Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Dinucleotide Repeats: The most common of the microsatellite tandem repeats (MICROSATELLITE REPEATS) dispersed in the euchromatic arms of chromosomes. They consist of two nucleotides repeated in tandem; guanine and thymine, (GT)n, is the most frequently seen.DNA, Satellite: Highly repetitive DNA sequences found in HETEROCHROMATIN, mainly near centromeres. They are composed of simple sequences (very short) (see MINISATELLITE REPEATS) repeated in tandem many times to form large blocks of sequence. Additionally, following the accumulation of mutations, these blocks of repeats have been repeated in tandem themselves. The degree of repetition is on the order of 1000 to 10 million at each locus. Loci are few, usually one or two per chromosome. They were called satellites since in density gradients, they often sediment as distinct, satellite bands separate from the bulk of genomic DNA owing to a distinct BASE COMPOSITION.Trinucleotide Repeats: Microsatellite repeats consisting of three nucleotides dispersed in the euchromatic arms of chromosomes.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid: Sequences of DNA or RNA that occur in multiple copies. There are several types: INTERSPERSED REPETITIVE SEQUENCES are copies of transposable elements (DNA TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS or RETROELEMENTS) dispersed throughout the genome. TERMINAL REPEAT SEQUENCES flank both ends of another sequence, for example, the long terminal repeats (LTRs) on RETROVIRUSES. Variations may be direct repeats, those occurring in the same direction, or inverted repeats, those opposite to each other in direction. TANDEM REPEAT SEQUENCES are copies which lie adjacent to each other, direct or inverted (INVERTED REPEAT SEQUENCES).Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Microsatellite Instability: The occurrence of highly polymorphic mono- and dinucleotide MICROSATELLITE REPEATS in somatic cells. It is a form of genome instability associated with defects in DNA MISMATCH REPAIR.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Tandem Repeat Sequences: Copies of DNA sequences which lie adjacent to each other in the same orientation (direct tandem repeats) or in the opposite direction to each other (INVERTED TANDEM REPEATS).Genetic Loci: Specific regions that are mapped within a GENOME. Genetic loci are usually identified with a shorthand notation that indicates the chromosome number and the position of a specific band along the P or Q arm of the chromosome where they are found. For example the locus 6p21 is found within band 21 of the P-arm of CHROMOSOME 6. Many well known genetic loci are also known by common names that are associated with a genetic function or HEREDITARY DISEASE.Loss of Heterozygosity: The loss of one allele at a specific locus, caused by a deletion mutation; or loss of a chromosome from a chromosome pair, resulting in abnormal HEMIZYGOSITY. It is detected when heterozygous markers for a locus appear monomorphic because one of the ALLELES was deleted.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.DNA, Plant: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of plants.Minisatellite Repeats: Tandem arrays of moderately repetitive, short (10-60 bases) DNA sequences which are found dispersed throughout the GENOME, at the ends of chromosomes (TELOMERES), and clustered near telomeres. Their degree of repetition is two to several hundred at each locus. Loci number in the thousands but each locus shows a distinctive repeat unit.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Trinucleotide Repeat Expansion: An increased number of contiguous trinucleotide repeats in the DNA sequence from one generation to the next. The presence of these regions is associated with diseases such as FRAGILE X SYNDROME and MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY. Some CHROMOSOME FRAGILE SITES are composed of sequences where trinucleotide repeat expansion occurs.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.MutS Homolog 2 Protein: MutS homolog 2 protein is found throughout eukaryotes and is a homolog of the MUTS DNA MISMATCH-BINDING PROTEIN. It plays an essential role in meiotic RECOMBINATION and DNA REPAIR of mismatched NUCLEOTIDES.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Endangered Species: An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Base Pair Mismatch: The presence of an uncomplimentary base in double-stranded DNA caused by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or adenine, mismatching during homologous recombination, or errors in DNA replication. Multiple, sequential base pair mismatches lead to formation of heteroduplex DNA; (NUCLEIC ACID HETERODUPLEXES).Ankyrin Repeat: Protein motif that contains a 33-amino acid long sequence that often occurs in tandem arrays. This repeating sequence of 33-amino acids was discovered in ANKYRIN where it is involved in interaction with the anion exchanger (ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 1, ERYTHROCYTE). Ankyrin repeats cooperatively fold into domains that mediate molecular recognition via protein-protein interactions.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.DNA Mismatch Repair: A DNA repair pathway involved in correction of errors introduced during DNA replication when an incorrect base, which cannot form hydrogen bonds with the corresponding base in the parent strand, is incorporated into the daughter strand. Excinucleases recognize the BASE PAIR MISMATCH and cause a segment of polynucleotide chain to be excised from the daughter strand, thereby removing the mismatched base. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)Repetitive Sequences, Amino Acid: A sequential pattern of amino acids occurring more than once in the same protein sequence.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis: A group of autosomal-dominant inherited diseases in which COLON CANCER arises in discrete adenomas. Unlike FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI with hundreds of polyps, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal neoplasms occur much later, in the fourth and fifth decades. HNPCC has been associated with germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. It has been subdivided into Lynch syndrome I or site-specific colonic cancer, and LYNCH SYNDROME II which includes extracolonic cancer.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Frameshift Mutation: A type of mutation in which a number of NUCLEOTIDES deleted from or inserted into a protein coding sequence is not divisible by three, thereby causing an alteration in the READING FRAMES of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. These mutations may be induced by certain types of MUTAGENS or may occur spontaneously.DNA Sequence, Unstable: A region of DNA that is highly polymorphic and is prone to strand breaks, rearrangements or other MUTATIONS because of the nature of its sequence. These regions often harbor palindromic, or repetitive sequences (REPETITIVE SEQUENCES, NUCLEIC ACID). Variability in stability of the DNA sequence is seen at CHROMOSOME FRAGILE SITES.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Inverted Repeat Sequences: Copies of nucleic acid sequence that are arranged in opposing orientation. They may lie adjacent to each other (tandem) or be separated by some sequence that is not part of the repeat (hyphenated). They may be true palindromic repeats, i.e. read the same backwards as forward, or complementary which reads as the base complement in the opposite orientation. Complementary inverted repeats have the potential to form hairpin loop or stem-loop structures which results in cruciform structures (such as CRUCIFORM DNA) when the complementary inverted repeats occur in double stranded regions.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.DNA Repeat Expansion: An increase number of repeats of a genomic, tandemly repeated DNA sequence from one generation to the next.Genomic Instability: An increased tendency of the GENOME to acquire MUTATIONS when various processes involved in maintaining and replicating the genome are dysfunctional.Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing: A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymesDNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3: A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Paternity: Establishing the father relationship of a man and a child.Linkage Disequilibrium: Nonrandom association of linked genes. This is the tendency of the alleles of two separate but already linked loci to be found together more frequently than would be expected by chance alone.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.

