Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Cartilage, Articular: A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.Osteoarthritis, Spine: A degenerative joint disease involving the SPINE. It is characterized by progressive deterioration of the spinal articular cartilage (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR), usually with hardening of the subchondral bone and outgrowth of bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE).Hand Joints: The articulations extending from the WRIST distally to the FINGERS. These include the WRIST JOINT; CARPAL JOINTS; METACARPOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and FINGER JOINT.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Menisci, Tibial: The interarticular fibrocartilages of the superior surface of the tibia.Osteophyte: Bony outgrowth usually found around joints and often seen in conditions such as ARTHRITIS.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Chondrocytes: Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.Finger Joint: The articulation between the head of one phalanx and the base of the one distal to it, in each finger.Synovial Membrane: The inner membrane of a joint capsule surrounding a freely movable joint. It is loosely attached to the external fibrous capsule and secretes SYNOVIAL FLUID.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Viscosupplementation: A therapeutic treatment typically involving INTRA-ARTICULAR INJECTIONS of HYALURONIC ACID and related compounds. The procedure is commonly used in the treatment of OSTEOARTHRITIS with the therapeutic goal to restore the viscoelasticity of SYNOVIAL FLUID, decrease pain, improve mobility and restore the natural protective functions of hyaluronan in the joint.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.Hyaluronic Acid: A natural high-viscosity mucopolysaccharide with alternating beta (1-3) glucuronide and beta (1-4) glucosaminidic bonds. It is found in the UMBILICAL CORD, in VITREOUS BODY and in SYNOVIAL FLUID. A high urinary level is found in PROGERIA.Viscosupplements: Viscoelastic solutions that are injected into JOINTS in order to alleviate symptoms of joint-related disorders such as OSTEOARTHRITIS.Cartilage Diseases: Pathological processes involving the chondral tissue (CARTILAGE).Patella: The flat, triangular bone situated at the anterior part of the KNEE.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Matrilin Proteins: PROTEOGLYCANS-associated proteins that are major components of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of various tissues including CARTILAGE; and INTERVERTEBRAL DISC structures. They bind COLLAGEN fibers and contain protein domains that enable oligomer formation and interaction with other extracellular matrix proteins such as CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN.Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Collagen Type II: A fibrillar collagen found predominantly in CARTILAGE and vitreous humor. It consists of three identical alpha1(II) chains.Synovitis: Inflammation of a synovial membrane. It is usually painful, particularly on motion, and is characterized by a fluctuating swelling due to effusion within a synovial sac. (Dorland, 27th ed)Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Carpometacarpal Joints: The articulations between the CARPAL BONES and the METACARPAL BONES.Matrix Metalloproteinase 13: A secreted matrix metalloproteinase that plays a physiological role in the degradation of extracellular matrix found in skeletal tissues. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is activated by the proteolytic cleavage of its N-terminal propeptide.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein: Major component of chondrocyte EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX of various tissues including bone, tendon, ligament, SYNOVIUM and blood vessels. It binds MATRILIN PROTEINS and is associated with development of cartilage and bone.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Chondrocalcinosis: Presence of calcium salts, especially calcium pyrophosphate, in the cartilaginous structures of one or more joints. When accompanied by attacks of goutlike symptoms, it is called pseudogout. (Dorland, 27th ed)Gait: Manner or style of walking.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.GlucosamineArthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Joint Deformities, Acquired: Deformities acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. The joint deformity is often associated with rheumatoid arthritis and leprosy.Joint DiseasesPatellofemoral Joint: The articulation between the articular surface of the PATELLA and the patellar surface of the FEMUR.Aggrecans: Large HYALURONAN-containing proteoglycans found in articular cartilage (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR). They form into aggregates that provide tissues with the capacity to resist high compressive and tensile forces.ArthritisExercise Therapy: A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Diclofenac: A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) with antipyretic and analgesic actions. It is primarily available as the sodium salt.ShoesArthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Quadriceps Muscle: The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Arthritis, Experimental: ARTHRITIS that is induced in experimental animals. Immunological methods and infectious agents can be used to develop experimental arthritis models. These methods include injections of stimulators of the immune response, such as an adjuvant (ADJUVANTS, IMMUNOLOGIC) or COLLAGEN.Growth Differentiation Factor 5: A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in early CHONDROGENESIS and joint formation.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Muscle Strength: The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Proteoglycans: Glycoproteins which have a very high polysaccharide content.Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Thumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Chondroitin Sulfates: Derivatives of chondroitin which have a sulfate moiety esterified to the galactosamine moiety of chondroitin. Chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin 4-sulfate, and chondroitin sulfate C, or chondroitin 6-sulfate, have the sulfate esterified in the 4- and 6-positions, respectively. Chondroitin sulfate B (beta heparin; DERMATAN SULFATE) is a misnomer and this compound is not a true chondroitin sulfate.Bone Marrow DiseasesNaproxen: An anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic and antipyretic properties. Both the acid and its sodium salt are used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic or musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and acute gout.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Harpagophytum: A plant genus of the family PEDALIACEAE. Members contain harpagoside.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Matrix Metalloproteinase 3: An extracellular endopeptidase of vertebrate tissues similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 1. It digests PROTEOGLYCAN; FIBRONECTIN; COLLAGEN types III, IV, V, and IX, and activates procollagenase. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Procollagen N-Endopeptidase: An extracellular endopeptidase which excises a block of peptides at the amino terminal, nonhelical region of the procollagen molecule with the formation of collagen. Absence or deficiency of the enzyme causes accumulation of procollagen which results in the inherited connective tissue disorder--dermatosparaxis. EC 3.4.24.14.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Canes: Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Calcium Pyrophosphate: An inorganic pyrophosphate which affects calcium metabolism in mammals. Abnormalities in its metabolism occur in some human diseases, notably HYPOPHOSPHATASIA and pseudogout (CHONDROCALCINOSIS).Genu Valgum: An inward slant of the thigh in which the knees are close together and the ankles far apart. Genu valgum can develop due to skeletal and joint dysplasias (e.g., OSTEOARTHRITIS; HURLER SYNDROME); and malnutrition (e.g., RICKETS; FLUORIDE POISONING).Genu Varum: An outward slant of the thigh in which the knees are wide apart and the ankles close together. Genu varum can develop due to skeletal and joint dysplasia (e.g., OSTEOARTHRITIS; Blount's disease); and malnutrition (e.g., RICKETS; FLUORIDE POISONING).Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Analgesics, Non-Narcotic: A subclass of analgesic agents that typically do not bind to OPIOID RECEPTORS and are not addictive. Many non-narcotic analgesics are offered as NONPRESCRIPTION DRUGS.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalIodoacetates: Iodinated derivatives of acetic acid. Iodoacetates are commonly used as alkylating sulfhydryl reagents and enzyme inhibitors in biochemical research.Piroxicam: A cyclooxygenase inhibiting, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that is well established in treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and used for musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and postoperative pain. Its long half-life enables it to be administered once daily.Keratan Sulfate: A sulfated mucopolysaccharide initially isolated from bovine cornea. At least two types are known. Type I, found mostly in the cornea, contains D-galactose and D-glucosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit; type II, found in skeletal tissues, contains D-galactose and D-galactosamine-6-O-sulfate as the repeating unit.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Rheumatic Diseases: Disorders of connective tissue, especially the joints and related structures, characterized by inflammation, degeneration, or metabolic derangement.Physical Therapy Modalities: Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Acetaminophen: Analgesic antipyretic derivative of acetanilide. It has weak anti-inflammatory properties and is used as a common analgesic, but may cause liver, blood cell, and kidney damage.Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Popliteal Cyst: A SYNOVIAL CYST located in the back of the knee, in the popliteal space arising from the semimembranous bursa or the knee joint.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Collagenases: Enzymes that catalyze the degradation of collagen by acting on the peptide bonds.SulfonesCyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors: A subclass of cyclooxygenase inhibitors with specificity for CYCLOOXYGENASE-2.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Foot Orthoses: Devices used to support or align the foot structure, or to prevent or correct foot deformities.Glycosaminoglycans: Heteropolysaccharides which contain an N-acetylated hexosamine in a characteristic repeating disaccharide unit. The repeating structure of each disaccharide involves alternate 1,4- and 1,3-linkages consisting of either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Short-Wave Therapy: The use of focused short radio waves to produce local hyperthermia in an injured person or diseased body area.Interleukin-1beta: An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Iodoacetic Acid: A derivative of ACETIC ACID that contains one IODINE atom attached to its methyl group.Radiography: Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Orthotic Devices: Apparatus used to support, align, prevent, or correct deformities or to improve the function of movable parts of the body.Joint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Medial Collateral Ligament, Knee: The ligament that travels from the medial epicondyle of the FEMUR to the medial margin and medial surface of the TIBIA. The medial meniscus is attached to its deep surface.Hydrotherapy: External application of water for therapeutic purposes.Trapezium Bone: A carpal bone adjacent to the TRAPEZOID BONE.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Ibuprofen: A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with analgesic properties used in the therapy of rheumatism and arthritis.ThiazinesCells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Mud Therapy: The therapeutic use of mud in packs or baths taking advantage of the absorptive qualities of the mud. It has been used for rheumatism and skin problems.Rheumatology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of inflammatory or degenerative processes and metabolic derangement of connective tissue structures which pertain to a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, such as arthritis.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle: Replacement of the ANKLE JOINT.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Carpus, Animal: The region corresponding to the human WRIST in non-human ANIMALS.Hyaline Cartilage: A type of CARTILAGE characterized by a homogenous amorphous matrix containing predominately TYPE II COLLAGEN and ground substance. Hyaline cartilage is found in ARTICULAR CARTILAGE; COSTAL CARTILAGE; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; and the NASAL SEPTUM.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Pyrazoles: Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Matrix Metalloproteinases: A family of zinc-dependent metalloendopeptidases that is involved in the degradation of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX components.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.ADAM Proteins: A family of membrane-anchored glycoproteins that contain a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain. They are responsible for the proteolytic cleavage of many transmembrane proteins and the release of their extracellular domain.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Exostoses: Benign hypertrophy that projects outward from the surface of bone, often containing a cartilaginous component.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Metatarsophalangeal Joint: The articulation between a metatarsal bone (METATARSAL BONES) and a phalanx.Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.Moxibustion: The burning of a small, thimble sized, smoldering plug of dried leaves on the SKIN at an ACUPUNCTURE point. Usually the plugs contain leaves of MUGWORT or moxa.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Interleukin-1: A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by retropatellar or peripatellar PAIN resulting from physical and biochemical changes in the patellofemoral joint. The pain is most prominent when ascending or descending stairs, squatting, or sitting with flexed knees. There is a lack of consensus on the etiology and treatment. The syndrome is often confused with (or accompanied by) CHONDROMALACIA PATELLAE, the latter describing a pathological condition of the CARTILAGE and not a syndrome.Acupuncture Analgesia: Analgesia produced by the insertion of ACUPUNCTURE needles at certain ACUPUNCTURE POINTS on the body. This activates small myelinated nerve fibers in the muscle which transmit impulses to the spinal cord and then activate three centers - the spinal cord, midbrain and pituitary/hypothalamus - to produce analgesia.Collagen Type IX: A fibril-associated collagen usually found crosslinked to the surface of COLLAGEN TYPE II fibrils. It is a heterotrimer containing alpha1(IX), alpha2(IX) and alpha3(IX) subunits.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Bashkiria: A political subdivision of eastern RUSSIA located within Europe. It consists of a plateau and mountainous area of the Southern Urals. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1997)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Chondrogenesis: The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.

