Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Lymph: The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Lymphatic Metastasis: Transfer of a neoplasm from its primary site to lymph nodes or to distant parts of the body by way of the lymphatic system.Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy: A diagnostic procedure used to determine whether LYMPHATIC METASTASIS has occurred. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive drainage from a neoplasm.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Tuberculosis, Lymph Node: Infection of the lymph nodes by tuberculosis. Tuberculous infection of the cervical lymph nodes is scrofula.Lymphatic Diseases: Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Mesentery: A layer of the peritoneum which attaches the abdominal viscera to the ABDOMINAL WALL and conveys their blood vessels and nerves.Mediastinum: A membrane in the midline of the THORAX of mammals. It separates the lungs between the STERNUM in front and the VERTEBRAL COLUMN behind. It also surrounds the HEART, TRACHEA, ESOPHAGUS, THYMUS, and LYMPH NODES.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Lymphoid Tissue: Specialized tissues that are components of the lymphatic system. They provide fixed locations within the body where a variety of LYMPHOCYTES can form, mature and multiply. The lymphoid tissues are connected by a network of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Dendritic Cells: Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Mice, Inbred BALB CT-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Mice, Inbred C57BLMelanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Lymphadenitis: Inflammation of the lymph nodes.Lymphography: Radiographic study of the lymphatic system following injection of dye or contrast medium.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Ranvier's Nodes: Regularly spaced gaps in the myelin sheaths of peripheral axons. Ranvier's nodes allow saltatory conduction, that is, jumping of impulses from node to node, which is faster and more energetically favorable than continuous conduction.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Rosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.Gastrectomy: Excision of the whole (total gastrectomy) or part (subtotal gastrectomy, partial gastrectomy, gastric resection) of the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Technetium Tc 99m Sulfur Colloid: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, liver, and spleen.Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast: An invasive (infiltrating) CARCINOMA of the mammary ductal system (MAMMARY GLANDS) in the human BREAST.Neoplasm Micrometastasis: Newly arising secondary tumors so small they are difficult to detect by physical examination or routine imaging techniques.Technetium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain TECHNETIUM as an integral part of the molecule. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) is an isotope of technetium that has a half-life of about 6 hours. Technetium 99, which has a half-life of 210,000 years, is a decay product of technetium 99m.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Lymphangiogenesis: The formation of LYMPHATIC VESSELS.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Giant Lymph Node Hyperplasia: Large benign, hyperplastic lymph nodes. The more common hyaline vascular subtype is characterized by small hyaline vascular follicles and interfollicular capillary proliferations. Plasma cells are often present and represent another subtype with the plasma cells containing IgM and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Peyer's Patches: Lymphoid tissue on the mucosa of the small intestine.Local Lymph Node Assay: The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is an alternative method for the identification of chemicals that have the ability to cause skin sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. Endpoints have been established so fewer animals are required and less painful procedures are used.Inguinal Canal: The tunnel in the lower anterior ABDOMINAL WALL through which the SPERMATIC CORD, in the male; ROUND LIGAMENT, in the female; nerves; and vessels pass. Its internal end is at the deep inguinal ring and its external end is at the superficial inguinal ring.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Receptors, CCR7: CCR receptors with specificity for CHEMOKINE CCL19 and CHEMOKINE CCL21. They are expressed at high levels in T-LYMPHOCYTES; B-LYMPHOCYTES; and DENDRITIC CELLS.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor C: A vascular endothelial growth factor that specifically binds to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-2 and VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-3. In addition to being an angiogenic factor it can act on LYMPHATIC VESSELS to stimulate LYMPHANGIOGENESIS. It is similar in structure to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR D in that they both contain N- and C-terminal extensions that were not found in other VEGF family members.Radiopharmaceuticals: Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)Esophageal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ESOPHAGUS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Antigens: Substances that are recognized by the immune system and induce an immune reaction.Lymphatic Irradiation: External or interstitial irradiation to treat lymphomas (e.g., Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and lymph node metastases and also some autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of T-lymphocytes involved in the induction of most immunological functions. The HIV virus has selective tropism for the T4 cell which expresses the CD4 phenotypic marker, a receptor for HIV. In fact, the key element in the profound immunosuppression seen in HIV infection is the depletion of this subset of T-lymphocytes.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Lymphoscintigraphy: Radionuclide imaging of the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Histiocytes: Macrophages found in the TISSUES, as opposed to those found in the blood (MONOCYTES) or serous cavities (SEROUS MEMBRANE).Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.False Negative Reactions: Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Carcinoma, Papillary: A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Langerhans Cells: Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)Chemotherapy, Adjuvant: Drug therapy given to augment or stimulate some other form of treatment such as surgery or radiation therapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Positron-Emission Tomography: An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Rectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the RECTUM.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.L-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.Chemokine CCL21: A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR7 RECEPTORS. It has activity towards DENDRITIC CELLS and T-LYMPHOCYTES.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Frozen Sections: Thinly cut sections of frozen tissue specimens prepared with a cryostat or freezing microtome.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Oxazolone: Immunologic adjuvant and sensitizing agent.Endothelium, Lymphatic: Unbroken cellular lining (intima) of the lymph vessels (e.g., the high endothelial lymphatic venules). It is more permeable than vascular endothelium, lacking selective absorption and functioning mainly to remove plasma proteins that have filtered through the capillaries into the tissue spaces.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Ovalbumin: An albumin obtained from the white of eggs. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Fluorodeoxyglucose F18: The compound is given by intravenous injection to do POSITRON-EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY for the assessment of cerebral and myocardial glucose metabolism in various physiological or pathological states including stroke and myocardial ischemia. It is also employed for the detection of malignant tumors including those of the brain, liver, and thyroid gland. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1162)T-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of T-lymphocytes, especially into helper/inducer, suppressor/effector, and cytotoxic subsets, based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Radiotherapy, Adjuvant: Radiotherapy given to augment some other form of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. Adjuvant radiotherapy is commonly used in the therapy of cancer and can be administered before or after the primary treatment.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Adoptive Transfer: Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).Esophagectomy: Excision of part (partial) or all (total) of the esophagus. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cystectomy: Used for excision of the urinary bladder.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Immunization: Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Endosonography: Ultrasonography of internal organs using an ultrasound transducer sometimes mounted on a fiberoptic endoscope. In endosonography the transducer converts electronic signals into acoustic pulses or continuous waves and acts also as a receiver to detect reflected pulses from within the organ. An audiovisual-electronic interface converts the detected or processed echo signals, which pass through the electronics of the instrument, into a form that the technologist can evaluate. The procedure should not be confused with ENDOSCOPY which employs a special instrument called an endoscope. The "endo-" of endosonography refers to the examination of tissue within hollow organs, with reference to the usual ultrasonography procedure which is performed externally or transcutaneously.Biopsy, Fine-Needle: Using fine needles (finer than 22-gauge) to remove tissue or fluid specimens from the living body for examination in the pathology laboratory and for disease diagnosis.Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D: A vascular endothelial growth factor that specifically binds to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-2 and VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR-3. In addition to being an angiogenic factor it can act on LYMPHATIC VESSELS to stimulate LYMPHANGIOGENESIS. It is similar in structure to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR C in that they both contain N- and C-terminal extensions that were not found in other VEGF family members.Uterine Cervical Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERINE CERVIX.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Keratins: A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Technetium Tc 99m Aggregated Albumin: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in cardiovascular and cerebral circulation.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Palatine Tonsil: A round-to-oval mass of lymphoid tissue embedded in the lateral wall of the PHARYNX. There is one on each side of the oropharynx in the fauces between the anterior and posterior pillars of the SOFT PALATE.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Lymphotoxin-beta: A membrane-bound tumor necrosis family member found primarily on LYMPHOCYTES. It can form a heterotrimer (LYMPHOTOXIN ALPHA1, BETA2 HETEROTRIMER) with the soluble ligand LYMPHOTOXIN-ALPHA and anchor it to the cell surface. The membrane-bound complex is specific for the LYMPHOTOXIN BETA receptor.Penile Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the PENIS or of its component tissues.Mediastinoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the anterior superior mediastinum of the thorax.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory: CD4-positive T cells that inhibit immunopathology or autoimmune disease in vivo. They inhibit the immune response by influencing the activity of other cell types. Regulatory T-cells include naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ cells, IL-10 secreting Tr1 cells, and Th3 cells.Mice, Inbred CBAFatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Keratin-19: A type I keratin found associated with KERATIN-7 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing: Cell surface glycoproteins on lymphocytes and other leukocytes that mediate adhesion to specialized blood vessels called high endothelial venules. Several different classes of lymphocyte homing receptors have been identified, and they appear to target different surface molecules (addressins) on high endothelial venules in different tissues. The adhesion plays a crucial role in the trafficking of lymphocytes.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Adenocarcinoma, Papillary: An adenocarcinoma containing finger-like processes of vascular connective tissue covered by neoplastic epithelium, projecting into cysts or the cavity of glands or follicles. It occurs most frequently in the ovary and thyroid gland. (Stedman, 25th ed)Lymphedema: Edema due to obstruction of lymph vessels or disorders of the lymph nodes.Receptors, Estrogen: Cytoplasmic proteins that bind estrogens and migrate to the nucleus where they regulate DNA transcription. Evaluation of the state of estrogen receptors in breast cancer patients has become clinically important.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Receptors, Chemokine: Cell surface glycoproteins that bind to chemokines and thus mediate the migration of pro-inflammatory molecules. The receptors are members of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family. Like the CHEMOKINES themselves, the receptors can be divided into at least three structural branches: CR, CCR, and CXCR, according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.Antigens, Surface: Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Injections, Subcutaneous: Forceful administration under the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the skin.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Mastectomy, Modified Radical: Total mastectomy with axillary node dissection, but with preservation of the pectoral muscles.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Antigens, CD11c: An integrin alpha subunit of approximately 150-kDa molecular weight. It is expressed at high levels on monocytes and combines with CD18 ANTIGEN to form the cell surface receptor INTEGRIN ALPHAXBETA2. The subunit contains a conserved I-domain which is characteristic of several of alpha integrins.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Keratin-20: A type I keratin expressed predominately in gastrointestinal epithelia, MERKEL CELLS, and the TASTE BUDS of the oral mucosa.Antigen Presentation: The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)Bacterial Translocation: The passage of viable bacteria from the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT to extra-intestinal sites, such as the mesenteric lymph node complex, liver, spleen, kidney, and blood. Factors that promote bacterial translocation include overgrowth with gram-negative enteric bacilli, impaired host immune defenses, and injury to the INTESTINAL MUCOSA resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Bacterial translocation from the lung to the circulation is also possible and sometimes accompanies MECHANICAL VENTILATION.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Cytodiagnosis: Diagnosis of the type and, when feasible, the cause of a pathologic process by means of microscopic study of cells in an exudate or other form of body fluid. (Stedman, 26th ed)Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Picryl Chloride: A hapten that generates suppressor cells capable of down-regulating the efferent phase of trinitrophenol-specific contact hypersensitivity. (Arthritis Rheum 1991 Feb;34(2):180).Neoplasm Transplantation: Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.Mice, Inbred C3HGranuloma: A relatively small nodular inflammatory lesion containing grouped mononuclear phagocytes, caused by infectious and noninfectious agents.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Interleukin-4: A soluble factor produced by activated T-LYMPHOCYTES that induces the expression of MHC CLASS II GENES and FC RECEPTORS on B-LYMPHOCYTES and causes their proliferation and differentiation. It also acts on T-lymphocytes, MAST CELLS, and several other hematopoietic lineage cells.Receptors, Progesterone: Specific proteins found in or on cells of progesterone target tissues that specifically combine with progesterone. The cytosol progesterone-receptor complex then associates with the nucleic acids to initiate protein synthesis. There are two kinds of progesterone receptors, A and B. Both are induced by estrogen and have short half-lives.Antibody-Producing Cells: Cells of the lymphoid series that can react with antigen to produce specific cell products called antibodies. Various cell subpopulations, often B-lymphocytes, can be defined, based on the different classes of immunoglobulins that they synthesize.Gamma Cameras: Electronic instruments that produce photographs or cathode-ray tube images of the gamma-ray emissions from organs containing radionuclide tracers.Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Th2 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete the interleukins IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10. These cytokines influence B-cell development and antibody production as well as augmenting humoral responses.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Lymphotoxin beta Receptor: A member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. It has specificity for LYMPHOTOXIN ALPHA1, BETA2 HETEROTRIMER and TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR LIGAND SUPERFAMILY MEMBER 14. The receptor plays a role in regulating lymphoid ORGANOGENESIS and the differentiation of certain subsets of NATURAL KILLER T-CELLS. Signaling of the receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Lymphotoxin-alpha: A tumor necrosis factor family member that is released by activated LYMPHOCYTES. Soluble lymphotoxin is specific for TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTOR TYPE I; TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTOR TYPE II; and TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR RECEPTOR SUPERFAMILY, MEMBER 14. Lymphotoxin-alpha can form a membrane-bound heterodimer with LYMPHOTOXIN-BETA that has specificity for the LYMPHOTOXIN BETA RECEPTOR.Sarcoidosis: An idiopathic systemic inflammatory granulomatous disorder comprised of epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells with little necrosis. It usually invades the lungs with fibrosis and may also involve lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen, eyes, phalangeal bones, and parotid glands.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Injections, Intradermal: The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.Neoplasms, Unknown Primary: Metastases in which the tissue of origin is unknown.Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Methylene Blue: A compound consisting of dark green crystals or crystalline powder, having a bronze-like luster. Solutions in water or alcohol have a deep blue color. Methylene blue is used as a bacteriologic stain and as an indicator. It inhibits GUANYLATE CYCLASE, and has been used to treat cyanide poisoning and to lower levels of METHEMOGLOBIN.

