Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Paternal Age: Age of the biological father.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Birth Order: The sequence in which children are born into the family.Pregnancy, High-Risk: Pregnancy in which the mother and/or FETUS are at greater than normal risk of MORBIDITY or MORTALITY. Causes include inadequate PRENATAL CARE, previous obstetrical history (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS), pre-existing maternal disease, pregnancy-induced disease (GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION), and MULTIPLE PREGNANCY, as well as advanced maternal age above 35.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Amniocentesis: Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Prenatal Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Pregnancy Trimester, First: The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Nondisjunction, Genetic: The failure of homologous CHROMOSOMES or CHROMATIDS to segregate during MITOSIS or MEIOSIS with the result that one daughter cell has both of a pair of parental chromosomes or chromatids and the other has none.Abortion, Spontaneous: Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Crown-Rump Length: In utero measurement corresponding to the sitting height (crown to rump) of the fetus. Length is considered a more accurate criterion of the age of the fetus than is the weight. The average crown-rump length of the fetus at term is 36 cm. (From Williams Obstetrics, 18th ed, p91)Nuchal Translucency Measurement: A prenatal ultrasonography measurement of the soft tissue behind the fetal neck. Either the translucent area below the skin in the back of the fetal neck (nuchal translucency) or the distance between occipital bone to the outer skin line (nuchal fold) is measured.Aneuploidy: The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).Chromosome Disorders: Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Pregnancy Trimester, Second: The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human: The beta subunit of human CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN. Its structure is similar to the beta subunit of LUTEINIZING HORMONE, except for the additional 30 amino acids at the carboxy end with the associated carbohydrate residues. HCG-beta is used as a diagnostic marker for early detection of pregnancy, spontaneous abortion (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS); ECTOPIC PREGNANCY; HYDATIDIFORM MOLE; CHORIOCARCINOMA; or DOWN SYNDROME.Pregnancy, Multiple: The condition of carrying two or more FETUSES simultaneously.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A: A product of the PLACENTA, and DECIDUA, secreted into the maternal circulation during PREGNANCY. It has been identified as an IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4 protease that proteolyzes IGFBP-4 and thus increases IGF bioavailability. It is found also in human FIBROBLASTS, ovarian FOLLICULAR FLUID, and GRANULOSA CELLS. The enzyme is a heterotetramer of about 500-kDa.Hernia, Umbilical: A HERNIA due to an imperfect closure or weakness of the umbilical ring. It appears as a skin-covered protrusion at the UMBILICUS during crying, coughing, or straining. The hernia generally consists of OMENTUM or SMALL INTESTINE. The vast majority of umbilical hernias are congenital but can be acquired due to severe abdominal distention.Gastroschisis: A congenital defect with major fissure in the ABDOMINAL WALL lateral to, but not at, the UMBILICUS. This results in the extrusion of VISCERA. Unlike OMPHALOCELE, herniated structures in gastroschisis are not covered by a sac or PERITONEUM.Preimplantation Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the OVUM; ZYGOTE; or BLASTOCYST prior to implantation. CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS is performed to determine the presence or absence of genetic disease.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Fertilization in Vitro: An assisted reproductive technique that includes the direct handling and manipulation of oocytes and sperm to achieve fertilization in vitro.Live Birth: The event that a FETUS is born alive with heartbeats or RESPIRATION regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE. Such liveborn is called a newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN).Stillbirth: The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.Perinatal Mortality: Deaths occurring from the 28th week of GESTATION to the 28th day after birth in a given population.Birth Intervals: The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.Reproductive Techniques, Assisted: Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.Infant, Small for Gestational Age: An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Abortion, Eugenic: Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.Polar Bodies: Minute cells produced during development of an OOCYTE as it undergoes MEIOSIS. A polar body contains one of the nuclei derived from the first or second meiotic CELL DIVISION. Polar bodies have practically no CYTOPLASM. They are eventually discarded by the oocyte. (from King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 21: A specific pair of GROUP G CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chorionic Villi Sampling: A method for diagnosis of fetal diseases by sampling the cells of the placental chorionic villi for DNA analysis, presence of bacteria, concentration of metabolites, etc. The advantage over amniocentesis is that the procedure can be carried out in the first trimester.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Twins: Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18: A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Chromosomes, Human, 21-22 and Y: The short, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group G in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 21 and 22 and the Y chromosome.Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13: A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Obstetric Labor, Premature: Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).Pre-Eclampsia: A complication of PREGNANCY, characterized by a complex of symptoms including maternal HYPERTENSION and PROTEINURIA with or without pathological EDEMA. Symptoms may range between mild and severe. Pre-eclampsia usually occurs after the 20th week of gestation, but may develop before this time in the presence of trophoblastic disease.Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic: An assisted fertilization technique consisting of the microinjection of a single viable sperm into an extracted ovum. It is used principally to overcome low sperm count, low sperm motility, inability of sperm to penetrate the egg, or other conditions related to male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE).Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Diabetes, Gestational: Diabetes mellitus induced by PREGNANCY but resolved at the end of pregnancy. It does not include previously diagnosed diabetics who become pregnant (PREGNANCY IN DIABETICS). Gestational diabetes usually develops in late pregnancy when insulin antagonistic hormones peaks leading to INSULIN RESISTANCE; GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; and HYPERGLYCEMIA.