Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Disasters: Calamities producing great damage, loss of life, and distress. They include results of natural phenomena and man-made phenomena. Normal conditions of existence are disrupted and the level of impact exceeds the capacity of the hazard-affected community.Relief Work: Assistance, such as money, food, or shelter, given to the needy, aged, or victims of disaster. It is usually granted on a temporary basis. (From The American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Education, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to substance abuse and mental health. It is commonly referred to by the acronym SAMHSA. On 1 October 1992, the United States Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) became SAMHSA.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Hospice Care: Specialized health care, supportive in nature, provided to a dying person. A holistic approach is often taken, providing patients and their families with legal, financial, emotional, or spiritual counseling in addition to meeting patients' immediate physical needs. Care may be provided in the home, in the hospital, in specialized facilities (HOSPICES), or in specially designated areas of long-term care facilities. The concept also includes bereavement care for the family. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Education, Nursing, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform nurses of recent advances in their fields.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Education, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform individuals of recent advances in their particular field of interest. They do not lead to any formal advanced standing.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Medically Underserved Area: A geographic location which has insufficient health resources (manpower and/or facilities) to meet the medical needs of the resident population.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.United StatesConsumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Great BritainPatient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.EnglandPublic Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)ScotlandPsychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Nursing Assessment: Evaluation of the nature and extent of nursing problems presented by a patient for the purpose of patient care planning.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Nutrition Assessment: Evaluation and measurement of nutritional variables in order to assess the level of nutrition or the NUTRITIONAL STATUS of the individual. NUTRITION SURVEYS may be used in making the assessment.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.

*  Community Health | Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Community Health Needs Assessment: Our hospital uses the Community Health Improvement Guiding Principles proposed by the Johns ... Many programs and classes are offered to help you stay well and fit and to provide you with the knowledge and support you need ...
hopkinsmedicine.org/sibley-memorial-hospital/community-health/index.html/?F_y=2013&F_m=6&F_d=06%2F23%2F2013&F_c=20

*  A needs assessment and evaluation of the Brooks Composite High School guidance program

... needs are being recognized and addressed. That is the purpose of this study. The needs assessment and evaluation addressed ... A needs assessment and evaluation of the Brooks Composite High School guidance program. Rommens, Janet L; University of ... A needs assessment and evaluation of the Brooks Composite High School guidance program. Login ... administer needs assessments and evaluations at regular intervals to determine if the students' ...
https://uleth.ca/dspace/handle/10133/869

*  Dignity Health | Community Health Needs Assessments

Our hospitals conduct needs assessments and implementation strategies to identify and address community health needs. Learn ... Community Health Needs Assessments and Implementation Strategies. Our hospitals conduct needs assessments and create ... Community Health Needs Assessments. Arizona. Chandler Regional Medical Center Mercy Gilbert Medical Center St. Joseph's ... For more information on Community Health Needs Assessments and Implementation Strategies, please contact communityhealth@ ...
https://dignityhealth.org/about-us/community-health/community-health-programs-and-reports/community-health-needs-assessments

*  Community Health Needs Assessments - Health Equity Research and Policy - Medical Research - Initiatives - AAMC

Snapshot The 2017 Health Equity Research Snapshot highlights innovative and effective community health needs assessments that ... Community Health Needs Assessments. Community Health Needs Assessment Snapshot The 2017 Health Equity Research Snapshot ... Community Health Needs Assessments: Filling Data Gaps for Population Health Research and Management ... AAMC Analysis in Brief: Community Health Needs Assessments: Engaging Community Partners to Improve Health ...
https://aamc.org/initiatives/research/healthequity/479350/chnaresources.html

*  Community Needs Assessment Survey

This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance ...
https://surveymonkey.com/s/OCSCommunityNeeds

*  Family Advocacy Needs Assessment

This survey was created by Truth Pharm and Magnolia New Beginnings, Inc. and is based on feedback we have received to date via our own advocacy work. The purpose is to help us determine the most important items for Family Advocacy for the National Agenda of Facing Addiction for 2016. As people have provided valuable input and critiquing of the form, we have added options and made some modifications. We very much appreciate the input. Please feel free to email us if you have other comments, concerns or input: truthpharm@gmail.com and copy Maureen@magnoliacs.com.. Please also share this form far and wide. ...
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfjE6MExWbMi3pIlBgjZ7ObEHDeNdz3CXIYTCHAozIiuxFD8Q/viewform?c=0&w=1