*  Lymph Nodes - Breast Cancer - MedHelp

Can you have lymph nodes in you armpit that you feel and not have any noticable changes in your breast? ... Why is it that when you enter lymph node pain online you get nothing but cancer links? What else can cause lymph node pain? I ... Another time that lymph nodes can be felt is if there has been an infection. For example if a pierced ear has been infected, ... My doctor told me not to worry, that it took a long time for a lymph node to return to normal. It would on occassion burn or ...
medhelp.org/posts/Breast-Cancer/Lymph-Nodes/show/260055

*  Swollen inguinal lymph nodes - Dermatology - MedHelp

I am quite sure it is a swollen lymph node. It is 2cm x 0.6 cm in size. In some position you almost can not see if you d... ... This kind of bump can be a swollen lymph node,a sebaceous cyst or a boil. Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) is usually ... This kind of bump can be a swollen lymph node,a sebaceous cyst or a boil. Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) is usually ... Swollen inguinal lymph nodes. Hi! I am 25 years old girl. A week before I notice a little bump in my groin. I am quite sure it ...
medhelp.org/posts/Dermatology/Swollen-inguinal-lymph-nodes/show/1925148

*  Pyloric lymph nodes definition | Drugs.com

Definition of pyloric lymph nodes. Provided by Stedman's medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... pyloric lymph nodes. Definition: group of lymph nodes surrounding the pylorus, draining lymph into the right gastric or the ... Synonym(s): gastroduodenal lymph nodes, nodi lymphoidei pylorici. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on GooglePlus Print ... suprapyloric nodes, superior to the pylorus; subpyloric nodes, inferior to the pylorus; and retropyloric nodes, posterior to ...
https://drugs.com/dict/pyloric-lymph-nodes.html

*  lymph node Clipart

Share and Use lymph node clipart and images from Openclipart ...
https://openclipart.org/tags/lymph node

*  Infraauricular deep parotid lymph nodes definition | Drugs.com

Definition of infraauricular deep parotid lymph nodes. Provided by Stedman's medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical ... Definition: small lymph nodes located deep to the parotid fascia and below the ear. ... infraauricular subfascial parotid lymph nodes. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on GooglePlus Print this page Email to ...
https://drugs.com/dict/infraauricular-deep-parotid-lymph-nodes.html

*  5y.o. w/ swollen lymph nodes... - Women's Health: Postpartum - MedHelp

Today I noticed that he now has a lot of swollen lymph nodes beginning from behind his ear and extending several inches down hi ... My son was born with 2 enlarged lymph nodes on the left side of his neck. ... 5y.o. w/ swollen lymph nodes.... My son was born with 2 enlarged lymph nodes on the left side of his neck. Today I noticed that ... I haven't checked his other lymph nodes (groin, armpit etc...) to see if there's any obvious nodes there. He may just be ...
medhelp.org/posts/Womens-Health-Postpartum/5yo--w--swollen-lymph-nodes/show/164102

*  swollen lymph nodes ina 6 month old... | CafeMom Answers

swollen lymph nodes ina 6 month old.... My 6 mo DS has had swollen lymph nodes in his neck and behind his ears since he was ... I know that swollen lymph nodes are a sight of infection that the body is fighting and having a hard time but it is doing its ...
cafemom.com/answers/667583/swollen_lymph_nodes_ina_6_month_old

*  Lymph Nodes - worried - Forum on Safe Sex and HIV Prevention -- TheBody.com

Your sore throat and swollen lymph nodes have to be because of something else. You should... ... Lymph Nodes - worried Dec 31, 2013. Can a person be HIV positive only in their Lymph Nodes and not test positive with a ... Your sore throat and swollen lymph nodes have to be because of something else. You should keep in mind that both those things ... One possibility is that you're constantly touching your lymph nodes.. if you're messing with them on a regular basis they could ...
thebody.com/Forums/AIDS/SafeSex/Q233531.html

*  Targeted Axillary Dissection of Lymph Nodes in Node-Positive Breast Cancer

... new procedure developed by surgeons at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center improves the staging accuracy in node- ... The TAD procedure involves removing sentinel lymph nodes, as well as additional cancerous lymph nodes found during diagnosis. ... the clipped node was not retrieved as a sentinel lymph node in 23% of the patients. This indicates that the node that was ... Several studies have shown that sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND), the less-invasive removal of one or a few key lymph ...
medindia.net/news/targeted-axillary-dissection-of-lymph-nodes-in-node-positive-breast-cancer-157241-1.htm

*  ATCC Products by Tissue - Lymph Node Page 2

ATCC holdings include a substantial collection of cell lines derived from lymph nodes, representing the normal and diseased ...
https://atcc.org/en/Products/Cells_and_Microorganisms/By_Tissue/Lymph_Node.aspx?dsNav=N:4294927656-4294926225

*  Lymph nodes can be key in spreading prion i... ( Lymph nodes can be crucial for sprea...)

...Lymph nodes can be crucial for spreading low doses of infective prion ...The research carried out by scientists in the group of Michael Beekes...Christine Kratzel and colleagues investigated the role of the lymphore...The team also noted that after a node had been removed and the wound n...,Lymph,nodes,can,be,key,in,spreading,prion,infectivity,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
bio-medicine.org/biology-news-1/Lymph-nodes-can-be-key-in-spreading-prion-infectivity-541-1/

*  Study Challenges Colon Cancer Surgery... ( Routine testing of 12 lymph nodes may...)

Health,...Routine testing of 12 lymph nodes may not be as useful as thought res...TUESDAY Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A new study is questioning the co...These post-op checks have been thought to be a good indicator of patie... What we are finding is that focusing on this quality indicator may no...,Study,Challenges,Colon,Cancer,Surgery,Follow-Up,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
bio-medicine.org/medicine-news-1/Study-Challenges-Colon-Cancer-Surgery-Follow-Up-6250-1/

*  from Kerfoot & Kubes, J Immunol 2002; 169: 1000) Anti-P-selectin alone blocks rolling, not other selectins. Expression is seen...

Both memory and effector CD4 + T cells express CD45RO - how to distinguish between the two? Ans. CCR7 CCR7- CD45RO+ T cells are effector-memory T cells - make cytokines, perforin, granzymes These cells don't enter lymph nodes 'Combination code' for entry of T cells to normal lymph nodes is L-selectin binding, followed by CCR7 signaling through SLC. This code is expressed by naive T cells and CCR7+ memory T cells, but not by certain cells that do not recirculate, and memory- effector T cells Other effector-memory T cells: CD8+ CD11b+ cells
slideplayer.com/slide/4344264/

*  Iliac lymph nodes - Answers on HealthTap

Answers from specialists on iliac lymph nodes. First: Sometimes these, and other nodes are palpable because of infection. Sometimes cancer can do it. Rock hard nodes would more likely mean cancer, while soft, painful ones would point to infection.
https://healthtap.com/topics/iliac-lymph-nodes

*  Plus it

Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lymph node biopsy specimens from 52 untreated patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large cell (n = 48) or mixed cell (n = 4) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) were analyzed for DNA content and proliferative activity (PA) by flow cytometry. The results obtained by flow cytometry were compared with the results of cytogenetic studies performed on 28 of the specimens. The median age of the patients was 65 years (range, 15-84 years) and the male to female ratio was 3 to 2. All patients were uniformly staged and uniformly treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, procarbazine, bleomycin, vincristine, and prednisone. The flow cytometric results were compared statistically by univariate analysis with the rate and duration of complete remission and survival. Tumors with low PA (≥80% of cells in G0/G1 phase) were found in 65% of the patients; 74% of those with low PA versus only 44% of those with high PA achieved an initial complete remission (P , ...
cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/48/22/6608

*  ECC 2013 Press Release: Treating Chest Lymph Nodes in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Improves Survival Without Increasing...