*  Microsatellites grant more stable flanking genes.

... or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are DNA sequences that include tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases ... Microsatellite or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are tandem repeated DNA sequences including tandem copies of specific ... Choudhary OP,Trivedi S,Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) instability depends on repeat characteristics during ... Microsatellite Repeats / genetics*. Models, Genetic. Mutation. Phytophthora / genetics. Plants / genetics. Polymerase Chain ...
biomedsearch.com/nih/Microsatellites-grant-more-stable-flanking/23035963.html

*  IJMS | Free Full-Text | Microsatellite Mutation Rate during Allohexaploidization of Newly Resynthesized Wheat | Notes

Of the 148260 SSR alleles investigated in S1 generation, only one mutation (changed number of repeats) was confirmed with a ... also known as microsatellites) are known to be mutational hotspots in genomes. DNA rearrangements have also been reported to ...
mdpi.com/1422-0067/13/10/12533/notes

*  ViewVC] Annotation of: msatfinder/README.txt

for the detection of microsatellite repeats. For full instructions,. 9. please see the msatminer user manual. Please send ... Repeats, /Artemis, and /Primers. A database of these results will be. 95. created that can be accessed from your cgi interface. ... Microsatellites' directory and edit the configuration file. 75. 'msatminer.rc'. Most values will work using the default ... 1. To search the test data for microsatellites, first move into the. ...
bioinformatics.org/cgi-bin/viewvc.cgi/msatfinder/README.txt?revision=1.1.1.1&view=markup

*  Clonal hematopoiesis in familial polycythemia vera suggests the involvement of multiple mutational events in the early...

Two microsatellite repeat polymorphisms in the EPO gene. Hum Mol Genet. 1994;3: 219. ... C) Exclusion of linkage between chromosome 9p microsatellite markers and PV. LOD scores less than -2.0 satisfy the criteria of ... 13 Microsatellite polymerase chain reaction for the EPOR and c-mpl genes was done as previously described.14,15 ... We performed linkage analysis using microsatellite markers mapping to these loci. Only the affected subjects with the full PV ...
bloodjournal.org/content/102/10/3793.long?sso-checked=true

*  Patent US8119885 - Plants and seeds of corn variety CV597869 - Google Patents

SSRs are genetic markers based on polymorphisms in repeated nucleotide sequences, such as microsatellites. A marker system ... e) repeating steps (c) and (d) three or more times in succession to produce selected fourth or higher backcross progeny plants ... c) repeating steps (b) and (c) with sufficient inbreeding until an inbred corn plant derived from the corn variety CV597869 is ... The reaction is run in a thermal cycling machine 3 minutes at 94 C, 39 repeats of the cycle 1 minute at 94 C, 1 minute at 50 C ...
google.com/patents/US8119885

*  Characterization of a Large Panel of Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Representing the Clinical Heterogeneity of Human...