*  Back Pain & Osteoarthritis

Get the facts about osteoarthritis of the spine and why it is more common than you think from Arthritis Today Magazine. ... Osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints, and your back has plenty. The spine is a column of 33 bones called vertebrae. Five ... Osteoarthritis can make the spine unstable, explains Dr. Marks. In response, growths called osteophytes, or bone spurs, can ... With an aging U.S. population, back pain may be a growing problem, since osteoarthritis (OA) typically emerges in people over ...
arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/back-pain/articles/oa-and-back-pain.php

*  Osteoarthritis: Arthroscopic Diagnostic? Video - ABC News

Osteoarthritis is really diagnosed by X-ray, sometimes by MRI, and by clinical exam. The reason to have arthroscopic surgery is ...
abcnews.go.com/Health/PainArthritis/comments?type=story&id=4574377

*  Osteoarthritis Newsletter: Subscribe

You want Information on your Osteoarthritis. We want to help you. Take Control and subscribe to our free OA Newsletter for the ...
https://healthline.com/health/osteoarthritis/newsletter-subscribe

*  Osteoarthritis

Information for patients with osteoarthritis: what it is, common causes, getting diagnosed, treatment options, and tips for ... Osteoarthritis Fast Facts. *Though some of the joint changes are irreversible, most patients will not need joint replacement ... Living with osteoarthritis. There is no cure for OA, but you can manage how it affects your lifestyle. Some tips include:. * ... Who gets osteoarthritis?. OA affects people of all races and both sexes. Most often, it occurs in patients age 40 and above. ...
https://rheumatology.org/I-Am-A/Patient-Caregiver/Diseases-Conditions/Osteoarthritis

