Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.United StatesCardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Mortality, Premature: Deaths that occur before LIFE EXPECTANCY is reached within a given population.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Death Certificates: Official records of individual deaths including the cause of death certified by a physician, and any other required identifying information.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.WalesKidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.EnglandOdds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.JapanSwedenChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Respiratory Tract DiseasesBiological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.EuropeDeveloping Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Great BritainSocial Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.DenmarkWounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.FinlandCerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.ItalyModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).BrazilAccidentsFetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Chemical Industry: The aggregate enterprise of manufacturing and technically producing chemicals. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Censuses: Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Heart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Guinea-Bissau: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and west of GUINEA. Its capital is Bissau.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Confounding Factors (Epidemiology): Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.ScotlandAir Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.CaliforniaMyocardial Ischemia: A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Cities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.TaiwanForecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).NorwayRural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.GermanyOccupations: Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.Aortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Diabetes Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.Shock, Septic: Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.IndiaStillbirth: The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Respiration Disorders: Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.IsraelLung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.CreatinineRussiaRespiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Weather: The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.Homicide: The killing of one person by another.Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Healthy Worker Effect: Phenomenon of workers' usually exhibiting overall death rates lower than those of the general population due to the fact that the severely ill and disabled are ordinarily excluded from employment.New YorkQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.MiningEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.

*  Mortality ratio, circulatory disease, Dorset | Zanran

Standardised mortality ratio, circulatory disease, Dorset 2001-2003. Source: NCHOD., Percentage change in mortality rate from ... circulatory disease mortality rates persons aged under 75, direct age sex standardised mortality rate per 100000 population, ... infant mortality rates across north central london, coronary heart disease mortality rates in south gloucestershire, trends in ... Standardised mortality ratio, circulatory disease, Dorset 2001-2003. Source: NCHOD. .... Chart A6 on page 86 shows a different ...
zanran.com/q/Mortality_ratio,_circulatory_disease,_Dorset

*  US Population Mortality Rate Study - Variation by Age Group, Cause of Death and Region from 2000‐2015 | SOA

... similarities in mortality by age group, time, cause of death and region to aid in understanding of future expected mortality ... US Population Mortality Rate Study - Variation by Age Group, Cause of Death and Region from 2000‐2015. May 2017 ... US Population Mortality Rate Study - Variation by Age Group, Cause of Death and Region from 2000‐2015 - revised 5/18/17 ... The purpose of the research is to produce an overview of the differences and similarities in mortality by age group, time, ...
https://soa.org/research-reports/2017/2017-us-pop-mort-age-cod-region/

*  Mortality

... See also Flesh and Blood; Man, Natural, Not Spiritually Reborn; Man, New, Spiritually Reborn; Man, Physical Creation ... raised from this mortality to a state of immortality, Alma 12:12. ...
https://lds.org/scriptures/tg/mortality?lang=eng

*  Child Mortality

Read More: Child Mortality, Ethiopia, International Development, Children, Impact, Global Child Mortality, UK Impact, UK World, ... Read More: Jon Ashworth, UK Labour Party, UK Parents, Early Years, Child Mortality, Child Health, UK Impact, UK Politics News ... Read More: Rwanda, Child Mortality, Christian Aid, Make Poverty History, Africa, Aid, Frich, Dfid, Ngos, Africa Enterprise ... Read More: Child Mortality, Hunger, UK News, Olympics, World Hunger, Malnourished, Food Prices, News, Worlds Poorest Families, ...
huffingtonpost.co.uk/news/child-mortality/

*  infant mortality - Respectful Insolence

infant mortality. Tag archives for infant mortality. Despicable: A parents' guide to blaming the death of their child on ...
scienceblogs.com/insolence/tag/infant-mortality/

*  Mortality - Conservapedia

Infant mortality. see Infant mortality Infant mortality rate (IMR) refers to the number of deaths in the first year of life per ... Measuring mortality. Death happens to everyone, but sooner is worse than later. The various measures of mortality are used to ... Mortality. From Conservapedia. This is an old revision of this page, as edited by RJJensen (Talk , contribs) at 21:59, 12 ... All the mortality rates are based on simple division-the number of people who die divided by the number at risk of dying in ...
conservapedia.com/index.php?title=Mortality&oldid=700068

