Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.United StatesTerminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Louping Ill: An acute tick-borne arbovirus infection causing meningoencephalomyelitis of sheep.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Single Person: The unmarried man or woman.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.CaliforniaPersonhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Homebound Persons: Those unable to leave home without exceptional effort and support; patients (in this condition) who are provided with or are eligible for home health services, including medical treatment and personal care. Persons are considered homebound even if they may be infrequently and briefly absent from home if these absences do not indicate an ability to receive health care in a professional's office or health care facility. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p309)GermanyFrail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.WisconsinPredictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.ConnecticutLength of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Right to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)

*  GovHK: Caring for Ex-mentally Ill People

Feature article by the Hong Kong Government on the information and services it provides for mentally-ill and ex-mentally ill ... Social rehabilitation services for ex-mentally ill persons Below are some other rehabilitation services provided by non- ... Here you can learn about the information and services the Government provides for mentally-ill and ex-mentally ill people as ... governmental organisations for the mentally-ill and ex-mentally ill.. Rehabilitation services from Baptist Oi Kwan Social ...
https://gov.hk/en/residents/health/rehab/caringexmentallyill.htm

*  Medical Information Search (Mentally Ill Persons • Definitions)

The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly ... Louping Ill: An acute tick-borne arbovirus infection causing meningoencephalomyelitis of sheep.Mentally Disabled Persons: ... Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no ... Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Time ...
lookformedical.com/definitions.php?q=Mentally Ill Persons&lang=1

*  The Involuntary Commitment and Treatment of Mentally Ill Persons

Involuntary Commitment and Treatment of Persons Diagnosed as Mentally Ill  Hull, Richard T. (1983) ... The Involuntary Commitment and Treatment of Mentally Ill Persons  Humber, James M. (1981-12) ... A case is made, based on appeal to moral principles, that only mentally ill persons who have violated criminal law may be ... Has the Pennsylvania Legislature Over-Reacted in Setting Standards for Involuntary Commitment of Mentally Ill Persons?  ...
https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/722232

*  Has the Pennsylvania Legislature Over-Reacted in Setting Standards for Involuntary Commitment of Mentally Ill Persons?

Dangerousness; Health; Involuntary Commitment; Judicial Action; Legislation; Mental Health; Mentally Ill Persons; Standards; ... Has the Pennsylvania Legislature Over-Reacted in Setting Standards for Involuntary Commitment of Mentally Ill Persons?  ... Has the Pennsylvania Legislature Over-Reacted in Setting Standards for Involuntary Commitment of Mentally Ill Persons?. Author ...
https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/722194

*  East Bay Columnists from The Berkeley Daily Planet

Usage of the word, "psychotic," as a noun to designate a mentally ill person, is widespread. You may not realize that such a ... The word "psychotic" in correct English is an adjective that describes some of the symptoms mentally ill people must endure. - ... Americans are taught to think of mentally ill people as freaks or misfits. ... First Person: Lifestyles of the Mentally Ill By Jack Bragen Thursday May 13, 2010 - 11:05:00 PM ...
berkeleydailyplanet.com/issue/2010-05-18/columns

*  OPA: Your Rights in a Psychiatric Facility

Mentally Ill Person: Any person who has a mental or emotional condition that has a substantial adverse effect on his or her ... If you are an emergency patient, a physician or licensed clinical psychologist has concluded that you are mentally ill and ... If the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that you are mentally ill and dangerous to yourself or others or gravely ... shelter or safety and that hospital treatment is necessary and available and that such person is mentally incapable of ...
ct.gov/opapd/cwp/view.asp?a=1756&q=277272

*  Mental Health Commitment Procedures

PROCEDURES FOR EMERGENCY COMMITMENT OF THE MENTALLY ILL OR CHEMICALLY DEPENDENT PERSON. ... A person will answer the Crisis Line and advise you of the procedures in order to get help for the person in need of assistance ... If the person is willing to be examined, a Detention Order is not needed. If the person refuses to be examined, then you may ... This Order allows the law enforcement officers to pick up the person and transport him/her to a doctor or emergency room to be ...
https://andersoncountysc.org/Government/Elected-Officials/Probate-Court/Mental-Health-Commitment-Procedures

