what do we do to help patients increase their health literacy?. We have developed a new evidence based health literacy ... The concept is very simple, according to the world health organisation - the more a patient knows about their medicine, the ... the more a patient knows about their medicine, the more likely they are to Read ...
lynchspharmacy.com/health-in-the-news

*  Compliance of Patients With Essential Hypertension Treated With Candesartan or Candesartan/Hydrochlorothiazide - Full Text View...

Compliance of Patients With Essential Hypertension Treated With Candesartan or Candesartan/Hydrochlorothiazide (CoCa). This ... Compliance of Patients With Essential Hypertension Treated With Candesartan or Candesartan/Hydrochlorothiazide. ... To estimate under naturalistic conditions the compliance rate, defined as the number of subjects with regular intake of the ... To assess under naturalistic conditions whether physicians are using procedures to improve the subject's compliance regarding ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00608153

*  Doctors Improve Patient Care with Affinity Billing; Integrated Workflow Helps Manage Growing Patient Volume, Regulatory...

Patients appreciate excellent care and keep Dr. Makar's schedule busy. Dr. Gamil Makar, Family Medicine, St. Joseph's ... "An intelligent scheduler avoids billing errors, manages patient flow, helps maintain regulatory compliance, alerts about unpaid ... Doctors Improve Patient Care with Affinity Billing; Integrated Workflow Helps Manage Growing Patient Volume, Regulatory ... "High patient volumes coupled with low administration costs mean improved profitability.". Dr. Makar has joined hundreds of ...
prweb.com/releases/2006/03/prweb359590.htm

*  Abstract TP389: Improving 30 Day Event Monitoring Compliance for Patients Transferred to Acute and Subacute Rehabilitation...

If a patient is discharged to AIR or SNF their caregiver will be a champion for monitor compliance, helping educate the ... Purpose: The goal was to improve 30 day event monitoring compliance in patient discharged to AIR and SNF facilities. ... Abstract TP389: Improving 30 Day Event Monitoring Compliance for Patients Transferred to Acute and Subacute Rehabilitation ... Abstract TP389: Improving 30 Day Event Monitoring Compliance for Patients Transferred to Acute and Subacute Rehabilitation ...
stroke.ahajournals.org/content/47/Suppl_1/ATP389

*  Lopinavir/r or Fosamprenavir/r Switch to Atazanavir/r or Darunavir/r - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Percent of Patients With HIV VL ,200 Copies/mL at Week 4, 12 & 24 [ Time Frame: Week 4, 12 & 24 ]. *Difference in CD4 From ... abuse or significant psychiatric illness that in the opinion of the investigator might interfere with study compliance ... Percentage of Patients That Experience 10% Decline in Triglycerides From Baseline to Week 24. [ Time Frame: baseline, 24 weeks ... We designed a study to determine if switching virologically suppressed patients on a regimen containing LPV/r or FPV/r to ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00756730?order=381

*  Sciton Introduces ProLipo PLUS(TM), the Most Robust Laser-Assisted Lipolysis System... ( PALO ALTO Calif. Dec. 1 /- Sciton int....

My patients are delighted with ProLipo said Dr. Salzman. ProL...,Sciton,Introduces,ProLipo,PLUS(TM),,the,Most,Robust,Laser- ... First Healthcare Compliance to Demonstrate New Compliance Solutions @ 68th Annual AHCA/NCAL Convention in Las Vegas ... "My patients are delighted with ProLipo," said Dr. Salzman. "ProLipo PLUS combines high power 1064 nm and 1319 nm wavelengths ... Doing so gives the highest patient satisfaction I've seen with any laser. I also like that there are no expensive consumable ...
bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-1/Sciton-Introduces-ProLipo-PLUS-28TM-29--the-Most-Robust-Laser-Assisted-Lipolysis-System-Available-30851-1/