*  Extraction from Mortality - Wikipedia

Extraction from Mortality è il primo album in studio del gruppo thrash metal statunitense Believer, pubblicato nel 1989. Unite ... 33 Extraction from Mortality - 6:07 Stress - 3:01 Kurt Bachman - voce, chitarre Dave Baddorf - chitarre Howe Kraft - basso Joey ... Daub - batteria Scott Laird - violino, viola (EN) Extraction from Mortality, su AllMusic, All Media Network.. ...
https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraction_from_Mortality

*  Extraction from Mortality - Wikipedia

Extraction from Mortality é o álbum de estreia da banda cristã norte-americana de thrash metal Believer, lançado em 1989. " ...
https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraction_from_Mortality

*  1850 Mortality Schedule

... Persons who died during the year ending 1st June, 1850 in the County of Oglethorpe. ...
rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gaogleth/mort1850.htm

*  Child mortality | Press centre | UNICEF

Child mortality rate drops by a third since 1990. NEW YORK, 17 September - The latest United Nations under-five mortality ... Child mortality. World must act now to save lives in Somalia, U.N. agencies warn. MOGADISHU, 17 February 2017- As a devastating ... Child mortality rates plunge by more than half since 1990 but global MDG target missed by wide margin. NEW YORK/GENEVA/ ... Global child mortality continues to drop. NEW YORK, 10 September 2009 - UNICEF today released new figures that show the rate of ...
https://unicef.org/media/media_pr_mortality.html

*  Editorial: Maternal mortality. | The BMJ

Editorial: Maternal mortality.. Br Med J 1976; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6002.114 (Published 17 January 1976) Cite ...
bmj.com/content/1/6002/114/article-info

*  Mortality in joggers | The BMJ

EDITOR-In their cohort study of mortality in Danish men, Schnohr et al compared the mortality in 96 men who reported that they ... Healthy jogger effect might explain differences in mortality. *Hans Okkels Birk (SYHOB@RA.DK), health economist, ... Mortality in joggers. BMJ 2001; 322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.322.7285.551/a (Published 03 March 2001) Cite this as: BMJ ...
bmj.com/content/322/7285/551.2

*  Human Mortality Database

The Human Mortality Database (HMD) was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, ... The Human Mortality Database (HMD) was created to provide detailed mortality and population data to researchers, students, ... Subject Terms: age, death, gender, marital status, mortality rates Geographic Coverage: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, ... Human Mortality Database (ICPSR 138) Principal Investigator(s): Wilmoth, John R., University of California-Berkeley; Shkolnikov ...
icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/138?classification=IDRC.V.&

*  morbidity and mortality

A rare virus has killed three people and sickened nearly 100 in Japan, the Philippines, the United States and the Netherlands over the past two years, US health authorities said Friday. The culprit is human enterovirus 68 (HEV68), and its ...
https://rawstory.com/tag/morbidity-and-mortality/

*  Reducing measles mortality | Immunization | UNICEF

Measles, rubella and maternal and neonatal tetanus can be prevented by vaccines and yet continue to afflict children around the world. UNICEF is committed to eliminating these fatal diseases.. Measles and rubella. Measles, a virus that attacks the respiratory tract, is one of the most contagious diseases known and is a leading cause of death among children. Measles is life threatening in low-income countries where children have limited or no access to medical treatment and are often malnourished.. Measles outbreaks are particularly deadly during emergency settings in communities experiencing, or recovering from, conflict or natural disaster. Children are especially vulnerable to deadly infections - 367 children die from measles every day, despite the availability of a safe, effective and affordable vaccine. Measles survivors are often left with life-long disabilities, such as blindness, deafness or brain damage.. The success of measles vaccination has been dramatic. Since 2000, an estimated 20.3 ...
https://unicef.org/immunization/index_measles.html