*  HIV, syphilis, and hepatitis B and C prevalence among patients with mental illness: a review of the literature

Keywords : Mentally Ill Persons; Sexually Transmitted Diseases; HIV. · abstract in Portuguese · text in English · English ( pdf ... the lack of information on the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and their associated factors among persons with ...
scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S0102-311X2008001600012&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en

*  HIV Prevention Among Substance Abusing SMI - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Mentally Ill Persons Substance Abuse HIV Infections Behavioral: PATH Phase 3 Study Type:. Interventional ... to be delivered by case managers to their seriously mentally ill, substance abusing clients. ... Persons with serious mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk for HIV/AIDS. The relative risk of HIV/AIDS is at least five ... We will implement a prevention program for persons with SMI who also abuse substances over five years at a local Community ...
https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00447720?order=357

*  Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and assisted dying | Journal of Medical Ethics

Mentally Ill and Disabled Persons. *Psychiatry. *Suicide/Assisted Suicide. Introduction. Opinion polls suggest that many of ... to refractory mentally ill people] reinforces loss of hope and demoralization" in mentally ill people in their paper. The ... 35 They conclude that offering assisted dying to mentally ill patients who meet the due care criteria "does not necessarily ... A TRD person's authentic self is by necessity defined to a significant extent by her illness. That does not render her ...
jme.bmj.com/content/early/2015/05/02/medethics-2014-102458

*  Abandoned YMCA camp trip(x-post /r/AskReddit) : Thetruthishere

Could have been a homeless, possibly mentally ill person.. Nonetheless still really creepy and I would have gotten out of there ... Sometimes the sites are too dangerous to work at - family members will fall ill and die, there will be bad accidents. There's ... You might have seen a little person, they don't like to be seen as it is disrespectful. ...
https://reddit.com/r/Thetruthishere/comments/294rx1/abandoned_ymca_camp_tripxpost_raskreddit/

*  Some tragedies go beyond the justice system - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

A mentally ill person can still be selfish and reckless. And it goes without saying that a suicidal person is seriously ill, ... so mentally ill' that he considered taking his own life. I know people who wouldn't be considered mentally ill at all who would ... like the child abuser who is mentally ill and damages others, like a person who steals the means for another to feed themselves ... I find it hard to believe that a man that acted in such a reckless way, even if he was mentally ill, is not committing any ...
abc.net.au/news/2014-11-17/hobday-some-tragedies-go-beyond-the-justice-system/5891872

*  From the Corner of His Eye by Dean Koontz

view spoiler)[ The villain is a severely mentally ill person. Dean Koontz presents this illness thr This is an amazing book. I ... view spoiler)[ The villain is a severely mentally ill person. Dean Koontz presents this illness through the villains own eyes ... his mother counsels him that all things happen for a reason and that every person' s life has an effect on every other person' ... his ill gotten gains on the dire but fashionable artworks. produced by idiot poseur Sklent. In his sexual life, Cain,. ...
https://goodreads.com/book/show/65948.From_the_Corner_of_His_Eye?from_search=true

*  prove that homosexuality is wrong. - Discussion on Topix

You are arguing with a person who is mentally ill. Think of the former Pvt. Bradley Manning; now known as Chelsea Manning. ... And the answer is obviously yes it is abnormal behavior practiced by mentally ill people.. If everyone on the planet at this ...
topix.com/forum/topstories/TIU8KUPT687KM5IL8/p1265

*  Stigma of Mental Illness by on Prezi

Shattel, M. (2009). Stigmatizing language with unintended meanings: "Persons with mental illness" or "mentally ill persons"? ... Identifies mentally disturbed behaviors as causing significant problems for the person's social, occupational, academic ... Essentializing language that sees and says anything but the person first.. (eg. the ________, disabled, deaf, blind, mentally ... from a person with schizophrenia than from a person with depression or no psychiatric symptoms. They also found that mental ...
https://prezi.com/cko_5uwnrxoo/stigma-of-mental-illness/

