Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases: A collective term for nutritional disorders resulting from poor absorption or nutritional imbalance, and metabolic disorders resulting from defects in biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) or breakdown (CATABOLISM) of endogenous substances.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Lipid Metabolism: Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Disorders affecting amino acid metabolism. The majority of these disorders are inherited and present in the neonatal period with metabolic disturbances (e.g., ACIDOSIS) and neurologic manifestations. They are present at birth, although they may not become symptomatic until later in life.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.Carbohydrate Metabolism, Inborn ErrorsSirtuin 1: A sirtuin family member found primarily in the CELL NUCLEUS. It is an NAD-dependent deacetylase with specificity towards HISTONES and a variety of proteins involved in gene regulation.Tyrosinemias: A group of disorders which have in common elevations of tyrosine in the blood and urine secondary to an enzyme deficiency. Type I tyrosinemia features episodic weakness, self-mutilation, hepatic necrosis, renal tubular injury, and seizures and is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetase. Type II tyrosinemia features INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY, painful corneal ulcers, and keratoses of the palms and plantar surfaces and is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme TYROSINE TRANSAMINASE. Type III tyrosinemia features INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp42-3)Xeroradiography: A photoelectric method of recording an X-ray image on a coated metal plate, using low-energy photon beams, long exposure time and dry chemical developers.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors: TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that are activated by ligands and heterodimerize with RETINOID X RECEPTORS and bind to peroxisome proliferator response elements in the promoter regions of target genes.Diet, High-Fat: Consumption of excessive DIETARY FATS.Adipocytes: Cells in the body that store FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. WHITE ADIPOCYTES are the predominant type and found mostly in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue. BROWN ADIPOCYTES are thermogenic cells that can be found in newborns of some species and hibernating mammals.Neonatal Screening: The identification of selected parameters in newborn infants by various tests, examinations, or other procedures. Screening may be performed by clinical or laboratory measures. A screening test is designed to sort out healthy neonates (INFANT, NEWBORN) from those not well, but the screening test is not intended as a diagnostic device, rather instead as epidemiologic.Lipid Metabolism Disorders: Pathological conditions resulting from abnormal anabolism or catabolism of lipids in the body.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Adipose Tissue, White: Fatty tissue composed of WHITE ADIPOCYTES and generally found directly under the skin (SUBCUTANEOUS FAT) and around the internal organs (ABDOMINAL FAT). It has less vascularization and less coloration than the BROWN FAT. White fat provides heat insulation, mechanical cushion, and source of energy.Chronobiology Disorders: Disruptions of the rhythmic cycle of bodily functions or activities.Eye Manifestations: Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Group III Histone Deacetylases: A subclass of histone deacetylases that are NAD-dependent. Several members of the SIRTUINS family are included in this subclass.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Phenylketonurias: A group of autosomal recessive disorders marked by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme PHENYLALANINE HYDROXYLASE or less frequently by reduced activity of DIHYDROPTERIDINE REDUCTASE (i.e., atypical phenylketonuria). Classical phenylketonuria is caused by a severe deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase and presents in infancy with developmental delay; SEIZURES; skin HYPOPIGMENTATION; ECZEMA; and demyelination in the central nervous system. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p952).Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.TriglyceridesAdipogenesis: The differentiation of pre-adipocytes into mature ADIPOCYTES.Blood Glucose: Glucose in blood.Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.Mice, Inbred C57BLPseudoxanthoma Elasticum: An inherited disorder of connective tissue with extensive degeneration and calcification of ELASTIC TISSUE primarily in the skin, eye, and vasculature. At least two forms exist, autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant. This disorder is caused by mutations of one of the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS. Patients are predisposed to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION and GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Dyslipidemias: Abnormalities in the serum levels of LIPIDS, including overproduction or deficiency. Abnormal serum lipid profiles may include high total CHOLESTEROL, high TRIGLYCERIDES, low HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL, and elevated LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL.Adiposity: The amount of fat or lipid deposit at a site or an organ in the body, an indicator of body fat status.PPAR gamma: A nuclear transcription factor. Heterodimerization with RETINOID X RECEPTOR ALPHA is important in regulation of GLUCOSE metabolism and CELL GROWTH PROCESSES. It is a target of THIAZOLIDINEDIONES for control of DIABETES MELLITUS.Brain Diseases, Metabolic: Acquired or inborn metabolic diseases that produce brain dysfunction or damage. These include primary (i.e., disorders intrinsic to the brain) and secondary (i.e., extracranial) metabolic conditions that adversely affect cerebral function.Thermogenesis: The generation of heat in order to maintain body temperature. The uncoupled oxidation of fatty acids contained within brown adipose tissue and SHIVERING are examples of thermogenesis in MAMMALS.3T3-L1 Cells: A continuous cell line that is a substrain of SWISS 3T3 CELLS developed though clonal isolation. The mouse fibroblast cells undergo an adipose-like conversion as they move to a confluent and contact-inhibited state.Heptanoates: Salts and esters of the 7-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acid heptanoic acid.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in the metabolism of LIPIDS resulting from inborn genetic MUTATIONS that are heritable.Sirtuins: A homologous family of regulatory enzymes that are structurally related to the protein silent mating type information regulator 2 (Sir2) found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sirtuins contain a central catalytic core region which binds NAD. Several of the sirtuins utilize NAD to deacetylate proteins such as HISTONES and are categorized as GROUP III HISTONE DEACETYLASES. Several other sirtuin members utilize NAD to transfer ADP-RIBOSE to proteins and are categorized as MONO ADP-RIBOSE TRANSFERASES, while a third group of sirtuins appears to have both deacetylase and ADP ribose transferase activities.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Mice, Obese: Mutant mice exhibiting a marked obesity coupled with overeating, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, marked insulin resistance, and infertility when in a homozygous state. They may be inbred or hybrid.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.PPAR delta: A nuclear transcription factor. It is activated by PROSTACYCLIN.Subcutaneous Fat: Fatty tissue under the SKIN through out the body.Stilbenes: Organic compounds that contain 1,2-diphenylethylene as a functional group.Lipogenesis: De novo fat synthesis in the body. This includes the synthetic processes of FATTY ACIDS and subsequent TRIGLYCERIDES in the LIVER and the ADIPOSE TISSUE. Lipogenesis is regulated by numerous factors, including nutritional, hormonal, and genetic elements.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Intra-Abdominal Fat: Fatty tissue inside the ABDOMINAL CAVITY, including visceral fat and retroperitoneal fat. It is the most metabolically active fat in the body and easily accessible for LIPOLYSIS. Increased visceral fat is associated with metabolic complications of OBESITY.Retinoid X Receptor alpha: A nuclear transcription factor. Heterodimerization with PPAR GAMMA is important in regulation of GLUCOSE metabolism and CELL GROWTH PROCESSES.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear: Intracellular receptors that can be found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. They bind to extracellular signaling molecules that migrate through or are transported across the CELL MEMBRANE. Many members of this class of receptors occur in the cytoplasm and are transported to the CELL NUCLEUS upon ligand-binding where they signal via DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Also included in this category are receptors found on INTRACELLULAR MEMBRANES that act via mechanisms similar to CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS.Ketosis: A condition characterized by an abnormally elevated concentration of KETONE BODIES in the blood (acetonemia) or urine (acetonuria). It is a sign of DIABETES COMPLICATION, starvation, alcoholism or a mitochondrial metabolic disturbance (e.g., MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE).Glucose Tolerance Test: A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).Caloric Restriction: Reduction in caloric intake without reduction in adequate nutrition. In experimental animals, caloric restriction has been shown to extend lifespan and enhance other physiological variables.