Compliance (physiology): Compliance is the ability of a hollow organ (vessel) to distend and increase volume with increasing transmural pressure or the tendency of a hollow organ to resist recoil toward its original dimensions on application of a distending or compressing force. It is the reciprocal of "elastance", hence elastance is a measure of the tendency of a hollow organ to recoil toward its original dimensions upon removal of a distending or compressing force.Child-resistant packaging: Child-resistant packaging or CR packaging is special packaging used to reduce the risk of children ingesting dangerous items. This is often accomplished by the use of a special safety cap.ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters: ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters is a peer-reviewed academic journal in the field of medicinal chemistry. Founded in 2009, this online journal is published monthly by the American Chemical Society.Sustained release dosage forms: Sustained release dosage forms are designed to release a drug at a predetermined rate in order to maintain a constant drug concentration for a specific period of time with minimum side effects. This can be achieved through a variety of formulations, including liposomes and drug-polymer conjugates (an example being hydrogels).Osmotic controlled-release oral delivery system: OROS (Osmotic [Controlled] Release Oral [Delivery] System) is a controlled release oral drug delivery system in the form of a tablet. The tablet has a rigid water-permeable jacket with one or more laser drilled small holes.Duragesic: Duragesic and Durogesic are trade names of fentanyl transdermal patches, used for relief of moderate to severe pain. The patches release fentanyl, a potent opioid, slowly through the skin.Effervescent tablet: Effervescent or carbon tablets are tablets which are designed to break in contact with water or another liquid, releasing carbon dioxide in the process.British Pharmacopeia 2003 Rapid breakdown often may cause the tablet to dissolve into a solution, and is also often followed by a froth.Cathartic: In medicine, a cathartic is a substance that accelerates defecation. This is in contrast to a laxative, which is a substance which eases defecation, usually by softening feces.Home appliance: Home appliances are electrical/mechanical machines which accomplish some household functions, such as cooking or cleaning. Home appliances can be classified into:Fecal occult bloodNeural drug delivery systems: Neural drug delivery is the next step beyond the basic addition of growth factors to nerve guidance conduits. Drug delivery systems allow the rate of growth factor release to be regulated over time, which is critical for creating an environment more closely representative of in vivo development environments.Online patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.CapsugelCombination therapy: Combination therapy or polytherapy is therapy that uses more than one medication or modality (versus monotherapy, which is any therapy taken alone). Typically, these terms refer to using multiple therapies to treat a single disease, and often all the therapies are pharmaceutical (although it can also involve non-medical therapy, such as the combination of medications and talk therapy to treat depression).Besins HealthcareCharged Aerosol Release Experiment: The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment also known as CARE, is a project run by NASA which will use a rocket to release dust in the upper atmosphere to form a dusty plasma in space. NASA plans to trigger cloud formation around the rocket's exhaust particles.Self-administration: Self-administration is, in its medical sense, the process of a subject administering a pharmacological substance to him-, her-, or itself. A clinical example of this is the subcutaneous "self-injection" of insulin by a diabetic patient.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingNational Clinical Guideline CentreFirst pass effect: The first-pass effect (also known as first-pass metabolism or presystemic metabolism) is a phenomenon of drug metabolism whereby the concentration of a drug is greatly reduced before it reaches the systemic circulation. It is the fraction of drug lost during the process of absorption which is generally related to the liver and gut wall.BacitracinCommunity-based clinical trial: Community-based clinical trials are clinical trials conducted directly through doctors and clinics rather than academic research facilities. They are designed to be administered through primary care physicians, community health centers and local outpatient facilities.Virtual colonoscopy: Virtual colonoscopy (VC, also called CT Colonography or CT Pneumocolon) is a medical imaging procedure which uses x-rays and computers to produce two- and three-dimensional images of the colon (large intestine) from the lowest part, the rectum, all the way to the lower end of the small intestine and display them on a screen. The procedure is used to diagnose colon and bowel disease, including polyps, diverticulosis and cancer.Lidanserin: Lidanserin (INN; ZK-33,839) is a drug which acts as a combined 5-HT2A and α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist. It was developed as an antihypertensive agent but was never marketed.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Beta encoder: A beta encoder is an analog to digital conversion (A/D) system in which a real number in the unit interval is represented by a finite representation of a sequence in base beta, with beta being a real number between 1 and 2. Beta encoders are an alternative to traditional approaches to pulse code modulation.Anti-diabetic medication: Drugs used in diabetes treat diabetes mellitus by lowering glucose levels in the blood. With the exceptions of insulin, exenatide, liraglutide and pramlintide, all are administered orally and are thus also called oral hypoglycemic agents or oral antihyperglycemic agents.AIP Conference Proceedings: AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970. It publishes the proceedings from various conferences of physics societies.CagA: Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) is a 120–145kDa protein encoded on the 40kb cag pathogenicity island (PAI). H.Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research: Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research (SIAF), founded in 1988, performs basic research in the field of allergy and asthma with the aim to improve the understanding and treatment of these conditions, which affect around 30-40% of the westernized population. The Institute has its roots in the Tuberculosis Research Institute of Davos, a medical society founded in 1905 to study the beneficial effects of high altitude treatment of tuberculosis.Placebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.HypertensionBehavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.Cancer screeningList of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Solubility: Solubility is the property of a solid, liquid, or gaseous chemical substance called solute to dissolve in a solid, liquid, or gaseous solvent to form a solution of the solute in the solvent. The solubility of a substance fundamentally depends on the physical and chemical properties of the solute and solvent as well as on temperature, pressure and the pH of the solution.Concentration effect: In the study of inhaled anesthetics, the concentration effect is the increase in the rate that the Fa(alveolar concentration)/Fi(inspired concentration) ratio rises as the alveolar concentration of that gas is increased. In simple terms, the higher the concentration of gas administered, the faster the alveolar concentration of that gas approaches the inspired concentration.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Moens–Korteweg equation: In biomechanics, the Moens–Korteweg equation models the relationship between wave speed or pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the incremental elastic modulus of the arterial wall or its distensibility. The equation was derived independently by Adriaan Isebree Moens and Diederik Korteweg.Distributing artery: A distributing artery (or muscular artery) is a medium-sized artery that draw blood from an elastic artery and branch into "resistance vessels" including small arteries and arterioles. In contrast to the mechanism elastic arteries use to store energy generated by the heart's contraction, distributing arteries contain layers of smooth muscle.