*  Early Exposure To Germs Has Lasting Benefits - Slashdot

Torment a person mentally and you get a mentally ill person, not a badass. ... As a person with crohns, it pleases me more is being found out about the intestinal tract and how the immune system functions ... When I get seriously ill, I will just die as I am supposed to or kill myself. Fu ... even if they aren't critically ill. Ie., a pair of women discussing it at the lunch counter at my work, both of them discussing ...
https://science.slashdot.org/story/12/03/23/2151256/early-exposure-to-germs-has-lasting-benefits

*  Bill S.921

An Act relative to the civil commitment of mentally ill persons to Bridgewater State Hospital ...
https://malegislature.gov/Bills/188/Senate/S921

*  Longitudinal effects of integrated treatment on alcohol use for persons with serious mental illness and substance use disorders...

Ridgely MS: Creating integrated programs for severely mentally ill persons with substance abuse disorders.New Directions for ... Ridgely MS, Jerrell JM: Analysis of three interventions for substance abuse treatment of severely mentally ill people.Community ... Minkoff K: Program components of a comprehension integrated care system for serious mentally ill patients with substance ... Clark R: Family support for persons with dual disorders.New Directions for Mental Health Services 1996; 70:65-78.Google Scholar ...
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02291740

*  Hillary Clinton on Welfare & Poverty

Locking people up for a day will not take a single homeless person off the streets for good. It will not make a mentally ill ... It will not help find a job for a responsible person who is willing to work. Source: CNN.com s Talkback Live Dec 2, 1999 1969 ... but the FHA was trying to increase the limits that would enable a person who wanted to be a homeowner to be able to borrow at ... so that when that young person turns 18 if they have finished high school they will be able to access it to go to college or ...
ontheissues.org/2008/Hillary_Clinton_Welfare_ _Poverty.htm

*  Current Legislation on Admission of Mentally Ill Patients in China

Our overall findings are that the legal regulations on detaining mentally ill persons are similar in the five cities of China ... To improve mental health services within these different systems and to protect the rights of mentally ill persons, China began ... with the popular assumption being that mentally ill persons pose a threat to the social order (Park, Xiao, & Worth, 2005). As a ... Current Legislation on Admission of Mentally Ill Patients in China. Yang Shao,* Bin Xie,* Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good,** and Byron ...
pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC2813951/?lang=en-ca

*  link

In 1960, a mentally ill person who had engaged in random acts of violence stood a good chance of being institutionalized before ... Of course, waiting until a mentally ill person commits murder to do anything about the situation is a horrible mistake. I've ... Of course, waiting until a mentally ill person commits murder to do anything about the situation is a horrible mistake. ... Severely mentally ill people whose judgment is almost gone can be found competent. Plus, all that happens when someone is ...
volokh.com/posts/1204227094.shtml

*  Signs & Symptoms of Paranoid Schizophrenia | LIVESTRONG.COM

Other times violent actions stem from commands given to the mentally ill person by the voices in his head. A schizophrenic may ... Often this is the first sign someone close to the person has that he is becoming mentally ill. Paranoia naturally pulls the ... A person with schizophrenia is often anxious. She worries about others harming her, the voices that may be mocking her, and ... A person suffering from paranoid schizophrenia often hears voices. These voices are generally negative in nature and may speak ...
https://livestrong.com/article/22699-signs-symptoms-paranoid-schizophrenia/

*  Beauty Forum - How Do the Beatiful Stay Beautiful - Page 46 | Chictopia

However feel stressed, your body will release chemicals prevented make a person are physically or mentally ill. ... A person know, an anti aging cream become as effective as its ingredients. So, a cream filled with good ingredients is ... What this means for you is that what works well for someone might not satisfy someone else, and what works for a person might ... When a person receive within 10 seconds, stop the timer, reset it to zero, get in position, and go. ...
chictopia.com/forums/Health and Beauty?page=46