Evaluation of tumor microsatellite instability using five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats and pentaplex PCR. ... Microsatellite Sequence Instability status.. Microsatellite sequence instability (MSI) testing was conducted according to the ... Revised Bethesda Guidelines for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and microsatellite instability. J ... low or high microsatellite instability is roughly similar to the proportion found in human CRC. ...
clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/18/19/5314?rss=1

*  Muir-Torre syndrome

Microsatellites are short repetitive DNA sequences, typically mononucleotide or dinucleotide tandem repeats, that are ... Microsatellite instability and immunostaining for MSH-2 and MLH-1 in cutaneous and internal tumors from patients with the Muir- ... Microsatellite instability and expression of hMLH-1 and hMSH-2 in sebaceous gland carcinomas as markers for Muir-Torre syndrome ... Microsatellite instability (MSI) is the hallmark of MMR gene deficiency. ...
https://uptodate.com/contents/muir-torre-syndrome

*  Plus it

Low HO-1 expressors in humans due to HO-1 polymorphisms [microsatellite polymorphisms of (GT)n repeats (longer repeats = lower ... repeating 40 cycles. Wt (510 bp), HO-1 Het, and HO-1 KO (390 bp) bands were analyzed by electrophoresis. ... expression; shorter repeats = higher expression), a single-nucleotide polymorphism, T(-143)/A, HO-1 mutant alleles] (57) may be ...
ajpgi.physiology.org/content/304/11/G991

*  Patente US20030130219 - Polynucleotides encoding mouse pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG ... - Google Patentes

K. Keparnik et al., Fast detection of a (CA)18 microsatellite repeat in the IgE receptor gene by capillary electrophoresis with ...
google.es/patents/US20030130219?hl=es&dq=flatulence

*  Dienekes' Anthropology Blog: X chromosomes and settling of Americas

2009) published for microsatellites (American Model Haplotype coupled with 9-repeat allele most frequent in the Americas). ...
https://dienekes.blogspot.com/2009/05/x-chromosomes-and-settling-of-americas.html

*  A systematic analysis of LINE-1 endonuclease-dependent retrotranspositional events causing human genetic disease | SpringerLink

Arcot SS, Wang Z, Weber JL, Deininger PL, Batzer MA (1995) Alu repeats: a source for the genesis of primate microsatellites. ... Batzer MA, Deininger PL (2002) Alu repeats and human genomic diversity. Nat Rev Genet 3:370-379CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Stoppa-Lyonnet D, Carter PE, Meo T, Tosi M (1990) Clusters of intragenic Alu repeats predispose the human C1 inhibitor locus to ... Lester T, McMahon C, Van Regemorter N, Jones A, Genet S (1997) X-linked immunodeficiency caused by insertion of Alu repeat ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00439-005-1321-0

*  Download Typing Tournament 2.0.5 Commercial by Pathold No 167 Pty Ltd

msatcommander is a python program written to locate microsatellite (SSR, VNTR, &c) repeats within fasta-formatted sequence or ... msatcommander will search for all di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide repeats (with options... 11.7 MB. ...
filetransit.com/download.php?id=222333

*  Download iTimeTable 1.0.1 Commercial by Kuko.sk

msatcommander is a python program written to locate microsatellite (SSR, VNTR, &c) repeats within fasta-formatted sequence or ... msatcommander will search for all di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide repeats (with options... 11.7 MB. ...
filetransit.com/download.php?id=279951

*  Download Mimir Mental Math 1.0 Shareware by Snarp

msatcommander is a python program written to locate microsatellite (SSR, VNTR, &c) repeats within fasta-formatted sequence or ... msatcommander will search for all di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide repeats (with options... 11.7 MB. ...
filetransit.com/download.php?id=230868

*  How India managed to eradicate polio | Amazing ...

... which was causing repeated disease outbreaks.

But it was organisation that was key in enabling India to cover the last ... Microsatellites - long stretches of short DNA repeats, such as TCGTCGTCG or ACACAC over and over - are common throughout the ... In addition, the team found that with MSMuTect they could correctly classify tumors based on their level of microsatellite ... Dubbed MSMuTect and MSMutSig, the tools use statistical approaches to respectively a) identify microsatellite indels, and b) ...
scoop.it/t/amazing-science/p/4017073912/2014/03/05/how-india-managed-to-eradicate-polio

*  Microsatellite-based phylogeny of Indian domestic goats

A hypervariable microsatellite revealed by in vitro amplification of a dinucleotide repeat within the cardiac muscle actin gene ... Microsatellite-based phylogeny of Indian domestic goats. Pramod K Rout,1 Manjunath B Joshi,2 Ajoy Mandal,1 D Laloe,3 Lalji ... Microsatellite markers have been used as good tools to analyse the genetic variation in cattle, sheep, pig, and goats [6-11]. ... Microsatellite analysis also revealed that the Pashmina goats exhibited the lowest diversity as compared to other breeds in the ...
pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC2268706/

*  'Junk' DNA: Why non-coding DNA Isn't Really...

