Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Connective and Soft Tissue: Neoplasms developing from some structure of the connective and subcutaneous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective or soft tissue.Neoplasms, Plasma Cell: Neoplasms associated with a proliferation of a single clone of PLASMA CELLS and characterized by the secretion of PARAPROTEINS.Appendiceal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the APPENDIX.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal: Carcinoma that arises from the PANCREATIC DUCTS. It accounts for the majority of cancers derived from the PANCREAS.Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue: Neoplasms composed of vascular tissue. This concept does not refer to neoplasms located in blood vessels.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Nose Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NOSE.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Neoplasms, Muscle Tissue: Neoplasms composed of muscle tissue: skeletal, cardiac, or smooth. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in muscles.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Intestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.Neoplasms, Adnexal and Skin Appendage: Neoplasms composed of sebaceous or sweat gland tissue or tissue of other skin appendages. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the sebaceous or sweat glands or in the other skin appendages.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Vascular Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the vasculature system, such as ARTERIES and VEINS. They are differentiated from neoplasms of vascular tissue (NEOPLASMS, VASCULAR TISSUE), such as ANGIOFIBROMA or HEMANGIOMA.Sweat Gland NeoplasmsLymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Neoplasms, Complex and Mixed: Neoplasms composed of more than one type of neoplastic tissue.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Mandibular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.Cystadenocarcinoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. The neoplastic cells manifest varying degrees of anaplasia and invasiveness, and local extension and metastases occur. Cystadenocarcinomas develop frequently in the ovaries, where pseudomucinous and serous types are recognized. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Thymus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYMUS GLAND.Splenic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Maxillary Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the MAXILLA or upper jaw.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal: Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the gonads or present in an embryo or FETUS.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Neoplasms, Adipose Tissue: Neoplasms composed of fatty tissue or connective tissue made up of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in adipose tissue.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Tongue Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TONGUE.Ileal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the ILEUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Urinary Bladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the URINARY BLADDER.Carcinoma, Acinar Cell: A malignant tumor arising from secreting cells of a racemose gland, particularly the salivary glands. Racemose (Latin racemosus, full of clusters) refers, as does acinar (Latin acinus, grape), to small saclike dilatations in various glands. Acinar cell carcinomas are usually well differentiated and account for about 13% of the cancers arising in the parotid gland. Lymph node metastasis occurs in about 16% of cases. Local recurrences and distant metastases many years after treatment are common. This tumor appears in all age groups and is most common in women. (Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240; from DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575)Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Vaginal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VAGINA.Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes arising from or involving components of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, cranial nerves, and meninges. Included in this category are primary and metastatic nervous system neoplasms.Janus Kinase 2: A Janus kinase subtype that is involved in signaling from GROWTH HORMONE RECEPTORS; PROLACTIN RECEPTORS; and a variety of CYTOKINE RECEPTORS such as ERYTHROPOIETIN RECEPTORS and INTERLEUKIN RECEPTORS. Dysregulation of Janus kinase 2 due to GENETIC TRANSLOCATIONS have been associated with a variety of MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Liver Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumors of the LIVER.Hemangiosarcoma: A rare malignant neoplasm characterized by rapidly proliferating, extensively infiltrating, anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood-filled or lumpy spaces. (Stedman, 25th ed)Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Myelodysplastic-Myeloproliferative Diseases: Clonal myeloid disorders that possess both dysplastic and proliferative features but are not properly classified as either MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES or MYELOPROLIFERATIVE DISORDERS.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PARANASAL SINUSES.Pleural Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the thin serous membrane that envelopes the lungs and lines the thoracic cavity. Pleural neoplasms are exceedingly rare and are usually not diagnosed until they are advanced because in the early stages they produce no symptoms.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Common Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumor or cancer of the COMMON BILE DUCT including the AMPULLA OF VATER and the SPHINCTER OF ODDI.Orbital Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony orbit and contents except the eyeball.Abdominal NeoplasmsCerebellar Neoplasms: Primary or metastatic neoplasms of the CEREBELLUM. Tumors in this location frequently present with ATAXIA or signs of INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION due to obstruction of the fourth ventricle. Common primary cerebellar tumors include fibrillary ASTROCYTOMA and cerebellar HEMANGIOBLASTOMA. The cerebellum is a relatively common site for tumor metastases from the lung, breast, and other distant organs. (From Okazaki & Scheithauer, Atlas of Neuropathology, 1988, p86 and p141)Lipoma: A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.Facial NeoplasmsRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Neoplasms by Site: A collective term for precoordinated organ/neoplasm headings locating neoplasms by organ, as BRAIN NEOPLASMS; DUODENAL NEOPLASMS; LIVER NEOPLASMS; etc.Bronchial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.Peritoneal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PERITONEUM.Histiocytic Disorders, Malignant: Distinctive neoplastic disorders of histiocytes. Included are malignant neoplasms of MACROPHAGES and DENDRITIC CELLS.Urogenital Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UROGENITAL SYSTEM in either the male or the female.Spinal NeoplasmsSkull Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the bony part of the skull.Vulvar Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VULVA.Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5)Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).Lip Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIP.Fibroma: A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Pelvic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the pelvic region.Gingival NeoplasmsGallbladder Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the gallbladder.Neoplasm Seeding: The local implantation of tumor cells by contamination of instruments and surgical equipment during and after surgical resection, resulting in local growth of the cells and tumor formation.Neoplasms, Fibroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Respiratory Tract NeoplasmsNeoplasms, Connective Tissue: Neoplasms composed of connective tissue, including elastic, mucous, reticular, osseous, and cartilaginous tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in connective tissue.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.Neoplasm Grading: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the level of CELL DIFFERENTIATION in neoplasms as increasing ANAPLASIA correlates with the aggressiveness of the neoplasm.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Polycythemia Vera: A myeloproliferative disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume, associated frequently with splenomegaly, leukocytosis, and thrombocythemia. Hematopoiesis is also reactive in extramedullary sites (liver and spleen). In time myelofibrosis occurs.Thrombocythemia, Essential: A clinical syndrome characterized by repeated spontaneous hemorrhages and a remarkable increase in the number of circulating platelets.RNA, Neoplasm: RNA present in neoplastic tissue.Trophoblastic Neoplasms: Trophoblastic growth, which may be gestational or nongestational in origin. Trophoblastic neoplasia resulting from pregnancy is often described as gestational trophoblastic disease to distinguish it from germ cell tumors which frequently show trophoblastic elements, and from the trophoblastic differentiation which sometimes occurs in a wide variety of epithelial cancers. Gestational trophoblastic growth has several forms, including HYDATIDIFORM MOLE and CHORIOCARCINOMA. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1691)Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Thoracic NeoplasmsCecal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the CECUM.Leukemia, B-Cell: A malignant disease of the B-LYMPHOCYTES in the bone marrow and/or blood.Hemangioendothelioma: A neoplasm derived from blood vessels, characterized by numerous prominent endothelial cells that occur singly, in aggregates, and as the lining of congeries of vascular tubes or channels. Hemangioendotheliomas are relatively rare and are of intermediate malignancy (between benign hemangiomas and conventional angiosarcomas). They affect men and women about equally and rarely develop in childhood. (From Stedman, 25th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Digestive System Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Tracheal NeoplasmsAdenocarcinoma, Follicular: An adenocarcinoma of the thyroid gland, in which the cells are arranged in the form of follicles. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Jejunal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the JEJUNUM region of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL).Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine: A group of carcinomas which share a characteristic morphology, often being composed of clusters and trabecular sheets of round "blue cells", granular chromatin, and an attenuated rim of poorly demarcated cytoplasm. Neuroendocrine tumors include carcinoids, small ("oat") cell carcinomas, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, Merkel cell tumor, cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and pheochromocytoma. Neurosecretory granules are found within the tumor cells. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Central Nervous System Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the brain, spinal cord, or meninges.Sarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Carcinosarcoma: A malignant neoplasm that contains elements of carcinoma and sarcoma so extensively intermixed as to indicate neoplasia of epithelial and mesenchymal tissue. (Stedman, 25th ed)Cyst Fluid: Liquid material found in epithelial-lined closed cavities or sacs.Carcinogens: Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.Adenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.Histiocytic Sarcoma: Malignant neoplasms composed of MACROPHAGES or DENDRITIC CELLS. Most histiocytic sarcomas present as localized tumor masses without a leukemic phase. Though the biological behavior of these neoplasms resemble lymphomas, their cell lineage is histiocytic not lymphoid.Keratoacanthoma: A benign, non-neoplastic, usually self-limiting epithelial lesion closely resembling squamous cell carcinoma clinically and histopathologically. It occurs in solitary, multiple, and eruptive forms. The solitary and multiple forms occur on sunlight exposed areas and are identical histologically; they affect primarily white males. The eruptive form usually involves both sexes and appears as a generalized papular eruption.Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: A condition characterized by poorly-circumscribed gelatinous masses filled with malignant mucin-secreting cells. Forty-five percent of pseudomyxomas arise from the ovary, usually in a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (CYSTADENOCARCINOMA, MUCINOUS), which has prognostic significance. Pseudomyxoma peritonei must be differentiated from mucinous spillage into the peritoneum by a benign mucocele of the appendix. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Carcinogenicity Tests: Tests to experimentally measure the tumor-producing/cancer cell-producing potency of an agent by administering the agent (e.g., benzanthracenes) and observing the quantity of tumors or the cell transformation developed over a given period of time. The carcinogenicity value is usually measured as milligrams of agent administered per tumor developed. Though this test differs from the DNA-repair and bacterial microsome MUTAGENICITY TESTS, researchers often attempt to correlate the finding of carcinogenicity values and mutagenicity values.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Genital Neoplasms, Male: Tumor or cancer of the MALE GENITALIA.Infratentorial Neoplasms: Intracranial tumors originating in the region of the brain inferior to the tentorium cerebelli, which contains the cerebellum, fourth ventricle, cerebellopontine angle, brain stem, and related structures. Primary tumors of this region are more frequent in children, and may present with ATAXIA; CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; vomiting; HEADACHE; HYDROCEPHALUS; or other signs of neurologic dysfunction. Relatively frequent histologic subtypes include TERATOMA; MEDULLOBLASTOMA; GLIOBLASTOMA; ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA; and choroid plexus papilloma (PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS).Biliary Tract Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer in the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.Iris Neoplasms: Tumors of the iris characterized by increased pigmentation of melanocytes. Iris nevi are composed of proliferated melanocytes and are associated with neurofibromatosis and malignant melanoma of the choroid and ciliary body. Malignant melanoma of the iris often originates from preexisting nevi.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Urethral Neoplasms: Cancer or tumors of the URETHRA. Benign epithelial tumors of the urethra usually consist of squamous and transitional cells. Primary urethral carcinomas are rare and typically of squamous cells. Urethral carcinoma is the only urological malignancy that is more common in females than in males.Laryngeal Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the LARYNX or any of its parts: the GLOTTIS; EPIGLOTTIS; LARYNGEAL CARTILAGES; LARYNGEAL MUSCLES; and VOCAL CORDS.Granulosa Cell Tumor: A neoplasm composed entirely of GRANULOSA CELLS, occurring mostly in the OVARY. In the adult form, it may contain some THECA CELLS. This tumor often produces ESTRADIOL and INHIBIN. The excess estrogen exposure can lead to other malignancies in women and PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY in girls. In rare cases, granulosa cell tumors have been identified in the TESTES.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Neoplasms: A family of mesenchymal tumors composed of histologically and immunohistochemically distinctive perivascular epithelioid cells. These cells do not have a normal anatomic homolog. (From Fletcher CDM, et. al., World Health Organization Classification of Tumors: Pathology and Genetics of Tumors of Soft Tissue and Bone, 2002).Rats, Inbred F344Carcinoma, Adenoid Cystic: Carcinoma characterized by bands or cylinders of hyalinized or mucinous stroma separating or surrounded by nests or cords of small epithelial cells. When the cylinders occur within masses of epithelial cells, they give the tissue a perforated, sievelike, or cribriform appearance. Such tumors occur in the mammary glands, the mucous glands of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and the salivary glands. They are malignant but slow-growing, and tend to spread locally via the nerves. (Dorland, 27th ed)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Astrocytoma: Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Mesenchymoma: A mixed mesenchymal tumor composed of two or more mesodermal cellular elements not commonly associated, not counting fibrous tissue as one of the elements. Mesenchymomas are widely distributed in the body and about 75% are malignant. (Dorland, 27th ed; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1866)Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Lymphoma, T-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors representing malignant transformations of T-lymphocytes.Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Submandibular Gland NeoplasmsPapilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Myoepithelioma: A usually benign tumor made up predominantly of myoepithelial cells.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Eyelid Neoplasms: Tumors of cancer of the EYELIDS.Keratin-7: A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.Hypothalamic Neoplasms: Benign and malignant tumors of the HYPOTHALAMUS. Pilocytic astrocytomas and hamartomas are relatively frequent histologic types. Neoplasms of the hypothalamus frequently originate from adjacent structures, including the OPTIC CHIASM, optic nerve (see OPTIC NERVE NEOPLASMS), and pituitary gland (see PITUITARY NEOPLASMS). Relatively frequent clinical manifestations include visual loss, developmental delay, macrocephaly, and precocious puberty. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2051)Oligodendroglioma: A relatively slow-growing glioma that is derived from oligodendrocytes and tends to occur in the cerebral hemispheres, thalamus, or lateral ventricle. They may present at any age, but are most frequent in the third to fifth decades, with an earlier incidence peak in the first decade. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, relatively avascular, and tend to form cysts and microcalcifications. Neoplastic cells tend to have small round nuclei surrounded by unstained nuclei. The tumors may vary from well-differentiated to highly anaplastic forms. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2052; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p655)Histiocytoma, Benign Fibrous: A benign tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of HISTIOCYTES and with various fibroblastic components. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. When they occur in the skin, they are called dermatofibromas or sclerosing hemangiomas. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p1747)Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)Lymphoma, B-Cell: A group of heterogeneous lymphoid tumors generally expressing one or more B-cell antigens or representing malignant transformations of B-lymphocytes.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Maxillary Sinus Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MAXILLARY SINUS. They represent the majority of paranasal neoplasms.