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Embryo Transfer: The transfer of mammalian embryos from an in vivo or in vitro environment to a suitable host to improve pregnancy or gestational outcome in human or animal. In human fertility treatment programs, preimplantation embryos ranging from the 4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage are transferred to the uterine cavity between 3-5 days after FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Abortion, Habitual: Three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions.Gravidity: The number of pregnancies, complete or incomplete, experienced by a female. It is different from PARITY, which is the number of offspring borne. (From Stedman, 26th ed)NorwayFetal Macrosomia: A condition of fetal overgrowth leading to a large-for-gestational-age FETUS. It is defined as BIRTH WEIGHT greater than 4,000 grams or above the 90th percentile for population and sex-specific growth curves. It is commonly seen in GESTATIONAL DIABETES; PROLONGED PREGNANCY; and pregnancies complicated by pre-existing diabetes mellitus.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.SicilyPregnancy Trimester, Third: The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.Pregnancy, Twin: The condition of carrying TWINS simultaneously.Multiple Birth Offspring: The offspring in multiple pregnancies (PREGNANCY, MULTIPLE): TWINS; TRIPLETS; QUADRUPLETS; QUINTUPLETS; etc.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced: A condition in pregnant women with elevated systolic (>140 mm Hg) and diastolic (>90 mm Hg) blood pressure on at least two occasions 6 h apart. HYPERTENSION complicates 8-10% of all pregnancies, generally after 20 weeks of gestation. Gestational hypertension can be divided into several broad categories according to the complexity and associated symptoms, such as EDEMA; PROTEINURIA; SEIZURES; abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION and liver functions.DenmarkFetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Estriol: A hydroxylated metabolite of ESTRADIOL or ESTRONE that has a hydroxyl group at C3, 16-alpha, and 17-beta position. Estriol is a major urinary estrogen. During PREGNANCY, a large amount of estriol is produced by the PLACENTA. Isomers with inversion of the hydroxyl group or groups are called epiestriol.Meiosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division, occurring during maturation of the GERM CELLS. Two successive cell nucleus divisions following a single chromosome duplication (S PHASE) result in daughter cells with half the number of CHROMOSOMES as the parent cells.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Infertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Abortion, Induced: Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)Sudden Infant Death: The abrupt and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant under one year of age, remaining unexplained after a thorough case investigation, including performance of a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history. (Pediatr Pathol 1991 Sep-Oct;11(5):677-84)Triplets: Three individuals derived from three FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Parturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Labor, Induced: Artificially induced UTERINE CONTRACTION. Generally, LABOR, OBSTETRIC is induced with the intent to cause delivery of the fetus and termination of pregnancy.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.SwedenNew YorkChromosomes, Human, 19-20: The short, metacentric human chromosomes, called group F in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 19 and 20.Anencephaly: A malformation of the nervous system caused by failure of the anterior neuropore to close. Infants are born with intact spinal cords, cerebellums, and brainstems, but lack formation of neural structures above this level. The skull is only partially formed but the eyes are usually normal. This condition may be associated with folate deficiency. Affected infants are only capable of primitive (brain stem) reflexes and usually do not survive for more than two weeks. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p247)Sex Chromosome Aberrations: Abnormal number or structure of the SEX CHROMOSOMES. Some sex chromosome aberrations are associated with SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS and SEX CHROMOSOME DISORDERS OF SEX DEVELOPMENT.Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Pregnancy in Diabetics: The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.Mosaicism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from a single ZYGOTE, as opposed to CHIMERISM in which the different cell populations are derived from more than one zygote.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.Infant Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of infants.Chromosomes, Human, 13-15: The medium-sized, acrocentric human chromosomes, called group D in the human chromosome classification. This group consists of chromosome pairs 13, 14, and 15.Oocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Maternal Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the mother.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Term Birth: CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.EnglandNepalIllegitimacy: The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.Adult Children: Children who have reached maturity or the legal age of majority.Extraction, Obstetrical: Extraction of the fetus by means of obstetrical instruments.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Abnormalities, Drug-Induced: Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Reproductive History: An important aggregate factor in epidemiological studies of women's health. The concept usually includes the number and timing of pregnancies and their outcomes, the incidence of breast feeding, and may include age of menarche and menopause, regularity of menstruation, fertility, gynecological or obstetric problems, or contraceptive usage.Twins, Dizygotic: Two offspring from the same PREGNANCY. They are from two OVA, fertilized at about the same time by two SPERMATOZOA. Such twins are genetically distinct and can be of different sexes.WalesFathers: Male parents, human or animal.Siblings: Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)Pregnancy Rate: The ratio of the number of conceptions (CONCEPTION) including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; and fetal losses, to the mean number of females of reproductive age in a population during a set time period.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Placenta Previa: Abnormal placentation in which the PLACENTA implants in the lower segment of the UTERUS (the zone of dilation) and may cover part or all of the opening of the CERVIX. It is often associated with serious antepartum bleeding and PREMATURE LABOR.United StatesPregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Postpartum Period: In females, the period that is shortly after giving birth (PARTURITION).BrazilGenetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.alpha-Fetoproteins: The first alpha-globulins to appear in mammalian sera during FETAL DEVELOPMENT and the dominant serum proteins in early embryonic life.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