*  Needs Assessment 3-5

I know my counselor can help me with SCHOOL issues ...
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc0xyrOzKReMWVntitB630MNWzZdnY4VRVfNjxBM0MEx09cMQ/viewform?usp=send_form

*  High-risk men needs assessment Survey

FORCE is conducting a brief (5-10 minute) survey in order to better understand the needs of men with a BRCA mutation or family ...
https://surveymonkey.com/r/BRCAMen?sm=ods/DYJi8CM9zJcAqysbZYjNOWNPhv67zEEQlBngNAg=

*  Community Needs Assessment 2017-2018 Survey

... meeting the community needs, and providing hope. All information will be kept confidential and your name is not required on the ...
https://surveymonkey.com/r/7NRSK7L-DanielBooneCNA

*  Autism Answers Household Needs Assesment Survey

4. Please rank your child's needs from 1 to 5. 1-most important, 5-least important ...
https://surveymonkey.com/r/GF6ZTWG

*  APA Digital Coast Needs Assessment Survey

... A Report on the Coastal and Marine Geospatial Tools, Data, Training, and Information ... The needs assessment survey was conducted by the following APA staff: Jim Schwab, AICP, Hazards Planning Research Center ... It was with this in mind that APA undertook the Digital Coast needs assessment survey in its first year of participation in ... The Needs page links to three pages breaking out responses concerning three subsets of needs, each of which then links to nine ...
https://planning.org/research/digitalcoast/

*  Community Health Needs Assessment

... 2016 Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA). (Summary). Community Health Needs ... Since the passage of Senate Bill 697 (SB 697) in 1994, Rady Children's has participated in a Community Health Needs Assessment ... To address the top unmet health needs of children in the region, Rady Children's is utilizing these two reports, as well as ... Rady Children's provides a variety of community-based and other programs that address the top health needs for children in the ...
https://rchsd.org/health-safety/community-health-needs-assessment/

*  Web Users Training Needs Assessment related searches

You are here > Home > Web Users Training Needs Assessment 1.0 > Web Users Training Needs Assessment related searches ... free education assessment , risk assessment software , power users , flash users , xp users , send file to , directx for mac , ...
brothersoft.com/web-users-training-needs-assessment-213237/searches.html

*  2012 Community Health Needs Assessment Survey. Thanks for your Participation!

28. In your opinion, what is the best way to address the health needs of people in your community? Please choose one option. a ... 31. In order to improve children's health in Louisville Metro/Jefferson County what do we need to do? a) Increase access to ... 18. Do you feel that health providers provide you with the education and resources you may need? a) Yes ... 27. Do you think there are people in your community that need care but cannot get it? a) Yes ...
https://surveymonkey.com/r/HealthNeedsSurvey?sm=l5MVq+RhfqOw4gagzo+8avU5Lp9XzwE0GFHKUwWnNuY=

*  Ocean services user needs assessment (Microform, 1984) [WorldCat.org]

Ocean services user needs assessment. [Donald R Montgomery; Randall J Patton; Samuel Walter McCandless; Jet Propulsion ... Ocean services user needs assessment. Author:. Donald R Montgomery; Randall J Patton; Samuel Walter McCandless; Jet Propulsion ... Ocean services user needs assessment. (OCoLC)729758626. Material Type:. Government publication, National government publication ... Ocean services user needs assessment/Donald R Montgomery; Randall J Patton; Samuel Walter McCandless; Jet Propulsion Laboratory ...
worldcat.org/title/ocean-services-user-needs-assessment/oclc/747099729

*  Needs Assessment

2017 Organization Needs Assessment. The Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) is sponsored by the New York State Department of ... If you have additional questions or require help to complete this needs assessment, please email us at support@ceitraining.org. ... The purpose of this Needs Assessment is to survey your organization's current and emerging educational, training, and capacity- ... Question 4: Agency's needs for training. A. What are your organization's objectives for training? (please rate the importance ...
https://ceitraining.org/needs/?cei

*  Community Health Needs Assessment - Atlantic Health

Atlantic Health System conducts community health needs assessments to better understand the health needs of our population. ... Previous Community Health Needs Assessments. *Atlantic Health System 2013 Community Health Needs Assessment ... 2016 Community Health Needs Assessment. The summaries of the most recent assessments are organized below by the main counties ... Atlantic Health System 2013 Community Health Needs Assessment Evaluation Report. *Chilton Hospital 2013 Community Health Needs ...
atlantichealth.org/atlantic/health-education/community-resources/community-health-needs-assessment.html

*  "Wilkes County Community Health Needs Assessment" by Joseph...