*  Osteoarthritis: Exercising With Arthritis

Covers exercises that are helpful for a person with osteoarthritis. Includes aerobic, strength, and flexibility exercises, and ... Osteoarthritis: Exercising With Arthritis. Skip to the navigation Introduction. *Exercise may make you feel better, reduce your ... A common symptom of osteoarthritis is pain after activity, which may make you not want to exercise. But you can use heat and ... How to exercise if you have osteoarthritis. There are several types of exercises that you can do to help keep your muscles ...
https://ghc.org/kbase/topic.jhtml?docId=tr4782&secId=tr4782mm1515

*  Glucosamine And Chondroitin Sulfate For Osteoarthritis - Alternative Medicine

Glucosamine And Chondroitin Sulfate For Osteoarthritis - Alternative Medicine at BellaOnline ... They both are thought to help slow or prevent the degeneration of joint cartilage, the underlying cause of osteoarthritis pain ... Glucosamine And Chondroitin Sulfate For Osteoarthritis. You may have heard about a supplement glucosamine and chondroitin ... it is only recently that these supplements have been used in the United States as an alternative treatment for osteoarthritis ...
bellaonline.com/articles/art37541.asp

*  Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis : Figure 3

Figure 3: Treatment of an isolated medial compartment OA by unicompartmental arthroplasty ...
https://hindawi.com/journals/arthritis/2011/454873/fig3/

*  Frequently Asked Questions about Noisy Joints - Outlook - Osteoarthritis | HealthCentral

A common cause for pain in a noisy joint is osteoarthritis, which means that the joint has become inflamed. Sometimes the ... Christina Lasich, M.D., wrote about chronic pain and osteoarthritis for HealthCentral. She is physiatrist in Grass Valley, ...
https://healthcentral.com/article/frequently-asked-questions-about-noisy-joints

*  Osteoarthritis Articles | What Is Osteoarthritis? | Lifescript.com

... osteoarthritis treatment, and new research on osteoarthritis knee problems. ... Articles and up-to-date news on osteoarthritis symptoms, ...
lifescript.com/health/centers/osteoarthritis/articles.aspx

*  Study Finds Pine Bark Extract to Ease Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is one of the commonest joint disorder and occurs as we age due to wear and tear of a joint. ... There are a few main components contributing to the clinical picture of treatment management in osteoarthritis: inflammation ... To describe and rate osteoarthritis symptoms (joint pain, stiffness and physical function), WOMAC questionnaires were evaluated ... sampled 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (OA). Patients were administered 100 mg Pycnogenol or placebo, daily for ...
medindia.net/news/Study-Finds-Pine-Bark-Extract-to-Ease-Osteoarthritis-35581-1.htm

*  UI receives $7.5 million to study post-traumatic osteoarthritis

Oct. 22, 2007. UI receives $7.5 million to study post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The University of Iowa has received a five-year, $7.5 million grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) to establish a Center of Research Translation (CORT) for post-traumatic osteoarthritis, which is the joint degeneration, pain and stiffness that develops after joint injury.. Although joint injuries -- including dislocations, ligament injuries and joint fractures -- are known to cause post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), the biological and mechanical processes that underlie development and progression of osteoarthritis following injury are not well understood.. This lack of understanding has seriously hampered progress toward preventing PTOA, according to Joseph Buckwalter, M.D., the Dr. Arthur A. Steindler Chair in Orthopaedic Surgery and professor and head of orthopaedics and rehabilitation at the UI Roy J. ...
news-releases.uiowa.edu/2007/october/102207osteoarthritis.html

*  Strontium ranelate reduces the progression of experimental dog osteoarthritis by inhibiting the expression of key proteases in...

Results At steady state, strontium blood exposures were within the clinical therapeutic range of osteoarthritis patients and correlated with strontium concentrations in synovial fluid. SrRan treatment significantly reduced the osteoarthritis cartilage lesions at all doses tested (p≤0.05). Significantly better preservation of the collagen network was also found in SrRan-treated dogs at 50 and 75 mg/kg per day (p=0.03). The osteoarthritis subchondral bone thickening observed in osteoarthritis-placebo dogs was significantly reduced by SrRan at 50 mg/kg per day (p=0.02). The increased gene expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-13 and cathepsin K in osteoarthritis cartilage were all significantly reduced by SrRan at 75 mg/kg per day (p≤0.03) as were, in osteoarthritis synovium, IL-1β at 50 and 75 mg/kg per day (p=0.05) and MMP-3 at all doses tested (p≤0.02). The serum level of CTX-II was reduced (p≤0.04) by SrRan at 16 ...
ard.bmj.com/content/early/2012/10/12/annrheumdis-2012-201710

*  Early Detection of Osteoarthritis in Dogs Could Open Doors for a Cure | MU News Bureau

June 10, 2009. Story Contact: Kelsey Jackson, (573) 882-8353, JacksonKN@missouri.edu. COLUMBIA, Mo. - Osteoarthritis is commonly diagnosed in the late and irreversible stages, when treatment can only be expected to decrease pain and slow progression of disease. Because osteoarthritis is a widespread problem in dogs, horses and humans, doctors and veterinarians need a precise way to diagnose the disease early and accurately. Now, University of Missouri researchers are investigating potential biomarkers in dogs for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis, which could help identify patients at increased risk of developing osteoarthritis.. "By developing methods for earlier diagnosis of osteoarthritis, prevention or even curative treatment strategies to manage the disease become more realistic," said James Cook, professor of veterinary medicine and surgery, and the William & Kathryn Allen Distinguished Professor in Orthopedic Surgery. ...
munews.missouri.edu/news-releases/2009/0610-cook-arthritis-biomarkers.php

*  Rheumatoid Arthritis|Psoriatic Arthritis Symptoms|Arthritis Treatment: To prevent OsteoArthritis: An All Natural Method of...

Metabolic: Diseases causing errors of metabolism reasons OsteoArthritis. Examples include Paget's contamination and Wilson disease. Genetic: An inherited defect may promote report on cartilage. Examples include collagen disturbances just like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Posttraumatic: Barbecue traumatic injuries of the joint that may promote OsteoArthritis, such as a broke bone that heal out of alignment causing loss of basic, or damage to a first rate joint cartilage. Microtraumas to happen over time, such staying repetitive movements, or overuse can cause OsteoArthritis. Other causes develop nutritional problems, hemophilia, and try to sickle cell. Treatment of OsteoArthritis begins through the elimination of risk factors, early diagnosis and monitoring developing on the disease, and Treatment for instance pain. Regaining mobility matters. The common course for example Treatment includes physical and achieving occupational therapy, weight ...
arthritismi.blogspot.com/2013/11/to-prevent-osteoarthritis-all-natural.html

*  Rheumatoid Arthritis|Psoriatic Arthritis Symptoms|Arthritis Treatment: Morbid obesity and OsteoArthritis - A clear Path to...