(1/6919) Single blind, randomised controlled trial of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment in management of genuine stress incontinence in women.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of pelvic floor exercises, electrical stimulation, vaginal cones, and no treatment for genuine stress incontinence. DESIGN: Stratified, single blind, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Multicentre. PARTICIPANTS: 107 women with clinically and urodynamically proved genuine stress incontinence. Mean (range) age was 49.5 (24-70) years, and mean (range) duration of symptoms 10.8 (1-45) years. INTERVENTIONS: Pelvic floor exercise (n=25) comprised 8-12 contractions 3 times a day and exercise in groups with skilled physical therapists once a week. The electrical stimulation group (n=25) used vaginal intermittent stimulation with the MS 106 Twin at 50 Hz 30 minutes a day. The vaginal cones group (n=27) used cones for 20 minutes a day. The untreated control group (n=30) was offered the use of a continence guard. Muscle strength was measured by vaginal squeeze pressure once a month. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pad test with standardised bladder volume, and self report of severity. RESULTS: Improvement in muscle strength was significantly greater (P=0.03) after pelvic floor exercises (11.0 cm H2O (95% confidence interval 7.7 to 14.3) before v 19.2 cm H2O (15.3 to 23.1) after) than either electrical stimulation (14.8 cm H2O (10. 9 to 18.7) v 18.6 cm H2O (13.3 to 23.9)) or vaginal cones (11.8 cm H2O (8.5 to 15.1) v 15.4 cm H2O (11.1 to 19.7)). Reduction in leakage on pad test was greater in the exercise group (-30.2 g; -43. 3 to 16.9) than in the electrical stimulation group (-7.4 g; -20.9 to 6.1) and the vaginal cones group (-14.7 g; -27.6 to -1.8). On completion of the trial one participant in the control group, 14 in the pelvic floor exercise group, three in the electrical stimulation group, and two in the vaginal cones group no longer considered themselves as having a problem. CONCLUSION: Training of the pelvic floor muscles is superior to electrical stimulation and vaginal cones in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence.  (+info)

(2/6919) Maternal vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation in lactating bangladeshi women benefits mothers and infants but does not prevent subclinical deficiency.