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.AMP-Activated Protein Kinases: Intracellular signaling protein kinases that play a signaling role in the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. Their activity largely depends upon the concentration of cellular AMP which is increased under conditions of low energy or metabolic stress. AMP-activated protein kinases modify enzymes involved in LIPID METABOLISM, which in turn provide substrates needed to convert AMP into ATP.Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress: Various physiological or molecular disturbances that impair ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM function. It triggers many responses, including UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE, which may lead to APOPTOSIS; and AUTOPHAGY.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Lipolysis: The metabolic process of breaking down LIPIDS to release FREE FATTY ACIDS, the major oxidative fuel for the body. Lipolysis may involve dietary lipids in the DIGESTIVE TRACT, circulating lipids in the BLOOD, and stored lipids in the ADIPOSE TISSUE or the LIVER. A number of enzymes are involved in such lipid hydrolysis, such as LIPASE and LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE from various tissues.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Adipokines: Polypeptides produced by the ADIPOCYTES. They include LEPTIN; ADIPONECTIN; RESISTIN; and many cytokines of the immune system, such as TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA; INTERLEUKIN-6; and COMPLEMENT FACTOR D (also known as ADIPSIN). They have potent autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine functions.Taurochenodeoxycholic Acid: A bile salt formed in the liver by conjugation of chenodeoxycholate with taurine, usually as the sodium salt. It acts as detergent to solubilize fats in the small intestine and is itself absorbed. It is used as a cholagogue and choleretic.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Hep G2 Cells: A human liver tumor cell line used to study a variety of liver-specific metabolic functions.Adiponectin: A 30-kDa COMPLEMENT C1Q-related protein, the most abundant gene product secreted by FAT CELLS of the white ADIPOSE TISSUE. Adiponectin modulates several physiological processes, such as metabolism of GLUCOSE and FATTY ACIDS, and immune responses. Decreased plasma adiponectin levels are associated with INSULIN RESISTANCE; TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS; OBESITY; and ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Dietary Fats: Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.Sphingolipids: A class of membrane lipids that have a polar head and two nonpolar tails. They are composed of one molecule of the long-chain amino alcohol sphingosine (4-sphingenine) or one of its derivatives, one molecule of a long-chain acid, a polar head alcohol and sometimes phosphoric acid in diester linkage at the polar head group. (Lehninger et al, Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd ed)11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1: A low-affinity 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase found in a variety of tissues, most notably in LIVER; LUNG; ADIPOSE TISSUE; vascular tissue; OVARY; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The enzyme acts reversibly and can use either NAD or NADP as cofactors.Adipocytes, Brown: Fat cells with dark coloration due to the densely packed MITOCHONDRIA. They contain numerous small lipid droplets or vacuoles. Their stored lipids can be converted directly to energy as heat by the mitochondria.Insulin-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 50-80% of the islet cells. Beta cells secrete INSULIN.Leptin: A 16-kDa peptide hormone secreted from WHITE ADIPOCYTES. Leptin serves as a feedback signal from fat cells to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM in regulation of food intake, energy balance, and fat storage.Mitochondrial Diseases: Diseases caused by abnormal function of the MITOCHONDRIA. They may be caused by mutations, acquired or inherited, in mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes that code for mitochondrial components. They may also be the result of acquired mitochondria dysfunction due to adverse effects of drugs, infections, or other environmental causes.Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Lipids: A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Epigenesis, Genetic: A genetic process by which the adult organism is realized via mechanisms that lead to the restriction in the possible fates of cells, eventually leading to their differentiated state. Mechanisms involved cause heritable changes to cells without changes to DNA sequence such as DNA METHYLATION; HISTONE modification; DNA REPLICATION TIMING; NUCLEOSOME positioning; and heterochromatization which result in selective gene expression or repression.Obesity, Abdominal: A condition of having excess fat in the abdomen. Abdominal obesity is typically defined as waist circumferences of 40 inches or more in men and 35 inches or more in women. Abdominal obesity raises the risk of developing disorders, such as diabetes, hypertension and METABOLIC SYNDROME X.Molecular Targeted Therapy: Treatments with drugs which interact with or block synthesis of specific cellular components characteristic of the individual's disease in order to stop or interrupt the specific biochemical dysfunction involved in progression of the disease.Palmitates: Salts and esters of the 16-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acid--palmitic acid.Hypoglycemic Agents: Substances which lower blood glucose levels.Fasting: Abstaining from all food.Adipose Tissue, Brown: A thermogenic form of adipose tissue composed of BROWN ADIPOCYTES. It is found in newborns of many species including humans, and in hibernating mammals. Brown fat is richly vascularized, innervated, and densely packed with MITOCHONDRIA which can generate heat directly from the stored lipids.Mitochondrial Proteins: Proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome or proteins encoded by the nuclear genome that are imported to and resident in the MITOCHONDRIA.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Adenylate Kinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of AMP to ADP in the presence of ATP or inorganic triphosphate. EC Intolerance: A pathological state in which BLOOD GLUCOSE level is less than approximately 140 mg/100 ml of PLASMA at fasting, and above approximately 200 mg/100 ml plasma at 30-, 60-, or 90-minute during a GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST. This condition is seen frequently in DIABETES MELLITUS, but also occurs with other diseases and MALNUTRITION.Anti-Obesity Agents: Agents that increase energy expenditure and weight loss by neural and chemical regulation. Beta-adrenergic agents and serotoninergic drugs have been experimentally used in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) to treat obesity.Hepatocytes: The main structural component of the LIVER. They are specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that are organized into interconnected plates called lobules.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).gamma-Glutamyltransferase: An enzyme, sometimes called GGT, with a key role in the synthesis and degradation of GLUTATHIONE; (GSH, a tripeptide that protects cells from many toxins). It catalyzes the transfer of the gamma-glutamyl moiety to an acceptor amino acid.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Hypothalamus: Ventral part of the DIENCEPHALON extending from the region of the OPTIC CHIASM to the caudal border of the MAMMILLARY BODIES and forming the inferior and lateral walls of the THIRD VENTRICLE.Orphan Nuclear Receptors: A broad category of receptor-like proteins that may play a role in transcriptional-regulation in the CELL NUCLEUS. Many of these proteins are similar in structure to known NUCLEAR RECEPTORS but appear to lack a functional ligand-binding domain, while in other cases the specific ligands have yet to be identified.Metabolome: The dynamic collection of metabolites which represent a cell's or organism's net metabolic response to current conditions.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.PPAR alpha: A nuclear transcription factor. Heterodimerization with RETINOID X RECEPTOR GAMMA is important to metabolism of LIPIDS. It is the target of FIBRATES to control HYPERLIPIDEMIAS.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Oxidation-Reduction: A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: A sterol regulatory element binding protein that regulates expression of GENES involved in FATTY ACIDS metabolism and LIPOGENESIS. Two major isoforms of the protein exist due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Hyperglycemia: Abnormally high BLOOD GLUCOSE level.Hyperlipidemias: Conditions with excess LIPIDS in the blood.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Malnutrition: An imbalanced nutritional status resulted from insufficient intake of nutrients to meet normal physiological requirement.Mitochondria, Muscle: Mitochondria of skeletal and smooth muscle. It does not include myocardial mitochondria for which MITOCHONDRIA, HEART is available.Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Oxidative Stress: A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.