Being obese one amongst common cause of OsteoArthritis and pain near joints. In other lyrics, the heavier your debt load, the more susceptible then you're able to to such health ailments. Of course, OsteoArthritis one is more common among the seniors. Still, being overweight can cut down the age at that you may develop this disease. OsteoArthritis a consequence of the wearing out of all the substance between the joints commonly called cartilage. Once it not really there, the bones start rubbing against near thus causing ample pain. Just think available pain in your grip, knees and your hub. It is only natural full that the heavier now i am, the more loaded workers' joints are. Being in poor condition, however, does not strike at your joints only mechanically. According to research the abdominal flab produces chemicals that could cause joint inflammation. Contemporary life to be able to do its best to serve OsteoArthritis. The sedentary ...
arthritismi.blogspot.com/2013/11/morbid-obesity-and-osteoarthritis-clear.html

*  Osteoarthritis - Arthritis Conditions

Arthritis is literally inflamed joint and can affect any joint in the body, including the joints between the 29 bones of the wrist, hand, and fingers. The most common forms of arthritis in the hand are osteoarthritis, post-traumatic arthritis (after an injury), and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease in which the smooth cartilage that covers the bone surfaces at the joints either is injured or wears over time.
assh.org/handcare/hand-arm-conditions/osteoarthritis

*  Local San Antonio Research Clinic Investigates New Osteoarthritis ... ((PRWEB) May 06 2013 Diagnostics Resea...)

Health,(PRWEB) May 06 2013 Diagnostics Research Group an independent site for pharmaceutical and device research is working with pharmaceutical companies to assess osteoarthritis (OA) medications currently not available to the public. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and affects an estimated 27 million Americans. OA occurs when a joint's,Local,San,Antonio,Research,Clinic,Investigates,New,Osteoarthritis,Treatments,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-1/Local-San-Antonio-Research-Clinic-Investigates-New-Osteoarthritis-Treatments-105358-1/

*  Knee Problems - Physical Therapy in Denver | PT Lifetime - FREE Screening

What is it: Also called "wear and tear" arthritis or degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) is the progressive breakdown of the joints' natural shock absorbers.. Important Facts: The symptoms of osteoarthritis tend to develop slowly. You may notice pain or soreness when you move certain joints or when you've been inactive for a prolonged period. The affected joints may also be stiff or creaky. Typically, osteoarthritis leads to morning stiffness that resolves in 30 minutes. When osteoarthritis affects the hands, some people develop bony enlargements in the fingers, which may or may not cause pain.. Statistics: More than 40 million people in the United States have the disease. By 2030, an estimated 20 percent of Americans - about 70 million people - will have passed their 65th birthday and will be at risk of developing osteoarthritis.. Treatment Duration: There is no treatment to stop the erosion of cartilage in the ...
ptlifetime.com/knee-problems/

*  Genetics likely to be a major factor in osteoarthritis ...( Assessment of a genetic contributi...)

Health,...... Assessment of a genetic contribution to osteoarthritis of the hi...Click below to download PDF document You will require Acrobat Read...Siblings have a five fold increased risk of developing osteoarthritis ...,Genetics,likely,to,be,a,major,factor,in,osteoarthritis,of,the,hip,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
news.bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-2/Genetics-likely-to-be-a-major-factor-in-osteoarthritis-of-the-hip-9540-1/

*  Psych Central - Efficacy of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may depend on level of osteoarthritis pain

In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the popular dietary supplement combination of glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate did not provide significant relief from osteoarthritis pain among all participants. However, a smaller subgroup of study participants with moderate-to-severe pain showed significant relief with the combined supplements. This research was funded by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), components of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
https://psychcentral.com/news/archives/2006-02/ncfc-eog022106.html

*  Osteoarthritis of the Knee - Harvard Health

Welcome to this guide regarding osteoarthritis (OA, or degenerative joint disease) of the knee. This Decision Guide is designed for persons who have learned…
https://health.harvard.edu/decision_guide/osteoarthritis-of-the-knee

*  Involvement of Nav 1.8 sodium ion channels in the transduction of mechanical pain in a rodent model of osteoarthritis |...

Management of osteoarthritis pain remains a huge challenge in the clinic with millions of arthritis patients living with chronic disability. Limitations to current pharmacological treatment strategies include a lack of therapeutic efficacy and potentially hazardous side-effects. Therefore, there is a pressing need to understand the underlying mechanisms that evoke OA pain and to develop new, more effective analgesics. One intuitive approach would be to attenuate pathological OA-induced pain by selectively blocking joint nociceptors while preserving other desirable physiological functions of the nerve. Intra-articular injection of non-selective sodium channel blockers has been shown to be effective for the treatment of OA pain [29] while intravenous administration of these agents can produce long lasting pain relief in both animal models [30] and in patients with intractable neuropathic pain [31]. The clear disadvantages of using non-selective sodium channel blockers locally are complete loss ...
https://arthritis-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/ar3553

*  Composition For Preventing Or Treating Osteoarthritis (Sunstar)

An object of the present invention is to provide a means for preventing or treating osteoarthritis. The present invention provides a composition for preventing or treating osteoarthritis, comprising a fish cartilage water extract containing proteoglycans having molecular weights of not less than 1,800,000.
freshpatents.com/-dt20150528ptan20150147407.php

*  Osteoarthritis in multiple joints | Ask The Doctor

Is it normal for a person to get osteoarthritis in the hips, knees, shoulder,elbow, hand, ankles, back and neck at an early age? Where symptoms started at around 36 years of age! I had no major accidents and was not involved in any sports
https://askthedoctor.com/osteoarthritis-in-multiple-joints-126395

*  PKCδ null mutations in a mouse model of osteoarthritis alter osteoarthritic pain independently of joint pathology by augmenting...