*  adult choroid plexus neoplasm 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine
Meningeal Neoplasms / secondary. Neoplasm Seeding. Papilloma, Choroid Plexus / surgery. *[MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers, Tumor ... Spinal Cord Neoplasms / secondary. *[MeSH-minor] Adult. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / pathology. Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms ... Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms / secondary. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / pathology. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / secondary. Fourth ... MeSH-major] Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / diagnosis. Choroid Plexus Neoplasms / pathology. Meningeal Neoplasms / diagnosis. ...
  http://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=adult+choroid+plexus+neoplasm+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0
*  Perineal skin recurrence on the site of Lone Star Retractor: case report | Surgical Case Reports | Full Text
Neoplasm seedingNeoplasm recurrenceRectal neoplasmsLone Star RetractorSkin recurrence. Background. Local recurrence (LR) of ... The recurrence was most likely caused by the seeding of exfoliated tumor cells into the perianal skin which was abraded by the ... Hyman N, Kida M. Adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon seeding a chronic anal fistula: report of a case. Dis Colon Rectum. 2003; ...
  https://surgicalcasereports.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s40792-017-0405-0
*  List of MeSH codes (C04) - Wikipedia
... neoplasm circulating cells MeSH C04.697.650.830 --- neoplasm seeding MeSH C04.697.650.895 --- neoplasms, unknown primary MeSH ... nose neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.656 --- orbital neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.828 --- skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 --- duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 --- ileal neoplasms MeSH ... femoral neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721 --- skull neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450 --- jaw neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721. ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(C04)
*  List of MeSH codes (C23) - Wikipedia
... neoplasm seeding MeSH C23.550.727.650.895 --- neoplasms, unknown primary MeSH C23.550.727.655 --- neoplasm recurrence, local ... neoplasm metastasis MeSH C23.550.727.650.560 --- lymphatic metastasis MeSH C23.550.727.650.645 --- neoplasm circulating cells ... MeSH C23.550.727.670 --- neoplasm regression, spontaneous MeSH C23.550.727.700 --- neoplasm, residual MeSH C23.550.737.500 --- ... neoplasm invasiveness MeSH C23.550.727.645.500 --- leukemic infiltration MeSH C23.550.727.650 --- ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(C23)
*  Plus it
... and subarachnoid seeding of neoplasm have been published in the radiologic literature (1-7). Many examples have been cited in ...
  http://www.ajnr.org/content/25/4/545
*  KIT (phospho Y719) polyclonal antibody - (PAB16884) - Products - Abnova
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local. *Neoplasm Seeding. *Neoplasm, Residual. *Oligospermia. *Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal. *Pancreatic ...
  http://www.abnova.com/products/products_detail.asp?catalog_id=PAB16884
*  Pancreatic Neoplasms
... Online Medical Reference - from diagnosis through treatment. Co-authored by Tyler Stevens and Peter Lee of ... Critics have argued that the theoretical risk of peritoneal seeding and procedure complications outweigh the benefit. ... Cystic neoplasms are reported to account for less than 1% of pancreatic cancers. Generally, they are indolent tumors with ... Papillary cystic neoplasm. Rare; young women. Yes; locally aggressive. Body and tail. ...
  http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/gastroenterology/pancreatic-neoplasms/
*  Search of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | 'Breast Neoplasms' AND 'Breast Diseases' - List Results -...
Permanent Breast Seed Implant (PBSI) Side Effects. *(and 2 more...). 420. Female. 50 Years and older (Adult, Senior). ... 1603 Studies found for: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies , 'Breast Neoplasms' AND 'Breast Diseases' ... Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies , 'Breast Neoplasms' AND 'Breast Diseases' (1603 records) ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?recr=open&cond=%22Breast+Neoplasms%22+AND+%22Breast+Diseases%22&show_down=Y
*  Palladium-103 Seed Implant and Single Daily Dosing of Uroxatral Vs. Twice Daily Dosing of Flomax- A 3 Month Retrospective...
Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing External Radiation and Seed Implantation. *Prostatic Neoplasms. .map{width:100%;height: ... Palladium-103 Seed Implant and Single Daily Dosing of Uroxatral Vs Twice Daily Dosing of Flomax-A 3 Month Retrospective ... Palladium-103 Seed Implant and Single Daily Dosing of Uroxatral Vs Twice Daily Dosing of Flomax-A 3 Month Retrospective ... therapy with alfuzosin10mg daily or tamulosin 0.4mg bid at time of seed implantation. - Baseline AUA score< or =12. - May be on ...
  http://www.knowcancer.com/cancer-trials/NCT00264017/
*  IH636 Grape Seed Extract in Treating Hardening of Breast Tissue in Women Who Have Undergone Radiation Therapy for Early Breast...
RATIONALE: IH636 grape seed extract may lessen hardening of breast tissue caused by radiation therapy and may help patients ... Arm I: Patients receive oral IH636 grape seed proanthocyanidin extract three times. daily for 6 months.. - Arm II: Patients ... Determine the efficacy of IH636 grape seed proanthocyanidin extract for the treatment. of radiation-induced fibrosis after high ... At least 3 months since prior dietary supplementation containing IH636 grape seed. proanthocyanidin extract over 50 mg per day ...
  http://www.knowcancer.com/cancer-trials/NCT00041223/
*  Tumor facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Tumor
Neoplasm What Is a Tumor?. The human body is made up of many types of cells that are constantly dividing to produce new, ... and seeding elsewhere (metastasizing) via the lymphatic or blood vessels. The technical term for a tumour of whatever varity is ... Also known as a neoplasm (meaning "new formation"), a tumor can be either benign (not serious or harmful) or malignant ( ...
  https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/diseases-and-conditions/pathology/tumor
*  Botulinum Toxin Injection With Prostate Brachytherapy
The purpose of this study is to see if botox injection into the prostate during seed implantation (brachytherapy) for prostate ... Radioactive seed implantation. *Prostatic Neoplasms. .map{width:100%;height:300px;margin-bottom:15px;} Name. Location. ... radioactive seeds are implanted through 18 gauge needles into the prostate via a perineal. template with rectal ultrasound ... parenchyma for future seed implantation). Even with these precautions, around 30-40% of. brachytherapy patients will still ...