*  3 Ways to Diagnose Metabolic Disease in Older Dogs - wikiHow
Like people, dogs develop a variety of metabolic disorders as they age. Unfortunately, since dogs are unable to communicate ... How to Diagnose Metabolic Disease in Older Dogs. ... diseases/metabolic_disorders_of_dogs/introduction_to_metabolic_ ... Consider kidney disease. Kidney disease is one of the more common metabolic disorders that afflict older dogs. About one in ten ... Some less common diseases include: *Addison's disease. Dogs with Addison's disease do not have enough cortisol or steroid in ...
*  Dental treatment in patients with metabolic diseases, especially diabetes mellitus]. - Semantic Scholar
Dental treatment in patients with metabolic diseases, especially diabetes mellitus].' by Taisuke Yoshimi et al. ... Dental treatment in patients with metabolic diseases, especially diabetes mellitus].. *. Taisuke Yoshimi. , Kazumichi Motegi ... article{Yoshimi1981DentalTI, title={[Dental treatment in patients with metabolic diseases, especially diabetes mellitus].}, ...
*  Metabolic Diseases, Biological Mechanisms of - CHEMICAL BIOLOGY
... - reflects the multidimensional character of chemical biology, ... Metabolic syndrome versus additive cardiometabolic risk factors. Cardiometabolic diseases may present as separate diseases but ... Metabolic syndrome with and without C-reactive protein as a predictor of coronary heart disease and diabetes in the West of ... peripheral artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease, and heart failure. On a global perspective, 30% ...
*  DMOZ - Health: Conditions and Diseases: Nutritional and Metabolic Disorders: Inherited
Many disorders of metabolism have a genetic component, or are presumed to do so, with research being directed at finding the factors responsible.
*  Dr. Salman Ashfaq, MD - Gainesville, GA - Cardiology & Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases |
Visit Healthgrades for information on Dr. Salman Ashfaq, MD Find Phone & Address information, medical practice history, affiliated hospitals and more.
*  Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases | Novartis
... atherosclerosis and vascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias and associated disorders. ... Cardiovascular (CV) and metabolic diseases are now the world's top killers, even in developing nations, where they have ... But the fight against CV and metabolic diseases would be incomplete without a focus on the main driving force behind these ... Ultimately, we hope to help stem the rising tide of CV and metabolic diseases around the world. ...
*  Estrogen Sulfotransferase: Intracrinology Meets Metabolic Diseases | Diabetes
Minireview: Estrogenic protection of beta-cell failure in metabolic diseases. Endocrinology 2010;151:859-864pmid:19966178. ... Estrogen Sulfotransferase: Intracrinology Meets Metabolic Diseases Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from ... adds a novel dimension of estrogen intracrinology to our knowledge of metabolic diseases. It is now emerging that estrogen ... Ambient Air Pollution and Type 2 Diabetes: Do the Metabolic Effects of Air Pollution Start Early in Life? ...
*  Understanding the outcomes - Treatments for rare metabolic diseases - CIHR
Understanding the outcomes - Treatments for rare metabolic diseases. Photo: Dr. Beth Potter is an Associate Professor in the ... The Canadian Inherited Metabolic Diseases Research Network (CIMDRN) has developed a national research program to investigate ... including variation in the symptoms and severity of the disease, and the small number of patients with any one rare disease. ... Over the past several decades, health care and outcomes for children who are born with rare genetic diseases that affect the ...
*  JCI - Hypothalamic inflammation in obesity and metabolic disease
Hypothalamic inflammation in obesity and metabolic disease. Alexander Jais1,2,3 and Jens C. Brüning1,2,3,4 1Department of ... Hypothalamic inflammation in obesity and metabolic disease Alexander Jais et al. * Immunologic impact of the intestine in ... Inflammatory links between obesity and metabolic disease. J Clin Invest. 2011;121(6):2111-2117.. View this article via: JCI ... Perinatal programming of metabolic diseases: role of insulin in the development of hypothalamic neurocircuits. Endocrinol Metab ...
*  Inherited Metabolic Diseases -- Overview | Medical City Dallas
Learn more about Inherited Metabolic Diseases -- Overview at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... Inherited metabolic diseases are a group of disorders that result in missing or defective enzymes. The enzyme problems can lead ... Inherited Metabolic Disorders. National Information Center for Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) website. Available at: http://www. ... These diseases are caused by a problem with the genes that determine how specific enzymes are made. The genes are passed on ...
*  Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, Division of
... Date [inclusive]. 1972-1987. Extent. 2.8 Cubic feet. Abstract. The ... Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, Division of Collection Number 161. Summary Information Repository. VUMC ... Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, Division of . Eskind Biomedical Library Special Collections, Vanderbilt ... and Metabolic diseases consist of fellow files going back to the 1960s. Preferred Citation. ...
*  JCI - Immunologic impact of the intestine in metabolic disease
Immunologic impact of the intestine in metabolic disease. Daniel A. Winer,1,2,3,4 Shawn Winer,3,5 Helen J. Dranse,6,7 and Tony ...
*  JCI - Immunologic impact of the intestine in metabolic disease