Y microsatellites, tandem repeat The order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule, or the order of amino acids in a protein ... Tandemly repeated The order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule, or the order of amino acids in a protein molecule. ... Microsatellite spreading in the human All the DNA contained in an organism or a cell, which includes both the chromosomes ... It is likely these tandem repeats play the role of weak enhancer-silencers that modulate, in a copy number-dependent way, the ...
godandscience.org/evolution/junkdna.html

*  Hypermethylation of the promoter region of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) in sporadic and ulcerative colitis associated colorectal...

1997) Allelic profiles of mononucleotide repeat microsatellites in control individuals and in colorectal tumors with and ... All PCRs were repeated in duplicate and those tumours that were RER+ were confirmed using CA repeat markersD16S520 and D5S404. ...
gut.bmj.com/content/48/3/367

*  Lynch Syndrome-Associated Breast Cancers: Clinicopathologic Characteristics of a Case Series from the Colon Cancer Family...

... phenotype in human tumors without the requirement for matching normal DNA by analysis of mononucleotide repeat microsatellites ... Infrequent occurrence of microsatellite instability in sporadic and familial breast cancer. Eur J Cancer 1995;31A:2330-4. ... Microsatellite instability in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast. J Pathol 1998;185:18-24. ... Microsatellite instability markers in breast cancer: a review and study showing MSI was not detected at 'BAT 25' and 'BAT 26' ...
clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/16/7/2214.long

*  Plus it

Sia E. A., Kokoska R. J., Dominska M., Greenwell P., Petes T. D. Microsatellite instability in yeast: dependence on repeat unit ... 1)⇓ . In colorectal cancers, MMR deficiency leads to the instability of short sequence repeats (microsatellite instability) ... because these repeats, such as (ca)n, are particularly prone to slippage during replication (10 , 11) . For more details on MMR ...
cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/11/12/1513

*  Construction of an intra-specific sweet cherry (Prunus aviumL.) genetic linkage map and synteny analysis with...

Cipriani G, Lot G, Huang W-G, Marrazzo MT, Peterlunger E, Testolin R (1999) AC/GT and AG/CT microsatellite repeats in peach ( ... Testolin R, Messina R, Lain O, Marrazzo MT, Huang WG, Cipriani G (2004) Microsatellites isolated in almond from an AC-repeat ... Mnejja M, Garcia-Mas J, Howad W, Badenes ML, Arús P (2004) Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of Japanese plum (Prunus ... Testolin R, Marrazzo T, Cipriani G, Quarta R, Verde I, Dettori MT, Pancaldi M, Sansavini S (2000) Microsatellite DNA in peach ( ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11295-008-0161-1

*  Researchers develop model to explore hard-to-study mutations in human genome

... called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. ... called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. ... In short tandem repeats, sequences of one to six of DNA's basic components, called nucleotides, repeat over and over again, ... Analyzing repeats. Tandem repeats are difficult to analyze with current genome sequencing techniques. That's because they're ...
https://news-medical.net/news/20170911/Researchers-develop-model-to-explore-hard-to-study-mutations-in-human-genome.aspx

*  Linkage Analysis of Candidate Genes and Gene-Gene Interactions in Chinese Hypertensive Sib Pairs | Hypertension

Microsatellite Polymorphisms. Genotyping for the GT-repeat microsatellite markers D1S249 (renin), D4S43 and D4S126 (α-adducin ... Dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the Huntington's disease region at the D4S43 locus. Hum Mol Genet. 1992;1:215. ... Table 4⇓ shows the power as a function of gene-specific λs according to the PIC value of each of the 6 microsatellite markers ... Dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms at the D4S126 and D4S114 loci. Hum Mol Genet. 1993;2:1077. ...
hyper.ahajournals.org/content/33/6/1332

*  Type-it Microsatellite PCR Kit - QIAGEN

For fast and reliable multiplex PCR analysis of microsatellite loci ... The Type-it Microsatellite PCR Kit is used to analyze microsatellites, STRs (short tandem repeats), SSRs (simple sequence ... Type-it Microsatellite PCR Buffer Unique Type-it Microsatellite PCR Buffer facilitates the amplification of multiple PCR ... The Type-it Microsatellite PCR Kit outperformed kits tested from other suppliers and ensures reliable microsatellite analysis. ...
https://qiagen.com/dk/shop/genes-and-pathways/technology-portals/browse-qpcr/mirna-gene-expression/mirna-isolation/type-it-microsatellite-pcr-kit/

