Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Leukemia, Plasma Cell: A rare, aggressive variant of MULTIPLE MYELOMA characterized by the circulation of excessive PLASMA CELLS in the peripheral blood. It can be a primary manifestation of multiple myeloma or develop as a terminal complication during the disease.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Paraproteinemias: A group of related diseases characterized by an unbalanced or disproportionate proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing cells, usually from a single clone. These cells frequently secrete a structurally homogeneous immunoglobulin (M-component) and/or an abnormal immunoglobulin.Granuloma, Plasma Cell: A slow-growing benign pseudotumor in which plasma cells greatly outnumber the inflammatory cells.Plasmacytoma: Any discrete, presumably solitary, mass of neoplastic PLASMA CELLS either in BONE MARROW or various extramedullary sites.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Syndecan-1: A syndecan that interacts with EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS and plays a role CELL PROLIFERATION and CELL MIGRATION.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: Conditions characterized by the presence of M protein (Monoclonal protein) in serum or urine without clinical manifestations of plasma cell dyscrasia.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Germinal Center: The activated center of a lymphoid follicle in secondary lymphoid tissue where B-LYMPHOCYTES are stimulated by antigens and helper T cells (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER) are stimulated to generate memory cells.Immunoglobulins: Multi-subunit proteins which function in IMMUNITY. They are produced by B LYMPHOCYTES from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES. They are comprised of two heavy (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) and two light chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) with additional ancillary polypeptide chains depending on their isoforms. The variety of isoforms include monomeric or polymeric forms, and transmembrane forms (B-CELL ANTIGEN RECEPTORS) or secreted forms (ANTIBODIES). They are divided by the amino acid sequence of their heavy chains into five classes (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A; IMMUNOGLOBULIN D; IMMUNOGLOBULIN E; IMMUNOGLOBULIN G; IMMUNOGLOBULIN M) and various subclasses.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Immunoglobulin A: Represents 15-20% of the human serum immunoglobulins, mostly as the 4-chain polymer in humans or dimer in other mammals. Secretory IgA (IMMUNOGLOBULIN A, SECRETORY) is the main immunoglobulin in secretions.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.B-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of B-lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.Plasma Cell Granuloma, Pulmonary: A tumor-like inflammatory lesion of the lung that is composed of PLASMA CELLS and fibrous tissue. It is also known as an inflammatory pseudotumor, often with calcification and measuring between 2 and 5 cm in diameter.Plasma Gases: Ionized gases, consisting of free electrons and ionized atoms or molecules which collectively behave differently than gas, solid, or liquid. Plasma gases are used in biomedical fields in surface modification; biological decontamination; dentistry (e.g., PLASMA ARC DENTAL CURING LIGHTS); and in other treatments (e.g., ARGON PLASMA COAGULATION).Palatine Tonsil: A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.Amyloidosis: A group of sporadic, familial and/or inherited, degenerative, and infectious disease processes, linked by the common theme of abnormal protein folding and deposition of AMYLOID. As the amyloid deposits enlarge they displace normal tissue structures, causing disruption of function. Various signs and symptoms depend on the location and size of the deposits.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Immunoglobulin Light Chains: Polypeptide chains, consisting of 211 to 217 amino acid residues and having a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa. There are two major types of light chains, kappa and lambda. Two Ig light chains and two Ig heavy chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS) make one immunoglobulin molecule.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains: One of the types of light chain subunits of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Syndecans: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins that contain a short cytoplasmic domain, a single-span transmembrane domain, and an extracellular domain with heparin sulfate and CHONDROITIN SULFATE chains. Syndecans interact with a variety of heparin-binding INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS and may play a role in modulating cellular signaling during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Antigens, CD19: Differentiation antigens expressed on B-lymphocytes and B-cell precursors. They are involved in regulation of B-cell proliferation.Bence Jones Protein: An abnormal protein with unusual thermosolubility characteristics that is found in the urine of patients with MULTIPLE MYELOMA.Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains: One of the types of light chains of the immunoglobulins with a molecular weight of approximately 22 kDa.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Antigens, CD38: A bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and HYDROLYSIS of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from NAD+ to ADP-RIBOSE. It is a cell surface molecule which is predominantly expressed on LYMPHOID CELLS and MYELOID CELLS.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Plasma Volume: Volume of PLASMA in the circulation. It is usually measured by INDICATOR DILUTION TECHNIQUES.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Hypergammaglobulinemia: An excess of GAMMA-GLOBULINS in the serum due to chronic infections or PARAPROTEINEMIAS.Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains: The largest of polypeptide chains comprising immunoglobulins. They contain 450 to 600 amino acid residues per chain, and have molecular weights of 51-72 kDa.Antigens, CD20: Unglycosylated phosphoproteins expressed only on B-cells. They are regulators of transmembrane Ca2+ conductance and thought to play a role in B-cell activation and proliferation.