Radiation therapy to the lymph nodes located behind the breast bone and above the collar bone to patients with early breast cancer improves survival..
esmo.org/Conferences/Past-Conferences/European-Cancer-Congress-2013/News/ECC-2013-Press-Release-Treating-Chest-Lymph-Nodes-in-Patients-with-Early-Breast-Cancer-Improves-Survival-Without-Increasing-Side-Effects

*  Ask an Expert: Lymph node right clavical

I have had a swollen lymph node right clavical for about three weeks now. My doctor did a CT scan of chest and mammogram. Also chest X-ray and blood work which all came out normal. She put me on Augmentin for 10 days but I got sick from it, so now just straight Amoxicillin. She does not believe it`s cancer from the testing, and it`s also soft in touch. The node itself isn`t painful, but it is around my neck. I`m a 49 year old female, and she said if the Amoxicillin doesn`t take it down, then I would get a biopsy. However, the first time I was on it, she did say she thought it had gone down. I just want to know if this info seems correct and if all the appropriate testing up to this point has been done? ...
netwellness.org/question.cfm/61000.htm

*  Lymph Node Cancer Symptoms - InfoBarrel

Lymph node cancer is a type of cancer which involves your lymphatic system, which is a crucial part of your body's immunity process.
infobarrel.com/Lymph_Node_Cancer_Symptoms

*  Plus it

The intraepidermal DNA "tattoo" strategy is very potent as compared with intramuscular vaccination (21). The vaccine DNA is expressed in keratinocytes (22). How antigen is subsequently delivered to antigen-presenting cells (APC) is not known, but most likely part of the antigen passively drains to the lymph node and many APCs that receive antigen are not activated for lack of contact with "danger" signal. This follows from the fact that helper epitope inclusion and consequent CD4+ T-cell help robustly promotes the CTL response to the vaccine. We here make use of exogenous helper epitopes, and the CD4+ T cells raised can therefore not recognize the tumor, whereas they can deliver help for CTL priming and memory programming.. Intravital imaging of T cells and APCs in the lymph node is elucidating how CD4+ T-cell help for the CTL response is orchestrated. T-cell priming involves successive interactions between T cells and different APCs in the lymph node, as ...
cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/76/10/2921

*  Washington Area Informix User Group Newsletter

When an index is searched, the root node is read and the next node to read is determined based on the search value. This continues until a level 0 node is read. This node will contain the pointer to the actual data for the desired search value. This means that the more levels you have in your index tree the more reads that are required to search the index.. As the index tree grows its nodes will become full. When this occurs, the full node is split in two and the middle key value is inserted in the node at the next higher level with a pointer to the newly created node. If the node at the next higher level is full then that node is split and so on. When the root node becomes full, the root node splits forming a new node and adding another level to the B+ tree.. An index may be either unique or duplicate and may also be composite and/or clustered. A unique index is one where all of the key values have a different value. A duplicate index is one that allows different rows to have the same ...
advancedatatools.com/TechInfo/WAIUG/iugnew36.htm

*  C - Page 3 - TechUtils.in

include "pathfinding.hpp" #include "child_node_iterator.hpp" #include "path_not_found_exception.hpp" #include ,cstdlib, #include ,functional, #include ,iostream, #include ,unordered_set, #include ,utility, #include ,vector, using net::coderodde::pathfinding::child_node_iterator; using net::coderodde::pathfinding::heuristic_function; using net::coderodde::pathfinding::weight_function; using net::coderodde::pathfinding::weighted_path; using net::coderodde::pathfinding::find_shortest_path; using net::coderodde::pathfinding::path_not_found_exception; // This is just a sample graph node type. The only requirement for coupling it // with the search algorithms is 'bool operator==(const grid_node& other) const' // and 'begin()' + 'end()' for iterating over the child nodes. class grid_node { private: class grid_node_neighbor_iterator : public child_node_iterator,grid_node, { private: std::vector,grid_node*,* m_neighbor_vector; std::size_t m_index; public: ...
techutils.in/tag/c/page/3/

*  The pericyte and stromal cell marker CD248 (endosialin) is required for efficient lymph node expansion - Nuffield Department of...

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings ...
https://ndorms.ox.ac.uk/publications/727986

*  location of lymph nodes: The Riskiest Activities. What Activities are Riskiest?

HIV can be transmitted from person to person in many different ways. But which activities are the riskiest? Which activities carry the highest risk of HIV infection? Here are the most risky ...
locationoflymphnodes.blogspot.com/2012/07/riskiest-activities-what-activities-are.html

*  Pathology - S2B2 - WBC/Lymph 2 Flashcards - Cram.com

Study Flashcards On Pathology - S2B2 - WBC/Lymph 2 at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
cram.com/flashcards/pathology-s2b2-wbclymph-2-441168

*  Html Agility Pack - extract table from HTML and loop through its rows and cells

HtmlNodeCollection. To 'read' the nodes of a HtmlDocument, use DocumentNode property. DocumentNode is a HtmlNode object.. Another important thing to KNOW about is that SelectSingleNode and SelectNodes return null when no nodes are found. So in this code, you should test for null. Pretend table.SelectNodes('./tr') returns null, and there are 3 tables in the html document, your code will not go past the first one, and throw an exception.. HtmlDocument doc = HtmlWeb.Load('sample.html ...
https://htmlagilitypack.codeplex.com/discussions/67224