*  Child mortality rate drops - UPI.com

Global child mortality rate drops *U.S. infant mortality rate drops 12 percent since 2005 *CDC: U.S. infant mortality drops to ... The Millennium Development Goals adopted by world leaders in 2000 require the 1990 under-5 mortality rate to be cut by two- ...
https://upi.com/Top_News/2007/09/13/Child-mortality-rate-drops/78711189706650/

*  Zimbabwe's Infant, Maternal Mortality Rates Drop

Gwinji said Zimbabwe's maternal mortality rate - 614 deaths in every 100,000 pregnancies - and infant mortality rate of 75 per ... We have bent the [trends of] maternal mortality, but we have really not won the war as yet. These gains cannot be sustained and ... According to research findings released Friday, Zimbabwe's infant and maternal mortality rates have declined by 20 and 36 ...
https://voanews.com/a/big-improvement-in-zimbabwe-infant-maternal-mortality-rates/2432486.html

*  MORTALITY OF VENEREAL DISEASES | The BMJ

MORTALITY OF VENEREAL DISEASES. Br Med J 1920; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.3119.568-c (Published 09 October 1920) Cite ...
bmj.com/content/2/3119/568.4

*  Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 - 2013 - English

Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2013 is jointly produced by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, The World Bank and the United Nations ... Round 4 MMEIG Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group MMR maternal mortality ratio MMRate maternal mortality rate PM ... Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 - 2013 * 1. THE WORLD BANK Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990 to 2013 Estimates by WHO, ... Measures of maternal mortality The extent of maternal mortality in a population is essentially the combination of two factors ...
https://slideshare.net/OutreachUNICEF/mmr2013

*  Mortality+rate Articles, Photos and Videos - AOL

Browse our collection of mortality rate information for news stories, slideshows, opinion pieces and related videos posted on ...
https://aol.com/tag/mortality rate/

*  The Mortality Toll of Estrogen Avoidance - Redorbit

The Mortality Toll of Estrogen Avoidance. Estrogen therapy has been widely misunderstood, and may offer important benefits to ...
redorbit.com/video/the-mortality-toll-of-estrogen-avoidance-07192013/

*  ACOG Statement on Maternal Mortality - ACOG

Unfortunately, maternal mortality rates are on the rise in the U.S. According to one recent study, the U.S. was one of eight ... ACOG Statement on Maternal Mortality. May 4, 2015. Washington, DC - Hal C. Lawrence, MD, Executive Vice President and CEO of ... "We must do a better job at addressing maternal mortality in the U.S. This means an improved commitment to well-woman care, ... "ACOG is working collaboratively with a variety of partners to lower the maternal mortality rate and to better meet our goal of ...
https://acog.org/About-ACOG/News-Room/Statements/2015/ACOG-Statement-on-Maternal-Mortality

*  Pro-cyclical mortality. Evidence from Norway

Mortality is most pro-cyclical for young men (18-24), but there are also some indications of more pro-cyclical mortality for ... Finally, we investigate pro-cyclical mortality across socioeconomic groups and find that mortality is more procyclical for the ... Overall, the observed associations between mortality and macroeconomic conditions seem to stem from a myriad of diverging ... Mortality is most pro-cyclical for young men (18-24), but there are also some indications of more pro-cyclical mortality for ...
https://ideas.repec.org/p/ssb/dispap/766.html

*  US Infant Mortality SUCKS - CafeMom

i would be really curious to see what china's mortality rate is with their 1 child law and all the unwanted baby girls. ...
cafemom.com/group/115189/forums/read/18255353/US_Infant_Mortality_SUCKS?last

*  Randolph County, GAGenWeb 1870 Mortality Schedule

1870 Mortality Schedule, Randolph County. For year ending June 1, 1870. Transcribed from microfilm copies of original mortality ...
rootsweb.ancestry.com/~garandol/oldsite/census/1870mortality.html

Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Muskoka Initiative: The Muskoka Initiative on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health is a funding initiative announced at the 36th G8 summit which commits member nations to collectively spend an additional $5 billion between 2010 and 2015 to accelerate progress toward the achievement of Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5, the reduction of maternal, infant and child mortality in developing countries. A second summit on Maternal, Newborn and Child Health was held in Toronto from May 28-30, 2014 in follow-up to the original 36th G8 summit.Sisterhood method: The Sisterhood Method is a household survey to estimate maternal deaths, which includes a series of four questions. The Sisterhood Method is one method recommended by the WHO.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingCancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.List of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,HeartScore: HeartScore is a cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management tool developed by the European Society of Cardiology, aimed at supporting clinicians in optimising individual cardiovascular risk reduction.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Certificate of relief from disabilities: A Certificate of relief from disabilities is issued by a state of the United States of America to a person who has committed a felony or misdemeanor but has subsequently shown that he or she has been rehabilitated. The closely related "Certificate of good conduct" is given to a person who has committed two or more felonies and has demonstrated rehabilitation.Disease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Morbidity and mortality conference: Morbidity and mortality}}QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.List of U.S. states by life expectancy: This article presents a list of United States states sorted by their life expectancy at birth and by race/ethnicity in every state where the population of that racial or ethnic group is sufficiently large for robust estimates. The data is taken from the Measure of America's third national human development report, The Measure of America 2013–2014 width="25%" align="center" |Electrocardiography in myocardial infarctionRegression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Epidemiological method: The science of epidemiology has matured significantly from the times of Hippocrates and John Snow. The techniques for gathering and analyzing epidemiological data vary depending on the type of disease being monitored but each study will have overarching similarities.Dialysis adequacy: In nephrology, dialysis adequacy is the measurement of renal dialysis for the purpose of determining dialysis treatment regime and to better understand the pathophysiology of renal dialysis. It is an area of considerable controversy in nephrology.Sepsis Alliance: Sepsis Alliance is a voluntary health organization dedicated to raising awareness of sepsis by educating patients, families, and healthcare professionals to treat sepsis as a medical emergency.http://www.North Wales Narrow Gauge RailwaysNathan W. LevinRed Moss, Greater Manchester: Red Moss is a wetland mossland in Greater Manchester, located south of Horwich and east of Blackrod. (Grid Reference ).Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Management of heart failure: Management of heart failure requires a multimodal approach. It involves a combination of lifestyle modifications, medications, and possibly the use of devices or surgery.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Niigata UniversityClimate change in Sweden: The issue of climate change has received significant public and political attention in Sweden and the mitigation of its effects has been high on the agenda of the two latest Governments of Sweden, the previous Cabinet of Göran Persson (-2006) and the current Cabinet of Fredrik Reinfeldt (2006-). Sweden aims for an energy supply system with zero net atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.List of kanji by stroke count: This Kanji index method groups together the kanji that are written with the same number of strokes. Currently, there are 2,186 individual kanji listed.GA²LENLucas paradox: In economics, the Lucas paradox or the Lucas puzzle is the observation that capital does not flow from developed countries to developing countries despite the fact that developing countries have lower levels of capital per worker.}}List of lighthouses in Spain: This is a list of lighthouses in Spain.Four Seasons Baltimore and Residences: Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore is currently a 22 story highrise hotel complex building which opened on November 14, 2011. The building's construction began back in 2007 and went through several changes.AIP Conference Proceedings: AIP Conference Proceedings is a serial published by the American Institute of Physics since 1970. It publishes the proceedings from various conferences of physics societies.National Cancer Research Institute: The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) is a UK-wide partnership between cancer research funders, which promotes collaboration in cancer research. Its member organizations work together to maximize the value and benefit of cancer research for the benefit of patients and the public.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Hospital-acquired pneumonia: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) or nosocomial pneumonia refers to any pneumonia contracted by a patient in a hospital at least 48–72 hours after being admitted. It is thus distinguished from community-acquired pneumonia.Apache AvroAarhus Faculty of Health Sciences (Aarhus University): The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences is a faculty of Aarhus University. The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences became a reality after Aarhus University was divided into four new main academic areas which came into effect on 1 January 2011.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.Australia–Finland relations: Australia–Finland relations are foreign relations between the Australia and Finland. Diplomatic relations were established on 31 May 1949.Silent strokeTriangle of death (Italy): The triangle of death (Italian: Triangolo della morte) is an area in the Italian province of Campania comprising the municipalities of Acerra, Nola and Marigliano. The region has recently experienced increasing deaths caused by cancer and other diseases that exceeds the Italian national average.Inverse probability weighting: Inverse probability weighting is a statistical technique for calculating statistics standardized to a population different from that in which the data was collected. Study designs with a disparate sampling population and population of target inference (target population) are common in application.University of CampinasList of film accidents: This is intended to be a list of notable accidents which occurred during the shooting of films and television, such as cast or crew fatalities or serious accidents which plagued production. It is not intended to be a list of every minor injury an actor or stuntman suffered during filming.Non-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Advanced Chemical Industries (ACI): ৳ 238 Million http://www.aci-bd.Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Air pollution: Air pollution is the introduction of particulates, biological molecules, or other harmful materials into Earth's atmosphere, causing diseases, death to humans, damage to other living organisms such as animals and food crops, or the natural or built environment. Air pollution may come from anthropogenic or natural sources.