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.B-Cell-Specific Activator Protein: A transcription factor that is essential for CELL DIFFERENTIATION of B-LYMPHOCYTES. It functions both as a transcriptional activator and repressor to mediate B-cell commitment.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell: IMMUNOGLOBULINS on the surface of B-LYMPHOCYTES. Their MESSENGER RNA contains an EXON with a membrane spanning sequence, producing immunoglobulins in the form of type I transmembrane proteins as opposed to secreted immunoglobulins (ANTIBODIES) which do not contain the membrane spanning segment.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)ADP-ribosyl Cyclase: A membrane-bound or cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). This enzyme generally catalyzes the hydrolysis of cADPR to ADP-RIBOSE, as well, and sometimes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose 2' phosphate (2'-P-cADPR) from NADP.Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue: Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.Mice, Inbred C57BLBiological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia: A lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by pleomorphic B-LYMPHOCYTES including PLASMA CELLS, with increased levels of monoclonal serum IMMUNOGLOBULIN M. There is lymphoplasmacytic cells infiltration into bone marrow and often other tissues, also known as lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Clinical features include ANEMIA; HEMORRHAGES; and hyperviscosity.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Myeloma Proteins: Abnormal immunoglobulins characteristic of MULTIPLE MYELOMA.Paraproteins: Abnormal immunoglobulins synthesized by atypical cells of the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. Paraproteins containing only light chains lead to Bence Jones paraproteinemia, while the presence of only atypical heavy chains leads to heavy chain disease. Most of the paraproteins show themselves as an M-component (monoclonal gammopathy) in electrophoresis. Diclonal and polyclonal paraproteins are much less frequently encountered.Plasma Exchange: Removal of plasma and replacement with various fluids, e.g., fresh frozen plasma, plasma protein fractions (PPF), albumin preparations, dextran solutions, saline. Used in treatment of autoimmune diseases, immune complex diseases, diseases of excess plasma factors, and other conditions.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Neoplasms, Muscle Tissue: Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.Immunoglobulin J-Chains: A 15 kD "joining" peptide that forms one of the linkages between monomers of IMMUNOGLOBULIN A or IMMUNOGLOBULIN M in the formation of polymeric immunoglobulins. There is one J chain per one IgA dimer or one IgM pentamer. It is also involved in binding the polymeric immunoglobulins to POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR which is necessary for their transcytosis to the lumen. It is distinguished from the IMMUNOGLOBULIN JOINING REGION which is part of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGION of the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Tumor Necrosis Factor Ligand Superfamily Member 13: A member of tumor necrosis factor superfamily found on MACROPHAGES; DENDRITIC CELLS and T-LYMPHOCYTES. It occurs as transmembrane protein that can be cleaved to release a secreted form that specifically binds to TRANSMEMBRANE ACTIVATOR AND CAML INTERACTOR PROTEIN; and B CELL MATURATION ANTIGEN.Lymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Antibody-Producing Cells: Cells of the lymphoid series that can react with antigen to produce specific cell products called antibodies. Various cell subpopulations, often B-lymphocytes, can be defined, based on the different classes of immunoglobulins that they synthesize.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Immunoglobulin alpha-Chains: The class of heavy chains found in IMMUNOGLOBULIN A. They have a molecular weight of approximately 58 kDa and contain about 470 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component bound covalently to their Fc fragment constant region.Immunologic Memory: The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue: Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.Interleukin-6: A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.POEMS Syndrome: A multisystemic disorder characterized by a sensorimotor polyneuropathy (POLYNEUROPATHIES), organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and pigmentary skin changes. Other clinical features which may be present include EDEMA; CACHEXIA; microangiopathic glomerulopathy; pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY); cutaneous necrosis; THROMBOCYTOSIS; and POLYCYTHEMIA. This disorder is frequently associated with osteosclerotic myeloma. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1335; Rev Med Interne 1997;18(7):553-62)PyrazinesNose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Immunoglobulin gamma-Chains: Heavy chains of IMMUNOGLOBULIN G having a molecular weight of approximately 51 kDa. They contain about 450 amino acid residues arranged in four domains and an oligosaccharide component covalently bound to the Fc fragment constant region. The gamma heavy chain subclasses (for example, gamma 1, gamma 2a, and gamma 2b) of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN G isotype subclasses (IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B) resemble each other more closely than the heavy chains of the other IMMUNOGLOBULIN ISOTYPES.Receptors, CCR10: CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL27. They may play a specialized role in the cutaneous homing of LYMPHOCYTES.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Immunoglobulin Class Switching: Gene rearrangement of the B-lymphocyte which results in a substitution in the type of heavy-chain constant region that is expressed. This allows the effector response to change while the antigen binding specificity (variable region) remains the same. The majority of class switching occurs by a DNA recombination event but it also can take place at the level of RNA processing.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Boronic Acids: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain the basic structure RB(OH)2.