*  Won Jung Koh

6%, p=0.13). In conclusion, these results suggest that the GT repeat microsatellite polymorphisms in intron II of the human ... Association between microsatellite polymorphisms in intron II of the human Toll-like receptor 2 gene and nontuberculous ... The aim of this study was to assess lung injury associated with repeated derecruitments and to assess whether this type of ... Recruitment maneuvers attenuate repeated derecruitment-associated lung injury. Won Jung Koh. Division of Pulmonary and Critical ...
https://labome.org/expert/korea/sungkyunkwan/koh/won-jung-koh-1886060.html

*  Genetic fingerprinting: a look inside | www.scienceinschool.org

2-9 bp repeated sequences, also called microsatellites - paved the way for the high-speed genetic fingerprinting technique that ... who used repeated DNA sequences known as variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs; e.g. sequence D1S80, (AGGACCACCAGGAAGG)n). ... They may be twins, but it is also likely that two unrelated persons will have the same number of repeats if only one STR is ... Depending on the number of VNTR repeats, DNA fragments of different sizes are generated (see also Figure 2, Step 4). Image ...
scienceinschool.org/2012/issue22/fingerprinting

Microsatellite: A microsatellite is a tract of repetitive DNA in which certain DNA motifs (ranging in length from 2–5 base pairs) are repeated, typically 5-50 times. Microsatellites occur at thousands of locations in the human genome and they are notable for their high mutation rate and high diversity in the population.Satellite DNA: Satellite DNA consists of very large arrays of tandemly repeating, non-coding DNA. Satellite DNA is the main component of functional centromeres, and form the main structural constituent of heterochromatin.Trinucleotide repeat disorder: Trinucleotide repeat disorders (also known as trinucleotide repeat expansion disorders, triplet repeat expansion disorders or codon reiteration disorders) are a set of genetic disorders caused by trinucleotide repeat expansion, a kind of mutation where [repeats in certain gene]s exceed the normal, stable threshold, which differs per gene. The mutation is a subset of unstable [[Microsatellite (genetics)|microsatellite repeats that occur throughout all genomic sequences.Infinite alleles model: The infinite alleles model is a mathematical model for calculating genetic mutations. The Japanese geneticist Motoo Kimura and American geneticist James F.Direct repeat: Direct repeats are a type of genetic sequence that consists of two or more repeats of a specific sequence.Thermal cyclerGene polymorphismSymmetry element: A symmetry element is a point of reference about which symmetry operations can take place. In particular, symmetry elements can be centers of inversion, axes of rotation and mirror planes.Chromosome regionsColes PhillipsDNA sequencer: A DNA sequencer is a scientific instrument used to automate the DNA sequencing process. Given a sample of DNA, a DNA sequencer is used to determine the order of the four bases: G (guanine), C (cytosine), A (adenine) and T (thymine).List of sequenced eukaryotic genomesPedigree chart: A pedigree chart is a diagram that shows the occurrence and appearance or phenotypes of a particular gene or organism and its ancestors from one generation to the next,pedigree chart Genealogy Glossary - About.com, a part of The New York Times Company.DNA condensation: DNA condensation refers to the process of compacting DNA molecules in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistic details of DNA packing are essential for its functioning in the process of gene regulation in living systems.Genetic variation: right|thumbTandem repeat: Tandem repeats occur in DNA when a pattern of one or more nucleotides is repeated and the repetitions are directly adjacent to each other. Several protein domains also form tandem repeats within their amino acid primary structure, such as Armadillo repeats.Loss of heterozygosity: Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a gross chromosomal event that results in loss of the entire gene and the surrounding chromosomal region.[Association of the autoimmune diseases scleroderma with an immunologic response to cancer,] Christine G.Panmixia: Panmixia (or panmixis) means random mating.King C and Stanfield W.Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis: Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA ) is a method employed for the genetic analysis of particular microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria, that takes advantage of the polymorphism of tandemly repeated DNA sequences. A "VNTR" is a "variable-number tandem repeat".Replication slippage: Replication slippage, otherwise known as slipped-strand mispairing, is a form of mutation that leads to either a trinucleotide or dinucleotide expansion or contraction during DNA replication.Hartl L.Genetic linkage: Genetic linkage is the tendency of alleles that are located close together on a chromosome to be inherited together during the meiosis phase of sexual reproduction. Genes whose loci are nearer to each other are less likely to be separated onto different chromatids during chromosomal crossover, and are therefore said to be genetically linked.Silent mutation: Silent mutations are mutations in DNA that do not significantly alter the phenotype of the organism in which they occur. Silent mutations can occur in non-coding regions (outside of genes or within introns), or they may occur within exons.GankyrinPanitumumabDNA mismatch repair: DNA mismatch repair is a system for recognizing and repairing erroneous insertion, deletion, and mis-incorporation of bases that can arise during DNA replication and recombination, as well as repairing some forms of DNA damage.BRCT domainHereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancerBranching order of bacterial phyla (Gupta, 2001): There are several models of the Branching order of bacterial phyla, one of these was proposed in 2001 by Gupta based on conserved indels or protein, termed "protein signatures", an alternative approach to molecular phylogeny. Some problematic exceptions and conflicts are present to these conserved indels, however, they are in agreement with several groupings of classes and phyla.Frameshift mutation: A frameshift mutation (also called a framing error or a reading frame shift) is a genetic mutation caused by indels (insertions or deletions) of a number of nucleotides in a DNA sequence that is not divisible by three. Due to the triplet nature of gene expression by codons, the insertion or deletion can change the reading frame (the grouping of the codons), resulting in a completely different translation from the original.Copenhagen Harbour BathsHealth geography: Health geography is the application of geographical information, perspectives, and methods to the study of health, disease, and health care.Signal transducing adaptor protein: Signal transducing adaptor proteins are proteins that are accessory to main proteins in a signal transduction pathway. Adaptor proteins contain a variety of protein-binding modules that link protein-binding partners together and facilitate the creation of larger signaling complexes.Phenotype microarray: The phenotype microarray approach is a technology for high-throughput phenotyping of cells.Misattributed paternity: Misattributed paternity is the situation when a child’s putative father is not the child's biological father. Overall, the incidence of misattributed paternity ranges from about 1% to 2%, though it may be considerably higher in certain populations.Disequilibrium (medicine): Disequilibrium}}Molecular evolution: Molecular evolution is a change in the sequence composition of cellular molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins across generations. The field of molecular evolution uses principles of evolutionary biology and population genetics to explain patterns in these changes.