*  no news isn't always good news: Baby #2's nursery decor
Azoosperma was a hurdle, and I was also "of advanced maternal age." We're now raising two beautiful daughters and our family is ... complete (and insurance wouldn't cover another fresh cycle at my "advanced" age anyhow).. View my complete profile ...
  http://hopingandtrying.blogspot.com/2011/08/baby-2s-nursery-decor.html
*  Mothers in Medicine: Advanced Maternal Age
I had a baby at age 27, which is above the mean age for a first baby in this country (25, I think), but well below the mean age ... AMA = Advanced Maternal Age). When I first started my residency, I felt like a pregnant teenager. I was the youngest of all the ... one of the first lectures the residents got was about how fertility declines sharply after age 30. She said it was kind of ...
  http://www.mothersinmedicine.com/2008/06/advanced-maternal-age.html?showComment=1213135140000
*  Maternal age and newborn blood pressure | Circulation
... gestational age, and maternal body mass index, weight gain, and systolic bp. Conclusions. Higher maternal age was associated ... Maternal age and newborn blood pressure. Matthew W Gillman, Carol L Link, Janet W Rich-Edwards, Ellice S Lieberman, Steven E ... Maternal age and newborn blood pressure. Matthew W Gillman, Carol L Link, Janet W Rich-Edwards, Ellice S Lieberman and Steven E ... Maternal age and newborn blood pressure. Matthew W Gillman, Carol L Link, Janet W Rich-Edwards, Ellice S Lieberman and Steven E ...
  http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/103/Suppl_1/1347.4
*  Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months...
Advanced maternal age was defined as ≥32 years and a reference group of women aged 25-31 years was used for comparisons. The ... SJ McCall, M Nair, M Knight, Factors associated with maternal mortality at advanced maternal age: a population-based case- ... Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months ... Objective To investigate if advanced maternal age at first birth increases the risk of psychological distress during pregnancy ...
  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2012.03411.x/abstract?globalMessage=0
*  Advanced Maternal Age Associated with AIS?
I wonder at what age the risk goes up.. Many childhood diseases are associated with advanced maternal age.. Type 1 Diabetes ( ... An Australian study determined that AIS in this country is associated with advanced maternal age (an environmental factor) as ... A significant difference between the study group and the general population was found in maternal age. Scoliosis was commoner ... Older Maternal Age Linked to Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes. the reviewers found that there was an overall 5 percent increase in ...
  http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?11778-Advanced-Maternal-Age-Associated-with-AIS&p=116036
*  Advanced maternal age - Wikipedia
1 in 1,383 At age 30, 1 in 959 At age 35, 1 in 338 At age 40, 1 in 84 At age 45, 1 in 32 At age 50, 1 in 44 Advanced maternal ... Advanced maternal age, in a broad sense, is the instance of a woman being of an older age at a stage of reproduction, although ... In the U.S., the average age of first childbirth was 26 in 2013. Advanced maternal age is associated with adverse reproductive ... have shown that despite the older maternal age at birth of the first child, the time span between the birth of the first and ...
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_maternal_age
*  Maternal Age and Birth Outcomes: Data from New Jersey | Guttmacher Institute
Thus, to assess the true effects of maternal age, researchers need an inclusive set of narrowly defined age-groups spanning all ... Maternal Age and Birth Outcomes: Data from New Jersey. Nancy E. Reichman. Deanna L. Pagnini. ... 11. D. Strobino et al., "Mechanisms for Maternal Age Differences in Birth Weight," American Journal of Epidemiology, 142:504- ... 8. D.C. La Grew, Jr., et al., "Advanced Maternal Age: Perinatal Outcome when Controlling for Physician Selection," Journal of ...
  https://www.guttmacher.org/journals/psrh/1997/11/maternal-age-and-birth-outcomes-data-new-jersey
*  Geriatric Pregnancy (Advanced Maternal Age): Definition and Risks
In recent years, geriatric pregnancy has come to be known as the pregnancy of 'advanced maternal age'. ... In recent years, women who become pregnant after age 35 are now considered to be of "advanced maternal age". This change in ... By the age 0f 35, only 10% of the women are infertile; by age 45, that number increases to 85%. In other words, if you ... While there are some risks that are elevated in an advanced maternal age pregnancy, improvements in medical technology and ...
  https://www.organicfacts.net/geriatric-pregnancy.html
*  Study: Paternal, Maternal Age Linked to Autism
Older paternal and maternal age is associated with having a child with autism, according to a study from the University of ... Older paternal and maternal age is associated with having a child with autism, according to a study from the University of ... Researchers compared 68 age- and sex-matched, case-control pairs from their research center at the University of the West ...
  http://wfnt.com/paternal-and-maternal-age-linked-to-autism/
*  Keratoconus: maternal age and social class. | British Journal of Ophthalmology
... and it is suggested that this is related to the patient's maternal age. ... A group of patients (150) suffering from keratoconus were asked their mother's age at their birth. A statistically significant ...
  http://bjo.bmj.com/content/65/2/104
*  Advanced Maternal Age at 35: Accurate or Artifactual? | Fit Pregnancy and Baby
... or advanced maternal age. But is this a thing of the past? ... women aged 35 and over who become pregnant are referred to as ... Traditionally, women aged 35 and over who become pregnant are referred to as AMA, or advanced maternal age. But is this a thing ... Poof! You're considered AMA, or advanced maternal age. The likelihood you will be able to conceive plummets, and your risk ... Ross says, "The truth is advanced maternal age is over 35 years. If there are any reclassifications to be made it should be for ...
  https://www.fitpregnancy.com/pregnancy/pregnancy-health/advanced-maternal-age-at-35-accurate-or-artifactual
*  Mutation risk associated with paternal and maternal age in a cohort of retinoblastoma survivors | SpringerLink
... also exhibits a paternal age effect due to the paternal origin o ... are known to be associated with advanced paternal age, and it ... The modeling strategy evaluated effects of continuous increasing maternal and paternal age and 5-year age increases adjusted ... Mean maternal ages for survivors classified as having de novo germline mutations and sporadic Rb were similar (28.3 and 28.5, ... In contrast, maternal and paternal ages for familial Rb did not differ significantly from the weighted US general population ...
  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00439-011-1126-2
*  Empowering Yourself for Pregnancy in Advanced Maternal Age (35 or better) - Pregnancy Info and Tips
I am the co-author of a website with stories about becoming a mother of an advanced maternal age (as we say 35 or better, which ... Empowering Yourself for Pregnancy in Advanced Maternal Age (35 or better). By Anonymous June 7, 2012 - 1:04pm ... I am the co-author of a website with stories about becoming a mother of an advanced maternal age (as we say 35 or better, which ... This Empowering Yourself for Pregnancy in Advanced Maternal Age (35 or better) page on EmpowHER Women's Health works best with ...
  https://www.empowher.com/community/share/empowering-yourself-pregnancy-advanced-maternal-age-35-or-better
*  Maternal Age And IQ « The Dish