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Genes, Immunoglobulin: Genes encoding the different subunits of the IMMUNOGLOBULINS, for example the IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN GENES and the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAIN GENES. The heavy and light immunoglobulin genes are present as gene segments in the germline cells. The completed genes are created when the segments are shuffled and assembled (B-LYMPHOCYTE GENE REARRANGEMENT) during B-LYMPHOCYTE maturation. The gene segments of the human light and heavy chain germline genes are symbolized V (variable), J (joining) and C (constant). The heavy chain germline genes have an additional segment D (diversity).Splenic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Antigens, CD27: A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily found on most T-LYMPHOCYTES. Activation of the receptor by CD70 ANTIGEN results in the increased proliferation of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES and CD8-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. Signaling by the activated receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia: Large benign, hyperplastic lymph nodes. The more common hyaline vascular subtype is characterized by small hyaline vascular follicles and interfollicular capillary proliferations. Plasma cells are often present and represent another subtype with the plasma cells containing IgM and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Mice, Inbred BALB CIntestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.gamma-Globulins: Serum globulins that migrate to the gamma region (most positively charged) upon ELECTROPHORESIS. At one time, gamma-globulins came to be used as a synonym for immunoglobulins since most immunoglobulins are gamma globulins and conversely most gamma globulins are immunoglobulins. But since some immunoglobulins exhibit an alpha or beta electrophoretic mobility, that usage is in decline.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Neoplasms, Adnexal and Skin Appendage: Neoplasms composed of sebaceous or sweat gland tissue or tissue of other skin appendages. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the sebaceous or sweat glands or in the other skin appendages.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Vascular Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Sweat Gland NeoplasmsEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed: Neoplasms composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cystadenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)Immunoglobulin Variable Region: That region of the immunoglobulin molecule that varies in its amino acid sequence and composition, and comprises the binding site for a specific antigen. It is located at the N-terminus of the Fab fragment of the immunoglobulin. It includes hypervariable regions (COMPLEMENTARITY DETERMINING REGIONS) and framework regions.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Thymus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.Mandibular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.Clone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Immunoglobulin D: An immunoglobulin which accounts for less than 1% of plasma immunoglobulin. It is found on the membrane of many circulating B LYMPHOCYTES.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Immunity, Humoral: Antibody-mediated immune response. Humoral immunity is brought about by ANTIBODY FORMATION, resulting from TH2 CELLS activating B-LYMPHOCYTES, followed by COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION.Translocation, Genetic: A type of chromosome aberration characterized by CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE and transfer of the broken-off portion to another location, often to a different chromosome.Cell SeparationColorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Heavy Chain Disease: A disorder of immunoglobulin synthesis in which large quantities of abnormal heavy chains are excreted in the urine. The amino acid sequences of the N-(amino-) terminal regions of these chains are normal, but they have a deletion extending from part of the variable domain through the first domain of the constant region, so that they cannot form cross-links to the light chains. The defect arises through faulty coupling of the variable (V) and constant (C) region genes.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.TriglyceridesMaxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Platelet-Rich Plasma: A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.Leukemia, B-Cell: A malignant disease of the B-LYMPHOCYTES in the bone marrow and/or blood.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Somatic Hypermutation, Immunoglobulin: A programmed mutation process whereby changes are introduced to the nucleotide sequence of immunoglobulin gene DNA during development.Lipoproteins: Lipid-protein complexes involved in the transportation and metabolism of lipids in the body. They are spherical particles consisting of a hydrophobic core of TRIGLYCERIDES and CHOLESTEROL ESTERS surrounded by a layer of hydrophilic free CHOLESTEROL; PHOSPHOLIPIDS; and APOLIPOPROTEINS. Lipoproteins are classified by their varying buoyant density and sizes.

*  9781107212589 - Diagnostic Techniques in Hematological Malignancies
Plasma cell neoplasms Rafael Fonseca and Riccardo Valdez; 13. Chronic myeloid leukemia Emma J. Gudgin and Brian Huntly; 14. ... Mature B cell leukemias Constantine S. Tam and Michael J. Keating; 10. Mature T cell and natural killer-cell leukemias Kaaren K ... Morphology, cell phenotyping, cytogenetics and molecular genetics are essential, and the results must be integrated. Diagnostic ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms Philip A. Beer and Anthony R. Green; 15. Myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/ ...
  https://www.wisepress.com/ebooks/diagnostic-techniques-in-hematological-malignancies-9781107212589/
*  Human IgG - Biocare Medical
... in the identification of plasma cell neoplasms (4) and in non-Hodgkin lymphomas (5). The ratio of IgG4+ plasma cells to IgG+ ... Plasma cell neoplasms. WHO classification of tumours of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. 2008, 200-13.. 5. Lindemalm C, et ... IgG4+ to IgG+ plasma cells ratio of ampulla can help differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from other "mass forming" pancreatic ... Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is an antibody isotype secreted by plasma cells and composed of four peptide chains - two identical ...