*  Research and Publication | OHSU Psychiatry Education & Training | OHSU

Shaefer M, Bloom JD (2005): The use of the insanity defense as a jail diversion mechanism for mentally ill persons charged with ... Bloom JD (2010): The "Incarceration Revolution", The abandonment of the seriously mentally ill to our jails and prisons. The ...
ohsu.edu/xd/education/schools/school-of-medicine/departments/clinical-departments/psychiatry/education-and-training/training-programs/forensic-psychiatry-fellowship/research-and-publications.cfm

*  Despite time in psychiatric hospital, man can challenge gun ban, appeals court says | MLive.com

"Congress, In its efforts to keep firearms away from the mentally ill, may cast a wider net than is necessary to perfectly ... The federal law at issue says: "It shall be unlawful for any person ... who has been adjudicated as a mental defective or who ... Thus, the Supreme Court has refused to extend the right to bear arms to entire classes of people, including 'the mentally ill ... should be taken to cast doubt on the long-standing prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and mentally ill.'" ...
mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2014/12/second_amendment_once_committe.html

National Outbreak Reporting System: ==The National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS)==List of foodborne illness outbreaks: This is a list of foodborne illness outbreaks. A foodborne illness may be from an infectious disease, heavy metals, chemical contamination, or from natural toxins, such as those found in poisonous mushrooms.Viral gastroenteritis: Viral gastroenteritis (Gastro-Enter-eye,tiss),http://www.merriam-webster.Mental disorderList of Parliamentary constituencies in Kent: The ceremonial county of Kent,Multiple disabilitiesHomeless dumping: Homeless dumping is the practice of hospital employees or emergency services releasing homeless patients on the streets instead of placing them into the custody of family, a warming center or homeless shelter or retaining them in a hospital where they may require expensive medical care. Many homeless people who have mental health problems can no longer find a place in a psychiatric hospital since the trend towards mental health deinstitutionalization from the 1960s onwards.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Management of HIV/AIDS: The management of HIV/AIDS normally includes the use of multiple antiretroviral drugs in an attempt to control HIV infection. There are several classes of antiretroviral agents that act on different stages of the HIV life-cycle.Closed-ended question: A closed-ended question is a question format that limits respondents with a list of answer choices from which they must choose to answer the question.Dillman D.Incidence (epidemiology): Incidence is a measure of the probability of occurrence of a given medical condition in a population within a specified period of time. Although sometimes loosely expressed simply as the number of new cases during some time period, it is better expressed as a proportion or a rate with a denominator.Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Proportional reporting ratio: The proportional reporting ratio (PRR) is a statistic that is used to summarize the extent to which a particular adverse event is reported for individuals taking a specific drug, compared to the frequency at which the same adverse event is reported for patients taking some other drug (or who are taking any drug in a specified class of drugs). The PRR will typically be calculated using a surveillance database in which reports of adverse events from a variety of drugs are recorded.Involuntary commitment: Involuntary commitment or civil commitment is a legal process through which an individual with symptoms of severe mental illness is court-ordered into treatment in a psychiatric hospital (inpatient) or in the community (outpatient).Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingNon-communicable disease: Non-communicable disease (NCD) is a medical condition or disease that is non-infectious or non-transmissible. NCDs can refer to chronic diseases which last for long periods of time and progress slowly.Apache AvroSepsis Alliance: Sepsis Alliance is a voluntary health organization dedicated to raising awareness of sepsis by educating patients, families, and healthcare professionals to treat sepsis as a medical emergency.http://www.Prism score of pediatric mortality: The Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) score was developed from the Physiologic Stability Index (PSI) to reduce the number of physiologic variables required for pediatric intensive-care unit (PICU) mortality risk assessment, from 34 (in the PSI) to 14, and to obtain an objective weighting of the remaining variables.Peak inspiratory pressure: Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) is the highest level of pressure applied to the lungs during inhalation. In mechanical ventilation the number reflects a positive pressure in centimeters of water pressure (cmH2O).Self-rated health: Self-rated health (also called Self-reported health, Self-assessed health, or perceived health) refers to both a single question such as “in general, would you say that you health is excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor?” and a survey questionnaire in which participants assess different dimensions of their own health.National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: The U.S.Carte Jaune: The Carte Jaune or Yellow Card is an international certificate of vaccination (ICV). It is issued