The effects of maternal postpartum vitamin A or beta-carotene supplementation on maternal and infant serum retinol concentrations, modified relative dose-response (MRDR) ratios and breast milk vitamin A concentrations were assessed during a community-based trial in Matlab, Bangladesh. At 1-3 wk postpartum, women were randomly assigned to receive either (1) a single dose of 200,000 international units [60,000 retinol equivalents (RE)] vitamin A followed by daily placebos (n = 74), (2) daily doses of beta-carotene [7.8 mg (1300 RE)] (n = 73) or (3) daily placebos (n = 73) until 9 mo postpartum. Compared to placebos, vitamin A supplementation resulted in lower maternal MRDR ratios (i.e., increased liver stores) and higher milk vitamin A concentrations at 3 mo, but these improvements were not sustained. The beta-carotene supplementation acted more slowly, resulting in milk vitamin A concentrations higher than the placebo group only at 9 mo. Irrespective of treatment group, over 50% of women produced milk with low vitamin A concentrations (/=0. 06. We conclude that while both interventions were beneficial, neither was sufficient to correct the underlying subclinical vitamin A deficiency in these women nor to bring their infants into adequate vitamin A status.  (+info)

(3/6919) An analysis of multiple misplaced parental social contingencies.

This study analyzed the training of a mother to modify five subclasses of her attention to her young child's noncompliance with instructions, and also displayed the changes in her child's behavior correlated with these events. Training in four subclasses consisted of teaching the mother to withhold various forms of social attention to her daughter's undesired behavior; training in the fifth subclass involved introduction of a brief room-timeout procedure for noncompliance. The effectiveness of the parent-training procedure, consisting of initial instructions and daily feedback, was demonstrated through a multiple-baseline design across the five subclasses of parent behavior. Sequential decreased in the first three subclasses of the mother's social attention to undesired child behavior resulted in incomplete improvements in some child responses; however, a decrease in the fourth subclass resulted in a significant increase in undesired child behavior. Complete remediation of all child behaviors was achieved following the training of a timeout procedure for noncompliance. Postchecks conducted up to 16 weeks later showed that these effects were durable.  (+info)

(4/6919) The effects of social punishment on noncompliance: a comparison with timeout and positive practice.

The effects of social punishment, positive practice, and timeout on the noncompliant behavior of four mentally retarded children were assessed in a multitreatment withdrawal design. When programmed, the experimental procedure occurred contigent on non-compliance to experimenter-issued commands. Commands were given at 55-sec intervals throughout each experimental session. The results showed (1) lower levels of noncompliance with social punishment than with the positive-practice or timeout conditions, and (2) that relatively few applications of social punishment were required to obtain this effect. The advantages of social punishment over other punishment procedures, considerations to be made before using it, and the various aspects of the procedure that contribute to its effectiveness were discussed.  (+info)

(5/6919) Following advice in general practice.

A random sample of 521 patients to whom prescriptions had been issued in an urban general practice were investigated to see how well they followed advice about taking medicines.Most factors that have been previously reported as affecting this did not appear to do so. A very high degree of compliance was achieved and it is suggested that the key factor in this is the relationship between doctor and patient.  (+info)

(6/6919) A multiple drug interaction study of stavudine with agents for opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

The effects of multiple opportunistic infection medications on stavudine pharmacokinetics were evaluated. Ten patients with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3 received stavudine (40 mg twice daily) in combination with one to three other drugs used to treat opportunistic infections. Serial blood samples for stavudine concentrations were collected after 1 week of therapy on each regimen and assayed for stavudine by using a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography method. Although the maximum concentration of drug in serum was significantly decreased when the drug was given in combination with three opportunistic infection medications, the area under the concentration-time curve did not significantly differ across various treatment regimens. Stavudine exposure was not significantly altered by multiple concomitant medications. Side effects were minor throughout the 3-month study period. The tolerability of stavudine, combined with its lack of drug interactions, makes it an attractive agent for use as part of a combination regimen.  (+info)

(7/6919) Itraconazole oral solution as prophylaxis for fungal infections in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial. GIMEMA Infection Program. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto.