Inferior mesenteric lymph nodes: The inferior mesenteric lymph nodes consist of:Lymphovascular invasionMale breast cancerABCD rating: ABCD rating, also called the Jewett staging system or the Whitmore-Jewett staging system, is a staging system for prostate cancer that uses the letters A, B, C, and D.Tuberculous lymphadenitisDermatopathic lymphadenopathySinoatrial arrest: Sinoatrial arrest (also known as sinus arrest or sinus pause) is a medical condition wherein the sinoatrial node of the heart transiently ceases to generate the electrical impulses that normally stimulate the myocardial tissues to contract and thus the heart to beat. It is defined as lasting from 2.Breast cancer classification: Breast cancer classification divides breast cancer into categories according to different schemes, each based on different criteria and serving a different purpose. The major categories are the histopathological type, the grade of the tumor, the stage of the tumor, and the expression of proteins and genes.Lymph: Lymph is the fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system. The lymph is formed when the interstitial fluid (the fluid which lies in the interstices of all body tissues)Fluid Physiology: 2.Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths: Periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths (or periarterial lymphatic sheaths, or PALS) are a portion of the white pulp of the spleen. They are populated largely by T cells and surround central arteries within the spleen; the PALS T-cells are presented with blood borne antigens via myeloid dendritic cells.Cystic tumour of the atrioventricular nodal region: Cystic tumour of the atrioventricular nodal region is a very rare tumour of the heart in the region of the atrioventricular node. It is also known as mesothelioma of the atrioventricular node.LymphangionIntraepithelial lymphocyte: Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) are lymphocytes found in the epithelial layer of mammalian mucosal linings, such as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and reproductive tract. However, unlike other T cells, IELs do not need priming.Adenocarcinoma of the lung: Adenocarcinoma of the lung (pulmonary adenocarcinoma) is a common histological form of lung cancer that contains certain distinct malignant tissue architectural, cytological, or molecular features, including gland and/or duct formation and/or production of significant amounts of mucus.Acute myeloid dendritic cell leukemia: Acute myeloid dendritic cell leukemia is an exceedingly rare form of leukemia. This form of leukemia represents only about 0.Squamous-cell carcinomaPMHC cellular microarray: PMHC cellular microarrays are a type of cellular microarray that has been spotted with pMHC complexes peptide-MHC class I or peptide-MHC class II.James A. Schlipmann Melanoma Cancer Foundation: The James A. Schlipmann Melanoma Cancer Foundation is a US-based non-profit organization with a mission to fund clinical trials and research studies, and to advance education, awareness, screenings and treatment to eventually eradicate melanoma.Marseillevirus: Marseillevirus is a genus of viruses, in the family Marseilleviridae. There are currently only two species in this genus, including the type species Marseillevirus marseillevirus.Neck dissectionCancer biomarkers: A cancer biomarker refers to a substance or process that is indicative of the presence of cancer in the body. A biomarker may be a molecule secreted by a tumor or a specific response of the body to the presence of cancer.Haptotaxis: Haptotaxis (from Greek ἅπτω (hapto, "touch, fasten") and τάξις (taxis, "arrangement, order")) is the directional motility or outgrowth of cells, e.g.Anaplastic carcinoma: Anaplastic carcinoma is a general term for a malignant neoplasm arising from the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells of epithelial origin, or showing some epithelial characteristics, but that reveal no cytological or architectural features of associated with more differentiated tumors, such as the glandular formation or special cellular junctions that typical of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively.Saltatory conduction: Saltatory conduction (from the Latin saltare, to hop or leap) is the propagation of action potentials along myelinated axons from one node of Ranvier to the next node, increasing the conduction velocity of action potentials. The uninsulated nodes of Ranvier are the only places along the axon where ions are exchanged across the axon membrane, regenerating the action potential between regions of the axon that are insulated by myelin, unlike electrical conduction in a simple circuit.Assay sensitivity: Assay sensitivity is a property of a clinical trial defined as the ability of a trial to distinguish an effective treatment from a less effective or ineffective intervention. Without assay sensitivity, a trial is not internally valid and is not capable of comparing the efficacy of two interventions.FuchsineGastrectomyLumpectomyBectumomabGroin: In human anatomy, the groin (the adjective is inguinal, as in inguinal canal) is the junctional area (also known as the inguinal region) between the abdomen and the thighon either side of the pubic bone. This is also known as the medial compartment of the thigh that consists of the adductor muscles of the hip or the groin muscles.Cancer survival rates: Cancer survival rates vary by the type of cancer, stage at diagnosis, treatment given and many other factors, including country. In general survival rates are improving, although more so for some cancers than others.Lymphangiogenesis: Lymphangiogenesis is the formation of lymphatic vessels from pre-existing lymphatic vessels in a method believed to be similar to angiogenesis (blood vessel development).Castleman's diseasePeyer's patch: Peyer's patches (or aggregated lymphoid nodules, or occasionally PP for brevity) are organized lymphoid nodules, named after the 17th-century Swiss anatomist Johann Conrad Peyer. They are aggregations of lymphoid tissue that are usually found in the lowest portion of the small intestine, the ileum, in humans; as such, they differentiate the ileum from the duodenum and jejunum.Guinea pig maximisation test: The Guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT) is an in vivo test to screen for substances the cause human skin sensitisation (i.e.Superficial external pudendal artery: The superficial external pudendal artery (superficial external pudic artery) arises from the medial side of the femoral artery, close to the superficial epigastric artery and superficial iliac circumflex artery.Temporal analysis of products: Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP), (TAP-2), (TAP-3) is an experimental technique for studyingClinical endpoint: In a clinical research trial, a clinical endpoint generally refers to occurrence of a disease, symptom, sign or laboratory abnormality that constitutes one of the target outcomes of the trial, but may also refer to any such disease or sign that strongly motivates the withdrawal of that individual or entity from the trial, then often termed humane (clinical) endpoint.Avid Radiopharmaceuticals: Avid Radiopharmaceuticals is an American company, founded by Dr. Daniel Skovronsky, and based at the University City Science Center research campus in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.History and naming of human leukocyte antigens: Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) began as a list of antigens identified as a result of transplant rejection. The antigens were initially identified by categorizing and performing massive statistical analyses on interactions between blood types.Breast biopsyRetroperitoneal hemorrhageImmunoperoxidase: Immunoperoxidase is a type of immunostain used in molecular biology, medical research, and clinical diagnostics. In particular, immunoperoxidase reactions refer to a sub-class of immunohistochemical or immunocytochemical procedures in which the antibodies are visualized via a peroxidase-catalyzed reaction.HistiocyteFlow cytometry: In biotechnology, flow cytometry is a laser-based, biophysical technology employed in cell counting, cell sorting, biomarker detection and protein engineering, by suspending cells in a stream of fluid and passing them by an electronic detection apparatus. It allows simultaneous multiparametric analysis of the physical and chemical characteristics of up to thousands of particles per second.Thyroid cancerLangerin: CD207, langerin (Cluster of Differentiation 207) is a protein which in humans is encoded by the CD207 gene. Langerin is a type II transmembrane, C-type lectin receptor on Langerhans cells.Invasive lobular carcinomaHead and Neck Cancer Alliance: The Head and Neck Cancer Alliance (HNCA) is a non-profit organization that works with health professionals and organizations, celebrities and survivors to enhance the overall effort in prevention, treatment, and detection of cancers of the head and neck region.Targeted therapy of lung cancer: Targeted therapy of lung cancer refers to using agents specifically designed to selectively target molecular pathways responsible for, or that substantially drive, the malignant phenotype of lung cancer cells, and as a consequence of this (relative) selectivity, cause fewer toxic effects on normal cells.Immunophenotyping: Immunophenotyping is a technique used to study the protein expressed by cells. This technique is commonly used in basic science research and laboratory diagnostic purpose.Brain positron emission tomography: Positron emission tomography (PET) measures emissions from radioactively labeled metabolically active chemicals that have been injected into the bloodstream. The emission data are computer-processed to produce multi-dimensional images of the distribution of the chemicals throughout the brain.Brain biopsyHassall's corpuscles: Hassall's corpuscles (or thymic corpuscles (bodies)) are structures found in the medulla of the human thymus, formed from eosinophilic type VI epithelial reticular cells arranged concentrically. These concentric corpuscles are composed of a central mass, consisting of one or more granular cells, and of a capsule formed of epithelioid cells.Dense artery sign: In medicine, the dense artery sign or hyperdense artery sign is a radiologic sign seen on computer tomography (CT) scans suggestive of early ischemic stroke. In earlier studies of medical imaging in patients with strokes, it was the earliest sign of ischemic stroke in a significant minority of cases.Dermal equivalent: The dermal equivalent is an in vitro model of the dermal layer of skin. It is constructed by seeding dermal fibroblasts into a collagen gel.PanitumumabAbscopal effect: The abscopal effect is a phenomenon in the treatment of metastatic cancer where localized treatment of a tumor causes not only a shrinking of the treated tumor but also a shrinking of tumors in different compartments from the treated tumor. Initially associated with single-tumor, localized radiation therapy, the term has also come to encompass other types of localized treatments such as electroporation and intra-tumoral injection of therapeutics.