by the World Health Organisation.Global Risks Report: The Global Risks Report is an annual study published by the World Economic Forum ahead of the Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Based on the work of the Global Risk Network, the report describes changes occurring in the global risks landscape from year to year and identifies the global risks that could play a critical role in the upcoming year.Time-trade-off: Time-Trade-Off (TTO) is a tool used in health economics to help determine the quality of life of a patient or group. The individual will be presented with a set of directions such as:Comorbidity: In medicine, comorbidity is the presence of one or more additional disorders (or diseases) co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder; or the effect of such additional disorders or diseases. The additional disorder may also be a behavioral or mental disorder.Adult-onset immunodeficiency syndrome: Adult-onset immunodeficiency syndrome is a provisional name for a newly diagnosed immunodeficiency illness. The name is proposed in the first public study to identify the syndrome.Familial British dementia: Familial British dementia is a form of dementia. It was first reported by Cecil Charles Worster-Drought in 1933 and is therefore also known as Worster-Drought syndrome.Netherlands national rollball team: Vishwaraj JadejaChao Yao-dong: Chao Yao-dong (died August 20, 2008) was a Taiwanese politician, economist and former Minister of Economic Affairs (1981–84).UNICEF Tap Project: The UNICEF Tap Project is a nationwide campaign that provides children in impoverished nations with access to safe, clean water. The campaign culminates during World Water Week, celebrating the United Nations’ World Water Day, March 22.Influenza A virus subtype H1N1: Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu.Generalizability theory: Generalizability theory, or G Theory, is a statistical framework for conceptualizing, investigating, and designing reliable observations. It is used to determine the reliability (i.San Diego County, California Probation: The San Diego County Probation Department is the body in San Diego County, California responsible for supervising convicted offenders in the community, either who are on probation, such as at the conclusion of their sentences, or while on community supervision orders.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Wholesome Wave: Wholesome Wave is a U.S.Baden, Lower Saxony: Baden is a town near Bremen, in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is known to Africanists and Phoneticians as the place where Diedrich Hermann Westermann was born and died.Frailty syndrome: Frailty is a common geriatric syndrome that embodies an elevated risk of catastrophic declines in health and function among older adults. Frailty is a condition associated with ageing, and it has been recognized for centuries.National Healthy Homes Hero Award: National Healthy Homes Hero Award is an award presented by a consortium of agencies at the United States' National Healthy Homes Conference. The first year this award was presented was in 2011.Wisconsin Senate, District 4: The 4th District of the Wisconsin Senate is located in Southern Wisconsin, and is composed of parts of Milwaukee County.District MapNeighbourhood: A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members.Bio Base EuropeRehabilitation in spinal cord injury: When treating a person with a spinal cord injury, repairing the damage created by injury is the ultimate goal. By using a variety of treatments, greater improvements are achieved, and, therefore, treatment should not be limited to one method.Postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a short-term decline in cognitive function (especially in memory and executive functions) that may last from a few days to a few weeks after surgery. In rare cases, this disorder may persist for several months after major surgery.Plymouth Congregational Church (New Haven, Connecticut)Cancer screeningRating scales for depression: A depression rating scale is a psychiatric measuring instrument having descriptive words and phrases that indicate the severity of depression for a time period. When used, an observer may make judgements and rate a person at a specified scale level with respect to identified characteristics.Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus: A newly identified and potentially treatable form of monogenic diabetes is the neonatal diabetes caused by activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene, which codes for the Kir6.2 subunit of the beta cell KATP channel.Mortality rate: Mortality rate, or death rate, is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in a particular population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit of time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1,000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.Biomarkers of aging: Biomarkers of aging are biomarkers that better predict functional capacity at a later age than chronological age. Stated another way, biomarkers of aging would give the true "biological age", which may be different from the chronological age.Home of the future: The home of the future, similar to the office of the future, is a concept that has been popular to explore since the early 20th century, or perhaps earlier. There have been many exhibits, such as at World's Fairs and theme parks, purporting to show how future homes will look and work, as well as standalone model "homes of the future" sponsored by builders, developers, or technology companies.