  https://biocare.net/product/human-igg/
*  "The tumor microenvironment is critical for the development of plasma c" by Timothy Robert Rosean
By adoptively transferring premalignant B cells into recipients, and then providing the B cells with an inflammatory ... In order to determine if tumor microenvironment (TME) or B cell-derived IL-6 was more important in PCN development, we utilized ... We discovered that TME-derived IL-6, and not B cell-derived IL-6, is most critical for PCN development. Furthermore, in ... Of interest however, the adoptive transfer of BCL-2/IL-6 B cells results in tumor formation without the use of pristane. ...
  http://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/1497/
*  CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS | Free Medical Textbook
BAIRD Definition and History Plasma Cell Neoplasms Essential Monoclonal Gammopathy Chronic Cold Agglutinin Syndrome ... GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS Williams Hematology CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS STEPHEN M. ... PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS. Plasma cell neoplasms are monoclonal tumors comprised of plasma cells and their precursors. All the ... CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. Williams Hematology. CHAPTER 104 PLASMA CELL NEOPLASMS: GENERAL ...
  https://medtextfree.wordpress.com/2012/01/23/chapter-104-plasma-cell-neoplasms-general-considerations/
*  Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®) (Patients) | OncoLink
Refractory Plasma Cell Neoplasms. Plasma cell neoplasms are called refractory when the number of plasma cells keeps going up ... Plasma cell neoplasms are diseases in which the body makes too many plasma cells.. Plasma cells develop from B lymphocytes (B ... Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment. General Information About Plasma ... Plasma cell neoplasms are diseases in which abnormal plasma cells or myeloma cells form tumors in the bones or soft tissues of ...
  https://www.oncolink.org/healthcare-professionals/nci/pqid-CDR0000258195
*  Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version - National Cancer Institute
... are different types of plasma cell neoplasms. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, stages, and ... Refractory Plasma Cell Neoplasms. Plasma cell neoplasms are called refractory when the number of plasma cells keeps going up ... Plasma cell neoplasms are diseases in which the body makes too many plasma cells.. Plasma cells develop from B lymphocytes (B ... Plasma cell neoplasms are diseases in which abnormal plasma cells or myeloma cells form tumors in the bones or soft tissues of ...
  https://www.cancer.gov/types/myeloma/patient/myeloma-treatment-pdq
*  Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations | Williams Hematology, 9e | AccessHemOnc | McGraw-Hill Medical
Plasma cell neoplasms are tumors derived from an expansion of mutated mature B-cells and their precursors. These neoplasms ... "Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations." Williams Hematology, 9e Kaushansky K, Lichtman MA, Prchal JT, Levi MM, Press OW ... Chapter 105: Plasma Cell Neoplasms: General Considerations Guido Tricot; Siegfried Janz; Kalyan Nadiminti; Erik Wendlandt; ... 109). The prototype of a malignant plasma cell neoplasm is myeloma, which is characterized by complex genetic alterations, best ...
  http://hemonc.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=1581§ionid=108076158
*  Study of DNA Copy Numbers Variations and Gene Expression Profile of Bone Marrow Plasma Cells From MGUS and SMM. - Full Text...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Paraproteinemias. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. ... Study of DNA Copy Numbers Variations and Gene Expression Profile of Bone Marrow Plasma Cells From MGUS and SMM. (GENOMGUS). ... The purpose of this study is to describe DNA copy number variations and gene expression profiles of bone marrow plasma cells of ... Large Scale Study of DNA Copy Numbers Variations and Gene Expression Profile of Bone Marrow Plasma Cells From Monoclonal ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01079429
*  Waldenstroms Macroglobulinemia facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Waldenstroms Macroglobulinemia
Plasma cell neoplasm WM is a type of plasma cell neoplasm or B-cell lymphoma. These are lymphomas in which certain plasma cells ... Plasma cell neoplasm. WM is a type of plasma cell neoplasm or B-cell lymphoma. These are lymphomas in which certain plasma ... Plasma cell- Type of white blood cell that produces antibodies; derived from an antigen-specific B cell. ... Plasma cell. -Type of white blood cell that produces antibodies; derived from an antigen-specific B cell. ...