Wilkes County Community Health Needs Assessment. Prepared for the Wilkes County CHA/CNA Coalition, Greensboro, NC (2013) * ... Joseph Telfair, Holly Sienkiewicz, J. Johnson, Aleksandra Babic, et al.. "Wilkes County Community Health Needs Assessment" ...
https://works.bepress.com/joseph_telfair/72/

*  Young Native Americans and Their Families: Educational Needs Assessment and ... - Google Books

Young Native Americans and Their Families: Educational Needs Assessment and Recommendations : Final Report. ... Young Native Americans and Their Families: Educational Needs Assessment and Recommendations : Final Report. ...
https://books.google.com/books/about/Young_native_Americans_and_their_familie.html?id=Al5EAAAAYAAJ&hl=en

*  Needs assessment and support planning

... A needs assessment and support plan should be completed to determine whether a sanctuary ... Needs assessment and support planning includes three stages:. *Completion of the assessment as soon as possible after referral ... Review of the needs assessment, support plan, and safety plan one month following implementation, and at least every three ... Illustrative example: Needs Assessment and Support Planning (London, United Kingdom). The following categories should be ...
endvawnow.org/en/articles/1410-needs-assessment-and-support-planning.html

*  Needs Assesment, Effective Learning, Theories examined

Needs Assessment If you had to conduct a needs assessment for your current employer (or most recent, if not currently employed ... Needs Assesment, Effective Learning, Theories examined. Add. Remove. 1. Needs Assessment. If you had to conduct a needs ... 1. Needs Assessment. If you had to conduct a needs assessment for your current employer (or most recent, if not currently ... Assessment and Educational Interventions. ... An accurate assessment of one's strengths, weaknesses, needs, and preferences ... ...
https://brainmass.com/business/business-management/438790

*  Poland, Presidential and Parliamentary Elections, 2015: Needs Assessment Mission Report | OSCE

Poland, Presidential and Parliamentary Elections, 2015: Needs Assessment Mission Report. Publisher. Organization for Security ... Home Resources Poland, Presidential and Parliamentary Elections, 2015: Needs Assessment Mission Report ...
osce.org/odihr/elections/poland/150121

*  First Aid Needs Assessment - RenewableUK

Its sets out the key issues to take into account when conducting a first aid needs assessment. It does not prescribe specific ... Both these matters are for duty holders to determine via the risk assessment process. However the guidance does set out an ...
renewableuk.com/news/309152/Publications-First-Aid-Needs-Assessment.htm

*  NEH grant details: Needs Assessment

Needs Assessment A preservation assessment to develop a long-term plan for preserving a collection of rare books related to the ...
https://securegrants.neh.gov/publicquery/main.aspx?f=1&gn=PA-24008-01