(1/190) Medical practice: defendants and prisoners.

It is argued in this paper that a doctor cannot serve two masters. The work of the prison medical officer is examined and it is shown that his dual allegiance to the state and to those individuals who are under his care results in activities which largely favour the former. The World Health Organisation prescribes a system of health ethics which indicates, in qualitative terms, the responsibility of each state for health provisions. In contrast, the World Medical Association acts as both promulgator and guardian of a code of medical ethics which determines the responsibilities of the doctor to his patient. In the historical sense medical practitioners have always emphasized the sanctity of the relationship with their patients and the doctor's role as an expert witness is shown to have centered around this bond. The development of medical services in prisons has focused more on the partnership between doctor and institution. Imprisonment in itself could be seen as prejudicial to health as are disciplinary methods which are more obviously detrimental. The involvement of medical practitioners in such procedures is discussed in the light of their role as the prisoner's personal physician.  (+info)

(2/190) Selecting subjects for participation in clinical research: one sphere of justice.

Recent guidelines from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) mandate the inclusion of adequate numbers of women in clinical trials. Ought such standards to apply internationally? Walzer's theory of justice is brought to bear on the problem, the first use of the theory in research ethics, and it argues for broad application of the principle of adequate representation. A number of practical conclusions for research ethics committees (RECs) are outlined. Eligibility criteria in clinical trials ought to be justified by trial designers. Research ethics committees ought to question criteria that seem to exclude unnecessarily women from research participation. The issue of adequate representation should be construed broadly, so as to include consideration of the representation of the elderly, persons with HIV, mental illness and substance abuse disorders in clinical research.  (+info)

(3/190) The public's view of the competence, dangerousness, and need for legal coercion of persons with mental health problems.

OBJECTIVES: The authors examined Americans' opinions about financial and treatment competence of people with mental health problems, potential for harm to self or others, and the use of legal means to force treatment. METHODS: The 1996 General Social Survey provided interview data with a nationally representative sample (n = 1444). Respondents were given a vignette based on diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, major depression, alcohol dependence, or drug dependence, or a "control" case. RESULTS: The specific nature of the problem was the most important factor shaping public reaction. Respondents viewed those with "troubles," alcohol dependence, or depression as able to make treatment decisions. Most reported that persons with alcohol or drug problems or schizophrenia cannot manage money and are likely to be violent toward others. Respondents indicated a willingness to coerce individuals into treatment. Respondent and other case characteristics rarely affected opinions. CONCLUSIONS: Americans report greater concern with individuals who have drug or alcohol problems than with persons who have other mental health problems. Evaluations of dangerousness and coercion indicate a continuing need for public education.  (+info)

(4/190) Food refusal in prisoners: a communication or a method of self-killing? The role of the psychiatrist and resulting ethical challenges.

Food refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. It may be used as a political tool, as a method of exercising control over others, at either the individual, family or societal level, or as a method of self-harm, and occasionally it indicates possible mental illness. This article examines the motivation behind hunger strikes in prisoners. It describes the psychiatrist's role in assessment and management of prisoners by referring to case examples. The paper discusses the assessment of an individual's competence to commit suicide by starvation, legal restraints to intervention, practical difficulties and associated ethical dilemmas. Anecdotal evidence suggests that most prisoners who refuse food are motivated by the desire to achieve an end rather than killing themselves, and that hunger-strike secondary to mental illness is uncommon. Although rarely required, the psychiatrist may have an important contribution to make in the management of practical and ethical difficulties.  (+info)

(5/190) Autonomy, rationality and the wish to die.