The mechanism by which OA develops from an asymptomatic condition to a painful disease has been a critical gap in our knowledge. The complementarity between our results from an experimental OA animal model and our human subject findings has significant ramifications for resolving a long-standing clinical discrepancy of the lack of correlation between histological damage and the degree of joint pain. We now show that the PKCδ is a key inhibitor of NGF/TrkA axis signalling and sensory nerve sprouting in synovial tissues and DRGs, and thus alleviates OA hyperalgesia. This beneficial function of PKCδ in reducing synovial innervation is diametrically opposed to the inflammation-responsive catabolic function of PKCδ in articular chondrocytes that mediates cartilage destruction. We postulate that the degree of pain in OA is directly attributable to changes in PKCδ signalling in sensory neurons rather than to joint pathology per se. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms by which PKCδ ...
ard.bmj.com/content/early/2016/01/18/annrheumdis-2015-208444

*  Status of lipid peroxidation, glutathione, ascorbic acid, vitamin E and antioxidant enzymes in patients with osteoarthritis.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The exact pro-oxidant and antioxidant status in osteoarthritis patients is still not clear. To add a new insight to the question, changes in the erythrocyte li..
https://omicsonline.org/references/status-of-lipid-peroxidation-glutathione-ascorbic-acid-vitamin-e-and-antioxidant-enzymes-in-patients-with-osteoarthritis-155800.html

*  Osteoarthritis - myDr.com.au

|p|Osteoarthritis causes the joints to become painful and stiff. It is the most common type of arthritis, and occurs when the cartilage on the end of bones becomes permanently damaged.|/p|
mydr.com.au/arthritis/osteoarthritis

*  Canine Osteoarthritis | Common Dog Diseases

Canine osteoarthritis is a condition in which the joints slowly deteriorate over time. bone, soft tissue, and cartilage will become inflamed and deteriorate slowly.
common-dog-diseases.com/canine-osteoarthritis/

*  I want to ask the formulation of Winmark's MEGASAM a tablet for osteoarthritis?

1 Answer (question resolved) - Posted in: osteoarthritis - Answer: For the exact formulation you may need to contact the manufacturer. All ...
https://drugs.com/answers/formulation-winmarks-megasam-tablet-osteoarthritis-556633.html

Osteoarthritis Research Society International: The Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) is a non-profit scientific organization.OARSI.Knee pain: Knee pain is a common complaint for many people. There are several factors that can cause knee pain.Articular cartilage repair: The aim of an articular cartilage repair treatment is to restore the surface of an articular joint's hyaline cartilage. Over the last decades, surgeons and researchers have been working hard to elaborate surgical cartilage repair interventions.Discoid meniscus: Discoid meniscus is a rare human anatomic variant that usually affects the lateral meniscus of the knee.http://www.Pain scale: A pain scale measures a patient's pain intensity or other features. Pain scales are based on self-report, observational (behavioral), or physiological data.Cancer pain: Pain in cancer may arise from a tumor compressing or infiltrating nearby body parts; from treatments and diagnostic procedures; or from skin, nerve and other changes caused by a hormone imbalance or immune response. Most chronic (long-lasting) pain is caused by the illness and most acute (short-term) pain is caused by treatment or diagnostic procedures.Hip resurfacing: 155px|right|thumb|The BHRChondrocyteHeberden's nodeFibroblast-like synoviocyte: Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) represent a specialised cell type located inside joints in the synovium. These cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.Oxford knee score: The Oxford Knee Score (OKS) is a Patient Reported Outcome questionnaire that was developed to specifically assess the patient's perspective of outcome following Total Knee Arthroplasty. The OKS has subsequently been validated for use in assessing other non-surgical therapies applied to those suffering from issues with the knee.Triple tibial osteotomy: The triple tibial osteotomy (TTO) is a surgical procedure used to treat dogs that have completely or partially ruptured the cranial cruciate ligament in one or both of their stifles. The cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) is a ligament connecting the femur with the tibia, which functions to stabilise the canine stifle joint from the forces put on it during exercise and weight bearing.ACR score for rheumatoid arthritis: ACR score is a scale to measure change in rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. It is named after the American College of Rheumatology.Ottawa knee rules: The Ottawa Knee Rules are a set of rules used to help physicians determine whether an x-ray of the knee is needed.http://www.Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructionPatellar network: The patellar network (circulatory anastomosis around the knee-joint, patellar anastomosis, genicular anastomosis, articular vascular network of knee or rete articulare genushttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.Hyaluronan synthase: Hyaluronan synthases (HAS) are membrane-bound enzymes which use UDP-α-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and UDP-α-D-glucuronate as substrates to produce the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan at the cell surface and extrude it through the membrane into the extracellular space.ATC code A09: ==A09A Digestives, including enzymes==ArthrogramCelecoxibChondronectin: Chondronectin is a cartilage matrix protein that specifically mediates the attachment of chondrocytes to type II collagen.OsteotomyDredge ball joint: A dredge ball joint is a connection between two pipes that are used to transport a mixture of water and sand from a dredger to the discharging area.Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema: Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (abbreviated RS3PE or sometimes RS3PE) is a rare syndrome identified by symmetric polyarthritis, synovitis, acute pitting edema (swelling) of the back of the hands and/or feet, and a negative serum rheumatoid factor. If no underlying disorder can be identified (idiopathic RS3PE), this entity has an excellent prognosis and responds well to treatment.Minimally invasive hip resurfacing: Minimally invasive hip resurfacing (MIS) is "total or partial hip surgery that can be carried out through an incision of less than 10 cm (3.94 inches) without imparting great forces on the anatomy or compromising component positioning"Comis Orthopaedics websiteTumor progression: Tumor progression is the third and last phase in tumor development. This phase is characterised by increased growth speed and invasiveness of the tumor cells.I-LIMB Hand: The i-LIMB Hand is the brand name of world's first commercially available bionic hand invented by David Gow and his team at the Bioengineering Centre of the Princess Margaret Rose Hospital in Edinburgh, and manufactured by Touch Bionics. The articulating prosthetic hand has individually powered digits and thumb and has a choice of grips.International Disability and Development Consortium: The International Disability and Development Consortium (IDDC) is a global consortium of disability and development related organisations. The aim of IDDC is to promote inclusive development internationally, with a special focus on promoting human rights for all disabled people living in economically poor communities in lower and middle-income countries.ChondrocalcinosisGait (human): Human gait refers to locomotion achieved through the movement of human limbs. Human gait is defined as bipedal, biphasic forward propulsion of center of gravity of the human body, in which there are alternate sinuous movements of different segments of the body with least expenditure of energy.HyperintensityGlucosamineJoint replacementArthroscopyMechanochemistry: Mechanochemistry or mechanical chemistry is the coupling of mechanical and chemical phenomena on a molecular scale and includes mechanical breakage, chemical behaviour of mechanically stressed solids (e.g.Henry Beighton: Henry Beighton (c. 20 August 1687 – 9 October 1743) was an English engineer and surveyor.Thomas test: The Thomas test (Hugh Owen Thomas well leg raising test) is a physical examination test, named after Dr. Hugh Owen Thomas (1834-1891), a British orthopaedic surgeon, used to rule out hip flexion contracture and psoas syndrome.Arthritis Research UKExercise prescription software: Exercise prescription software is a branch of computer software designed to aid in the construction of exercise programmes or regimes for patients who require some kind of ongoing rehabilitation.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Diabetic shoe: Diabetic shoes, sometimes referred to as extra depth, therapeutic shoes or Sugar Shoes, are specially designed shoes, or shoe inserts, intended to reduce the risk of skin breakdown in diabetics with co-existing foot disease.Quadriceps tendon rupturePUR4: pUR4 is a recombinant peptide that is known to inhibit the polymerization of fibronectin in a number of cell types including fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibronectin is an essential component of the extracellular matrix that acts as a mediator between the extracellular matrix and the cells that reside within the matrix.Protrusio acetabuliAlbert Narath: Albert Narath (September 13, 1864, Vienna – August 15, 1924, Heidelberg) was an Austrian surgeon and anatomist.Footballer's ankle: Footballer's Ankle is a pinching or impingement of the ligaments or tendons of the ankle between the bones, particularly the talus and tibia. This results in pain, inflammation and swelling.Walking on a Dream (song)Proteoglycan: Proteoglycans are proteins that are heavily glycosylated. The basic proteoglycan unit consists of a "core protein" with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain(s).Sidebone: Sidebone is a common condition of horses, characterized by the ossification of the collateral cartilages of the coffin bone. These are found on either side of the foot protruding above the level of the coronary band.Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale: The Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale (BADLS) is a 20-item questionnaire designed to measure the ability of someone with dementia to carry out daily activities such as dressing, preparing food and using transport.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.Placebo-controlled study: Placebo-controlled studies are a way of testing a medical therapy in which, in addition to a group of subjects that receives the treatment to be evaluated, a separate control group receives a sham "placebo" treatment which is specifically designed to have no real effect. Placebos are most commonly used in blinded trials, where subjects do not know whether they are receiving real or placebo treatment.Dorothea Bennett: Dorothea Bennett (December 27, 1929 in Honolulu – August 16, 1990 in Houston) was a geneticist, known for the genetics of early mammalian development and for research into mammalian sperm surface structures and their role in fertilization and spermatogenesis."Dorothea Bennett, 60, Geneticist and Teacher" (obituary), New York Times, Aug.Flexor pollicis brevis muscle: The flexor pollicis brevis is a muscle in the hand that flexes the thumb. It is one of three thenar muscles.Chondroitin sulfatePharex Naproxen Sodium Bidang Generix: The Pharex Naproxen Sodium Bidang Generix is a basketball team currently playing in the PBA Developmental League and is owned by Pascual Laboratories, Inc. The team also played in the Philippine Basketball League from 2007 to 2010.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Harpagophytum: Harpagophytum, also called grapple plant, wood spider and most commonly devil's claw, is a genus of plants in the sesame family, native to southern Africa. It owes its common name Devil's Claw to the peculiar appearance of its hooked fruit.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.