  http://www.knowcancer.com/cancer-trials/NCT00681148/
*  Patent US6508755 - Fiberoptic-guided interstitial seed manual applicator and seed cartridge - Google Patents
A seed cartridge is releasably connected to the implantation device to store unused seeds and to load the seeds into the ... the needle bore being adapted to permit at least one seed to pass therethrough. An elongated plunger extends longitudinally ... the needle to an extended position wherein the plunger is advanced through the needle bore to eject at least one of the seeds ... A method and apparatus for implanting seeds in or about a target area, such as a tumor, within a patient. The implantation ...
  http://www.google.co.uk/patents/US6508755
*  The Trend of CEACAM3 Blood Expression as Number Index of the CTCs in the Colorectal Cancer Perioperative Course
... "seed and soil" hypothesis is founded upon three principles. In the first place, neoplasms contain genetically diverse tumor ... inferior mesenteric vein and ileocolic vein in neoplasms of the left colon/rectum and in neoplasms of the ascending colon, resp ... Patient characteristics, site of the neoplasm, and the type of the procedure performed are given in Table 1. ... detection and evaluation of CTCs could provide a deep insight in the solid neoplasm prognosis, which can be hardly foreseen on ...
  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/2015/931784/
*  Kamagra Chewable Tablets Uk! SUPER FAST U.S. DELIVERY!
S aim nonradioactive seeds, stoping isotopes, in or artificial the neoplasm with catheterss or needles. As the atoms decrease ... A low carbohydrate, tenor supermolecule fare department of energy yet moderatos neoplasm biological process and precludes genus ...
  http://www.riccardovandoni.com/2015/11/caterina-davide/
*  IH636 Grape Seed Extract in Preventing Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women at Risk of Developing Breast Cancer - Full Text...
Breast Neoplasms. Neoplasms by Site. Neoplasms. Breast Diseases. Skin Diseases. Grape Seed Extract. Proanthocyanidin. ... IH636 Grape Seed Extract in Preventing Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women at Risk of Developing Breast Cancer. This study ... The use of IH636 grape seed extract may prevent breast cancer.. PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and ... A Phase I Prevention Trial of ACTIVIN Grape Seed Extract as an Aromatase Inhibitor In Healthy Postmenopausal Women at Risk for ...
  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct/gui/show/NCT00100893?order=7
*  Neoplasms II Flashcards - Cram.com
Study Flashcards On Neoplasms II at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get ... soil and seed' hypothesis tumor cells have membrane receptors for molecules present in sites of prefered metatastasis. ... ":"Neoplasms II","payreferer_url":"\/flashcards\/copy\/neoplasms-ii-472579","isGuest":true,"ga_id":"UA-272909-1","facebook":{" ...
  http://www.cram.com/flashcards/neoplasms-ii-472579
*  AASLD - Topics: Hepatic neoplasms
Original Article Open Access Rate of seeding with biopsies and ablations of hepatocellular carcinoma: A retrospective cohort ... Clinical Observations in Hepatology Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct: A rare liver tumor complicated by ...
  http://aasldpubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/hub/results/Hepatic-neoplasms/?Focus=Diagnosis
*  Plus it
... luminal A neoplasms do not become basal-like neoplasms in their metastases, etc.; refs. 2, 24). However, we learned from MBC3 ... In 1889, Stephen Paget proposed the "seed and soil" theory to explain the nonrandom distribution of breast cancer metastases, ... Is the capacity to metastasis an intrinsic property of the neoplasm, or an acquired feature? Are all cells in a primary ... Second, our results suggest that the hormone receptor status of a breast cancer is a fundamental feature of the neoplasm, which ...
  http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/14/7/1938
*  Introduction To Neoplasms - OzRadOnc
Features of Neoplasms. Neoplasia. Neoplasia is 'new growth'. A neoplasm is "an abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which ... The initial cell which gives initially gives rise to a neoplasm. *The population of cells within a tumour which drives the ... Tumour heterogeneity refers to that despite the proposed origin from a single cancer stem cell, neoplasms contain a variety of ... Seeding due to medical procedures (eg biopsy). Links. Back to Pathology. cancerpathologyphase1 ...
  http://ozradonc.wikidot.com/introduction-to-neoplasms
*  The seed and soil hypothesis revisited--the role of tumor-stroma interactions in metastasis to different organs. - PubMed -...
Neoplasm Metastasis*. *Neoplasms/pathology*. *Neoplastic Stem Cells/pathology*. *Stromal Cells/pathology*. *Tumor ... The seed and soil hypothesis revisited--the role of tumor-stroma interactions in metastasis to different organs.. Langley RR1, ... The seed and soil hypothesis revisited - the role of tumor-stroma interactions in metastasis to different organs ... The seed and soil hypothesis revisited - the role of tumor-stroma interactions in metastasis to different organs ...
  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21365651?access_num=21365651&link_type=MED&dopt=Abstract
*  Capitol Drugs Condition Center
Grape seed: There is currently little information available on the use of grape seed extract in the treatment of human cancer. ... Cancer, also called malignancy or neoplasm, develops when cells in a specific part of the body begin to grow out of control. ... Grape seed. Greater celandine. Green tea. Healing touch. Hoxsey formula. Hydrazine sulfate. Iodine. Jiaogulan. Lavender. Lutein ... Ginkgo seeds are dangerous and should be avoided. Skin irritation and itching may also occur. Do not use ginkgo in supplemental ...
  http://www.livingnaturally.com/promog/ConditionCenter.asp?ConditionID=9&StoreID=98623QASQBSR2L1C0G03N0ET9VTJ27C2
*  Grape seed | Article about grape seed by The Free Dictionary
... and a protective outer seed coat. Seeds are... Explanation of grape seed ... Find out information about grape seed. fertilized and ripened ovule, consisting of the plant embryo, varying amounts of stored ... in angiosperms it consists of a neoplasm that arises as a result of the merging of the second spermatozoid with the secondary ... seed stalk) in angiosperm seeds. The hilum is the scar left when the seed is detached from the funiculus. Some seeds have a ...
  https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/grape+seed
*  Appendix A
regional. A term describing stage of disease for a malignant neoplasm that 1) has extended beyond the limits of the organ of ... implantation or seeding) to distant organs, tissues, or via the lymphatic system to distant lymph nodes. Stage of disease for ... localized. A term describing stage of disease for an invasive malignant neoplasm that is confined entirely to the organ of ... secondary site. The organ to which a malignant neoplasm has spread from a primary site; metastatic site. ...
  http://www.in.gov/isdh/reports/cancerinc/1996/appendix_a.htm

PancreatoblastomaCystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms: Cystic, mucinous, and serous neoplasms is a group of tumors.Kidney tumour: Kidney tumours (or kidney tumors), also known as renal tumours, are tumours, or growths, on or in the kidney. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous).Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasmThyroid cancerMyelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases: Myelodysplastic–myeloproliferative diseases are a category of hematological malignancies disorders created by the World Health Organization which have characteristics of both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative conditions.Targeted therapy of lung cancer: Targeted therapy of lung cancer refers to using agents specifically designed to selectively target molecular pathways responsible for, or that substantially drive, the malignant phenotype of lung cancer cells, and as a consequence of this (relative) selectivity, cause fewer toxic effects on normal cells.Sialoblastoma: A sialoblastoma is a low-grade salivary gland neoplasm that recapitulates primitive salivary gland anlage. It has previously been referred to as congenital basal cell adenoma, embryoma, or basaloid adenocarcinoma.Solution precursor plasma spray: Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) is a thermal spray process where a feedstock solution is heated and then deposited onto a substrate. Basic properties of the process are fundamentally similar to other plasma spraying processes.Goblet cell carcinoid: The goblet cell carcinoid, abbreviated GCC and also known as crypt cell carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour with goblet cell differentiation, is a rare biphasic gastrointestinal tract tumour that consists of a neuroendocrine component and a conventional carcinoma, histologically arising from Paneth cells.Metastatic liver disease: A liver metastasis is a malignant tumor in the liver that has spread from another organ affected by cancer. The liver is a common site for metastatic disease because of its rich, dual blood supply (the liver receives blood via the hepatic artery and portal vein).Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm: Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, also mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas and mucinous cystic tumour, is a grouping of cystic neoplasms that arise from the pancreas. They may be benign, malignant or in between.Ovarian Cancer National Alliance: The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is an advocacy organization for women with ovarian cancer in the United States. To advance the interests of women with ovarian cancer, the organization advocates at a national level for increases in research funding for the development of an early detection test, improved health care practices, and life-saving treatment protocols.Ductal carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma is a type of tumor that primarily presents in the ducts of a gland.Vascular tissue neoplasmIntraocular lymphoma: Intraocular lymphoma is a rare malignant form of eye cancer. Intraocular lymphoma may affect the eye secondarily from a metastasis from a non-ocular tumor or may arise within the eye primarily (primary intraocular lymphoma, PIOL).Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma: Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, often abbreviated PLGA, is a rare, asymptomatic, slow-growing malignant salivary gland tumor. It is most commonly found in the palate.Spaceflight radiation carcinogenesisAggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (also known as a digital papillary adenocarcinoma and papillary adenoma) is a cutaneous condition characterized by an aggressive malignancy involving the digit between the nailbed and the distal interphalangeal joint spaces.Bob ChampionInflammatory myofibroblastic tumourGlandular and epithelial neoplasm: Glandular and epithelial neoplasm is a grouping of tumors arising from the glands and epithelium.Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung: Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the lung (MCACL) is a very rare malignant mucus-producing neoplasm arising from the uncontrolled growth of transformed epithelial cells originating in lung tissue.Thyroid adenomaOsteolipochondroma: Osteolipochondroma (osteo, bone, lipos, fat, + chondros, cartilage, oma, tumor) is a cartilaginous tumor containing fatty and bony tissue.Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act: The Hematological Cancer Research Investment and Education Act of 2001 (P.L.Adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms: Adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms is a group of tumors.ABCD rating: ABCD rating, also called the Jewett staging system or the Whitmore-Jewett staging system, is a staging system for prostate cancer that uses the letters A, B, C, and D.Hidradenocarcinoma: Hidradenocarcinoma (also known as malignant hidradenoma, malignant acrospiroma, clear cell eccrine carcinoma, or primary mucoepidermoid cutaneous carcinoma) is a malignant adnexal tumor of the sweat gland. It is the malignant variant of the benign hidradenoma.World Lymphoma Awareness Day: World Lymphoma Awareness Day (WLAD) is held on September 15 every year and is a day dedicated to raising awareness of lymphoma, an increasingly common form of cancer. It is a global initiative hosted by the Lymphoma Coalition (LC), a non-profit network organisation of 63 lymphoma patient groups from 44 countries around the world.Bone tumorCancer/testis antigen family 45, member a5Papillary serous cystadenocarcinomaLittoral cell angioma: Littoral cell angioma, abbreviated LCA, and formally known as littoral cell angioma of the spleen, is a benign tumour of the spleen that arises from the cells that line the red pulp.Ovarian serous cystadenoma: Ovarian serous cystadenoma, also (less precisely) known as serous cystadenoma, is a very common benign ovarian tumour.Oncotype DX Colon Cancer AssayCancer biomarkers: A cancer biomarker refers to a substance or process that is indicative of the presence of cancer in the body. A biomarker may be a molecule secreted by a tumor or a specific response of the body to the presence of cancer.Old German Shepherd Dog: Old German Shepherd Dog () is a controversial predicate for the long-hair variation of the German Shepherd Dog (), which is not a separate breed recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. Nonetheless, there are efforts to establish this variety as a separate breed.Germ cell tumorAdipose tissue neoplasm: An adipose tissue neoplasm is a neoplasm derived from adipose tissue.PanitumumabDuodenal cancerPrimary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma: Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, abbreviated PMBL, is a type of lymphoma that rises in the mediastinum and predominantly affects young adults.GlossectomyAutoschizis: "Autoschizis" is a term derived from the Greek αὐτο- auto-, meaning "self", and σχίζειν skhizein, "to split". It was introduced in 1998 to describe a novel form of cancer cell death characterized by a reduction in cell size that occurs due to the loss of cytoplasm through self-excision (the cell splits open) without the loss of cell organelles, morphologic degradation of the cells nucleus and nucleolus without the formation of apoptotic bodies and destruction of the cell membrane.Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas, also acinar cell carcinoma, is a rare malignant exocrine tumour of the pancreas. It represents 5% of all exocrine tumours of the pancreas, making it the second most common type of pancreatic cancer.Spinal tumorVaginal intraepithelial neoplasiaOncocytomaEpidemiology of cancer: The epidemiology of cancer is the study of the factors affecting cancer, as a way to infer possible trends and causes. The study of cancer epidemiology uses epidemiological methods to find the cause of cancer and to identify and develop improved treatments.Janus kinase 2: Janus kinase 2 (commonly called JAK2) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase. It is a member of the Janus kinase family and has been implicated in signaling by members of the type II cytokine receptor family (e.HemangiosarcomaAnaplastic carcinoma: Anaplastic carcinoma is a general term for a malignant neoplasm arising from the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells of epithelial origin, or showing some epithelial characteristics, but that reveal no cytological or architectural features of associated with more differentiated tumors, such as the glandular formation or special cellular junctions that typical of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively.Adenocarcinoma of the lung: Adenocarcinoma of the lung (pulmonary adenocarcinoma) is a common histological form of lung cancer that contains certain distinct malignant tissue architectural, cytological, or molecular features, including gland and/or duct formation and/or production of significant amounts of mucus.PancreatectomyLudwig G. KempeBreast cancer classification: Breast cancer classification divides breast cancer into categories according to different schemes, each based on different criteria and serving a different purpose. The major categories are the histopathological type, the grade of the tumor, the stage of the tumor, and the expression of proteins and genes.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Orbital lymphoma: Orbital lymphoma is a common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that occurs near or on the eye. Common symptoms include decreased vision and uveitis.