Although suicide has traditionally carried a negative sanction in Western societies, this is now being challenged, and while there remains substantial public concern surrounding youth and elder suicide, there is a paradoxical push to relax the prohibition under certain circumstances. Central to the arguments behind this are the principles of respect for autonomy and the importance of rationality. It is argued here that the concepts of rationality and autonomy, while valuable, are not strong enough to substantiate a categorical "right to suicide" and that the concepts of "understandability" and "respect" are more useful and able to provide the foundation for responding to a person expressing a wish to die. Roman suicide, sometimes held as an example of "rational suicide", illustrates the effects of culture, tradition and values on the attitudes to, and the practice of, suicide.  (+info)

(6/190) The family rule: a framework for obtaining ethical consent for medical interventions from children.

Children's consent to treatment remains a contentious topic, with confusing legal precepts and advice. This paper proposes that informed consent in children should be regarded as shared between children and their families, the balance being determined by implicit, developmentally based negotiations between child and parent--a "family rule" for consent. Consistent, operationalized procedures for ethically obtaining consent can be derived from its application to both routine and contentious situations. Therefore, use of the "family Rule" concept can consistently define negligent procedure in obtaining consent from children, and could be used as a unifying framework in the development of new professional guidelines. A "guideline"-based approach to children's consent to treatment may offer greater individuality than a "rights"-based approach, though careful training and oversight will be needed for it to be effective.  (+info)

(7/190) The man who claimed to be a paedophile.

A psychiatrist recounts a case of a man presenting with severe depression who claimed to have abused children and his pet dog. Clinical management of the case hinged on whether this claim was true, a lie or delusional. The uncertainty over this raised complex ethical dilemmas regarding confidentiality and protection of the public (and animals).  (+info)

(8/190) Working with mentally ill homeless persons: should we respect their quest for anonymity?

In recent years, the homeless population has received much attention as authorities attempt to comprehend this phenomenon and offer solutions. When striving to establish a relationship with the homeless person, many problems arise. We encounter this dilemma when respecting the right of the mentally ill to dwell neglected in the streets and simultaneously observe their inability to comprehend provisions such as housing, shelter, medical and mental care which contribute to their human dignity. The polarities of autonomy versus involuntary treatment are highlighted when treating the homeless population.  (+info)



Involuntary Commitment


  • Has the Pennsylvania Legislature Over-Reacted in Setting Standards for Involuntary Commitment of Mentally Ill Persons? (georgetown.edu)
  • If you have personal knowledge of a person who suffers from mental illness or chemical dependence (alcohol or drug addiction) who is endangering himself or others and is unwilling to get help, the person may need involuntary commitment at a facility for treatment. (andersoncountysc.org)

substance abuse


  • Ridgely MS: Creating integrated programs for severely mentally ill persons with substance abuse disorders. (springer.com)
  • Ridgely MS, Jerrell JM: Analysis of three interventions for substance abuse treatment of severely mentally ill people. (springer.com)

symptoms


  • The word "psychotic" in correct English is an adjective that describes some of the symptoms mentally ill people must endure. (berkeleydailyplanet.com)
  • 2006) demonstrated that both the general public and mental health professionals indicated a greater desire for social distance from a person with schizophrenia than from a person with depression or no psychiatric symptoms. (prezi.com)

principles


  • A case is made, based on appeal to moral principles, that only mentally ill persons who have violated criminal law may be involuntarily incarcerated/hospitalized and then only for a determinate time based on the nature of the criminal act. (georgetown.edu)
  • Blankertz LE, Cnaan RA: Principles of care for dually diagnosed homeless persons: Findings from a demonstration project. (springer.com)

people


  • Here you can learn about the information and services the Government provides for mentally-ill and ex-mentally ill people as well as their carers. (gov.hk)
  • For ex-mentally ill people to truly start a new life in the community, acceptance and support from family members and the community is important. (gov.hk)
  • Meanwhile, if ex-mentally ill people are found to have emotional disturbance or their family members are under enormous stress, remember to seek help. (gov.hk)
  • Americans are taught to think of mentally ill people as freaks or misfits. (berkeleydailyplanet.com)
  • 3 A spokesperson for a UK antichoice activist group ( Care Not Killing ) underlines the attitudinal issues likely expressed in these survey results, when he refers to "those people who are not terminally ill and are probably just (sic! (bmj.com)
  • And the answer is obviously yes it is abnormal behavior practiced by mentally ill people. (topix.com)
  • Homosexuality is abnormal behavior practiced by mentally ill people. (topix.com)