(1/3950) Overexpression of human homologs of the bacterial DnaJ chaperone in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

OBJECTIVE: To study the expression of the chaperone family of J proteins in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis. METHODS: Rabbit antibodies specific for a synthetic peptide (pHSJ1: EAYEVLSDKHKREIYD), representing the most conserved part of all J domains thus far identified--among them the Drosophila tumor suppressor Tid56--were used in immunohistochemical analyses of frozen sections of synovial tissue and immunoblotting of protein extracts of adherent synovial cells. IgG specific for Tid56 was also used. RESULTS: Both antisera predominantly and intensely stained synovial lining cells from RA patients; other cells did not stain or stained only faintly. In immunoblots, anti-pHSJ1 specifically detected several bands with molecular weights of >74 kd (type I), 57-64 kd (type II), 41-48 kd (type III), and < or =36 kd (type IV). The strongest band detected in RA adherent synovial cells was the type II band, whereas in a B cell line, a type I band was prominent. CONCLUSION: Several potentially new members of the J family are described. The type II band represents the human homolog of the Drosophila Tid56 protein and is strongly expressed in RA synovial tissue.  (+info)

(2/3950) Establishment and characterization of nurse cell-like stromal cell lines from synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the features of synovial stromal cells established from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to define these cells as nurse cells. METHODS: Synovial nurse-like stromal cell lines (RA-SNCs) were established from patients with RA. These cell lines were examined for morphology, pseudoemperipolesis activity, cell surface markers, and cytokine production. The interaction between these RA-SNCs and a synovial tissue B cell clone was also examined. RESULTS: RA-SNCs had nurse cell activity. They spontaneously produced interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Furthermore, they produced IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha and expressed higher levels of the other cytokines after coculture with the B cell clone. Proliferation and Ig production by the B cell clone were dependent on direct contact with RA-SNCs. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the RA-SNCs were nurse cells. The findings suggest that RA-SNCs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA by producing large amounts of cytokines and maintaining infiltrating lymphocytes.  (+info)

(3/3950) Ankle arthrodesis using an anterior AO T plate.

We describe a surgical technique for ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach to the ankle and internal fixation with an anteriorly-placed AO T plate. A total of 33 patients who had ankle arthrodeses have been followed retrospectively. Thirty-one (94%) of the ankles fused although two patients developed tibial stress fractures. Four patients had a superficial infection which did not prevent union. The surgical technique is simple, easily reproducible and gives excellent clinical results with a high rate of union.  (+info)

(4/3950) Prevalence of generalised osteoarthritis in patients with advanced hip and knee osteoarthritis: the Ulm Osteoarthritis Study.

OBJECTIVES: Different prevalences of generalised osteoarthritis (GOA) in patients with knee and hip OA have been reported. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate radiographic and clinical patterns of disease in a hospital based population of patient subgroups with advanced hip and knee OA and to compare the prevalence of GOA in patients with hip or knee OA, taking potential confounding factors into account. METHODS: 420 patients with hip OA and 389 patients with knee OA scheduled for unilateral total joint replacement in four hospitals underwent radiographic analysis of ipsilateral and contralateral hip or knee joint and both hands in addition to a standardised interview and clinical examination. According to the severity of radiographic changes in the contralateral joints (using Kellgren-Lawrence > or = grade 2 as case definition) participants were classified as having either unilateral or bilateral OA. If radiographic changes of two joint groups of the hands (first carpometacarpal joint and proximal/distal interphalangeal joints defined as two separate joint groups) were present, patients were categorised as having GOA. RESULTS: Patients with hip OA were younger (mean age 60.4 years) and less likely to be female (52.4%) than patients with knee OA (66.3 years and 72.5% respectively). Intensity of pain and functional impairment at hospital admission was similar in both groups, while patients with knee OA had a longer symptom duration (median 10 years) compared with patients with hip OA (5 years). In 41.7% of patients with hip OA and 33.4% of patients with knee OA an underlying pathological condition could be observed in the replaced joint, which allowed a classification as secondary OA. Some 82.1% of patients with hip and 87.4% of patients with knee OA had radiographic changes in their contralateral joints (bilateral disease). The prevalence of GOA increased with age and was higher in female patients. GOA was observed more often in patients with knee OA than in patients with hip OA (34.9% versus 19.3%; OR = 2.24; 95% CI: 1.56, 3.21). Adjustment for the different age and sex distribution in both patient groups, however, takes away most of the difference (OR = 1.32; 95% CI: 0.89, 1.96). CONCLUSION: The crude results confirm previous reports as well as the clinical impression of GOA being more prevalent in patients with advanced knee OA than in patients with advanced hip OA. However, these different patterns might be attributed to a large part to a different distribution of age and sex in these hospital based populations.  (+info)

(5/3950) Nuclear factor-kappa B activity in T cells from patients with rheumatic diseases: a preliminary report.