(1/4576) The expiry date of man: a synthesis of evolutionary biology and public health.

In industrialised countries, mortality and morbidity are dominated by age related chronic degenerative diseases. The health and health care needs of future populations will be heavily determined by these conditions of old age. Two opposite scenarios of future morbidity exist: morbidity might decrease ("compress"), because life span is limited, and the incidence of disease is postponed. Or morbidity might increase ("expand"), because death is delayed more than disease incidence. Optimality theory in evolutionary biology explains senescence as a by product of an optimised life history. The theory clarifies how senescence is timed by the competing needs for reproduction and survival, and why this leads to a generalised deterioration of many functions at many levels. As death and disease are not independent, future morbidity will depend on duration and severity of the process of senescence, partly determined by health care, palliating the disease severity but increasing the disease duration by postponing death. Even if morbidity might be compressed, health care needs will surely expand.  (+info)

(2/4576) Avoidable mortality in Europe 1955-1994: a plea for prevention.

OBJECTIVE: To analyse trends of avoidable mortality in Europe, emphasising causes of death amenable to primary prevention through reduction of exposures, secondary prevention through early detection and treatment, and tertiary prevention through improved treatment and medical care. DESIGN: Descriptive study of mortality from avoidable causes for the years 1955 through 1994, for ages 5-64 at time of death. Using the World Health Organisation Mortality Database, five year death rates were standardised to the world population. SETTING: 21 countries of Europe in four regions (northern, central, and southern Europe, Nordic countries). PARTICIPANTS: All causes of deaths for men and women, aged 5-64, at time of death. MAIN RESULTS: Between 1955-59 and 1990-94, the reduction in mortality was somewhat greater for avoidable causes than for all causes: 45.8% v 45.1% (women) and 39.3% v 32.6% among men. Reductions in mortality were greater for causes amenable to improved medical care: 77.9% among women and 76.3% among men. The smallest reduction in mortality was seen in women for causes amenable to secondary prevention (11.0%), and in men for causes amendable to primary prevention including tobacco related conditions (16.6%). From a geographical point of view, there were slight differences in trends between European regions, but overall the patterns were similar. CONCLUSIONS: The greatest reduction of avoidable mortality in Europe from 1955-94 came from causes amenable to improved treatment and medical care for both sexes. Further reductions of avoidable mortality can be achieved through implementation of primary and secondary prevention activities, such as tobacco control, reduction of occupational exposures, and universal access to breast and cervical cancer screening programmes.  (+info)

(3/4576) The meaning and use of the cumulative rate of potential life lost.