(1/8354) Superimposed histologic and genetic mapping of chromosome 9 in progression of human urinary bladder neoplasia: implications for a genetic model of multistep urothelial carcinogenesis and early detection of urinary bladder cancer.

The evolution of alterations on chromosome 9, including the putative tumor suppressor genes mapped to the 9p21-22 region (the MTS genes), was studied in relation to the progression of human urinary bladder neoplasia by using whole organ superimposed histologic and genetic mapping in cystectomy specimens and was verified in urinary bladder tumors of various pathogenetic subsets with longterm follow-up. The applicability of chromosome 9 allelic losses as non-invasive markers of urothelial neoplasia was tested on voided urine and/or bladder washings of patients with urinary bladder cancer. Although sequential multiple hits in the MTS locus were documented in the development of intraurothelial precursor lesions, the MTS genes do not seem to represent a major target for p21-23 deletions in bladder cancer. Two additional tumor suppressor genes involved in bladder neoplasia located distally and proximally to the MTS locus within p22-23 and p11-13 regions respectively were identified. Several distinct putative tumor suppressor gene loci within the q12-13, q21-22, and q34 regions were identified on the q arm. In particular, the pericentromeric q12-13 area may contain the critical tumor suppressor gene or genes for the development of early urothelial neoplasia. Allelic losses of chromosome 9 were associated with expansion of the abnormal urothelial clone which frequently involved large areas of urinary bladder mucosa. These losses could be found in a high proportion of urothelial tumors and in voided urine or bladder washing samples of nearly all patients with urinary bladder carcinoma.  (+info)

(2/8354) Level of retinoblastoma protein expression correlates with p16 (MTS-1/INK4A/CDKN2) status in bladder cancer.

Recent studies have shown that patients whose bladder cancer exhibit overexpression of RB protein as measured by immunohistochemical analysis do equally poorly as those with loss of RB function. We hypothesized that loss of p16 protein function could be related to RB overexpression, since p16 can induce transcriptional downregulation of RB and its loss may lead to aberrant RB regulation. Conversely, loss of RB function has been associated with high p16 protein expression in several other tumor types. In the present study RB negative bladder tumors also exhibited strong nuclear p16 staining while each tumor with strong, homogeneous RB nuclear staining were p16 negative, supporting our hypothesis. To expand on these immunohistochemical studies additional cases were selected in which the status of the p16 encoding gene had been determined at the molecular level. Absent p16 and high RB protein expression was found in the tumors having loss of heterozygosity within 9p21 and a structural change (mutation or deletion) of the remaining p16 encoding gene allele, confirming the staining results. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the RB nuclear overexpression recently associated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer is also associated with loss of p16 function and implies that loss of p16 function could be equally deleterious as RB loss in bladder and likely other cancers.  (+info)

(3/8354) Multiple target sites of allelic imbalance on chromosome 17 in Barrett's oesophageal cancer.