  http://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/diseases-and-conditions/pathology/waldenstroms-macroglobulinemia
*  S1211 Bortezomib, Dexamethasone, and Lenalidomide With or Without Elotuzumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... DS Stage I Plasma Cell Myeloma DS Stage II Plasma Cell Myeloma DS Stage III Plasma Cell Myeloma Drug: Bortezomib Drug: ... Primary plasma cell leukemia (defined by either ,= 2,000 plasma cells/mL of peripheral blood, or 20% on a manual differential ... Platelet count ,= 70,000 cells/mm^3 for patients who have bone marrow plasmacytosis , 50%; or ,= 50,000 cells/mm^3 for patients ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01668719?term=multiple+myeloma&recr=Open&cond=multiple+myeloma&rank=19
*  Studying Blood Samples From Patients With Multiple Myeloma Who Were Treated With Thalidomide or Lenalidomide - Full Text View -...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Plasmacytoma. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. ... Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm Genetic: gene expression analysis Genetic: reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00899080?term=deep+vein+thrombosis+OR+thrombophlebitis+OR+venous+thrombosis+OR+venous+thromboembolism&recr=Open&fund=01&rank=20
*  Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Other Disease - Full Text View -...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Neoplasm Metastasis. Primary Myelofibrosis. Plasmacytoma. ... B-cell, Chronic Lymphosarcoma Multiple Myeloma Follicular Lymphoma B-cell Lymphoma Mantle Cell Lymphoma Diffuse Large B-Cell ... Leukemia Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm Myelodysplastic Syndromes Precancerous Condition Secondary ... The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer or abnormal cells (graft- ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00423826?recr=Open&cond=%22Plasmacytoma%22&rank=8
*  Non-Ablative Allo HSCT For Hematologic Malignancies or SAA - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders Leukemia Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm Myelodysplastic Syndromes ... Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Plasmacytoma. Myeloproliferative Disorders. Myelodysplastic- ... Intestinal Neoplasms. Precancerous Conditions. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Lymphoproliferative Disorders. ... Peripheral stem cell transplantation may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy used to kill ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00006379?cond=%22Acute+erythroleukemia%22+%22Acute+erythroid+leukemia%22&rank=17
*  Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Preleukemia. Graft vs Host Disease. Plasmacytoma. Neoplasms by Histologic ... Anemia Graft Versus Host Disease Leukemia Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm Myelodysplastic Syndromes ... B-cell Lymphoma Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Leukemia, B-cell, Chronic Acute Lymphoblastic ... RATIONALE: Bone marrow that has been treated to remove certain white blood cells may be able to replace immune cells that were ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00003398
*  Open-label Study of TH-302 and Dexamethasone With or Without Bortezomib or Pomalidomide in Subjects With Relapsed/Refractory...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Previously treated malignancies, except for adequately treated non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell or squamous cell), in situ ... Maximum plasma concentration of TH-302 and bortezomib [ Time Frame: Cycle 1 Day 1 predose and up to 24 hours postdose ]. ... Prior peripheral stem cell transplant within 12 weeks of the start of study ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01522872
*  A Phase 3 Study Comparing Oral Ixazomib Plus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone Versus Placebo Plus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... plasma cells in bone marrow. VGPR is defined as Serum and urine M-protein detectable by immunofixation but not on ... attributed solely to plasma cell proliferative disease. Status evaluated every 4 weeks until disease progression (PD) was ... plasma cell leukemia, primary amyloidosis, myelodysplastic syndrome, or myeloproliferative syndrome.. *Evidence of current ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01564537?term=multiple+myeloma&recr=Open&cond=multiple+myeloma&rank=11
*  QUIREDEX: Revlimid (Lenalidomide) and Dexamethasone (ReDex) Treatment Versus Observation in Patients With Smoldering Multiple...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Patient with a previous clinical history of another malignant illness except for squamous cell carcinoma or skin cancer or ... Geitz H, Handt S, Zwingenberger K. Thalidomide selectively modulates the density of cell surface molecules involved in the ... significance and smoldering multiple myeloma based on multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow plasma cells. Blood ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00480363
*  A Phase 1/2, Multi-center, Open-label, Dose-escalation Study of Elotuzumab(Humanized Anti-CS1 Monoclonal IgG1 Antibody) and...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Solitary bone or solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma as the only evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia. ... Platelets ,=75,000 cells/mm3 (75 x 10^9 cells/L) without transfusion within 72 hours of screening; ... Prior malignancy, except for adequately treated basal cell or squamous cell skin cancer, in situ cervical cancer, or other ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00726869
*  Dose Escalation Trial of WT1-specific Donor-derived T Cells Following T-Cell Depleted Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Dose Escalation Trial of WT1-specific Donor-derived T Cells Following T-Cell Depleted Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell ... PR at 3 months following autologous stem cell transplantation and patients with plasma cell leukemia at diagnosis. ... and a T cell depleted stem cell transplant from a histocompatible related or unrelated donor. Hematopoietic stem cell donors ...