OBJECTIVE: The NF-kappa B/Rel family of transcription factors regulates the expression of many genes involved in the immune or inflammatory response at the transcriptional level. The aim of this study was to determine whether distinctive patterns of NF-kappa B activation are seen in different forms of joint disease. METHODS: The DNA binding activity of these nucleoproteins was examined in purified synovial and peripheral T cells from patients with various chronic rheumatic diseases (12: four with rheumatoid arthritis; five with spondyloarthropathies; and three with osteoarthritis). RESULTS: Electrophoretic mobility shift assays disclosed two specific complexes bound to a NF-kappa B specific 32P-labelled oligonucleotide in nucleoproteins extracted from purified T cells isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The complexes consisted of p50/p50 homodimers and p50/p65 heterodimers. Increased NF-kappa B binding to DNA in synovial T cells was observed relative to peripheral T cells. In non-rheumatoid arthritis, binding of NF-kappa B in synovial T cells was exclusively mediated by p50/p50 homodimers. CONCLUSION: Overall, the results suggest that NF-kappa B may play a central part in the activation of infiltrating T cells in chronic rheumatoid arthritis. The activation of this nuclear factor is qualitatively different in rheumatoid synovial T cells to that in other forms of non-rheumatoid arthritis (for example, osteoarthritis, spondyloarthropathies).  (+info)

(6/3950) Effects of joint lavage and steroid injection in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: results of a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of joint lavage and intraarticular steroid injection, alone and in combination, in the treatment of patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Ninety-eight patients with painful tibiofemoral OA were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, controlled, 2 x 2 factorial-design trial of 6 months' duration. The 4 treatment groups consisted of 1) intraarticular placebo (1.5 ml of 0.9% normal saline), 2) intraarticular corticosteroids (3.75 mg of cortivazol in 1.5 ml), 3) joint lavage and intraarticular placebo, and 4) joint lavage and intraarticular corticosteroid. Outcome measures evaluated at baseline, week 1, week 4, week 12, and week 24 included severity of pain (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]), global status (100-mm VAS), and Lequesne's functional index. RESULTS: No interaction between steroid injection and joint lavage was demonstrated. Patients who had undergone joint lavage had significantly improved pain VAS scores at week 24 (P = 0.020). In contrast, corticosteroid injection had no long-term effect (P = 0.313); corticosteroid injection was associated with a decrease in pain only at week 1 (P = 0.003) and week 4 (P = 0.020). After week 4, Lequesne's functional index was not significantly improved regardless of the assigned treatment. CONCLUSION: Compared with placebo, both treatments significantly relieved pain but did not improve functional impairment. The effects of the 2 treatments were additive. Cortivazol provided short-term relief of pain (up to week 4). The effects of joint lavage persisted up to week 24.  (+info)

(7/3950) The associations of bone mineral density and bone turnover markers with osteoarthritis of the hand and knee in pre- and perimenopausal women.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Caucasian women ages 28-48 years with newly defined osteoarthritis (OA) would have greater bone mineral density (BMD) and less bone turnover over time than would women without OA. METHODS: Data were derived from the longitudinal Michigan Bone Health Study. Period prevalence and 3-year incidence of OA were based on radiographs of the dominant hand and both knees, scored with the Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scale. OA scores were related to BMD, which was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and to serum osteocalcin levels, which were measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: The period prevalence of OA (K/L grade > or =2 in the knees or the dominant hand) was 15.3% (92 of 601), with 8.7% for the knees and 6.7% for the hand. The 3-year incidence of knee OA was 1.9% (9 of 482) and of hand OA was 3.3% (16 of 482). Women with incident knee OA had greater average BMD (z-scores 0.3-0.8 higher for the 3 BMD sites) than women without knee OA (P < 0.04 at the femoral neck). Women with incident knee OA had less change in their average BMD z-scores over the 3-year study period. Average BMD z-scores for women with prevalent knee OA were greater (0.4-0.7 higher) than for women without knee OA (P < 0.002 at all sites). There was no difference in average BMD z-scores or their change in women with and without hand OA. Average serum osteocalcin levels were lower in incident cases of hand OA (>60%; P = 0.02) or knee OA (20%; P not significant). The average change in absolute serum osteocalcin levels was not as great in women with incident hand OA or knee OA as in women without OA (P < 0.02 and P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSION: Women with radiographically defined knee OA have greater BMD than do women without knee OA and are less likely to lose that higher level of BMD. There was less bone turnover among women with hand OA and/or knee OA. These findings suggest that bone-forming cells might show a differential response in OA of the hand and knee, and may suggest a different pathogenesis of hand OA and knee OA.  (+info)

(8/3950) Tumor necrosis factor alpha regulation of the FAS-mediated apoptosis-signaling pathway in synovial cells.

OBJECTIVE: Fas-mediated apoptosis is observed in synoviocytes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but not in those of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The present study was conducted to elucidate the mechanisms that initiate induction of Fas-mediated apoptosis in RA synoviocytes. METHODS: Cultured OA synoviocytes, which are insensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis in spite of Fas antigen expression, were used in these experiments. Synovial cell proliferation and cytotoxicity studies were performed using MTS and lactate dehydrogenase release assays. Surface expression of Fas antigen was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression and function of apoptosis-signaling molecules, such as caspase 8 and caspase 3, were examined by immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) induced proliferation of cultured OA synoviocytes. Fas ligation with anti-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb) resulted in cytotoxic activity against cultured OA synoviocytes that had been pretreated with TNFalpha for 5 days, but not those pretreated for 2 days. In contrast, anti-Fas mAb did not show a cytotoxic effect against untreated cultured OA synoviocytes. A gradual up-regulation of caspase 8 and caspase 3, which played a role in the caspase cascade for Fas-mediated apoptosis, was observed in TNFalpha-treated cultured OA synoviocytes. In addition, Fas ligation to TNFalpha-treated cultured OA synoviocytes induced activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3, with subsequent cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a substrate of activated caspase 3. More importantly, Z-IETD-FMK, a caspase 8 inhibitor, and Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase 3 inhibitor, almost completely inhibited Fas-mediated apoptosis of TNFalpha-treated cultured OA synoviocytes, whereas Ac-YVAD-CHO, a caspase 1 inhibitor, did not. CONCLUSION: Our results clearly demonstrate that TNFalpha stimulates synovial cells to proliferate as well as sensitizes the cells for Fas-mediated apoptosis, at least in part by up-regulation and activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3. These findings suggest that TNFalpha may be one of the factors providing sensitization of synovial cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis in RA.  (+info)