Twelve Barrett's adenocarcinomas have been analysed for the occurrence of allelic imbalance (LOH) on chromosome 17 using 41 microsatellite markers. This study provides evidence for 13 minimal regions of LOH, six on 17p and seven on 17q. Four of these centre in the vicinity of the known tumour suppressor genes (TSGs) TP53 (17p13.1), NFI (17q11.2), BRCA1 (17q21.1), and a putative TSG (17p13.3). The tumours all displayed relatively small regions of LOH (1-10 cM), and in several tumours extensive regions of LOH were detected. One tumour displayed only two very small regions of LOH; 17p11.2 and 17p13.1. The frequency of allelic imbalance has been calculated based on the LOH encompassing only one minimal region, and based on all the LOH observations. By both evaluations the highest LOH frequencies were found for regions II (p53), III (17p13.1 centromeric to p53), IV (17p12), V (17p11.2) and VII (NF1, 17q11.2). Our data supports the existence of multiple TSGs on chromosome 17 and challenges the view that p53 is the sole target of LOH on 17p in Barrett's adenocarcinoma.  (+info)

(4/8354) p73 at chromosome 1p36.3 is lost in advanced stage neuroblastoma but its mutation is infrequent.

p73, a novel p53 family member, is a recently identified candidate neuroblastoma (NBL) suppressor gene mapped at chromosome 1p36.33 and was found to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in cell lines. To test the hypothesis that p73 is a NBL suppressor gene, we analysed the p73 gene in primary human NBLs. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for p73 was observed in 19% (28/151) of informative cases which included 92 mass-screening (MS) tumors. The high frequency of p73 LOH was significantly associated with sporadic NBLs (9% vs 34%, P<0.001), N-myc amplification (10% vs 71%, P<0.001), and advanced stage (14% vs 28%, P<0.05). Both p73alpha and p73beta transcripts were detectable in only 46 of 134 (34%) NBLs at low levels by RT-PCR methods, while they were easily detectable in most breast cancers and colorectal cancers under the same conditions. They found no correlation between p73 LOH and its expression levels (P>0.1). We found two mutations out of 140 NBLs, one somatic and one germline, which result in amino acid substitutions in the C-terminal region of p73 which may affect transactivation functions, though, in the same tumor samples, no mutation of the p53 gene was observed as reported previously. These results suggest that allelic loss of the p73 gene may be a later event in NBL tumorigenesis. However, p73 is infrequently mutated in primary NBLs and may hardly function as a tumor suppressor in a classic Knudson's manner.  (+info)

(5/8354) Genomic organization of the KCNQ1 K+ channel gene and identification of C-terminal mutations in the long-QT syndrome.

The voltage-gated K+ channel KVLQT1 is essential for the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential and for K+ homeostasis in the inner ear. Mutations in the human KCNQ1 gene encoding the alpha subunit of the KVLQT1 channel cause the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). The autosomal dominant form of this cardiac disease, the Romano-Ward syndrome, is characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. The autosomal recessive form, the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, also includes bilateral deafness. In the present study, we report the entire genomic structure of KCNQ1, which consists of 19 exons spanning 400 kb on chromosome 11p15.5. We describe the sequences of exon-intron boundaries and oligonucleotide primers that allow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of exons from genomic DNA. Two new (CA)n repeat microsatellites were found in introns 10 and 14. The present study provides helpful tools for the linkage analysis and mutation screening of the complete KCNQ1 gene. By use of these tools, five novel mutations were identified in LQTS patients by PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in the C-terminal part of KCNQ1: two missense mutations, a 20-bp and 1-bp deletions, and a 1-bp insertion. Such mutations in the C-terminal domain of the gene may be more frequent than previously expected, because this region has not been analyzed so far. This could explain the low percentage of mutations found in large LQTS cohorts.  (+info)

(6/8354) Genomic structure and alterations of homeobox gene CDX2 in colorectal carcinomas.

Expression of CDX2, a caudal-related homeobox gene, was found to be decreased in colorectal carcinomas. Heterozygous null mutant mice as to Cdx2 develop multiple intestinal adenomatous polyps. To clarify the role of CDX2 in colorectal carcinogenesis, we determined its genomic structure, and searched for mutations of CDX2 in 49 sporadic colorectal carcinomas and ten hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC) without microsatellite instability. None of them exhibited a mutation. We further examined 19 HNPCC carcinomas with microsatellite instability for mutations in a (G)7 repeat site within CDX2. One of them (5.3%) exhibited one G insertion. Loss of heterozygosity was observed in 2 of the 20 (10%) informative sporadic carcinomas, and in one of the three (33.3%) informative HNPCC cancers. These data indicate that CDX2 may play only a minor role in colorectal carcinogenesis.  (+info)

(7/8354) Microsatellite instability, Epstein-Barr virus, mutation of type II transforming growth factor beta receptor and BAX in gastric carcinomas in Hong Kong Chinese.