There is a strong correlation, across all races, between IQ and birth-age of mother. The birth age of the mother is directly ... For instance, how come there are no studies that look at IQ adjusted for the age of the mother? In my spare time, I scan ... who have kids around the same age as white or Asians, do just as well economically. I don't get why this important information ... I've done has me convinced that if any of these IQ researchers actually took the time to adjust test scores for the birth age ...
  http://dish.andrewsullivan.com/2015/01/01/maternal-age-and-iq/
*  advanced maternal age Archives - Texas Fertility Center
Tags: advanced maternal age, AMH, egg freezing. Posted in Advanced maternal age, AMH, Egg freezing, Kaylen Silverberg MD, MD , ...
  http://txfertility.com/tag/advanced-maternal-age-2/
*  Maternal age of menarche is not associated with asthma or atopy in prepubertal children | Thorax
... maternal age at delivery (,20, 20-24, 25-30, 31-35, and 35+ years), maternal BMI before pregnancy (obese/non-obese), maternal ... Xu B, Jarvelin MR, Hartikainen AL, et al. Maternal age at menarche and atopy among offspring at the age of 31 years. Thorax2000 ... Information on maternal age at delivery and season of birth of the child was collected from clinical records. Maternal body ... The weaknesses were with self-reporting of asthma, eczema, and hay fever, along with the age of maternal menarche and maternal ...
  http://thorax.bmj.com/content/60/10/810
*  Causes of Oocyte Aneuploidy and Infertility in Advanced Maternal Age and Emerging Therapeutic Approaches | Frontiers Research...
Increased rates of egg infertility temporally coincide with rising levels of FSH that occur with age. By age 42, up to 87% of ... Section 2 will discuss the impact of the molecular environment of the oocyte as a determinant of elevated aneuploidy with age. ... pregnancies caused by increased frequency of chromosome segregation errors in the eggs of women of advanced maternal age (AMA ... Section 1 will discuss defects that emerge with age in controlling the fidelity of meiotic oocyte chromosome segregation ...
  https://www.frontiersin.org/research-topics/6334/causes-of-oocyte-aneuploidy-and-infertility-in-advanced-maternal-age-and-emerging-therapeutic-approa
*  Maternal age, social changes, and pregnancy outcome in Ribeirão Preto, southeast Brazil, in 1978-79 and 1994
Key words Birth Weight; Maternal Age; Social Conditions Resumo Foram estudadas as mudanças nos padrões demográficos, sociais e ... Maternal age, social changes, and pregnancy outcome in Ribeirão Preto, southeast Brazil, in 1978-79 and 1994 Idade materna, ... Association of young maternal age with adverse reproductive outcomes. New England Journal of Medicine, 332:1113-1117. [ Links ] ... Thus, all births were included, although some data were not found in the medical records, such as maternal age, parity, newborn ...
  http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-311X2000000400022&lng=en&nrm=iso
*  Association of Maternal Age to Development and Progression of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Infants of Gestational Age under 33...
Association of Maternal Age to Development and Progression of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Infants of Gestational Age under 33 ... 95% CI, 0.994-0.998), and lower maternal age (. ; 95% CI, 0.819-0.991) were the risk factors for ROP development and GA (. ; 95 ... and maternal age (. ). All the other variables were not significant. The odds ratio of requiring laser treatment was 3.3 when ... and maternal age (. ). Nonsignificant variables were SGA, Apgar score (1 and 5 minutes), multiple birth, gender, and the usage ...
  https://www.hindawi.com/journals/joph/2014/187929/
*  Impact of maternal age on obstetric and neonatal outcome with emphasis on primiparous adolescents and older women: a Swedish...
Impact of maternal age on obstetric and neonatal outcome with emphasis on primiparous adolescents and older women: a Swedish ... Objectives: To evaluate the associations between maternal age and obstetric and neonatal outcomes in primiparous women with ... The results imply that there is a need for individualising antenatal surveillance programmes and obstetric care based on age ... The reference group consisted of the women aged 25-29 years. Primary outcome: Obstetric and neonatal outcome. Results: The ...
  http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/record.jsf?pid=diva2:779298
*  Mikko Myrskylä - Maternal Age and Offspring Outcomes | Population Studies Center
The Population Studies Center (PSC) at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) has fostered research and training in population since 1962, with support from the NICHD P30 program from 1978-2003 and the R24 Population Research Infrastructure Program since 2003. Our goal is to remain a national and world leader in research on the growth and structure of human populations and on the role of socioeconomic stratification and human and social diversity on the health of populations. The PSC is characterized by strong continuity in the production of high-quality research on demography, population-based studies of health and human development, and behavioral and social science approaches to sexually transmitted diseases and reproductive health. ...
  http://www.pop.upenn.edu/event/mikko-myrskyl%C3%A4-maternal-age-and-offspring-outcomes
*  Biomedical & Health Informatics
Maternal, Infant, and Child Health - Epidemiology Summit 2018 (Japan). *Maternal, Infant, and Child Health - Public Health ... Anti-Aging Skin Care - Wound Care Europe 2018 (Italy). *Applied Health Economics and Health Policy - Health Economics 2018 ( ... Yoga for Pregnancy & Aging - Yoga Meditation 2018 (Indonesia). *Yoga for the Brain & Nervous System - Yoga Meditation 2018 ( ... Healthy Aging and Longevity - Health Economics 2018 (Netherlands). *Herbal Drug Procreation & Manufacturing - Herbal Medicine ...
  https://publichealthcongress.conferenceseries.com/events-list/biomedical-health-informatics
*  Dienekes' Anthropology Blog: 02/2013
New Radiometric Ages for the BH-1 Hominin from Balanica (Serbia): Implications for Understanding the Role of the Balkans in ... To investigate this haplogroup's significance in the maternal population history of Europeans we employed novel techniques such ... Specifically, our aging of this European haplogroup to 5,800 (±SE = 1750) or 8,400 (±SE = 2500) years (depending on the dingo ... Using ultrafiltration to purify faunal bone collagen before radiocarbon dating, we obtain ages at least 10 ka 14C years older, ...
  http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2013_02_01_archive.html?m=0
*  Needs Communication: viable need patterns and their identification
In the light of the current image of man, there is a basic human need for gradual aging and the eventual death of the ... as with the adolescent attempting to throw off the paternal and maternal scaffolding of family life. But they do not contain ... the death of Tagore, Aurobindo, Jung, etc.), in which age is felt to be a consequence and a measure of experience; ... in ignoring the cyclic significance of aging and death as the necessary counterparts of growth and birth, almost implying a ...
  https://www.laetusinpraesens.org/docs/needs.php
*  Midlife crisis facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Midlife crisis
O'Gorman, H. J. "False Consciousness of Kind: Pluralistic Ignorance among the Aged." Research on Aging 2 (1980): 105-128. ... or experience a sudden onset of maternal instincts including the desire to have a child. ... Aging in the Eighties: America in Transition. Washington, D.C.: National Council on the Aging, 1981. ... Such age-related stereotypes are not only present with regard to old age but also exist for midlife. The myth of the midlife ...
  https://www.encyclopedia.com/medicine/psychology/psychology-and-psychiatry/midlife-crisis