(1/11252) Suppression of Moloney sarcoma virus immunity following sensitization with attenuated virus.

Murine sarcoma virus (Moloney strain) (MSV-M)-induced tumors are unusual in that they regularly appear less than 2 weeks after virus inoculation, progress for 1 to 2 weeks, and are rejected by normal adult BALB/c mice. Rejectio leaves the animals immune to tumor induction. In the present study, presensitization of normal adult BALB/c mice with attenuated MSV-M resulted in an altered pattern of tumor immunity. Injection of active MSV-M into the presensitized animals resulted in tumor induction and rejection similar to that observed in normal animals, but rejection failed to produce protection against the secondary inoculation with MSV-M. After the second inoculation with active MSV-M, tumors appeared and progressed but ultimately were rejected. Over 80% of the mice died, 25% after the primary challenge and the remainder after the secondary challenge. At death, all mice had histological evidence of leukemia which was the probable cause of death. The animals that died following the secondary challenge also had evidence of disseminated MSV-M. Solid tumor nodules were found in skeletal muscle distant from the original site of inoculation, and active MSV-M was isolated from spleen and lungs. The possibility that the results were produced by specific suppression of MSV-Moloney leukemia virus immunity is discussed.  (+info)

(2/11252) Prolonged eosinophil accumulation in allergic lung interstitium of ICAM-2 deficient mice results in extended hyperresponsiveness.

ICAM-2-deficient mice exhibit prolonged accumulation of eosinophils in lung interstitium concomitant with a delayed increase in eosinophil numbers in the airway lumen during the development of allergic lung inflammation. The ICAM-2-dependent increased and prolonged accumulation of eosinophils in lung interstitium results in prolonged, heightened airway hyperresponsiveness. These findings reveal an essential role for ICAM-2 in the development of the inflammatory and respiratory components of allergic lung disease. This phenotype is caused by the lack of ICAM-2 expression on non-hematopoietic cells. ICAM-2 deficiency on endothelial cells causes reduced eosinophil transmigration in vitro. ICAM-2 is not essential for lymphocyte homing or the development of leukocytes, with the exception of megakaryocyte progenitors, which are significantly reduced.  (+info)

(3/11252) Analysis of V(H)-D-J(H) gene transcripts in B cells infiltrating the salivary glands and lymph node tissues of patients with Sjogren's syndrome.

OBJECTIVE: In patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), B lymphocytes have been found to infiltrate salivary glands, resulting in sialadenitis and keratoconjunctivitis. The disease is frequently associated with benign and neoplastic lymphoproliferation. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether clonal B cell expansion takes place in lymphocytic infiltrations of salivary glands under (auto- [?]) antigen stimulation, by analyzing in more detail the variable part (V(H)-D-J(H)) of the immunoglobulin heavy chain genes expressed in these B cells. METHODS: Biopsies of the labial salivary glands and lymph nodes were performed on 2 female patients with SS. The Ig gene rearrangements in these tissues were amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using specific primers. RESULTS: A total of 94 V(H)-D-J(H) transcripts were cloned and sequenced. Our data suggest a polyclonal origin of the B cell infiltrates. In 92 of the transcripts, V(H) genes were modified by somatic mutation. Further analysis showed counterselection for replacement mutations within the framework regions, suggesting that those B cells were stimulated and selected for functional expression of a surface Ig. In labial salivary glands from both patients, clonally related B cells became evident. Members of 1 particular clone were found in both the lip and lymph node material. CONCLUSION: These data provide evidence, on the nucleotide sequence level, that an antigen-triggered clonal B cell expansion takes place in the salivary glands of patients with SS who do not have histologic evidence of developing lymphoma. It may be speculated that those B cell clones expand during disease progression, resulting in lymphomagenesis.  (+info)

(4/11252) T-cell lymphoma in a savanna monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) probably related to simian T-cell leukemia virus infection.

Lymphoma was seen in an 11-year-old female savanna monkey (Ceropithecus aethiops). The superficial inguinal and visceral lymph nodes were markedly enlarged, and their architecture was completely effaced by neoplastic cells. The neoplastic cells, which were highly pleomorphic, resembled those in adult T-cell lymphoma-leukemia in humans. Ultrastructurally the neoplastic cells were characterized by nuclear irregularity and clustered dense bodies, and almost all cells showed positivity for CD3. The animal had been reared with her family, and her mother and 2 brothers had antibodies reactive to human T-cell leukemia virus. This virus serologically cross-reacts with simian T-cell leukemia virus, which may be the causative agent of the present neoplasm.  (+info)

(5/11252) Lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria in children: presentation and response to therapy.

The most common manifestation of infection due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in children is cervical lymphadenitis in an otherwise healthy patient. We identified and reviewed 19 cases of proven or presumptive lymphadenitis due to NTM seen at our hospital over the course of 13 months. Nine patients underwent initial surgical excision of involved lymph nodes. Ten children did not have involved lymph nodes excised initially and were treated with macrolide-containing antibiotic regimens. Of these patients, five required subsequent surgical excision and five were cured with combination chemotherapy. Six patients underwent radiographic imaging of the head and neck that revealed asymmetrical adenopathy with ring-enhancing masses but minimal inflammatory stranding of the subcutaneous fat, a finding that may distinguish adenitis caused by NTM from staphylococcal and streptococcal adenitis. Our data suggest that if surgical excision is not considered feasible, antimicrobial therapy for adenitis due to NTM may be beneficial for some patients.  (+info)

(6/11252) Detection of occult lymph node metastases in esophageal cancer by minimally invasive staging combined with molecular diagnostic techniques.