South Asia Disaster Report: South Asia Disaster Report is a 2006 report by Duryog Nivaran, edited by Amjad Bhatti and others, and subtitled Tackling the Tides and Tremors. It looks at disasters affecting the South Asian region's "countries and communities (that) are connected to each other geologically, geographically and culturally".Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator: December 1991Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Syllabus: A syllabus (pl. syllabi) is an outline and summary of topics to be covered in an education or training course.Urban Services Department: Urban Services Department () was a government department in Hong Kong. It carried out the policies and managed the facilities of the former Urban Council.Treatment Improvement Protocols: Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs) are a series of best-practice manuals for the treatment of substance use and other related disorders. The TIP series is published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA an agency of the U.General Medicine Faculty of RostGMU (Rostov State Medical University): Rostov State Medical University, Faculty of General Medicine - Located in Rostov city center with 20 departments, each departments has its own clinics with numbers of beds.Hospice care in the United States: Hospice care in the United States is a type and philosophy of end-of-life care which focuses on the palliation of a terminally ill patient's symptoms. These symptoms can be physical, emotional, spiritual or social in nature.Standard evaluation frameworkComprehensive Rural Health Project: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project (CRHP) is a non profit, non-governmental organization located in Jamkhed, Ahmednagar District in the state of Maharashtra, India. The organization works with rural communities to provide community-based primary healthcare and improve the general standard of living through a variety of community-led development programs, including Women's Self-Help Groups, Farmers' Clubs, Adolescent Programs and Sanitation and Watershed Development Programs.Upsilon Phi Delta: Upsilon Phi Delta (ΥΦΔ) is the national academic honor society for students in healthcare administration in the United States. The organization was formed in 1965 to further the profession of health administration and the professional competence and dedication of its members.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Psychiatric interview: The psychiatric interview refers to the set of tools that a mental health worker (most times a psychiatrist or a psychologist but at times social workers or nurses) uses to complete a psychiatric assessment.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.Public Health Act: Public Health Act is a stock short title used in the United Kingdom for legislation relating to public health.Behavior change (public health): Behavior change is a central objective in public health interventions,WHO 2002: World Health Report 2002 - Reducing Risks, Promoting Healthy Life Accessed Feb 2015 http://www.who.British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases: The British Pediatric Association Classification of Diseases is a system of diagnostic codes used for pediatrics.Q Services Corps (South Africa): The establishment of the 'Q' Services Corps as part of the South African Permanent Force was promulgated in the Government Gazette dated 10 November 1939.Typed copy of Proclamation 276 of 1939Emergency Digital Information Service: Emergency Digital Information Service (EDIS) is a wireless datacast based emergency and disaster information service operated by the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Services. In operation since 1990 the system was upgraded in 1999 to support image and sound capabilities via satellite broadcast.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,School health education: School Health Education see also: Health Promotion is the process of transferring health knowledge during a student's school years (K-12). Its uses are in general classified as Public Health Education and School Health Education.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Online patient education: Online Patient Education also known as Online Patient Engagement is a method of providing medical information and education to patients using Learning Management Systems delivered through the Internet.Evaluation of bariatric Centers of Excellence Web sites for functionality and efficacy.Halfdan T. MahlerRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Internet organizations: This is a list of Internet organizations, or organizations that play or played a key role in the evolution of the Internet by developing recommendations, standards, and technology; deploying infrastructure and services; and addressing other major issues.American Osteopathic Board of Internal MedicineBio Base EuropeLifestyle management programme: A lifestyle management programme (also referred to as a health promotion programme, health behaviour change programme, lifestyle improvement programme or wellness programme) is an intervention designed to promote positive lifestyle and behaviour change and is widely used in the field of health promotion.Essex School of discourse analysis: The Essex School constitutes a variety of discourse analysis, one that combines theoretical sophistication – mainly due to its reliance on the post-structuralist and psychoanalytic traditions and, in particular, on the work of Lacan, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, etc. – with analytical precision, since it focuses predominantly on an in-depth analysis of political discourses in late modernity.Dundee Royal Infirmary: Dundee Royal Infirmary, often shortened to DRI, was a major teaching hospital in Dundee, Scotland. Until the opening of Ninewells Hospital in 1974, Dundee Royal Infirmary was Dundee’s main hospital.David Budescu: David Budescu is a psychologist and academic. He is the Anne Anastasi Professor of Psychometrics and Quantitative Psychology at Fordham University.National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health: The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) is one of several centres of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) tasked with developing guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific conditions within the National Health Service (NHS) in England and Wales. It was established in 2001.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Rock 'n' Roll (Status Quo song)Canadian Organ Replacement Registry: The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry CORR is a health organisation was started by Canadian nephrologists and kidney transplant surgeons in 1985 in order to develop the care of patients with renal failure. In the early 1990s data on liver and heart transplantation were added to the registry.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studying

(1/2070) Conditions required for a law on active voluntary euthanasia: a survey of nurses' opinions in the Australian Capital Territory.

OBJECTIVES: To ascertain which conditions nurses believe should be in a law allowing active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). DESIGN: Survey questionnaire posted to registered nurses (RNs). SETTING: Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of 1996, when active voluntary euthanasia was legal in the Northern Territory. SURVEY SAMPLE: A random sample of 2,000 RNs, representing 54 per cent of the RN population in the ACT. MAIN MEASURES: Two methods were used to look at nurses' opinions. The first involved four vignettes which varied in terms of critical characteristics of each patient who was requesting help to die. The respondents were asked if the law should be changed to allow any of these requests. There was also a checklist of conditions, most of which have commonly been included in Australian proposed laws on AVE. The respondents chose those which they believed should apply in a law on AVE. RESULTS: The response rate was 61%. Support for a change in the law to allow AVE was 38% for a young man with AIDS, 39% for an elderly man with early stage Alzheimer's disease, 44% for a young woman who had become quadriplegic and 71% for a middle-aged woman with metastases from breast cancer. The conditions most strongly supported in any future AVE law were: "second doctor's opinion", "cooling off period", "unbearable protracted suffering", "patient fully informed about illness and treatment" and "terminally ill". There was only minority support for "not suffering from treatable depression", "administer the fatal dose themselves" and "over a certain age". CONCLUSION: Given the lack of support for some conditions included in proposed AVE laws, there needs to be further debate about the conditions required in any future AVE bills.  (+info)

(2/2070) How physician executives and clinicians perceive ethical issues in Saudi Arabian hospitals.