Immunologic impact of the intestine in metabolic disease. Daniel A. Winer,1,2,3,4 Shawn Winer,3,5 Helen J. Dranse,6,7 and Tony ... Hypothalamic inflammation in obesity and metabolic disease Alexander Jais et al. * Immunologic impact of the intestine in ... The gut microbiota regulates intestinal CD4 T cells expressing RORγt and controls metabolic disease. Cell Metab. 2015;22(1):100 ... Chassaing B, Aitken JD, Gewirtz AT, Vijay-Kumar M. Gut microbiota drives metabolic disease in immunologically altered mice. Adv ...
*  Metabolic diseases - Other forms of dementia - Dementia - Alzheimer Europe
Metabolic diseases. Other forms of dementia. Metabolic diseases are a group of often treatable diseases which may lead to ... June 2010: "Alzheimer's disease and dementia as a national priority: contrasting approaches by France and the UK" ... 2016: Ethical issues linked to the changing definitions/use of terms related to Alzheimer's disease *Foreword ... June 2012: 'Alzheimer's disease in the new European public health and research programmes' ...
*  Dominant versus recessive: Molecular mechanisms in metabolic disease | SpringerLink
The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease, 8th edn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 5241-5285.Google Scholar ... In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D (eds) The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease. New York: McGraw-Hill ... In: Fernandes J, Saudubray JM, van den Berghe G, Walter JH (eds) Inborn Metabolic Diseases. Heidelberg: Springer 451-464.Google ... Most metabolic disorders represent a spectrum of phenotypes from normal via attenuated to severe (and sometimes prenatally ...
*  Inflammation of Fat Tissues may Help Prevent Metabolic Disease
Chronic inflammation of tissues is thought to cause obesity and metabolic disease, but a new research has found how 'healthy' ... "Syndrome X" or "Metabolic syndrome" is a group of conditions that puts a person at risk for diabetes and heart disease. With ... Unexpectedly, the team found that the lean mice showed symptoms of metabolic disease, such as glucose intolerance. This result ... "What our research shows is that we need some localized inflammation to remodel our fat tissue and to prevent metabolic diseases ...
*  Contact the Metabolic Disease Program | Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Contact the Metabolic Disease Program. Do you have a question about Biochemical Genetics-Metabolic Disease or about the ...
*  Metabolic Diseases - Metabolic Disease Summary | CureHunter Mobile
Metabolic Diseases (Metabolic Disease) Summary Description: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. ... Also Known As: Metabolic Disease; Disease, Metabolic; Thesaurismosis; Diseases, Metabolic; Thesaurismoses. Networked: 3200 ... relevant articles (99 outcomes, 256 trials/studies) for this Disease. Key Drugs and Agents for Metabolic Diseases. Efficacy ... Key Therapies for Metabolic Diseases. Efficacy Chart ,, * Liver Transplantation : 4 outcomes 3 studies in 71 results ...
*  Dr. Mark Fisch, MD - Carmel, IN - Cardiology & Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases |
Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). includes other areas of care:. - Coronary Artery Calcification. ...
*  Anne Williams, LAC - New York, NY - Acupuncture & Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases |
Her primary interests include women's health conditions and heart disease. When treating her patients, Dr. Williams aims to get ... clinical research on detoxification cardiovascular disease and herbal medicine Fellowship: Two-year fellowship at Inner Source ...
*  IJERPH | Free Full-Text | Bisphenol A and Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Occupational Medicine
We review the epidemiological literature in the relation between BPA exposure and the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, ... evidences in this way showed a potential role in etiology of metabolic disease, both for children and for adults. ... Nevertheless, occupational medicine focus on reproductive effects and not metabolic ones. ... The prevalence of metabolic diseases has markedly increased worldwide during the last few decades. Lifestyle factors (physical ...
*  Metabolic Disease Risk Increases With Just a Little Junk Food
"Syndrome X" or "Metabolic syndrome" is a group of conditions that puts a person at risk for diabetes and heart disease. With ... A single junk food at snack or dinner may trigger signs of metabolic disease, says a new study. Researcher Suzan Wopereis said ... Just one high calorie food is enough to make people with metabolic disease worse and in others, it triggered the onset of ... resembling the very subtle start of negative health effects similar to that affecting those with metabolic disease.. Researcher ...
*  Dr. Luis Gonzalez, MD - West New York, NJ - Cardiovascular & Metabolic Diseases |
Luis Gonzalez, MD is a cardiovascular & metabolic diseases doctor who practices in West New York, NJ. He is 61 years old and ... Mitral Valve Disease. Mitral Valve Disease. includes other areas of care:. - Congenital Mitral Stenosis. ...
*  Hydroxyapatite Crystal-Induced
Articular disease. Intra-articular BCP crystal deposits may be found in synovial joint fluid, synovium, and articular cartilage ... Frequent occurrence of bilateral and multifocal deposits suggests a systemic predisposition, although no local, metabolic cause ... How should patients with basic calcium phosphate crystal/hydroxyapatite deposition disease be managed? * Calcific periarthritis ... Does this patient have basic calcium phosphate crystal/hydroxyapatite deposition disease? * Calcific periarthritis ...
*  Norges idrettshøgskole
Background: Some ethnic minority populations have a higher risk of non-communicable diseases than the majority European ... Background: High-intensity exercise induces many metabolic responses. In is unknown whether the response in the peripheral ...

Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease: The Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering inherited metabolic disorders. It was established in 1978 and is the official journal of the Society for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism.Classification of obesity: Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it has an adverse effect on health.WHO 2000 p.Lipotoxicity: Lipotoxicity is a metabolic syndrome that results from the accumulation of lipid intermediates in non-adipose tissue, leading to cellular dysfunction and death. The tissues normally affected include the kidneys, liver, heart and skeletal muscle.Index of energy articles: This is an index of energy articles.Lysinuric protein intoleranceNational Cholesterol Education Program: The National Cholesterol Education Program is a program managed by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health. Its goal is to reduce increased cardiovascular disease rates due to hypercholesterolemia (elevated cholesterol levels) in the United States of America.Outline of diabetes: The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to diabetes:Adipose tissue macrophages: Adipose tissue macrophages (abbr. ATMs) comprise tissue resident macrophages present in adipose tissue.Protein deacetylase: Protein deacetylase; any enzyme that removes acetyl groups from lysine amino acids in proteins.Tyrosinemia type IIHypolipoproteinemiaInflammation: Inflammation (Latin, [is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogen]s, damaged cells, or irritants.Liver sinusoid: A liver sinusoid is a type of sinusoidal blood vessel (with fenestrated, discontinuous endothelium) that serves as a location for the oxygen-rich blood from the hepatic artery and the nutrient-rich blood from the portal vein.SIU SOM Histology GIFatty liverInsulin signal transduction pathway and regulation of blood glucose: The insulin transduction pathway is an important biochemical pathway beginning at the cellular level affecting homeostasis. This pathway is also influenced by fed versus fasting states, stress levels, and a variety of other hormones.Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Hyperphenylalaninemia: (also includes non-classic PKU)RDCRN Contact Registry: The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) Contact Registry is an international patient contact registry sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. This registry collects basic data (i.Glucose transporterTriglycerideAdipogenesis: Adipogenesis is the process of cell differentiation by which preadipocytes become adipocytes. Adipogenesis has been one of the most intensively studied models of cellular differentiation.Blood glucose monitoring: Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in the care of diabetes mellitus, a blood glucose test is performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'.HeartScore: HeartScore is a cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management tool developed by the European Society of Cardiology, aimed at supporting clinicians in optimising individual cardiovascular risk reduction.Stearyl heptanoateNeutral lipid storage disease: Neutral lipid storage disease (also known as Chanarin–Dorfman syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by accumulation of triglycerides in the cytoplasm of leukocytes, muscle, liver, fibroblasts, and other tissues.Freedberg, et al.PPAR agonist: 450px|thumb|[[Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor|PPAR-alpha and-gamma pathways]]Vitisin B (stilbenoid): Vitisin B}}Matrix model: == Mathematics and physics ==Myokine: A myokine is one of several hundred cytokines or other small proteins (~5–20 kDa) and proteoglycan peptides that are produced and released by muscle cells (myocytes) in response to muscular contractions.Bente Klarlund Pedersen , Thorbjörn C.Orphan receptor: An orphan receptor is an apparent receptor that has a similar structure to other identified receptors but whose endogenous ligand has not yet been identified. If a ligand for an orphan receptor is later discovered, the receptor is referred to as an "adopted orphan".KetosisCALERIE: CALERIE (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) is a trial currently underway in the U.S.Gross pathology: Gross pathology refers to macroscopic manifestations of disease in organs, tissues, and body cavities. The term is commonly used by anatomical pathologists to refer to diagnostically useful findings made during the gross examination portion of surgical specimen processing or an autopsy.Mayo Clinic Diet: The Mayo Clinic Diet is a diet created by Mayo Clinic. Prior to this, use of that term was generally connected to fad diets which had no association with Mayo Clinic.Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Lipolysis: Lipolysis is the breakdown of lipids and involves hydrolysis of triglycerides into glycerol and free fatty acids. The following hormones induce lipolysis: epinephrine, norepinephrine, ghrelin, growth hormone, testosterone, and cortisol.Flux (metabolism): Flux, or metabolic flux is the rate of turnover of molecules through a metabolic pathway. Flux is regulated by the enzymes involved in a pathway.Adipokine: The adipokines, or adipocytokines (Greek adipo-, fat; cytos-, cell; and -kinos, movement) are cytokines (cell signaling proteins) secreted by adipose tissue. The first adipokine to be discovered was leptin in 1994.Taurochenodeoxycholic acidHeptadecanoic acidQRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Mitochondrion: The mitochondrion (plural mitochondria) is a double membrane-bound organelle found in most eukaryotic cells. The word mitochondrion comes from the Greek , , i.Adiponectin: Adiponectin (also referred to as GBP-28, apM1, AdipoQ and Acrp30) is a protein which in humans is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene. It is involved in regulating glucose levels as well as fatty acid breakdown.Animal fatSphingolipid: Sphingolipids, or glycosylceramides, are a class of lipids containing a backbone of sphingoid bases, a set of aliphatic amino alcohols that includes sphingosine. They were discovered in brain extracts in the 1870s and were named for the mythological Sphinx because of their enigmatic nature.LeptinMitochondrial diseaseLipid droplet: Lipid droplets, also referred to as lipid bodies, oil bodies or adiposomes, are lipid-rich cellular organelles that regulate the storage and hydrolysis of neutral lipids and are found largely in the adipose tissue.Mobilization and cellular uptake of stored fats and triacylglycerol (with Animation) They also serve as a reservoir for cholesterol and acyl-glycerols for membrane formation and maintenance.Epigenetic code: The epigenetic code is hypothesised to be a defining code in every eukaryotic cell consisting of the specific epigenetic modification in each cell. It consists of histone modifications defined by the histone code and additional epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation.Abdominal obesityAnti-diabetic medication: Drugs used in diabetes treat diabetes mellitus by lowering glucose levels in the blood. With the exceptions of insulin, exenatide, liraglutide and pramlintide, all are administered orally and are thus also called oral hypoglycemic agents or oral antihyperglycemic agents.