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lymph node metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients with esophageal cancer. Histologic examination misses micrometastases in up to 20% of lymph nodes evaluated. In addition, non-invasive imaging modalities are not sensitive enough to detect small lymph nodes metastases. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) to increase the detection of micrometastases in lymph nodes from patients with esophageal cancer. METHODS: RT-PCR of CEA mRNA was performed in lymph nodes from patients with malignant and benign esophageal disease. Each specimen was examined histopathologically and by RT-PCR and the results were compared. RESULTS: Metastases were present in 29 of 60 (48%) lymph nodes sample by minimally invasive staging from 13 patients with esophageal cancer when examined histopathologically. RT-PCR identified nodal metastases in 46 of these 60 (77%) samples. RT-PCR detected CEA mRNA in all 29 histologically positive samples and in 17 histologically negative lymph nodes. All lymph nodes from patients with benign disease (n = 15) were negative both histopathologically and by RT-PCR. The stage of two patients was reclassified based on the RT-PCR results, which identified lymph node spread undetected histopathologically. Both of these patients developed recurrent disease after resection of the primary tumor. CONCLUSIONS: RT-PCR is more sensitive than histologic examination in the detection of lymph node metastases in esophageal cancer and can lead to diagnosis of a more advanced stage in some patients. The combination of minimally invasive surgical techniques in combination with new molecular diagnostic techniques may improve our ability to stage cancer patients.  (+info)

(7/11252) Expanded tumor-reactive CD4+ T-cell responses to human cancers induced by secondary anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activation.

Generation of tumor-reactive T cells in large numbers ex vivo is a requisite step in the adoptive immunotherapy of patients. We examined the immune responses of T cells derived from tumor vaccine-primed lymph nodes activated with anti-CD3 alone and with an anti-CD3/anti-CD28 combination. Nylon wool-purified CD3+ cells were isolated from vaccine-primed lymph nodes obtained from melanoma, renal cell, and head and neck cancer patients. In the absence of antigen-presenting cells, activation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 greatly enhanced subsequent T-cell expansion in interleukin 2 (>100-fold), compared to anti-CD3 alone. CD4+ T cells were preferentially stimulated. In four of eight patients, we found evidence of CD4+ cellular responses to autologous tumors by cytokine release assays. Positively selected CD4+ cells activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 released greater amounts of cytokine (IFN-gamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in response to autologous tumors compared to cells activated by anti-CD3 alone. The CD4+ reactivity was MHC class II restricted and appeared to be associated with the expression of class II molecules on the vaccinating tumor cells. The CD4+ T-cell responses to class II-restricted tumor-associated antigens in patients with renal cell cancers represent unique findings.  (+info)

(8/11252) Identification of a novel activation-inducible protein of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and its ligand.

Among members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, 4-1BB, CD27, and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related gene (GITR) share a striking homology in the cytoplasmic domain. Here we report the identification of a new member, activation-inducible TNFR family member (AITR), which belongs to this subfamily, and its ligand. The receptor is expressed in lymph node and peripheral blood leukocytes, and its expression is up-regulated in human peripheral mononuclear cells mainly after stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin. AITR associates with TRAF1 (TNF receptor-associated factor 1), TRAF2, and TRAF3, and induces nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation via TRAF2. The ligand for AITR (AITRL) was found to be an undescribed member of the TNF family, which is expressed in endothelial cells. Thus, AITR and AITRL seem to be important for interactions between activated T lymphocytes and endothelial cells.  (+info)



swollen lymph


  • Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection along with other numerous causes.Treatment is usually cold compresses,over the counter anti-inflammatory analgesics(pain killers) like acetaminophen or ibuprofen,antibiotics if cause of infection is suspected to be a bacteria and surgical drainage if there is any abscess formation. (medhelp.org)
  • 5y.o. w/ swollen lymph nodes. (medhelp.org)
  • Today I noticed that he now has a lot of swollen lymph nodes beginning from behind his ear and extending several inches down his neck (the original 2 have not changed in size, shape, etc. (medhelp.org)
  • swollen lymph nodes ina 6 month old. (cafemom.com)
  • My 6 mo DS has had swollen lymph nodes in his neck and behind his ears since he was born. (cafemom.com)
  • I know that swollen lymph nodes are a sight of infection that the body is fighting and having a hard time but it is doing its job. (cafemom.com)
  • I tested Negative at 4 months however have a sore throat and swollen lymph nodes. (thebody.com)
  • Your sore throat and swollen lymph nodes have to be because of something else. (thebody.com)
  • Explain "irregular border abdominal soft tissue density" left external iliac vessels.Swollen lymph nodes sll in neck, abdomen, main portal vein. (healthtap.com)

axillary lymph node diss


  • Until recently, the standard of care was for these patients to undergo a complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) under the arm. (medindia.net)
  • Contrarily to former procedure where an axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) was done each time, an ALND now only follows if the detected sentinel lymph node is metastatic. (clinicaltrials.gov)

sentinel lymph nodes


  • The TAD procedure involves removing sentinel lymph nodes, as well as additional cancerous lymph nodes found during diagnosis. (medindia.net)
  • The main objective of this clinical trial is to show the efficacy of fluorescence lymphangiography with indocyanine green (ICG) for the detection of sentinel lymph nodes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Prior surgery, the so called sentinel lymph nodes are detected, harvested and histopathologically examined. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Routinely sentinel lymph nodes are mapped using radiocolloid tracers such as technetium, sometimes combined with a blue dye. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Sentinel lymph nodes receiving lymphatic drainage from a tumor can be removed by limited surgery and examined to determine whether more extensive lymph node dissection is necessary. (oncolink.org)

groin


  • I haven't checked his other lymph nodes (groin, armpit etc...) to see if there's any obvious nodes there. (medhelp.org)
  • In the human body, the most likely place where lymph nodes can be felt are the neck , underarms , and groin area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inguinal nodes can be easily palpated- that's in the groin . (healthtap.com)

biopsy


  • When patients underwent their first ultrasound and biopsy at the time of diagnosis, radiologists placed a clip in the cancerous node. (medindia.net)
  • The sentinel lymph node biopsy allows minimizing risks and burdens for patients who very likely have no metastasis in the axillary lymph nodes sparing the ALND and reducing the risk of surgery and postoperative lymph oedema for instance. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy carries lower morbidity and cost than a complete lymph node dissection. (oncolink.org)

dissection


  • The research, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology , has changed treatment guidelines at the institution for a select group of breast cancer patients with lymph node metastasis, who will now receive Targeted Axillary Dissection (TAD). (medindia.net)
  • Several studies have shown that sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND), the less-invasive removal of one or a few key lymph nodes, shows promise in assessing disease status, yet the procedure alone can miss residual disease in 10-15% of women, defined as a false negative rate (FNR). (medindia.net)