Prenatal nutrition: Nutrition and weight management before and during :pregnancy has a profound effect on the development of infants. This is a rather critical time for healthy fetal development as infants rely heavily on maternal stores and nutrient for optimal growth and health outcome later in life.Paternal age effect: The paternal age effect is the statistical relationship between paternal age at conception and biological effects on the child. Such effects can relate to birthweight, congenital disorders, life expectancy, and psychological outcomes.National Down Syndrome SocietyBirth weight: Birth weight is the body weight of a baby at its birth.Definitions from Georgia Department of Public Health.Gestational age: Gestational age (or menstrual age) is a measure of the age of a pregnancy where the origin is the woman's last normal menstrual period (LMP), or the corresponding age as estimated by other methods. Such methods include adding 14 days to a known duration since fertilization (as is possible in in vitro fertilization), or by obstetric ultrasonography.Prenatal diagnosis: Prenatal diagnosis or prenatal screening (note that prenatal diagnosis and prenatal screening refer to two different types of tests) is testing for diseases or conditions in a fetus or embryo before it is born. The aim is to detect birth defects such as neural tube defects, Down syndrome, chromosome abnormalities, genetic disorders and other conditions, such as spina bifida, cleft palate, Tay Sachs disease, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, cystic fibrosis, Muscular dystrophy, and fragile X syndrome.Trisomy 9National Birth Defects Prevention Network: The National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) was founded in 1997. It is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit volunteer organization whose members are involved in birth defects surveillance, prevention and research.QRISK: QRISK2 (the most recent version of QRISK) is a prediction algorithm for cardiovascular disease (CVD) that uses traditional risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and ratio of total serum cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) together with body mass index, ethnicity, measures of deprivation, family history, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, and antihypertensive treatment.Lower segment Caesarean section: A lower (uterine) segment Caesarean section (LSCS) is the most commonly used type of Caesarean section used today. It includes a transverse cut just above the edge of the bladder and results in less blood loss and is easier to repair than other types of Caesarean sections.Low birth-weight paradox: The low birth-weight paradox is an apparently paradoxical observation relating to the birth weights and mortality rate of children born to tobacco smoking mothers. Low birth-weight children born to smoking mothers have a lower infant mortality rate than the low birth weight children of non-smokers.Mothers TalkOmphaloceleGastroschisisYury VerlinskyNatural cycle in vitro fertilization: Natural Cycle IVF is in vitro fertilisation (IVF) using either of the following procedures:Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and StillbirthTeenage Mother (film): Teenage Mother (a.k.Genetic imbalance: Genetic imbalance is to describe situation when the genome of a cell or organism has more copies of some genes than other genes due to chromosomal rearrangements or aneuploidy.Maternal-fetal medicine: Maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) is the branch of obstetrics that focuses on the medical and surgical management of high-risk pregnancies. Management includes monitoring and treatment including comprehensive ultrasound, chorionic villus sampling, genetic amniocentesis, and fetal surgery or treatment.Obstetric labor complicationTwin reversed arterial perfusionDisease registry: Disease or patient registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition, or procedure, and they play an important role in post marketing surveillance of pharmaceuticals. Registries are different from indexes in that they contain more extensive data.Nested case-control study: A nested case control (NCC) study is a variation of a case-control study in which only a subset of controls from the cohort are compared to the incident cases. In a case-cohort study, all incident cases in the cohort are compared to a random subset of participants who do not develop the disease of interest.Victor Willard: Victor M. Willard (1813 – December 10, 1869) was an American farmer from Waterford, Wisconsin who spent two years (1849–1850) as a Free Soil Party member of the Wisconsin State Senate from the 17th District.Breastfeeding promotionReproductive technology: Reproductive technology (RT) encompasses all current and anticipated uses of technology in human and animal reproduction, including assisted reproductive technology, contraception and others.Nasal fractureInternational Association of Plastics DistributorsEmbryo transfer: Embryo transfer refers to a step in the process of assisted reproduction in which embryos are placed into the uterus of a female with the intent to establish a pregnancy. This technique (which is often used in connection with in vitro fertilization (IVF)), may be used in humans or in animals, in which situations the goals may vary.Regression dilution: Regression dilution, also known as regression attenuation, is the biasing of the regression slope towards zero (or the underestimation of its absolute value), caused by errors in the independent variable.Hospital of Southern Norway: [[Sørlandet Hospital Arendal, seen from the north.|thumb|200px]]Age adjustment: In epidemiology and demography, age adjustment, also called age standardization, is a technique used to allow populations to be compared when the age profiles of the populations are quite different.Elizabeth of Carinthia, Queen of Sicily: Elizabeth of Carinthia (1298-1352) was an influential queen and royal family member in the Kingdom of Sicily, who lived and ruled in a tumultuous time. In 1323, she married Peter II of Sicily and became the Queen of Sicily.Relative index of inequality: The relative index of inequality (RII) is a regression-based index which summarizes the magnitude of socio-economic status (SES) as a source of inequalities in health. RII is useful because it takes into account the size of the population and the relative disadvantage experienced by different groups.Gestational hypertensionAarhus Faculty of Health Sciences (Aarhus University): The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences is a faculty of Aarhus University. The Aarhus Faculty of Health Sciences became a reality after Aarhus University was divided into four new main academic areas which came into effect on 1 January 2011.Estriol