(1/134) Rat sarcoma model supports both "soil seed" and "mechanical" theories of metastatic spread.

Following injection into the portal venous or vena caval systems, tumour cells are held up almost exclusively in the liver or lung respectively, and subsequent outgrowth of tumour only occurs in these organs. Following systemic arterial injection, cells are distributed, and subsequently grow, in a variety of organs. However, the adrenal gland supports tumour growth from much fewer cells than the lung, and this is partly due to the fact the rate of tumour cell loss in the initial 48 h is very high in the latter compared to the former organ.  (+info)

(2/134) Detection and clinical importance of micrometastatic disease.

Metastatic relapse in patients with solid tumors is caused by systemic preoperative or perioperative dissemination of tumor cells. The presence of individual tumor cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood can be detected by immunologic or molecular methods and is being regarded increasingly as a clinically relevant prognostic factor. Because the goal of adjuvant therapy is the eradication of occult micrometastatic tumor cells before metastatic disease becomes clinically evident, the early detection of micrometastases could identify the patients who are most (and least) likely to benefit from adjuvant therapy. In addition, more sensitive methods for detecting such cells should increase knowledge about the biologic mechanisms of metastasis and improve the diagnosis and treatment of micrometastatic disease. In contrast to solid metastatic tumors, micrometastatic tumor cells are appropriate targets for intravenously applied agents because macromolecules and immunocompetent effector cells should have access to the tumor cells. Because the majority of micrometastatic tumor cells may be nonproliferative (G0 phase), standard cytotoxic chemotherapies aimed at proliferating cells may be less effective, which might explain, in part, the failure of chemotherapy. Thus, adjuvant therapies that are aimed at dividing and quiescent cells, such as antibody-based therapies, are of considerable interest. From a literature search that used the databases MEDLINE(R), CANCERLIT(R), Biosis(R), Embase(R), and SciSearch(R), we discuss the current state of research on minimal residual cancer in patients with epithelial tumors and the diagnostic and clinical implications of these findings.  (+info)

(3/134) Cytogenetic monoclonality in multifocal uroepithelial carcinomas: evidence of intraluminal tumour seeding.

Twenty-one multifocal urinary tract transitional cell carcinomas, mostly bladder tumours, from a total of six patients were processed for cytogenetic analysis after short-term culturing of the tumour cells. Karyotypically related, often identical, cytogenetically complex clones were found in all informative tumours from each case, including the recurrent tumours. Rearrangement of chromosome 9, leading to loss of material from the short and/or the long arm, was seen in all cases, indicating that this is an early, pathogenetically important event in transitional cell carcinogenesis. The presence of related clones with great karyotypic similarity in anatomically distinct tumours from the same bladder indicates that multifocal uroepithelial tumours have a monoclonal origin and arise via intraluminal seeding of viable cancer cells shed from the original tumour. Later lesions may develop also from cells shed from the so called second primary tumours. The relatively complex karyotypes seen in all lesions from most cases argue that the seeding of tumour cells is a late event that succeeds the acquisition by them of multiple secondary genetic abnormalities.  (+info)

(4/134) Needle-tract implantation from hepatocellular cancer: is needle biopsy of the liver always necessary?