  https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01758328
*  Genomic-Based Diagnosis, Classification and Targeted Treatment of Multiple Myeloma - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... Multiple myeloma is an incurable bone marrow cancer characterized by an abnormal expansion of plasma cells that secretes ... CD138 positive cells will be selected using magnetic beads and RNA extracted. The quality of RNA will be checked using the ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01619358
*  Serum Vitamin D Levels and Peripheral Neuropathy Among Multiple Myeloma Patients - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Peripheral Nervous System Diseases. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. ... Plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein (M-protein) and skin changes (POEMS ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01697839?recr=Open&cond=%22Peripheral+Nervous+System+Diseases%22&rank=12
*  S0115, High-Dose Melphalan and Autologous Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma or...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Amyloidosis. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. ... Multiple Myeloma Plasma Cell Myeloma Biological: filgrastim Drug: cyclophosphamide Drug: dexamethasone Drug: melphalan Drug: ... Evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia (i.e., monoclonal gammopathy in the serum or urine by immunofixation electrophoresis and/or ... No other malignancy within the past 5 years except adequately treated basal cell or squamous cell skin cancer, carcinoma in ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00064337?cond=%22AL+amyloidosis%22&rank=20
*  Bendamustine, Bortezomib (Velcade ®) and Prednisone (BVP) in Patients Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma - Full Text View -...
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Hemostatic Disorders. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular ... History of other malignancies after different myeloma (except for basal or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin or carcinoma in ... The patients eligible for autologous transplant receive four cycles of BVP, hematopoietic stem cell collection and ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01376401
*  Pasireotide & Everolimus in Adult Patients With Radioiodine-Refractory Differentiated & Medullary Thyroid Cancer - Full Text...
Neoplasms by Site. Neoplasms. Head and Neck Neoplasms. Neuroendocrine Tumors. Neuroectodermal Tumors. Neoplasms, Germ Cell and ... Patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus or a fasting plasma glucose , 1.5 ULN. Note: At the principal investigator's ... Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma. Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue. ... Patients with prior or concurrent malignancy except for the following: adequately treated basal cell or squamous cell skin ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01270321?term=sirolimus+cancer&recr=Open&rank=17

Plasma cellPlasma cell leukemiaSolution precursor plasma spray: Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) is a thermal spray process where a feedstock solution is heated and then deposited onto a substrate. Basic properties of the process are fundamentally similar to other plasma spraying processes.Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: right|240pxLight chain deposition diseasePlasmacytomaPolyclonal B cell response: Polyclonal B cell response is a natural mode of immune response exhibited by the adaptive immune system of mammals. It ensures that a single antigen is recognized and attacked through its overlapping parts, called epitopes, by multiple clones of B cell.PancreatoblastomaCystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms: Cystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms is a group of tumors.Bone marrow suppression: Bone marrow suppression or myelotoxicity (adjective myelotoxic) or myelosuppression is the decrease in production of cells responsible for providing immunity (leukocytes), carrying oxygen (erythrocytes), and/or those responsible for normal blood clotting (thrombocytes). Bone marrow suppression is a serious side effect of chemotherapy and certain drugs affecting the immune system such as azathioprine.Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significanceGerminal center B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Gene expression profiling has revealed that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is composed of at least 3 different sub-groups, each having distinct oncogenic mechanisms that respond to therapies in different ways. Germinal Center B-Cell like (GCB) DLBCLs appear to arise from normal germinal center B cells, while Activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCLs are thought to arise from postgerminal center B cells that are arrested during plasmacytic differentiation.CD4 immunoadhesin: CD4 immunoadhesin is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of a combination of CD4 and the fragment crystallizable region.Cell membraneSeroconversionCorona treatment: Corona treatment (sometimes referred to as air plasma) is a surface modification technique that uses a low temperature corona discharge plasma to impart changes in the properties of a surface. The corona plasma is generated by the application of high voltage to an electrode that has a sharp tip.Palatine tonsilAmyloidosisWorld Lymphoma Awareness Day: World Lymphoma Awareness Day (WLAD) is held on September 15 every year and is a day dedicated to raising awareness of lymphoma, an increasingly common form of cancer. It is a global initiative hosted by the Lymphoma Coalition (LC), a non-profit network organisation of 63 lymphoma patient groups from 44 countries around the world.Flow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Immunoglobulin light chainKidney tumour: Kidney tumours (or kidney tumors), also known as renal tumours, are tumours, or growths, on or in the kidney. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous).Immunophenotyping: Immunophenotyping is a technique used to study the protein expressed by cells. This technique is commonly used in basic science research and laboratory diagnostic purpose.Sieved ultraspherical polynomials: In mathematics, the two families c(x;k) and B(x;k) of sieved ultraspherical polynomials, introduced by Waleed Al-Salam, W.R.