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of itraconazole oral solution for preventing fungal infections, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter trial was conducted: 405 neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies were randomly assigned to receive either itraconazole, 2.5 mg/kg every 12 hours (201 patients), or placebo (204 patients). Proven and suspected deep fungal infection occurred in 24% of itraconazole recipients and in 33% of placebo recipients, a difference of 9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6% to 22.5%; P = .035). Fungemia due to Candida species was documented in 0.5% of itraconazole recipients and in 4% of placebo recipients, a difference of 3.5 percentage points (95% CI, 0.5% to 6%; P = .01). Deaths due to candidemia occurred in none of the itraconazole recipients compared with 4 placebo recipients, a difference of 2 percentage points (95% CI, 0.05% to 4%; P = .06). Aspergillus infection was documented in four itraconazole recipients (one death) and one placebo recipient (one death). Side effects causing drug interruption occurred in 18% of itraconazole recipients and 13% of placebo recipients. Itraconazole oral solution was well-tolerated and effectively prevented proven and suspected deep fungal infection as well as systemic infection and death due to Candida species.  (+info)

(8/6919) Higher dosage nicotine patches increase one-year smoking cessation rates: results from the European CEASE trial. Collaborative European Anti-Smoking Evaluation. European Respiratory Society.

The Collaborative European Anti-Smoking Evaluation (CEASE) was a European multicentre, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled smoking cessation study. The objectives were to determine whether higher dosage and longer duration of nicotine patch therapy would increase the success rate. Thirty-six chest clinics enrolled a total of 3,575 smokers. Subjects were allocated to one of five treatment arms: placebo and either standard or higher dose nicotine patches (15 mg and 25 mg daily) each given for 8 or 22 weeks with adjunctive moderately intensive support. The 12 month sustained success rates were: 25 mg patch for 22 weeks (L-25), 15.4%; 25 mg patch for 8 weeks (S-25), 15.9%; 15 mg patch for 22 weeks (L-15), 13.7%; 15 mg patch for 8 weeks (S-15), 11.7%; and placebo (P-0) 9.9% (placebo versus 15 mg, p<0.05; 25 mg versus 15 mg, p<0.03; 25 mg versus placebo, p<0.001, Chi-squared test). There was no significant difference in success rate between the two active treatment durations. Of the first week abstainers (n=1,698), 25.1% achieved success at 12 months as opposed to first week smokers, 2.7% of 1,877 subjects (p< 0.001). In summary, a higher than standard dose of nicotine patch was associated with an increase in the long-term success in smoking cessation but continuation of treatment beyond 8-12 weeks did not increase the success rates.  (+info)



adherence


  • One of the most complex and challenging situations facing today's pharmaceutical industry is patient medication adherence and compliance. (fuld.com)
  • However, patient adherence and compliance has proven to involve more than just the pharmaceutical companies developing the drugs. (fuld.com)
  • com/research/30d4f6/improving_medicati) has announced the addition of the "Improving Medication Adherence: Practical Strategies to Increase Patient Compliance , a webinar on CD-ROM" report to their offering. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Patient adherence to treatment plans has a significant impact on healthcare outcomes. (healthtechinsider.com)
  • A recent study showed that digital self-monitoring and clinical management tools can significantly improve patients' adherence to treatment. (healthtechinsider.com)
  • Medication Adherence / Patient Compliance. (web-archive-net.com)

noncompliance


  • This paper proposes an analysis of both doctors and patients' behavior in an agency model that accounts for the interplay between two highly debated health issues: drug advertising toward doctors and/or patients, and the serious problem of patients' noncompliance with their doctors' prescriptions. (repec.org)
  • The results suggest that doctors' prescriptions are directly influenced by the probability of noncompliance, as well as advertising aimed at both doctors and patients. (repec.org)
  • Advertisement toward patients (respectively, doctors) appears to have contributed to (respectively, slowed down) the reduction of the estimated average noncompliance rate. (repec.org)
  • Cutting Edge Information's report, "Pharmaceutical Patient Compliance and Disease Management," describes how patient noncompliance can bring about serious health and financial problems for both patients and pharmaceutical companies. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • We review evidence that the rate of noncompliance ranges up to 70%, suggesting an important gulf between physician prescription behavior and realized patient welfare. (repec.org)