OBJECTIVES: To compare the perceptions of physician executives and clinicians regarding ethical issues in Saudi Arabian hospitals and the attributes that might lead to the existence of these ethical issues. DESIGN: Self-completion questionnaire administered from February to July 1997. SETTING: Different health regions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of 457 physicians (317 clinicians and 140 physician executives) from several hospitals in various regions across the kingdom. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in the perceptions of physician executives and clinicians regarding the existence of various ethical issues in their hospitals. The vast majority of physician executives did not perceive that seven of the eight issues addressed by the study were ethical concerns in their hospitals. However, the majority of the clinicians perceived that six of the same eight issues were ethical considerations in their hospitals. Statistically significant differences in the perceptions of physician executives and clinicians were observed in only three out of eight attributes that might possibly lead to the existence of ethical issues. The most significant attribute that was perceived to result in ethical issues was that of hospitals having a multinational staff. CONCLUSION: The study calls for the formulation of a code of ethics that will address specifically the physicians who work in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia. As a more immediate initiative, it is recommended that seminars and workshops be conducted to provide physicians with an opportunity to discuss the ethical dilemmas they face in their medical practice.  (+info)

(3/2070) Toward sensitive practice: issues for physical therapists working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The high rates of prevalence of childhood sexual abuse in the United States and Canada suggest that physical therapists work, often unknowingly, with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse. The purposes of this qualitative study were to explore the reactions of adult female survivors of childhood sexual abuse to physical therapy and to listen to their ideas about how practitioners could be more sensitive to their needs. The dynamics and long-term sequelae of childhood sexual abuse, as currently understood by mental health researchers and as described by the participants, are summarized to provide a context for the findings of this study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven female survivors (aged 19-62 years) participated in semistructured interviews in which they described their reactions to physical therapy. RESULTS: Survivors' reactions to physical therapy, termed "long-term sequelae of abuse that detract from feeling safe in physical therapy," are reported. Participant-identified suggestions that could contribute to the sense of safety are shared. CONCLUSIONS AND DISCUSSION: Although the physical therapist cannot change the survivor's history, an appreciation of issues associated with child sexual abuse theoretically can increase clinicians' understanding of survivors' reactions during treatment. We believe that attention by the physical therapist to the client's sense of safety throughout treatment can maximize the benefits of the physical therapy experience for the client who is a survivor.  (+info)

(4/2070) Sexual problems: a study of the prevalence and need for health care in the general population.

BACKGROUND: There has been little research carried out on the prevalence and types of sexual dysfunction in the general population, although the indications are that such problems are relatively common. Most common sexual problems are potentially treatable. However GPs have estimated the prevalence of sexual problems to be far lower than survey estimates. OBJECTIVE: To provide an estimate of the prevalence of sexual problems in the general population, and assess the use of and need for professional help for such problems. METHODS: We used an anonymous postal questionnaire survey. The study was set in four general practices in England*, and the study population was a stratified random sample of the adult general population (n = 4000). The subjects were 789 men and 979 women who responded to the questionnaire. The main outcome measures were the presence and type of current sexual problems in men and women, and the provision and use of treatments for sexual problems. RESULTS: A response rate of 44% was obtained. The median age of the responders was 50 years. A third of men (34%) and two-fifths of women (41 %) reported having a current sexual problem. The most common problems were erectile dysfunction (n = 170) and premature ejaculation (n = 88) in men; in women the most widely reported problems were vaginal dryness (n = 186) and infrequent orgasm (n = 166). In men, the proportion of responders reporting sexual problems increased with age, but there was no similar trend in women. Of those responders who reported a sexual problem, 52% said that they would like to receive professional help for this problem, but only one in ten of these people (n = 50) had received such help. CONCLUSION: Among responders there was a high level of reported sexual problems. The most frequently reported problems (vaginal dryness, erectile problems) may be amenable to physical treatment in practice, and yet few had sought or received help. However, many said that they would like to receive help. These figures suggest that there may be an important burden of potentially reversible sexual problems in the general population.  (+info)

(5/2070) House calls in Lebanon: reflections on personal experience.