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingThyroid cancerIntraductal papillary mucinous neoplasmPeriarteriolar lymphoid sheaths: Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths (or periarterial lymphatic sheaths, or PALS) are a portion of the white pulp of the spleen. They are populated largely by T cells and surround central arteries within the spleen; the PALS T-cells are presented with blood borne antigens via myeloid dendritic cells.Bridget Jones: Bridget Jones is a franchise based on the fictional character with the same name, Bridget Jones. British writer Helen Fielding started her Bridget Jones's Diary column in The Independent in 1995, while chronicling the life of Bridget Jones as a thirtysomething single woman in London as she tries to make sense of life and love with the help of a surrogate "urban family" of friends in the 1990s.Targeted therapy of lung cancer: Targeted therapy of lung cancer refers to using agents specifically designed to selectively target molecular pathways responsible for, or that substantially drive, the malignant phenotype of lung cancer cells, and as a consequence of this (relative) selectivity, cause fewer toxic effects on normal cells.Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases: Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases are a category of hematological malignancies disorders created by the World Health Organization which have characteristics of both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative conditions.Cancer/testis antigen family 45, member a5CD36 antigen: CD36 antigen is a transmembrane, highly glycosylated, glycoprotein expressed by monocytes, macrophages, platelets, microvascular endothelial cells and adipose tissues. CD36 recognises oxidized low density lipoprotein, long chain fatty acids, anionic phospholipids, collagen types I, IV and V, thrombospondin and Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes.Hyper-IgM syndrome type 1Immunoglobulin heavy chainCancer biomarkers: A cancer biomarker refers to a substance or process that is indicative of the presence of cancer in the body. A biomarker may be a molecule secreted by a tumor or a specific response of the body to the presence of cancer.Inferior mesenteric lymph nodes: The inferior mesenteric lymph nodes consist of:Metastatic liver disease: A liver metastasis is a malignant tumor in the liver that has spread from another organ affected by cancer. The liver is a common site for metastatic disease because of its rich, dual blood supply (the liver receives blood via the hepatic artery and portal vein).Intraocular lymphoma: Intraocular lymphoma is a rare malignant form of eye cancer. Intraocular lymphoma may affect the eye secondarily from a metastasis from a non-ocular tumor or may arise within the eye primarily (primary intraocular lymphoma, PIOL).Old German Shepherd Dog: Old German Shepherd Dog () is a controversial predicate for the long-hair variation of the German Shepherd Dog (), which is not a separate breed recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Nonetheless, there are efforts to establish this variety as a separate breed.Sialoblastoma: A sialoblastoma is a low-grade salivary gland neoplasm that recapitulates primitive salivary gland anlage. It has previously been referred to as congenital basal cell adenoma, embryoma, or basaloid adenocarcinoma.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.Goblet cell carcinoid: The goblet cell carcinoid, abbreviated GCC and also known as crypt cell carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour with goblet cell differentiation, is a rare biphasic gastrointestinal tract tumour that consists of a neuroendocrine component and a conventional carcinoma, histologically arising from Paneth cells.Ovarian Cancer National Alliance: The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is an advocacy organization for women with ovarian cancer in the United States. To advance the interests of women with ovarian cancer, the organization advocates at a national level for increases in research funding for the development of an early detection test, improved health care practices, and life-saving treatment protocols.Toralizumab: IDEC}}Monoclonal antibody therapyCryosupernatant: The term cryosupernatant (also called cryo-poor plasma, cryoprecipitate depleted) refers to plasma from which the cryoprecipitate has been removed.ABCD rating: ABCD rating, also called the Jewett staging system or the Whitmore-Jewett staging system, is a staging system for prostate cancer that uses the letters A, B, C, and D.Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumourATC code J06: ==J06A Immune sera==Liver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GILarge-cell lymphomaPancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm: Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, also mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and mucinous cystic tumour, is a grouping of cystic neoplasms that arise from the pancreas. They may be benign, malignant or in between.Brain biopsyHematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act: The Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act of 2001 (P.L.Intraepithelial lymphocyte: Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) are lymphocytes found in the epithelial layer of mammalian mucosal linings, such as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and reproductive tract. However, unlike other T cells, IELs do not need priming.Immunoperoxidase: Immunoperoxidase is a type of immunostain used in molecular biology, medical research, and clinical diagnostics. In particular, immunoperoxidase reactions refer to a sub-class of immunohistochemical or immunocytochemical procedures in which the antibodies are visualized via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction.Coles PhillipsAtaciceptDuctal carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma is a type of tumor that primarily presents in the ducts of a gland.

(1/26) Gene expression profiling reveals different pathways related to Abl and other genes that cooperate with c-Myc in a model of plasma cell neoplasia.