Microsatellite instability (MI), the phenotypic manifestation of mismatch repair failure, is found in a proportion of gastric carcinomas. Little is known of the links between MI and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status and clinicopathological elements. Examination of genes mutated through the MI mechanism could also be expected to reveal important information on the carcinogenic pathway. Seventy-nine gastric carcinomas (61 EBV negative, 18 EBV positive) from local Hong Kong Chinese population, an intermediate-incidence area, were examined. Eight microsatellite loci, inclusive of the A10 tract of type II transforming growth factor beta receptor (TbetaR-II), were used to evaluate the MI status. MI in the BAX and insulin-like growth factor II receptor (IGF-IIR) genes were also examined. High-level MI (>40% unstable loci) was detected in ten cases (12.7%) and low-level MI (1-40% unstable loci) in three (3.8%). High-level MI was detected in two EBV-associated cases (11%) and the incidence was similar for the EBV-negative cases (13%). The high-level MIs were significantly associated with intestinal-type tumours (P = 0.03) and a more prominent lymphoid infiltrate (P = 0.04). Similar associations were noted in the EBV-positive carcinomas. The high-level MIs were more commonly located in the antrum, whereas the EBV-associated carcinomas were mostly located in body. Thirteen cardia cases were negative for both high-level MI and EBV. All patients aged below 55 were MI negative (P = 0.049). Of the high-level MIs, 80% had mutation in TbetaR-II, 40% in BAX and 0% in IGF-IIR. Of low-level MIs, 33% also had TbetaR-II mutation. These mutations were absent in the MI-negative cases. Of three lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas, two cases were EBV positive and MI negative, one case was EBV negative but with high-level MI. In conclusion, high-level MIs were present regardless of the EBV status, and were found in a particular clinicopathological subset of gastric carcinoma patient. Inactivation of important growth regulatory genes observed in these carcinomas confirms the importance of MI in carcinogenesis.  (+info)

(8/8354) Characterization of a CACAG pentanucleotide repeat in Pasteurella haemolytica and its possible role in modulation of a novel type III restriction-modification system.

In a previous study, a recombinant plasmid that contains a CACAG pentanucleotide repeat was isolated from a Pasteurella haemolytica A1 library. Southern hybridization analysis using a (CACAG)5probe indicated the presence of two loci that contain the pentanucleotide repeats on the genome of P.haemolytica A1. Additional hybridization analyses against genomic DNA from related microorganisms indicated that the repeats are only present in P.haemolytica and Pasteurella trehalosi T3. The various serotypes of P.haemolytica werefound to have either one or two of the CACAG repeat-containing loci. Examination of the locus designated Rpt2 by PCR and sequence analysis indicated that the number of CACAG repeats could change upon serial subculture which most likely occurs as a result of DNA slipped-strand mispairing. A plasmid carrying the Rpt2 locus was isolated and characterized. Sequenceanalysis indicated that the CACAG repeats are contained within the 5'-end of a gene that showed homology to mod genes of type III restriction-modification systems. A second open reading frame downstream was identified which showed homology to res genes of type III restriction-modification systems. Both the modification and restriction proteins could be expressed and polypeptides of the expected sizes were detected by SDS-PAGE. Restriction activity could also be detected in crude cytoplasmic extracts of Escherichia coli strains carrying the mod and res genes on recombinant plasmids.  (+info)



simple sequenc


  • BACKGROUND: Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are DNA sequences that include tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Cantini C, Iezzoni AF, Lamboy WF, Boritzki M, Struss D (2001) DNA fingerprinting of tetraploid cherry germplasm using simple sequence repeats. (springer.com)

Polymerase Chain Re


  • 12 , 13 Microsatellite polymerase chain reaction for the EPOR and c-mpl genes was done as previously described. (bloodjournal.org)

Genome


  • The loss of DNA mismatch repair function due to germline and/or somatic inactivating mutations of MMR genes leads to the accumulation of mutations across the genome and mainly in the microsatellite repetitive sequences, creating a molecular phenotype known as microsatellite instability. (uptodate.com)

instability


  • Microsatellite instability (MSI) is the hallmark of MMR gene deficiency. (uptodate.com)

2002


  • Batzer MA, Deininger PL (2002) Alu repeats and human genomic diversity. (springer.com)
  • Aranzana MJ, Garcia-Mas J, Carbo J, Arús P (2002) Development and variability analysis of microsatellite markers in peach. (springer.com)

Genetic


  • In the present study we assess genetic diversity of Indian goats using 17 microsatellite markers. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Our study concludes that Indian goat populations can be classified into distinct genetic groups or breeds based on the microsatellites as well as mtDNA information. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

sequences


  • Microsatellites are short repetitive DNA sequences, typically mononucleotide or dinucleotide tandem repeats, that are susceptible to mutations during DNA replication. (uptodate.com)

tandem


  • Their abundance and the tandem repeated nature of SSRs make the loci highly mutable loci. (biomedsearch.com)

detection


markers


  • Linkage maps of the sweet cherry cultivar 'Emperor Francis' (EF) and the wild forest cherry 'New York 54' (NY) were constructed using primarily simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and gene-derived markers with known positions on the Prunus reference map. (springer.com)