(1/1017) Viral gene delivery selectively restores feeding and prevents lethality of dopamine-deficient mice.

Dopamine-deficient mice (DA-/- ), lacking tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in dopaminergic neurons, become hypoactive and aphagic and die by 4 weeks of age. They are rescued by daily treatment with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); each dose restores dopamine (DA) and feeding for less than 24 hr. Recombinant adeno-associated viruses expressing human TH or GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) were injected into the striatum of DA-/- mice. Bilateral coinjection of both viruses restored feeding behavior for several months. However, locomotor activity and coordination were partially improved. A virus expressing only TH was less effective, and one expressing GTPCH1 alone was ineffective. TH immunoreactivity and DA were detected in the ventral striatum and adjacent posterior regions of rescued mice, suggesting that these regions mediate a critical DA-dependent aspect of feeding behavior.  (+info)

(2/1017) Human molybdopterin synthase gene: genomic structure and mutations in molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B.

Biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) can be divided into (1) the formation of a precursor and (2) the latter's subsequent conversion, by molybdopterin synthase, into the organic moiety of MoCo. These two steps are reflected by the complementation groups A and B and the two formally distinguished types of MoCo deficiency that have an identical phenotype. Both types of MoCo deficiency result in a pleiotropic loss of all molybdoenzyme activities and cause severe neurological damage. MOCS1 is defective in patients with group A deficiency and has been shown to encode two enzymes for early synthesis via a bicistronic transcript with two consecutive open reading frames (ORFs). MOCS2 encodes the small and large subunits of molybdopterin synthase via a single transcript with two overlapping reading frames. This gene was mapped to 5q and comprises seven exons. The coding sequence and all splice site-junction sequences were screened for mutations, in MoCo-deficient patients in whom a previous search for MOCS1 mutations had been negative. In seven of the eight patients whom we investigated, we identified MOCS2 mutations that, by their nature, are most likely responsible for the deficiency. Three different frameshift mutations were observed, with one of them found on 7 of 14 identified alleles. Furthermore, a start-codon mutation and a missense mutation of a highly conserved amino acid residue were found. The locations of the mutations confirm the functional role of both ORFs. One of the patients with identified MOCS2 mutations had been classified as type B, in complementation studies. These findings support the hypothetical mechanism, for both forms of MoCo deficiency, that formerly had been established by cell-culture experiments.  (+info)

(3/1017) Does a high peritoneal transport rate reflect a state of chronic inflammation?

OBJECTIVE: It has recently been reported that a high peritoneal transport rate was associated with increased mortality in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients. One possible explanation is that a high peritoneal transport rate might be caused by a state of chronic inflammation, which also per se might result in increased mortality. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether high peritoneal transport rate patients are in a state of chronic inflammation. METHODS: The study included 39 clinically stable peritoneal dialysis patients (free of peritonitis) who had been on PD for more than 3 months (16.8+/-11.8 months). Seven patients were treated with continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) and the others were on CAPD. A 4-hour standard peritoneal equilibration test (PET) using 2.27% glucose solution was performed in each patient. Dialysate samples at 4 hours and blood samples at 2 hours were measured for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor(alpha)(TNFalpha), C-reactive protein (CRP), and hyaluronan as markers of inflammation. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between dialysate/plasma (DIP) creatinine (0.82+/-0.15, range 0.51 - 1.15) and blood concentrations of IL-1beta (11.2 ng/L, range <5 - 65.9 ng/L),TNFalpha (12.1 ng/L, range <5 - 85.4 ng/L), CRP (<10 mg/L, range <10 - 76 mg/L), nor with the blood hyaluronan concentration (165 microg/L, range 55 - 955 microg/L). The dialysate concentrations of IL-1beta and TNFalpha were below the detectable level in most of the samples. Although dialysate hyaluronan concentration (334 microg/L, range 89 - 1100 microg/L) was correlated with D/P creatinine (r= 0.36, p< 0.05), there was no correlation between the total amount of hyaluronan in the effluent and D/P creatinine. However, a significant correlation was found between serum hyaluronan concentration and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (r = -0.49, p< 0.005); GFR also tended to be correlated with serum TNFalpha (r = -0.31, p = 0.058) but not with serum IL-1beta and serum CRP. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a high peritoneal transport rate is not necessarily related to a state of chronic inflammation in CAPD patients. The high mortality rate observed in high transporters may relate to other issues, such as fluid balance or abnormal nutrition and metabolism, rather than to chronic inflammation.  (+info)

(4/1017) Acute symptomatic seizures - incidence and etiological spectrum: a hospital-based study from South India.

We analysed the incidence and etiological spectrum of acute symptomatic seizures in 2531 patients with seizure disorder, both in-patients and out-patients, seen in a university hospital in South India. Seizure(s) occurred in close temporal association with an acute systemic, metabolic, or toxic insult or in association with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult in 22.5% of patients. Of the 572 patients, 8% could be grouped under the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) category 4.1 and 92% under category 1.2. The seizure type was generalized in all the patients included in category 4.1 and 78% of patients grouped in category 2.1 had simple or complex partial seizure(s) with or without secondary generalization. Sixteen (3%) patients developed status epilepticus during the acute phase of illness and 7% of patients had only single seizure. Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) and single CT enhancing lesions (SCTEL) together accounted for 77% of the provoking factors in patients grouped under category 2.1. These two etiological factors together accounted for 95% of etiologies in patients aged under 16 years. SCTEL and neurocysticercosis together accounted for 67% of the provoking factors. In 14% of patients cerebrovascular diseases were the etiological factors and 60% of the patients were aged over 40 years. In patients with cerebrovascular diseases, aged under 40 years, cortical sinovenous thrombosis accounted for 37%. SCTEL was the provoking factor in 61% of patients with isolated seizure. Infections of CNS and SCTEL together accounted for 62.5% of etiological factors for status epilepticus. This study illustrates that the etiological spectrum of acute symptomatic seizures in this part of the world is different from that described from developed countries and CNS infections account for a significant number of cases.  (+info)

(5/1017) Hypermetabolism in clinically stable patients with liver cirrhosis.