CPAP


  • U-Sleep is our premium CPAP compliance solution that streamlines patient population management and helps you coach patients throughout their therapy. (resmed.com)

physicians and patients


  • March 16 /PRNewswire/ -- With Internet usage growing exponentially, pharmaceutical companies shift their disease management efforts into the digital world to boost patient compliance and avoid communication breakdown between physicians and patients, according to a study by pharmaceutical intelligence firm Cutting Edge Information. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Hausman, 1996), this paper unpacks the separate choices made by physicians and patients in pharmaceutical decisionmaking and develops an estimable econometric model which reflects these choices. (repec.org)
  • The key contribution of this paper resides in integrating the choices made by both physicians and patients into a unified theoretical framework and suggesting how the parameters of such a model can be estimated from data. (repec.org)

hypertension


  • The CoCa study with at maximum daily dose of 32 mg candesartan or 16/12.5 mg candesartan/hydrochlorothiazide has the objective to evaluate under naturalistic conditions, i.e. under routine medical care conditions, the subject compliance as well as the efficacy and tolerability of candesartan or candesartan/HCT in subjects suffering from essential hypertension. (clinicaltrials.gov)

behavior


  • Our proposed estimator for patient welfare depends on (a) whether patients comply with the prescriptions they receive from physicians and (b) the motives of physicians in their prescription behavior. (repec.org)
  • By focusing on compliance behavior, the proposed welfare measure reflects a specific economic choice made by patients. (repec.org)

medications


  • It is important for patients to take their medications exactly as prescribed by their doctor. (hubpages.com)
  • According to "The Merck Manual Home Health Handbook," about 25% of nursing home admissions, 10% of hospital admissions and numerous doctor visits and diagnostic tests could be avoided if patients took their medications as directed by their doctor. (hubpages.com)
  • Patients who take several different medications may become confused and lose track of which drugs have been taken on a given day. (hubpages.com)
  • The meaning of medications: Another look at compliance ," Social Science & Medicine , Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 29-37, January. (repec.org)
  • Patient non-compliance is perhaps most easily seen in how patients fill and use prescription medications. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • Furthermore, treatment failures or new medical problem result from improper outpatient use of medications prescribed to 40% of patients. (mcknights.com)

outcomes


  • AirView is a cloud-based patient management system that brings you data on demand to help improve outcomes in sleep and respiratory care. (resmed.com)
  • Understanding the behaviors that lead to both patient compliance and patient satisfaction could be the key to experiencing medical encounters with more positive outcomes for both the patient and the provider. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • To improve compliance, manage patient conditions over time, improve health outcomes and lower costs, some pharmaceutical companies are establishing tools such as interactive Web sites for patients to track their medication use and doctor visits, the reports authors state. (mcknights.com)
  • The benefits to patients who do increase their knowledge of their medicines is well documented and include: Increase in health outcomes Increase in quality of. (lynchspharmacy.com)

disease management


  • According to "Pharmaceutical Patient Compliance and Disease Management," a report from Cutting Edge Information, 70% of all medical prescriptions are not consumed, leading to $77 billion in excess healthcare costs each year. (mcknights.com)
  • Pharmaceutical Patient Compliance and Disease Management" is available at http://www.PharmaDiseaseManagement.com . (mcknights.com)

affects


  • As health care continues to develop and extend human longevity, there needs to be a proportional push to bring awareness to the issue of compliance, and how it affects every single one of us, not just those missing their prescription refills. (fuld.com)
  • If anyone has a sense of how socioeconomic status (SES) affects the health of patients, it is Urjeet A. Patel, MD. (enttoday.org)
  • We will also examine whether patients' health literacy affects the success of the interventions. (clinicaltrials.gov)

strategies


  • This puzzling and multifaceted issue has been the subject of debate in the industry for many years, with various companies revamping strategies to encourage patients to better observe their medication schedules. (fuld.com)
  • to test 2 different strategies designed to help patients take their medicines more regularly. (clinicaltrials.gov)

significantly


  • In a clinical study published in the April 2009 edition of "Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism," researchers conclude that patients who took metformin XL had significantly better compliance rates than those who took the conventional metformin immediate release formulation. (hubpages.com)