(1/2227) Effect of the interval between pregnancies on perinatal outcomes.

BACKGROUND: A short interval between pregnancies has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Whether that association is due to confounding by other risk factors, such as maternal age, socioeconomic status, and reproductive history, is unknown. METHODS: We evaluated the interpregnancy interval in relation to low birth weight, preterm birth, and small size for gestational age by analyzing data from the birth certificates of 173,205 singleton infants born alive to multiparous mothers in Utah from 1989 to 1996. RESULTS: Infants conceived 18 to 23 months after a previous live birth had the lowest risks of adverse perinatal outcomes; shorter and longer interpregnancy intervals were associated with higher risks. These associations persisted when the data were stratified according to and controlled for 16 biologic, sociodemographic, and behavioral risk factors. As compared with infants conceived 18 to 23 months after a live birth, infants conceived less than 6 months after a live birth had odds ratios of 1.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 1.6) for low birth weight, 1.4 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 1.5) for preterm birth, and 1.3 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 1.4) for small size for gestational age; infants conceived 120 months or more after a live birth had odds ratios of 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.7 to 2.4);1.5 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.3 to 1.7), and 1.8 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.6 to 2.0) for these three adverse outcomes, respectively, when we controlled for all 16 risk factors with logistic regression. CONCLUSIONS: The optimal interpregnancy interval for preventing adverse perinatal outcomes is 18 to 23 months.  (+info)