BACKGROUND: Hypermetabolism has a negative effect on prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis. Its exact prevalence and associations with clinical data, the nutritional state, and beta-adrenergic activity are unclear. OBJECTIVE: We investigated resting energy expenditure (REE) in 473 patients with biopsy-proven liver cirrhosis. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study with a controlled intervention (beta-blockade) in a subgroup of patients. RESULTS: Mean REE was 7.12 +/- 1.34 MJ/d and correlated closely with predicted values (r = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Hypermetabolism was seen in 160 patients with cirrhosis (33.8% of the study population). REE was > 30% above the predicted value in 41% of the hypermetabolic patients with cirrhosis. Hypermetabolism had no association with clinical or biochemical data on liver function. REE correlated with total body potassium content (TBP; r = 0.49, P < 0.0001). Hypermetabolic patients had lower than normal body weight and TBP (P < 0.05). About 47% of the variance in REE could be explained by body composition whereas clinical state could maximally explain 3%. Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were elevated in hypermetabolic cirrhotic patients (by 56% and 41%, respectively; P < 0.001 and 0.01). Differences in REE from predicted values were positively correlated with epinephrine concentration (r = 0.462, P < 0.001). Propranolol infusion resulted in a decrease in energy expenditure (by 5 +/- 3%; P < 0.05), heart rate (by 13 +/- 4%; P < 0.01), and plasma lactate concentrations (by 32 +/- 12%; P < 0.01); these effects were more pronounced in hypermetabolic patients (by 50%, 33%, and 68%, respectively; each P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Hypermetabolism has no association with clinical data and thus is an extrahepatic manifestation of liver disease. Increased beta-adrenergic activity may explain approximately 25% of hypermetabolism.  (+info)

(6/1017) Effect on cytokine release and graft-versus-host disease of different anti-T cell antibodies during conditioning for unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Three different types of anti-T cell antibody were used in patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with an HLA-A, -B and -DR compatible unrelated donor: ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F) (n = 26), Thymoglobuline (TMG) (n = 61) and OKT-3 (n = 45). The groups were comparable regarding diagnosis, stage, age, conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis, Adverse events were less frequent after ATG-F treatment. Levels of IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF were increased after OKT-3 infusion. In multivariate analysis OKT-3 treatment (P = 0.01), G-CSF treatment (P = 0.02) and a cell dose >/=2.7 x 108/kg (P = 0.03) gave a faster engraftment. Acute GVHD grades II-IV occurred in 25% of the ATG-F patients, 12% of the TMG-patients and 43% (P < 0.001 vs TMG) of the OKT-3 patients. OKT-3 was associated with acute GVHD in multivariate analysis. TRM was 26% using TMG as compared to 43% in the OKT-3 group (P = 0.03). Patient survival at 4 years was 63%, 50% and 45% in the ATG-F, TMG and OKT-3-treated patients, respectively (NS). Relapses were 8%, 49% and 34%, respectively (ATG-F vs TMG, P = 0.03). Relapse-free survivals were 61%, 40% and 37% (NS). Among CML patients the probability of relapse was 61% in TMG-treated patients, while no patients relapsed in the other two groups. To conclude, the type of anti-T cell antibody affects GVHD and relapse after HSCT using unrelated donors.  (+info)

(7/1017) Itraconazole oral solution as antifungal prophylaxis in children undergoing stem cell transplantation or intensive chemotherapy for haematological disorders.

This was an open study of oral antifungal prophylaxis in 103 neutropenic children aged 0-14 (median 5) years. Most (90%) were undergoing transplantation for haematological conditions (77% allogeneic BMT, 7% autologous BMT, 6% PBSC transplants and 10% chemotherapy alone). They received 5.0 mg/kg itraconazole/day (in 10 mg/ml cyclodextrin solution). Where possible, prophylaxis was started at least 7 days before the onset of neutropenia and continued until neutrophil recovery. Of the 103 who entered the study, 47 completed the course of prophylaxis, 27 withdrew because of poor compliance, 19 because of adverse events and 10 for other reasons. Two patients died during the study and another five died within the subsequent 30 days. No proven systemic fungal infections occurred, but 26 patients received i.v. amphotericin for antibiotic-unresponsive pyrexia. One patient received amphotericin for mycologically confirmed oesophageal candidosis. Three patients developed suspected oral candidosis but none was mycologically proven and no treatment was given. Serious adverse events (other than death) occurred in 21 patients, including convulsions (7), suspected drug interactions (6), abdominal pain (4) and constipation (4). The most common adverse events considered definitely or possibly related to itraconazole were vomiting (12), abnormal liver function (5) and abdominal pain (3). Tolerability of study medication at end-point was rated as good (55%), moderate (11%), poor (17%) or unacceptable (17%). Some patients had poor oral intakes due to mucositis. No unexpected problems of safety or tolerability were encountered. We conclude that itraconazole oral solution may be used as antifungal prophylaxis for neutropenic children.  (+info)

(8/1017) Adverse metabolic disorders during highly active antiretroviral treatments (HAART) of HIV disease.