Skip


  • If the side effects of the medication are particularly unpleasant, the patient may be tempted to skip the dosing. (hubpages.com)

pharmaceutical


  • But truly solving the patient compliance conundrum is a societal problem, he says, that will require a multi-stakeholder, collaborative effort among a broad range of important players, including doctors, payers, pharmacists, patients, pharmaceutical makers and others. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Call centers are one more way that pharmaceutical companies can help control patient compliance ," said Eric Bolesh, senior analyst at Cutting Edge Information. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The main goal of this paper is to develop an empirical framework for evaluating the patient welfare benefits arising from pharmaceutical innovation. (repec.org)
  • Patient Welfare and Patient Compliance: An Empirical Framework for Measuring the Benefits from Pharmaceutical Innovation ," NBER Working Papers 6890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (repec.org)

comply


  • Patients who find these restrictions too burdensome may simply not comply with treatment. (hubpages.com)
  • The analysis notes that the patients' failure to comply with medication prescriptions-albeit for a variety of reasons-costs the U.S. health system between $100 billion and $289 billion a year. (healthleadersmedia.com)

devices


  • myAir allows patients with AirSense 10 and AirCurve 10 therapy devices to track their nightly sleep data and receive interactive coaching. (resmed.com)
  • Assess key innovative drug delivery devices that are in development and understand how they can improve patient compliance and for which indications. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • However, low patient compliance levels (mainly owing to discomfort in using anti-snoring devices) stand as an impediment to growth for players in the anti-snoring devices and surgery market. (medgadget.com)
  • The growing demand for connected and wireless devices as well as remote patient monitoring is reflected in the way an increasing number of anti-snoring devices companies are integrating IoT with their products. (medgadget.com)
  • In contrast, a lack of patient compliance, certain side effects such as throat dryness and nasal congestion, ambiguity in handling the device have limited the use of anti-snoring devices among patients. (medgadget.com)

intervention


  • We then assigned patients to 1 of 4 intervention groups (intervention ongoing). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We are following patients for 1 year to see which intervention has the greatest impact on their medication compliance, blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes measurements. (clinicaltrials.gov)

rate


  • Most ophthalmologists rate patient compliance with eye care medication instructions as "good" to an extent. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • To estimate under naturalistic conditions the compliance rate, defined as the number of subjects with regular intake of the prescribed dose of candesartan or candesartan/HCT as judged by the physician at the end of the observational period. (clinicaltrials.gov)

clinical


  • Yes, the change will improve continuity of care for patients, clinical teamwork, and the learning experience for residents. (enttoday.org)

healthcare


  • ResMed ReSupply is a patient communication and management solution that gives healthcare providers a way to effectively build and manage their patient populations. (resmed.com)
  • Other negative consequences of patient non-compliance include a decline in the patient's health, additional hospitalizations and significant increases in the cost of healthcare. (hubpages.com)
  • Patience compliance with all forms of care, treatment, and medication counts among the medical community's top healthcare challenges. (healthtechinsider.com)
  • According to a study by researchers at the Departments of Psychology at La Sierra University and the University of California, Riverside, more than 40% of patients misunderstand, forget, or ignore healthcare advice to their detriment. (healthtechinsider.com)
  • Patients often don't stick to their medical treatment plans, which leads to as much as $290 billion a year in extra healthcare costs, according to the New England Healthcare Institute. (healthtechinsider.com)

problem


  • Manufacturers of drug technology have taken note of the problem of patient non-compliance with drug therapy regimens. (hubpages.com)

However


  • Physicians do have concerns, however, including the time spent in patient engagement and reimbursement for that time. (healthtechinsider.com)
  • However, only 50%-60% of patients take their medicines as directed. (clinicaltrials.gov)

medicines


  • Patients who don't take their medicines regularly are considered noncompliant. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients with low health literacy may not understand their illnesses as well, or how to take their medicines properly. (clinicaltrials.gov)

increase


  • No, longer shifts for residents increase the odds of sleep deprivation and accidents, putting patients as well as physicians in harm's way. (enttoday.org)
  • So, what do we do to help patients increase their health literacy? (lynchspharmacy.com)

care


  • A recent American Medical Association (AMA) survey found that 85 percent of those doctors surveyed felt that digital health solutions improve patient care. (healthtechinsider.com)