degenerative joint d


  • While glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin have been taken orally since the 1960 s in Europe, it is only recently that these supplements have been used in the United States as an alternative treatment for osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease. (bellaonline.com)
  • Welcome to this guide regarding osteoarthritis (OA, or degenerative joint disease) of the knee. (harvard.edu)

knee


  • The lifetime risk of developing OA of the knee is about 46%, and the lifetime risk of developing OA of the hip is 25%, according to the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a long-term study from the University of North Carolina and sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (often called the CDC) and the National Institutes of Health. (rheumatology.org)
  • The randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study, held at Italy's Chieti-Pescara University, sampled 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee (OA). (medindia.net)
  • TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Only a few physical therapy (PT) interventions are effective for knee pain secondary to osteoarthritis, specifically exercise and ultrasonography, according to a review published in the Nov. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine . (nursingcenter.com)
  • Shi-Yi Wang, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues conducted a literature review to identify studies evaluating interventions for community-dwelling adults with knee osteoarthritis. (nursingcenter.com)
  • ACR issues recommendations on therapies for osteoarthritis of the hand, hip, and knee. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Available at: http://www.dynamed.com/topics/dmp~AN~T116897/Osteoarthritis-OA-of-the-knee. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • This is a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of a lateral wedge insole with subtalar strapping in knee osteoarthritis treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Fifty-eight patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomized to use either a lateral wedge or a neutral insole. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Is Botox Effective in Relieving Pain From Knee Osteoarthritis? (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • GAIT enrolled nearly 1,600 participants with documented osteoarthritis of the knee. (psychcentral.com)
  • This rigorous, large-scale study showed that the combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate appeared to help people with moderate-to-severe pain from knee osteoarthritis, but not those with mild pain," said Stephen E. Straus, M.D., NCCAM Director. (psychcentral.com)

glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate


  • The nutritional supplements, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, have emerged as an alternative treatment or complementary treatments for some patients suffering from osteoarthritis pain. (bellaonline.com)

inflammation


  • There are a few main components contributing to the clinical picture of treatment management in osteoarthritis: inflammation causing a progression in the disease, alteration of fatigue resistance and muscular performance-reversing and blocking the vascular problems associated to altered mobility. (medindia.net)

cartilage


  • In osteoarthritis, the cartilage between the bones in the joint breaks down. (rheumatology.org)
  • They both are thought to help slow or prevent the degeneration of joint cartilage, the underlying cause of osteoarthritis pain. (bellaonline.com)
  • It is the breakdown of these tissues such as cartilage and synovial fluids that causes the pain and immobility of osteoarthritis. (bellaonline.com)

symptoms


  • According to a new study, Pycnogenol - an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree -naturally reduces osteoarthritis symptoms by 56 percent. (medindia.net)
  • To describe and rate osteoarthritis symptoms (joint pain, stiffness and physical function), WOMAC questionnaires were evaluated by the investigator and patient at the start and after three months of treatment. (medindia.net)
  • Although there is no cure for osteoarthritis (OA), most symptoms can be managed with a combination of lifestyle changes and medications. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • We are excited to support studies looking at new treatment options that could improve the symptoms and quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. (psychcentral.com)

Diagnosis


joints


  • Osteoarthritis is a disease of the joints, and your back has plenty. (arthritis.org)

treatment


  • The goal of osteoarthritis treatment is to reduce pain and improve function. (rheumatology.org)

WOMAC


  • VAS, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Lequesne questionnaires were applied at baseline, and weeks two, eight, and 24. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • On entering the study, a participant's level of pain was assessed as either mild or moderate to severe using standard pain assessment tools and scales, such as the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). (psychcentral.com)

knees


  • Obesity seems to be a factor in osteoarthritis of the knees. (harvard.edu)

adults


  • Healthy adults clinically diagnosed with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • More than 20 million Americans have osteoarthritis, making it a frequent cause of physical disability among adults," said Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D., NIAMS Director. (psychcentral.com)

typically


  • With an aging U.S. population, back pain may be a growing problem, since osteoarthritis (OA) typically emerges in people over age 40, and the spine is a prime target for this common joint condition. (arthritis.org)

people


  • Osteoarthritis (also known as OA) is a common joint disease that most often affects middle-age to elderly people. (rheumatology.org)
  • Osteoarthritis is particularly common among older people, but it is not an inevitable part of aging and age does not cause OA. (harvard.edu)
  • There probably is no single cause of osteoarthritis, and, for most people, no cause can be identified. (harvard.edu)

pain


  • A common symptom of osteoarthritis is pain after activity, which may make you not want to exercise. (ghc.org)
  • A common cause for pain in a noisy joint is osteoarthritis, which means that the joint has become inflamed. (healthcentral.com)
  • Christina Lasich, M.D., wrote about chronic pain and osteoarthritis for HealthCentral. (healthcentral.com)
  • In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine*, the popular dietary supplement combination of glucosamine plus chondroitin sulfate did not provide significant relief from osteoarthritis pain among all participants. (psychcentral.com)
  • Celecoxib is an FDA-approved drug for the management of osteoarthritis pain and served as a positive control for the study. (psychcentral.com)

Topics


common


  • Osteoarthritis of the spine is more common than you think. (arthritis.org)
  • Osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint is one of the most common sites of arthritic degeneration in the hand. (clinicaltrials.gov)

joint


  • Osteoarthritis is one of the commonest joint disorder and occurs as we age due to wear and tear of a joint. (medindia.net)
  • Osteoarthritis can affect any joint of the body. (medindia.net)

health


  • Available at: http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health%5FInfo/Osteoarthritis/default.asp. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Potential Contribution: The data that we intend to gather could further our understanding of the overall health impact of thumb osteoarthritis and allow surgeons to more accurately interpret patient-rated measures of upper extremity function in the presence of comorbidities. (clinicaltrials.gov)

make


  • Osteoarthritis can make the spine unstable, explains Dr. Marks. (arthritis.org)