BACKGROUND: The 'years of potential life lost' (YPLL) is a public health measure in widespread use. However, the index does not apply to the comparisons between different populations or across different time periods. It also has the limit of being cross-sectional in nature, quantifying current burden but not future impact on society. METHODS: A new years-lost index is proposed-the 'cumulative rate of potential life lost' (CRPLL). It is a simple combination of the 'cumulative rate' (CR) and the YPLL. Vital statistics in Taiwan are used for demonstration and comparison of the new index with existing health-status measures. RESULTS: The CRPLL serves the purpose of between-group comparison. It can also be considered a projection of future impact, under the assumption that the age-specific mortality rates in the current year prevail. For a rare cause of death, it can be interpreted as the expected years (days) of potential life lost during a subject's lifetime. CONCLUSIONS: The CRPLL has several desirable properties, rendering it a promising alternative for quantifying health status.  (+info)

(4/4576) The European mesothelioma epidemic.

Projections for the period 1995-2029 suggest that the number of men dying from mesothelioma in Western Europe each year will almost double over the next 20 years, from 5000 in 1998 to about 9000 around 2018, and then decline, with a total of about a quarter of a million deaths over the next 35 years. The highest risk will be suffered by men born around 1945-50, of whom about 1 in 150 will die of mesothelioma. Asbestos use in Western Europe remained high until 1980, and substantial quantities are still used in several European countries. These projections are based on the fit of a simple age and birth cohort model to male pleural cancer mortality from 1970 to 1989 for six countries (Britain, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and Switzerland) which together account for three-quarters of the population of Western Europe. The model was tested by comparing observed and predicted numbers of deaths for the period 1990-94. The ratio of mesothelioma to recorded pleural cancer mortality has been 1.6:1 in Britain but was assumed to be 1:1 in other countries.  (+info)

(5/4576) A historical cohort mortality study of workers exposed to asbestos in a refitting shipyard.

To investigate the risks of developing asbestos-related diseases we conducted a historical cohort mortality study on 249 ship repair workers (90 laggers and 159 boiler repairers) in a single U.S. Navy shipyard in Japan. We successfully identified the vital status of 87 (96.7%) laggers and 150 (94.3%) boiler repairers, and, of these, 49 (56.3%) and 65 (43.3%) died, respectively, during the follow-up period from 1947 till the end of 1996. Our in-person interviews with some of the subjects clarified that asbestos exposure was considered to be substantially high in the 1950-60s, decreased thereafter gradually but remained till 1979 in the shipyard. The laggers, who had handled asbestos materials directly, showed a significantly elevated SMR of 2.75 (95% C.I.: 1.08-6.48) for lung cancer. The risk developing the disease was greater in the laggers after a 20-year latency (SMR = 3.42). Pancreatic cancer yielded a greater SMR than unity (7.78, 90% C.I.: 2.07-25.19) in a longer working years group. Four laggers died from asbestosis. The boiler repairers, who had many chances for secondary exposure to asbestos and a few for direct exposure, showed no elevation of the SMR of lung cancer overall, but there was a borderline statistically significant SMR of 2.41 (90% C.I.: 1.05-5.45) in a longer working years group. One boiler repairer died from mesothelioma and four from asbestosis.  (+info)

(6/4576) Effects of calcium-channel blockade in older patients with diabetes and systolic hypertension. Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial Investigators.