treatment


  • Patient non-compliance with the drug regimen is one of the most prominent impediments to the successful treatment of chronic conditions. (hubpages.com)
  • If the patient finds that the instructions for taking the drug are too complicated and the drug needs to be taken too frequently, he or she may decide not to bother with treatment. (hubpages.com)
  • The concept is very simple, according to the world health organisation - the more a patient knows about their medicine, the more likely they are to continue taking their prescribed treatment correctly. (lynchspharmacy.com)

improve patient


  • As the only 3T MR system designed to improve patient compliance and comfort while offering advanced radiology capabilities, Toshiba's new Vantage Titan 3T open bore MR has received FDA clearance. (thefreedictionary.com)

conditions


  • To assess under naturalistic conditions whether physicians are using procedures to improve the subject's compliance regarding the intake of candesartan or candesartan/HCT and to get insight in the type and effects of these procedures [ Time Frame: app. (clinicaltrials.gov)

drug


  • In some cases, the patient can't afford the high cost of the drug, and therefore decides to reduce the number of doses. (hubpages.com)
  • The relationship between doctor and patient also factors into the patient's compliance with drug therapy. (hubpages.com)
  • Finally, some drug therapy regimens require that the patient avoid sunlight, alcoholic beverages or milk products. (hubpages.com)
  • In addition, in a paper published in the November 2008 edition of "Recent Patents on Drug Delivery and Formulation," researchers note that recently developed rapidly disintegrating oral formulations including tablets and films have led to very high rates of compliance particularly among geriatric and pediatric patients. (hubpages.com)

medical


  • Moreover, the economic impact of sleep apnea can be particularly high as it is associated with CVD, leading patients to incur high medical expenses. (medgadget.com)
  • In February 2015, the medical device maker launched an innovative telemedicine assistance system that not only monitors the sleeping patterns of patients with obstructive sleep apnea disorder but also helps schedule doctors' appointments. (medgadget.com)
  • Though there is a great deal of discussion about the $750 billion that the U.S. spends annually on ordering unnecessary medical procedures, the financial waste resulting from patient non-compliance gets less press. (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • It has been estimated by numerous studies that one-third to one-half of all patients are non-compliant with medical direction. (healthleadersmedia.com)

issues


  • Featuring intuitive interfaces and at-a-glance reports, our patient monitoring and data management solutions can help you proactively identify patient issues and address them early on for increased patient compliance. (resmed.com)

side effects


  • The researchers recommend that patients who can't tolerate the gastrointestinal side effects of conventional metformin should try metformin XL. (hubpages.com)

analysis


  • Since physicians act as imperfect but interested agents for their patients, the welfare analysis based on compliance must account for the nonrandom selection of patients into drugs by their physicians. (repec.org)

Time


  • Patients who have difficulty with swallowing prefer these rapidly disintegrating formulations because they can't drink a large quantity of water in a short time. (hubpages.com)

take


  • There are a number of reasons why patients may not take their medication exactly as prescribed. (hubpages.com)
  • Patients who have difficulty swallowing may find it too frustrating to take conventional tablets and pills. (hubpages.com)
  • Some patients don't take their medication properly because they are in denial about the seriousness of their illness. (hubpages.com)

hearing aids


  • For decades, otolaryngologists have been frustrated by the refusal of some patients with hearing loss to use hearing aids. (enttoday.org)

Technology


  • About 75 percent already use or plan to use digital technology for patient engagement. (healthtechinsider.com)

hospital


  • So what can hospital and health systems do to drive out patient non-compliance costs? (healthleadersmedia.com)
  • As many as 125,000 deaths a year and up to 20% of all hospital and nursing home admissions each year can be attributed to patient non-compliance, according to a recent pharmacy industry report. (mcknights.com)

Easy


  • An easy and flexible patient management system providing excellent therapy insights. (resmed.com)

year


  • Is the change to a 24-hour work shift good for first-year residents, and for patients? (enttoday.org)

drugs


  • They have come up with new ways of delivering drugs, and these new methods greatly facilitate patient compliance. (hubpages.com)

Please


  • Please be patient as the files may be large. (repec.org)