BACKGROUND: Home health services play an important role in decreasing hospital admissions and physicians' medical house calls play an integral role in home health services. There is no national survey of physicians' house call practice in the Lebanon. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to provide some information about house call practice in the Lebanon. METHOD: Data on patients examined during house call visits between 1 January and the end of December 1995 were reviewed. RESULTS: During this period, 137 patients were seen at their home. Eighty-four patients (62%) were female and 53 patients (38%) were male. Ages ranged from 1 to 85 years. The number of cases seen in 1 month averaged 11. The diagnosis differed according to the age group of patients examined. Most of the house call visits occurred between 6.30 p.m. to 12.00 p.m. (47%). Fifteen patients (11%) were admitted to the hospital. CONCLUSION: The rate of cases per month was similar to those reported elsewhere. Physicians might feel reluctant to conduct house calls out of hours. Our study revealed that the majority of patients were seen between 6 p.m. and 12 p.m., and only 6% were seen after 12 a.m. It is our belief that house calls are an integral part of family practice and need to be stressed during the internships of all primary care physicians.  (+info)

(6/2070) The promotion of healthy eating: food availability and choice in Scottish island communities.

Communities in rural areas are in receipt of health education messages on healthy eating aimed at the population. These messages are invariably composed without regard to where people reside, and, in particular, to the availability of, and access to, foodstuffs in rural areas. In this paper the authors present data derived from a participative health needs assessment on the topic of food, diet and health. The research was conducted in a number of islands of the Western Isles of Scotland and comprised seven focus groups, 33 semi-structured interviews, one community and one policy workshop, and a final community feedback session. The needs assessment demonstrated a dichotomy between local experiences of food availability, island food cultures and the contents of healthy eating advice. As a result of the research, local people and health care professionals developed a range of activities on the topic of the traditional island diet. People noted the potentially positive elements of this diet for health but also the possibility of promoting social cohesion through the consideration of food and diet histories. In addition, lobbying at a national level was also identified as necessary to the development of a 'healthy food policy'.  (+info)

(7/2070) Noncommunicable disease management in resource-poor settings: a primary care model from rural South Africa.

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy are placing an increasing burden on clinical services in developing countries and innovative strategies are therefore needed to optimize existing services. This article describes the design and implementation of a nurse-led NCD service based on clinical protocols in a resource-poor area of South Africa. Diagnostic and treatment protocols were designed and introduced at all primary care clinics in the district, using only essential drugs and appropriate technology; the convenience of management for the patient was highlighted. The protocols enabled the nurses to control the clinical condition of 68% of patients with hypertension, 82% of those with non-insulin-dependent diabetes, and 84% of those with asthma. The management of NCDs of 79% of patients who came from areas served by village or mobile clinics was transferred from the district hospital to such clinics. Patient-reported adherence to treatment increased from 79% to 87% (P = 0.03) over the 2 years that the service was operating. The use of simple protocols and treatment strategies that were responsive to the local situation enabled the majority of patients to receive convenient and appropriate management of their NCD at their local primary care facility.  (+info)

(8/2070) Mortality among homeless shelter residents in New York City.

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the rates and predictors of mortality among sheltered homeless men and women in New York City. METHODS: Identifying data on a representative sample of shelter residents surveyed in 1987 were matched against national mortality records for 1987 through 1994. Standardized mortality ratios were computed to compare death rates among homeless people with those of the general US and New York City populations. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine predictors of mortality within the homeless sample. RESULTS: Age-adjusted death rates of homeless men and women were 4 times those of the general US population and 2 to 3 times those of the general population of New York City. Among homeless men, prior use of injectable drugs, incarceration, and chronic homelessness increased the likelihood of death. CONCLUSIONS: For homeless shelter users, chronic homelessness itself compounds the high risk of death associated with disease/disability and intravenous drug use. Interventions must address not only the health conditions of the homeless but also the societal conditions that perpetuate homelessness.  (+info)



clinical


  • Summary: The Assessment Nurse works in collaboration with the member's Nurse Care Manager (NCM) and an interdisciplinary team… based on members' clinical, behavioral and social needs that addresses barriers to care . (glassdoor.com)

Health


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