BACKGROUND: Recent reports suggest that calcium-channel blockers may be harmful in patients with diabetes and hypertension. We previously reported that antihypertensive treatment with the calcium-channel blocker nitrendipine reduced the risk of cardiovascular events. In this post hoc analysis, we compared the outcome of treatment with nitrendipine in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. METHODS: After stratification according to center, sex, and presence or absence of previous cardiovascular complications, 4695 patients (age, > or =60 years) with systolic blood pressure of 160 to 219 mm Hg and diastolic pressure below 95 mm Hg were randomly assigned to receive active treatment or placebo. Active treatment consisted of nitrendipine (10 to 40 mg per day) with the possible addition or substitution of enalapril (5 to 20 mg per day) or hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 to 25 mg per day) or both, titrated to reduce the systolic blood pressure by at least 20 mm Hg and to less than 150 mm Hg. In the control group, matching placebo tablets were administered similarly. RESULTS: At randomization, 492 patients (10.5 percent) had diabetes. After a median follow-up of two years, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the placebo and active-treatment groups differed by 8.6 and 3.9 mm Hg, respectively, among the diabetic patients. Among the 4203 patients without diabetes, systolic and diastolic pressures differed by 10.3 and 4.5 mm Hg, respectively, in the two groups. After adjustment for possible confounders, active treatment was found to have reduced overall mortality by 55 percent (from 45.1 deaths per 1000 patients to 26.4 deaths per 1000 patients), mortality from cardiovascular disease by 76 percent, all cardiovascular events combined by 69 percent, fatal and nonfatal strokes by 73 percent, and all cardiac events combined by 63 percent in the group of patients with diabetes. Among the nondiabetic patients, active treatment decreased all cardiovascular events combined by 26 percent and fatal and nonfatal strokes by 38 percent. In the group of patients receiving active treatment, reductions in overall mortality, mortality from cardiovascular disease, and all cardiovascular events were significantly larger among the diabetic patients than among the nondiabetic patients (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Nitrendipine-based antihypertensive therapy is particularly beneficial in older patients with diabetes and isolated systolic hypertension. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis that the use of long-acting calcium-channel blockers may be harmful in diabetic patients.  (+info)

(7/4576) Association between serum fructosamine and mortality in elderly women: the study of osteoporotic fractures.

Serum fructosamine levels can be used to estimate long-term serum glucose values and can be measured in frozen serum. The authors examined whether fructosamine levels were associated with mortality in a cohort of 9,704 white women (> or = 65 years of age) recruited from September 1986 to October 1988 at four clinical centers in the United States. A random sample of women who had died during a mean of 6 years of follow-up (n = 55) was compared with randomly selected controls (n = 276, 54 of whom had died). Fructosamine assays were performed blinded to vital status. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were adjusted for age, clinical center, smoking, hypertension, and serum albumin and cholesterol levels. Each standard deviation (46 micromol) increase in fructosamine level was associated with a 1.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6, p = 0.04) increased rate of all-cause mortality, including a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.0-2.1, p = 0.03) increase in cardiovascular disease mortality. Elevated fructosamine levels (>285 micromol/liter) were associated with a 4.3-fold (95% CI 1.6-12, p = 0.004) increased rate of cardiovascular mortality; in women without a history of diabetes, the hazard ratio was 4.6 (95% CI 1.3-16, p = 0.02). Fructosamine level, or another indicator of glycemia, should be included when the risk of cardiovascular disease among older patients is evaluated.  (+info)

(8/4576) Cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition, and all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in men.

BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness are both related to health, but their interrelation to all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We examined the health benefits of leanness and the hazards of obesity while simultaneously considering cardiorespiratory fitness. DESIGN: This was an observational cohort study. We followed 21925 men, aged 30-83 y, who had a body-composition assessment and a maximal treadmill exercise test. There were 428 deaths (144 from CVD, 143 from cancer, and 141 from other causes) in an average of 8 y of follow-up (176742 man-years). RESULTS: After adjustment for age, examination year, cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, and parental history of ischemic heart disease, unfit (low cardiorespiratory fitness as determined by maximal exercise testing), lean men had double the risk of all-cause mortality of fit, lean men (relative risk: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.16, 3.69; P = 0.01). Unfit, lean men also had a higher risk of all-cause and CVD mortality than did men who were fit and obese. We observed similar results for fat and fat-free mass in relation to mortality. Unfit men had a higher risk of all-cause and CVD mortality than did fit men in all fat and fat-free mass categories. Similarly, unfit men with low waist girths (<87 cm) had greater risk of all-cause mortality than did fit men with high waist girths (> or =99 cm). CONCLUSIONS: The health benefits of leanness are limited to fit men, and being fit may reduce the hazards of obesity.  (+info)