BACKGROUND: To elucidate the genes involved in the neoplastic transformation of B cells, global gene expression profiles were generated using Affymetrix U74Av2 microarrays, containing 12,488 genes, for four different groups of mouse B-cell lymphomas and six subtypes of pristane-induced mouse plasma cell tumors, three of which developed much earlier than the others. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis exhibited two main sub-clusters of samples: a B-cell lymphoma cluster and a plasma cell tumor cluster with subclusters reflecting mechanism of induction. This report represents the first step in using global gene expression to investigate molecular signatures related to the role of cooperating oncogenes in a model of Myc-induced carcinogenesis. Within a single subgroup, e.g., ABPCs, plasma cell tumors that contained typical T(12;15) chromosomal translocations did not display gene expression patterns distinct from those with variant T(6;15) translocations, in which the breakpoint was in the Pvt-1 locus, 230 kb 3' of c-Myc, suggesting that c-Myc activation was the initiating factor in both. When integrated with previously published Affymetrix array data from human multiple myelomas, the IL-6-transgenic subset of mouse plasma cell tumors clustered more closely with MM1 subsets of human myelomas, slow-appearing plasma cell tumors clustered together with MM2, while plasma cell tumors accelerated by v-Abl clustered with the more aggressive MM3-MM4 myeloma subsets. Slow-appearing plasma cell tumors expressed Socs1 and Socs2 but v-Abl-accelerated plasma cell tumors expressed 4-5 times as much. Both v-Abl-accelerated and non-v-Abl-associated tumors exhibited phosphorylated STAT 1 and 3, but only v-Abl-accelerated plasma cell tumors lost viability and STAT 1 and 3 phosphorylation when cultured in the presence of the v-Abl kinase inhibitor, STI-571. These data suggest that the Jak/Stat pathway was critical in the transformation acceleration by v-Abl and that v-Abl activity remained essential throughout the life of the tumors, not just in their acceleration. A different pathway appears to predominate in the more slowly arising plasma cell tumors. CONCLUSION: Gene expression profiling differentiates not only B-cell lymphomas from plasma cell tumors but also distinguishes slow from accelerated plasma cell tumors. These data and those obtained from the sensitivity of v-Abl-accelerated plasma cell tumors and their phosphorylated STAT proteins indicate that these similar tumors utilize different signaling pathways but share a common initiating genetic lesion, a c-Myc-activating chromosome translocation.  (+info)

(2/26) AID-deficient Bcl-xL transgenic mice develop delayed atypical plasma cell tumors with unusual Ig/Myc chromosomal rearrangements.

Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, and has also been implicated in translocations between Ig switch regions and c-Myc in plasma cell tumors in mice. We asked if AID is required for accelerated tumor development in pristane-treated Bcl-xL transgenic BALB/c mice deficient in AID (pBxAicda-/-). pBxAicda-/- mice developed tumors with a lower frequency (24 vs. 62%) and a longer mean latency (108 vs. 36 d) than AID-sufficient mice. The tumors appeared in oil granuloma tissue and did not form ascites. By interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization, six out of nine pBxAicda-/- primary tumors had T(12;15) and one had T(6;15) chromosomal translocations. Two tumors were transplantable and established as stable cell lines. Molecular and cytogenetic analyses showed that one had an unusual unbalanced T(12;15) translocation, with IgH Cmu and Pvt-1 oriented head to tail at the breakpoint, resulting in an elevated expression of c-Myc. In contrast, the second was T(12;15) negative, but had an elevated N-Myc expression caused by a paracentric inversion of chromosome 12. Thus, novel mechanisms juxtapose Ig and Myc-family genes in AID-deficient plasma cell tumors.  (+info)

(3/26) Novel markers of normal and neoplastic human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

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(4/26) Plasmacytoma of bone, extramedullary plasmacytoma, and multiple myeloma: incidence and survival in the United States, 1992-2004.

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(5/26) Risk of plasma cell and lymphoproliferative disorders among 14621 first-degree relatives of 4458 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in Sweden.

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(6/26) Genetic and immune-related factors in the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative and plasma cell malignancies.

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(7/26) Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH): revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

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(8/26) A quantitative analysis of genomic instability in lymphoid and plasma cell neoplasms based on the PIG-A gene.

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  • monoclonal
  • The purpose of this study is to describe DNA copy number variations and gene expression profiles of bone marrow plasma cells of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Large Scale Study of DNA Copy Numbers Variations and Gene Expression Profile of Bone Marrow Plasma Cells From Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and Indolent Myeloma (SMM). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Although monoclonal immunoglobulin protein generally is detected in plasma cell myeloma, other conditions also may result in the production of a relative excess of monoclonal immunoglobulin. (wordpress.com)
  • This chapter also delineates laboratory features that can be used to distinguish plasma cell myeloma from related conditions that may give rise to a relative excess of monoclonal immunoglobulin. (wordpress.com)
  • However, a low but significant percentage of patients with monoclonal gammopathy develop frank B-cell malignancies each year.7,8,9,10 and 11 For this reason, the term benign monoclonal gammopathy largely has been replaced by the term essential monoclonal gammopathy (see Chap. 105). (wordpress.com)
  • Chronic cold agglutinin syndrome is a disease in which elderly patients produce a monoclonal IgM molecule that binds red blood cells and causes their agglutination at temperatures significantly below 37°C (98.6°F) (see Chap. 56). (wordpress.com)