(2/2227) Maternal smoking and Down syndrome: the confounding effect of maternal age.

Inconsistent results have been reported from studies evaluating the association of maternal smoking with birth of a Down syndrome child. Control of known risk factors, particularly maternal age, has also varied across studies. By using a population-based case-control design (775 Down syndrome cases and 7,750 normal controls) and Washington State birth record data for 1984-1994, the authors examined this hypothesized association and found a crude odds ratio of 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.65-0.98). Controlling for broad categories of maternal age (<35 years, > or =35 years), as described in prior studies, resulted in a negative association (odds ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.71-1.07). However, controlling for exact year of maternal age in conjunction with race and parity resulted in no association (odds ratio = 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.82-1.24). In this study, the prevalence of Down syndrome births increased with increasing maternal age, whereas among controls the reported prevalence of smoking during pregnancy decreased with increasing maternal age. There is a substantial potential for residual confounding by maternal age in studies of maternal smoking and Down syndrome. After adequately controlling for maternal age in this study, the authors found no clear relation between maternal smoking and the risk of Down syndrome.  (+info)

(3/2227) Energy intake, not energy output, is a determinant of body size in infants.

BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that the primary determinants of body weight at 1 y of age are genetic background, as represented by parental obesity, and low total energy expenditure. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine the relative contributions of genetic background and energy intake and expenditure as determinants of body weight at 1 y of age. DESIGN: Forty infants of obese and 38 infants of lean mothers, half boys and half girls, were assessed at 3 mo of age for 10 risk factors for obesity: sex, risk group (obese or nonobese mothers), maternal and paternal body mass index, body weight, feeding mode (breast, bottle, or both), 3-d energy intake, nutritive sucking behavior during a test meal, total energy expenditure, sleeping energy expenditure, and interactions among them. RESULTS: The only difference between risk groups at baseline was that the high-risk group sucked more vigorously during the test meal. Four measures accounted for 62% of the variability in weight at 12 mo: 3-mo weight (41%, P = 0.0001), nutritive sucking behavior (9%, P = 0.0002), 3-d food intake (8%, P = 0.0002), and male sex (3%, P = 0.05). Food intake and sucking behavior at 3 mo accounted for similar amounts of variability in weight-for-length, body fat, fat-free mass, and skinfold thickness at 12 mo. Contrary to expectations, neither total nor sleeping energy expenditure at 3 mo nor maternal obesity contributed to measures of body size at 12 mo. CONCLUSIONS: Energy intake contributes significantly to measures of body weight and composition at 1 y of age; parental obesity and energy expenditure do not.  (+info)

(4/2227) Breast cancer risk in monozygotic and dizygotic female twins: a 20-year population-based cohort study in Finland from 1976 to 1995.

This population-based study investigated the occurrence of breast cancer over a 20-year period in a cohort of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins in Finland. Altogether, 13,176 female twins of known zygosity who were living in Finland at the end of 1975 were identified from the Finnish Twin Cohort Study and followed-up for cancer through the Finnish Cancer Registry for the years 1976-1995. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated, based on national cancer incidence rates. The relative risk of breast cancer for MZ twins compared to DZ twins was decreased [SIR(MZ)/SIR(DZ) ratio = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58-1.0]; the decreased risk for MZ twins (SIR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.58-1.0) accounted for this result, whereas the risk for DZ twins did not differ from the general population risk (SIR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84-1.1). There was no risk decrease among MZ twins in other cancers related to reproductive behavior; i.e., number of children and age at first birth seem not to explain the decreased risk of breast cancer. Our results, which are in line with earlier studies on the same topic, suggest that prenatal influences or postnatal behavioral factors may protect MZ female twins from breast cancer.  (+info)

(5/2227) A family study of coarctation of the aorta.