serious mental illness


  • Persons with serious mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk for HIV/AIDS. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A multilevel, nonlinear model was used to estimate hospital treatment effects on days of alcohol use for persons with serious mental illness and substance use disorders over 18 months. (springer.com)

chronic mental illness


  • This review highlights the lack of information on the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases and their associated factors among persons with chronic mental illness and identifies gaps in the knowledge base in both developing and developed countries. (scielo.br)
  • Intensive case management of persons with chronic mental illness who abuse substances. (springer.com)

hospital


  • If you are an emergency patient, a physician or licensed clinical psychologist has concluded that you are mentally ill and dangerous to yourself or others, or gravely disabled and in need of immediate care and treatment in a hospital. (ct.gov)

alcohol or drug


  • This specifically excludes a person whose sole disability is alcohol or drug dependency as defined in Connecticut General Statutes 17a-680. (ct.gov)

patients


  • This is implied in survey results showing overwhelming societal support for the decriminalisation of assisted dying only for terminally ill patients, but also in at least one small-scale survey from the Canadian city of Edmonton. (bmj.com)
  • Minkoff K: Program components of a comprehension integrated care system for serious mentally ill patients with substance disorders. (springer.com)
  • This article aims to describe and analyze current legal frameworks for voluntary and involuntary admissions of mentally ill patients in the five cities of China that currently have municipal mental health regulations. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

emotional


  • Any person who has a mental or emotional condition that has a substantial adverse effect on his or her ability to function and who requires care and treatment. (ct.gov)

Treatment


  • Furthermore, compulsory treatment is morally defensible, but it must be restricted to those committed persons judged incompetent to make an informed decision concerning treatment. (georgetown.edu)
  • Mueser KT, Drake RE, Miles KM: The course and treatment of substance use disorder in persons with severe mental illness. (springer.com)
  • A more comprehensive and enforceable national mental health act is needed in order to ensure the rights of persons suffering mental illness in terms of admission and treatment procedures. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

mental


  • If the person refuses to be examined, then you may bring the necessary documents issued to you from the Mental Health Center to the Probate Court to seek an Order of Detention. (andersoncountysc.org)
  • We will implement a prevention program for persons with SMI who also abuse substances over five years at a local Community Mental Health Center. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To improve mental health services within these different systems and to protect the rights of mentally ill persons, China began passing a series of mental health reform laws in 1985 ( Liu, 1998 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • First, there still lingers a longstanding stigma against mental illness, with the popular assumption being that mentally ill persons pose a threat to the social order ( Park, Xiao, & Worth, 2005 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)

abuse substances


  • Together we will translate them into ongoing case management for SMI persons who also abuse substances in the Preventing AIDS through Health Project (PATH). (clinicaltrials.gov)

social


  • The Social Welfare Department provides various social rehabilitation services for ex-mentally ill persons, such as vocational training, residential care homes and community support services. (gov.hk)

criminal


assistance


  • A person will answer the Crisis Line and advise you of the procedures in order to get help for the person in need of assistance. (andersoncountysc.org)

found


  • Consistent with other findings regarding HIV infections among the SMI, in our preliminary studies we found that these individuals are at much higher risk within the population of persons being served in Philadelphia. (clinicaltrials.gov)

life


  • As he copes with his blindness and proves to be a prodigy, his mother counsels him that all things happen for a reason and that every person' s life has an effect on every other person' s, in often unknowable ways. (goodreads.com)

order


  • If the person is willing to be examined, a Detention Order is not needed. (andersoncountysc.org)
  • This Order allows the law enforcement officers to pick up the person and transport him/her to a doctor or emergency room to be examined. (andersoncountysc.org)