Lymphatic


  • A sentinel lymph node (SLN) is the first lymph node along the route of lymphatic drainage from a primary tumor. (oncolink.org)
  • In this study of patients with gastrointestinal cancers, lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymphadenectomy was feasible and accurately predicted the tumor status of regional lymph nodes, and identified abnormal lymphatic drainage. (oncolink.org)

neck


  • For example if a pierced ear has been infected, the lymph nodes in the neck can become a little swollen and tender. (medhelp.org)
  • My son was born with 2 enlarged lymph nodes on the left side of his neck. (medhelp.org)
  • When my son was around the same age as yours his lymp nodes in his neck around the ear, jaw line, and tonsil area started to swell then it continued down his neck. (medhelp.org)
  • Hard, fixed lymph nodes in neck. (healthtap.com)
  • Other than lymph nodes in neck are commonly thyroid nodules , branchial cleft cysts, lipomas. (healthtap.com)

Lymphadenopathy


  • Doctors may also refer to the glands as lymph nodes and the swelling as lymphadenopathy. (boots.com)

armpit


  • Can you have lymph nodes in you armpit that you feel and not have any noticable changes in your breast? (medhelp.org)
  • So, yes, it is possible that you could be feeling lymph nodes in your armpit. (medhelp.org)
  • Hi - I have exactly the same symptoms - swollen and painful lymph node in left armpit and excessive sweating at nights. (medhelp.org)

lymphoma


  • In the mean time my sons nodes continued to swell now under his arm in the chest area (he was very skinny) What I found was that a blood test could be given that wouldn't prove that he had lymphoma but would prove that he didn't have it. (medhelp.org)

pathology


  • During surgery, pathologists would then determine the specific pathology of the clipped node to see how it related to other nodes. (medindia.net)

metastases


  • Yet, with the addition of chemotherapy before surgery, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, research has shown that approximately 40% of these patients have no evidence of disease in their lymph nodes, and therefore would not need the invasive surgery to remove lymph nodes that no longer contain cancer metastases. (medindia.net)
  • 36 cases of nodal metastases were identified, of which 89% had at least one positive sentinel node. (oncolink.org)
  • Fifteen of the patients had metastases only to the sentinel node. (oncolink.org)

sore


  • I noticed later that year, even though the lymph node shrank down that it was often sore and I always was aware of it - like carrying a ball under my arm. (medhelp.org)
  • My other lymph nodes in my body are not noticeably swollen or sore. (medhelp.org)

painful


  • When you fight infection and nodes are swollen they are painful. (medhelp.org)

disease


  • As chemotherapy is utilized more often before surgery, there is a greater likelihood that the disease in the lymph nodes will be eradicated and surgeons do not need to perform extensive nodal surgery," explains Caudle. (medindia.net)
  • Hs 445 was derived in 1970 from an intra-abdominal lymph node of a patient with stage 1 Hodgkin's disease. (atcc.org)

infection


  • Another time that lymph nodes can be felt is if there has been an infection. (medhelp.org)
  • Swollen lymph glands can be a sign the body is fighting an infection, such as colds or glandular fever . (boots.com)

thereby


  • Caudle said, "We just haven't had a good way to determine which patients have converted to node-negative status, and thereby, we are subjecting too many women to unnecessary surgery. (medindia.net)
  • The histopathologic status of the sentinel node thereby accurately reflects the status of the remaining axillary nodes. (clinicaltrials.gov)

cancers


  • Sentinel node was the only positive node in all T1 stage cancers and 70% of T2 stage cancers. (oncolink.org)
  • Lymph nodes "taste" the lymph for anything bad like bacteria/viruses/cancers, etc. (healthtap.com)

procedure


  • A new procedure developed by surgeons at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center improves the accuracy of axillary staging and pathologic evaluation in clinically node-positive breast cancer, and reduces the need for a more invasive procedure with debilitating complications. (medindia.net)
  • It improves the accuracy of axillary staging and pathologic evaluation in clinically node-positive breast cancer, and reduces the need for a more invasive procedure with debilitating complications. (medindia.net)

researchers


  • One note, say the researchers, the clipped node was not retrieved as a sentinel lymph node in 23% of the patients. (medindia.net)

white blood


body


  • Lymph nodes are found all through the body, and remove foreign ( not of the body ) objects from the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • A diagram that shows where lymph nodes are found in the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lymph glands are an important part of the body's immune system defences and are found throughout the body. (boots.com)

found


  • At least one sentinel lymph node either involved or uninvolved was found in 95% of patients. (oncolink.org)

left


  • Last spring (one year ago), I noticed my left underarm lymph node had swollen up big like a walnut. (medhelp.org)
  • There is an enlargement of the left and right iliac lymph nodes. (healthtap.com)

normal


  • My doctor told me not to worry, that it took a long time for a lymph node to return to normal. (medhelp.org)
  • I feel no lumps outside of the normal lymph nodes. (medhelp.org)
  • U/s stated nodes appeared normal. (healthtap.com)

positive


  • Can a person be HIV positive only in their Lymph Nodes and not test positive with a Antibody or DNA Bloodtest. (thebody.com)

surgery


  • At the time of diagnosis, those select nodes are clipped for identification during later surgery. (medindia.net)
  • With our study, we hoped to find a new way to target the lymph node known to have cancer, selectively remove it, look at it, and hopefully avoid additional surgery if chemotherapy has wiped out all the cancer. (medindia.net)
  • To help locate the specific nodes during surgery, small radioactive seeds were implanted in the clipped node the day before. (medindia.net)

felt


  • Dear pattsy: Lymph nodes are located throughout our bodys, some are closer to the surface and can sometimes be felt, particularly if a person is thin. (medhelp.org)

contain


  • This indicates that the node that was confirmed to contain cancer before chemotherapy would have been missed by SLND alone, and therefore not examined in these patients. (medindia.net)

size


  • One major factor would be the exact size of the nodes, this would indicate the relative significance. (healthtap.com)

important


  • This is an important extension of the clinical application of sentinel node sampling. (oncolink.org)

feel


total


  • Conidia specific total T CD4+ cells, central memory T CD4+ cells and effector memory T CD4+ cells, were increased in lymph nodes by porins coimmunization. (omicsonline.org)

else


cells


  • We report the activation, migration and T cell activation induction capacity of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in skin and lymph nodes in mice. (omicsonline.org)
  • Conidia specific memory T CD4+ cells in lymph nodes were analysed by flow cytometry and in skin by a delayed-type hypersensivity test. (omicsonline.org)
  • Porins induced an increased number of migratory dendritic cells in lymph nodes which had an activated phenotype. (omicsonline.org)
  • Conclusion: Intradermal immunization with S. typhi porins induced early activation of epidermal dendritic cells and recruitment of antigen-presenting cells to skin, also promoted migration of skin dendritic cells that are able to generate memory T CD4+ cells in lymph nodes and skin, inducing systemic immune responses. (omicsonline.org)