Families of 100 patients with coarctation of the aorta and 50 controls for age, sex, and social status were studied to assess the influence of genetic and environmental variables in the aetiology. A tendency to familial aggregation of the condition and other congenital heart defects compatible with multifactorial inheritance was discerned. Recurrence risk for sibs is approximately 1 in 200 for coarctation of the aorta, and 1% for any form of congenital heart defect. The heritability of coarctation is estimated at 58%. The tendency for other non-cardiac defects to occur in the patients with coarctation does not appear in their sibs and is not so pronounced as in some other congenital heart conditions. Of the several environmental variables examined, there was no definitive association with any other than season of birth, which implies a possible association with maternal infection; there is also a suggestion of a paternal age effect, but these require investigation in a prospective survey.  (+info)

(6/2227) Fertility patterns after appendicectomy: historical cohort study.

OBJECTIVE: To examine fertility patterns in women who had their appendix removed in childhood. DESIGN: Historical cohort study with computerised data and fertility data for this cohort and for an age matched cohort of women from the Swedish general population. The cohorts were followed to 1994. SETTING: General population. PARTICIPANTS: 9840 women who were under 15 years when they underwent appendicectomy between 1964 and 1983; 47 590 control women. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnoses at discharge. Distributions of age at birth of first child among women with perforated and non-perforated appendix and women who underwent appendicectomy but were found to have a normal appendix compared with control women by using survival analysis methods. Parity distributions at the latest update of the registry were also examined. RESULTS: Women with a history of perforated appendix had a similar rate of first birth as the control women (adjusted hazard ratio 0.95; 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1. 04) and had a similar distribution of parity at the end of follow up. Women who had had a normal appendix removed had an increased rate of first births (1.48; 1.42 to 1.54) and on average had their first child at an earlier age and reached a higher parity than control women. CONCLUSION: A history of perforated appendix in childhood does not seem to have long term negative consequences on female fertility. This may have important implications for the management of young women with suspected appendicitis as the liberal attitude to surgical explorations with a subsequently high rate of removal of a normal appendix is often justified by a perceived increased risk of infertility after perforation. Women whose appendix was found to be normal at appendicectomy in childhood seem to belong to a subgroup with a higher fertility than the general population.  (+info)

(7/2227) Maternal age- and gestation-specific risk for trisomy 21.

OBJECTIVE: To provide estimates of maternal age- and gestational age-related risks for trisomy 21. METHODS: The prevalence of trisomy 21 was examined in 57,614 women who had fetal karyotyping at 9-16 weeks of gestation for the sole indication of maternal age of 35 years or more. On the basis of the maternal age distribution and the reported maternal age-related risk for trisomy 21 at birth, the expected number of trisomy 21 cases was calculated for each gestational age subgroup (9-10 weeks, 11-14 weeks and 15-16 weeks). The ratio of the observed to expected number of cases of trisomy 21 was then calculated and regression analysis was applied to derive a smoothened curve. The formula for maternal age- and gestational age-related risk was then applied to a population of 96,127 pregnancies that were examined at 10-14 weeks to calculate the expected number of trisomy 21 pregnancies, and this number was compared to the observed number of 326. RESULTS: In the 57,614 pregnancies there were 538 cases of trisomy 21. The relative prevalences of trisomy 21, compared to a prevalence of 1.0 at 40 weeks, was 10 exp(0.2718 x log(10)(gestation)2 - 1.023 x log10(gestation) + 0.9425). On the basis of the estimated maternal age- and gestational age-related risks, the expected number of trisomy 21 cases at 10-14 weeks of gestation in the 96,127 pregnancies was 329 (95% confidence interval 291-361), which was not significantly different from the observed number of 326 cases (chi2 = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The risk for trisomy 21 increases with maternal age and decreases with gestation. The prevalence of trisomy 21 at 12 and 16 weeks of gestation is higher than the prevalence at 40 weeks by 30% and 21%, respectively.  (+info)

(8/2227) Is maternal age a risk factor for mental retardation among children?

The purpose of this study was to determine whether older or very young maternal age at delivery is associated with mental retardation in children. Ten-year-old children with mental retardation (an intelligence quotient of 70 or less) were identified in 1985-1987 from multiple sources in the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, area. These children were subdivided into two case groups according to whether they had concomitant developmental disabilities or birth defects affecting the central nervous system (codevelopmental retardation) or did not have such disabilities (isolated retardation). Control children were randomly chosen from the regular education files of the public school systems in the study area. Data on sociodemographic variables were gathered from birth certificates. Children of teenaged mothers were not at increased risk for either form of retardation and children of mothers aged > or =30 years were not at increased risk for isolated retardation, in comparison with children of mothers aged 20-29 years. A markedly elevated risk of codevelopmental retardation was seen among black children of mothers aged > or =30 years that was not attributable to Down syndrome. A modest increase in risk for codevelopmental retardation was observed among white children born to older mothers, but it was entirely due to Down syndrome.  (+info)