Percutaneous needle biopsies are frequently used to evaluate focal lesions of the liver. Needle-tract implantation of hepatocellular cancer has been described in case reports, but the true risk for this problem has not been clearly defined. We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases of hepatocellular cancer during a 4-year period from 1994 to 1997. Data on diagnostic studies, therapy, and outcome were noted. Of 91 patients with hepatocellular cancer, 59 patients underwent percutaneous needle biopsy as part of their diagnostic workup for a liver mass. Three patients (5.1%) were identified with needle-tract implantation of tumor. Two patients required en bloc chest wall resections for implantation of hepatocellular cancer in the soft tissues and rib area. The third patient, who also received percutaneous ethanol injection of his tumor, required a thoracotomy and lung resection for implanted hepatocellular cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy of suspicious hepatic lesions should not be performed indiscriminately because there is a significant risk for needle-tract implantation. These biopsies should be reserved for those lesions in which no definitive surgical intervention is planned and pathological confirmation is necessary for a nonsurgical therapy.  (+info)

(5/134) Recurrence of clival chordoma along the surgical pathway.

Chordomas are locally aggressive malignant tumors of notochordal origin whose metastatic potential is increasingly recognized. Surgical pathway recurrence has been noted only rarely in the literature. We present three patients with clival chordomas whose sole or initial recurrence was along the pathway of prior surgical access. A characteristic mass found along the pathway of prior surgical access for resection of a chordoma should suggest recurrent chordoma.  (+info)

(6/134) It's what the surgeon doesn't see that kills the patient.

Peritoneal dissemination can be prevented by the responsible surgeon at least in part by proper surgical technique used to resect the primary malignancy. What most people do not know is that cancer surgery can do great harm. It can convert a contained malignant condition into a disseminated disease that unnecessarily becomes a deadly process. Containment must be the number one priority of the gastrointestinal cancer surgery. Also, established peritoneal carcinomatosis can be cured if it is attacked in a timely fashion with peritonectomy procedures and heated intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Many small changes can make a big difference in survival with gastrointestinal cancer surgery.  (+info)

(7/134) Scavenging of reactive oxygen species leads to diminished peritoneal tumor recurrence.

Previously, we demonstrated that RBCs inhibit the recurrence of perioperatively spilled tumor cells. The aim of this study was to identify on which RBC component(s) the inhibitory effect is based. By using a cell-seeding model in rats, the effect of RBC-related antioxidant scavengers [hemoglobin, catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD)] on peritoneal tumor recurrence was investigated. i.p. injection of hemoglobin caused 45% more tumor load (P < 0.0001). At least 40% inhibition of tumor recurrence was achieved with the use of catalase or SOD (P < 0.05). Combining SOD and catalase did not lead to additional inhibition of tumor recurrence. Inhibition of the overwhelming oxidative potential after surgical peritoneal trauma with the use of scavengers may lead to interesting new approaches for diminishing peritoneal tumor recurrence.  (+info)

(8/134) Lung cancer implantation in the chest wall following percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy.

We describe a 70-year-old man with lung cancer implantation in the chest wall following percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy. He underwent lobectomy after percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy using a 19-gauge needle. Twenty-six months after the biopsy, he noticed a hard subcutaneous tumor at the biopsy site in the chest wall. Ribs and intercostal muscles were resected. The primary lung tumor and the chest wall tumor were histologically identical, but were not contiguous to each other. We concluded that the subcutaneous tumor was due to needle biopsy implantation. This complication is extremely rare, but open biopsy should always be considered as a possible alternative. During the procedure, care must be taken with the least chance of implantation and patients should be observed carefully after needle biopsy.  (+info)



  • radioactive seeds
  • Brachytherapy is a popular treatment modality for localized prostate cancer, where radioactive seeds are implanted through 18 gauge needles into the prostate via a perineal template with rectal ultrasound guidance. (knowcancer.com)
  • We propose to study botox intraprostatic injection during brachytherapy to see whether this improves urinary symptoms or avoids need for urinary tract instrumentation over this 6-8 month post-operative period when one wants to avoid manipulating the radioactive seeds. (knowcancer.com)
  • The most common radiation treatment is plaque brachytherapy, in which a small disc-shaped shield (plaque) encasing radioactive seeds (most often Iodine-125, though Ruthenium-106 and Palladium-103 are also used) is attached to the outside surface of the eye, overlying the tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • Vascular anomalies are divided into vascular tumors/neoplasms which include infantile hemangiomas, and vascular malformations which include entities with enlarged or abnormal vessels such as capillary malformations (port wine stains), venous malformations, and lymphatic malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • implantation
  • Because the initial acute inflammation may persist for many months despite steadily declining doses of radiation, attempts are made to minimize urinary symptoms prior to brachytherapy with pharmacologic therapy (alpha-blockers) or minimally invasive surgical therapy (transurethral incision or limited transurethral resection to avoid significant distortion of the prostate parenchyma for future seed implantation). (knowcancer.com)
  • The implantation device includes an implantation needle having a bore extending longitudinally therethrough from a proximal and to a distal end of the needle, the needle bore being adapted to permit at least one seed to pass therethrough. (google.co.uk)
  • An optical device is carried by and operatively connected to the plunger to provide visual assistance to an operator of the implantation device to guide and verify implantation of the ejected seed into the target area. (google.co.uk)
  • A seed cartridge is releasably connected to the implantation device to store unused seeds and to load the seeds into the implantation device. (google.co.uk)
  • Radiation
  • 9. A seed cartridge according to claim 7 , wherein said proximal and distal caps are each constructed so as to block radiation due to said seeds from passing therethrough to the exterior of said cartridge. (google.co.uk)
  • soil
  • The hard-coated seeds can remain viable for several years, and will successfully germinate only when soil is persistently soggy for five to seven days, with temperatures above 20 °C (68 °F). Once germinated, saplings must be kept in a well-drained medium that retains high moisture. (wikipedia.org)