maternal mort


  • ACOG is working collaboratively with a variety of partners to lower the maternal mortality rate and to better meet our goal of healthy mothers and healthy babies. (acog.org)
  • PESHAWAR, July 27: Speakers at a dialogue on Friday called for better public awareness about adoption of modern techniques to reduce maternal mortality rate. (dawn.com)
  • The speakers said annual maternal mortality rate in Pakistan was 276 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. (dawn.com)
  • Mr Shoaib of Mercy Corps said special programmes would be carried out for increasing public awareness of modern techniques to reduce maternal mortality rate. (dawn.com)
  • From 1915 through 1997, the infant mortality rate declined greater than 90% to 7.2 per 1000 live births, and from 1900 through 1997, the maternal mortality rate declined almost 99% to less than 0.1 reported death per 1000 live births (7.7 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1997) (3) ( Figure 1 and Figure 2 ). (cdc.gov)

infant


  • This paper examines the relationship between health aid and infant mortality, using data from in total 135 countries (for the purposes of this study, developing countries), between 1975 and 2010. (repec.org)
  • Utilizing both conventional Instrumental Variable and System GMM approaches, a tentative conclusion can be drawn that aid comes to have a statistically significant and positive effect on infant mortality rate, as doubling of aid leads to an approximately 1.3% reduction in infant mortality rates. (repec.org)
  • Assessing Impact of Health Oriented Aid on Infant Mortality Rates ," MPRA Paper 43212, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2012. (repec.org)
  • and the implementation of the Healthy Start Program and Healthy People 2020 infant mortality objectives. (federalregister.gov)
  • and, Update on HHS National Strategy to Address Infant Mortality. (federalregister.gov)
  • Despite these improvements in maternal and infant mortality rates, significant disparities by race and ethnicity persist. (cdc.gov)
  • This report summarizes trends in reducing infant and maternal mortality in the United States, factors contributing to these trends, challenges in reducing infant and maternal mortality, and provides suggestions for public health action for the 21st century. (cdc.gov)
  • The decline in infant mortality is unparalleled by other mortality reduction this century. (cdc.gov)
  • Efforts to reduce infant mortality focused on improving environmental and living conditions in urban areas (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Urban environmental interventions (e.g., sewage and refuse disposal and safe drinking water) played key roles in reducing infant mortality. (cdc.gov)
  • Declining fertility rates also contributed to reductions in infant mortality through longer spacing of children, smaller family size, and better nutritional status of mothers and infants (1). (cdc.gov)
  • During the first three decades of the century, public health, social welfare, and clinical medicine (pediatrics and obstetrics) collaborated to combat infant mortality (1). (cdc.gov)
  • The Children's Bureau defined the problem of infant mortality and shaped the debate over programs to ameliorate the problem. (cdc.gov)
  • By the 1920s, the integration of these services changed the approach to infant mortality from one that addressed infant health problems to an approach that included infant and mother and prenatal-care programs to educate, monitor, and care for pregnant women. (cdc.gov)
  • From 1950 through 1964, infant mortality declined more slowly (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Although no reliable data exist, the rapid decline in infant mortality during earlier decades probably was not influenced by decreases in LBW rates because the decrease in mortality was primarily in postneonatal deaths that are less influenced by birthweight. (cdc.gov)

deaths


  • They said a vast majority of maternal deaths (27.2 per cent) was caused by postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and that skilled birth attendance was critical for reducing maternal mortality and mortality including that associated with PPH. (dawn.com)

rates


  • The National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS) consists of a database developed for the purpose of studying the effects of demographic and socio-economic characteristics on differentials in United States mortality rates. (umich.edu)
  • Unfortunately, maternal mortality rates are on the rise in the U.S. According to one recent study , the U.S. was one of eight countries where maternal death rates worsened between 2003 and 2013.This is unacceptable for women, their children, their families, and society. (acog.org)
  • from 1930 through 1949, mortality rates declined 52% (4). (cdc.gov)

data


  • It consists of United States Census Bureau data from Current Population Surveys, annual Social and Economic Supplements and the 1980 Census combined with death certificate information to identify mortality status and cause of death. (umich.edu)
  • Users should consult the data owners directly (via National Longitudinal Mortality Study (NLMS) ) for details on obtaining these resources. (umich.edu)

health


  • According to them, the millennium development goal 5 focused on improving maternal health by reducing maternal mortality ratio and achieving universal access to reproductive health by 2015. (dawn.com)