Protease inhibitor treatment has dramatically improved rates of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. However, it has recently been shown that this medication is associated with long-term side effects characterized by metabolic, clinical and biological alterations. These modifications have been described in patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), including nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) and generally (but not always) protease inhibitors (PI). Clinical alterations are characterised by a body fat redistribution syndrome or lipodystrophy, with peripheral lipoatrophy and/or central fat accumulation. They are often associated with biological alterations, i.e. insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia, which can also be observed alone. The pathophysiology of these alterations is presently unknown. The deleterious effect of PI on adipose tissue could be direct or indirect, and is probably modulated by genetic or environmental factors. NRTI could also be involved because of their mitochondrial toxicity. The purpose of the treatment is to control metabolic disturbances in order to prevent immediate complications such as acute pancreatitis and limit possible cardiovascular and diabetic complications at longer term. Studies are in progress to evaluate the possibility of therapeutic alternatives to PI when major metabolic disturbances are present.  (+info)

  • molecular
  • 3 Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD) and Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. (
  • Today the division conducts Research Programs that cover a broad range of endocrinologic and metabolic topics and utilize techniques of molecular and cellular biology, physiologic studies in humans, and clinical trials of new therapeutics. (
  • In: Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D (eds) The Metabolic and Molecular Bases of Inherited Disease . (
  • consist
  • Other causes of myoglobinuria include: McArdle's disease Phosphofructokinase deficiency Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency Malignant hyperthermia Polymyositis Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency Thermal or electrical burn Myoglobinuria pathophysiology consist of a series of metabolic actions in which damage to muscle cells affect calcium mechanisms, thereby increasing free ionized calcium (cytoplasm). (
  • adults
  • evidences in this way showed a potential role in etiology of metabolic disease, both for children and for adults. (
  • We review the epidemiological literature in the relation between BPA exposure and the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, with a focus on occupational exposure. (
  • osteoporosis osteomalacia (adults) & rickets (children) osteitis fibrosa cystica Paget's disease of bone pyramiding (turtles) Osteoporosis is due to causal factors like atrophy of disuse and gonadal deficiency. (
  • tissues
  • Thus, it is reasonable to assume that although men have lower circulating estrogen concentrations than premenopausal women, aromatization of circulating androgen to estrogen in target metabolic tissues equilibrates cellular estrogen concentrations, and ER activation is critical in both sexes in promoting fuel homeostasis ( 5 ). (
  • Treatments
  • The Canadian Inherited Metabolic Diseases Research Network (CIMDRN) has developed a national research program to investigate patient treatments and outcomes to help create more effective, evidence-informed health care for children with IEM. (
  • In February 2012, AstraZeneca and Amgen announced a collaboration on treatments for inflammatory diseases. (
  • outcomes
  • CIMDRN is a large Canadian network of investigators dedicated to improving care and outcomes for children and families affected by rare metabolic diseases. (
  • treatment
  • With recent successes and a pipeline of investigational drugs, we see a renaissance on the horizon for the treatment of CV and metabolic diseases. (
  • Led by Drs. Beth Potter and Pranesh Chakraborty, the network is focusing on understanding the implications of the shift in treatment goals for IEM from 'urgent care' to 'opportunity for improvement', a better understanding of variation in disease and the need for personalized care, and, critical evaluation and comparison of existing and new therapies. (
  • Although there is currently no treatment for the genetic condition, replacement of phosphate often corrects or improves the metabolic bone disorder. (
  • Identification and treatment of metabolic bone disease Metabolic Bone Disease Squirrel Wildlife Rehabilitators-Metabolic Bone Disease Metabolic Bone Disease in reptiles - An in depth review. (
  • Treatment is depended on the type of glycogen storage disease. (
  • At this point in time, there has been no cure or effective treatment of Tay-Sachs disease. (
  • practices
  • Dr. Luis Gonzalez, MD is a cardiovascular & metabolic diseases doctor who practices in West New York, NJ. (
  • The delivery of health services is provided at five different levels in the public sector: Level I: Local Health Posts (166 in total) that provide preventive and simple curative care for common diseases and attempt to promote proper health practices. (
  • mutation
  • Somatic mosaicism for an OTC gene mutation is given as an example of an apparently heterozygous mutation pattern in a boy with an X-linked disease. (
  • Approach
  • Researcher Suzan Wopereis said that acute effects of diet were mostly small, but might have large consequences in the long run, adding that their novel approach allowed detection of small but relevant effects, thereby contributing to the urgently needed switch from disease-care to health-care, aiming for a life-long optimal health and disease prevention. (
  • mutations
  • whereas, mutations in the gene encoding the alpha subunit (HEXA, this gene) decrease the hydrolysis of GM2 gangliosides, which is the main cause of Tay-Sachs disease. (
  • Over 100 different mutations have been discovered just in infantile cases of Tay-Sachs disease alone. (
  • common
  • The following research hubs are currently active: Epigenetics and Common Human Diseases The Tumor and its Microenvironment Mitochondria Developmental Processes, Malformations and Diseases Cardiovascular Research The Herbert and Dorothy Nadolny Cardio-Metabolic Diseases Research Hub Microbe Brain Storming - MIBS Muscle Degeneration Diseases Virus-host Interactions and Viral Pathogenesis. (
  • human
  • Its mission has traditionally been to pursue new knowledge applicable to the promotion of human health, the prevention of human disease, and the improvement of the quality of human life, to apply that knowledge to the compassionate care of the sick, and to teach others to pursue and apply knowledge in similar fashion. (
  • group
  • If your vet suspects a metabolic disorder, they may refer you to a veterinary specialist or a specialty group. (
  • rare
  • By bringing information together and looking at it in new ways, we are filling in important evidence gaps and laying the foundation for a learning health system that will benefit thousands of Canadians affected by rare diseases. (
  • By extension, CIMDRN's research methods will benefit the broader rare disease research community, both in Canada and beyond, where generating robust evidence using traditional methods is particularly challenging. (
  • brain
  • People with Tay-Sachs disease are unable to remove the GalNAc residue from the GM2 ganglioside, and as a result, they end up storing 100 to 1000 times more GM2 gangliosides in the brain than the normal person. (
  • study
  • Overall, according to a study in British Columbia, approximately 2.3 children per 100,000 births (1 in 43,000) have some form of glycogen storage disease. (
  • health
  • A dog's behavior can also tell you a lot about their general health and if they are suffering from a metabolic disorder. (
  • This is an overview about the chapter IV (also called chapter E) of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10). (
  • medical
  • Research Hubs gather together scientists and clinicians focusing on a specific subject or disease, integrating various scientific and medical disciplines. (